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Franklin's paper the statesman. (Denver, Colo.) 1906-1912, June 01, 1912, Image 4

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The Statesman
C. A. FRANKLIN, Editor.
Office 926 Nineteenth Street. Phone Main 7905.
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Three Months 50
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and we will cheerfully forward a duplicate of the missing number.
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Order, Registered Letter or Bank Draft. Postage stamps will be received the
same as cash for the fractional part of a dollar. Only 1-cent and 2-cent stamps
taken.
Communications to reoeive attention must be newsy, upon important sub
jects, plainly written only upon one side of the paper. No manuscript re
turned unless stamps are sent for postage.
Entered as second class matter at the postoffice in the city of Denver,
Colorado.
The city of Denver in all depart
ments and including all officers is now
under control of the Citizens’ party.
While The Statesman was in opposi
tion to that party, in common w’ith all
citizens, we wish the government to
be of the best, and since they have
won and are the preference of the
majority, we hope that they will come
up to the high hopes of their support
ers have entertained. It matters not
what predictions of good or evil have
been made, Mayor Arnold and his ad
ministration, have their chance to
make good ,and it is common sense
to wait and see what they do.
We are especially desirous of see
ing what showing they will make un
der the present form of the city gov
ernment. We have always insisted
that the imperfections of Speer De
mocracy should not be used to prove
the utter failure of present laws. Good
men may be able to make of the
“mayor” form as good machinery of
government as the “commission”
form. We believe they can do so
more easily. Mr. Arnold, while com
mitted to the commision form, will
doubtlss continue to be mayor for
many months. We hope he will do
so well in that time that the demand
for commission government will die
out.
Ever since the Cuban government
has been organized, and since the
United States troops were withdrawn,
there have been race difficulties. It
will be remembered that Maceo and
the blacks were some of the most
active and resolute rebels against
Spanish rule and the most effective
allies of the United States in securing
Cuban freedom. However, when it
came to the election of the officials.
American interests and race preju
dice reduced the blacks to an inferior
position. This they resented. And
now they are in revolt. While we do
not now the specific occasion of their
rebellion, nor the justice of their
cause, we are human enough to be
interested in them and to desire that
they be given fair treatment. It does
not follow that they are wrong be
cause they are black nor because they
are in an inferior position. If Amer
ican control of Cuba is to mean to
the Cuban -Negro what has happened
to the American Negro in the South,
it is no improvement of his condition
that Spanish rule is gone. In neither
case is he a citizen with opportunity
to say what the law shall be or how
it shall be enforced. The dark cloud
of race hate is spreading .and our
hope is the good sense of the world
will destroy it like it did slavery .
CITY NEWS.
HEAR THE PEERLESS TRIO AT
WEST BROS. - OPENING SUNDAY
EVENING. PLENTY OF TABLES
FOR EVERYBODY.
On June 7 and 8 there will be a mid
summer sale of millinery by Mrs.
Esther Morris at her parlors, 2953
Stout street. One hat given away each
evening.
NOTHING DOWN.
With two years’ private music les
sons free. Sale now on. Columbine
Music Co., 920-924 Fifteenth street,
Charles building, Fifteenth and
Curtis.
For coal, for fuel, for express serv
ice, call on C. A. Reeves, 2924 Lari
mer street, or phone Champa 2357.
The Railroad Men's Club is again
wearing the familiar smile since its
THE SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION
Which meets in conjunction with the State Baptists
Wednesday, June 19
Wednesday Evening.
7:30 Devotional Service, Sister Dora Loveless, Denver; Sister A. Sam
uels, Rocky Ford.
7:50 Call to order. Announcement of Committees.
Music, Central Choir.
6:00 Paper, ‘ Trained Workers for the Sunday School," Sister R. B.
Fleming, Colorado Springs.
8:15 Vocal Solo, Sister H. Banks Gardenhire, Pueblo.
8:25 President’s Annual Address.
Vocal Solo, Brother J. W. Russell, Denver.
Offertory.
Announcement of Committees.
Benediction.
Thursday Morning.
9:30 Devotional Service, Deacon J. A. Weddington, Pueblo; Sister Julia
Shannon, Pueblo.
9:45 Call to order, President.
Bible Hour. “Sermon on the Mount," Matt. 5: 17-48, Rev. D. ifi.
Over.
10:15 Song, “He’s the One," Convention.
10:20 Paper, “Developing the ( Social Side in the Sunday School," Sister
Beatrice Thrashley, Denver.
10:35 Violin Solo, Prof. Robert H. Lee, Denver.
1*0:45 Roll Call. Financial Reports.
11:00 Reports of Corresponding Secretary and Treasurer.
11:15 Report of Nominating Committee.
Miscellaneous Business.
Offertory.
Announcements.
Report of Finance Committee.
Benediction.
genial manager, Frank Burnley has
gotten back his good health.
The Pearl Barber Shop, located at
929 Twenty-first street, is one of the
most complete and up-to-date ton
sorial parlors in the West. The pro
prietor, Harry Jones, needs no recom
mendation to the public. His years
of service in this line of work speak
louder than anything we might say in
his behalf. Everything sanitary. Call
and give us a trial.
The Knights of Pythias of this jur
isdiction will hold their grand session
in this city August G with the su
preme chancellor present.
The Sunshine Club meets next
Thursday with Mrs. Esther Morris.
The Champion Drill Entertainment
will take place at Shorter church
Thursday evening, June 20. Mrs. D.
E. Norwood is chairman and Miss
Carrie L. Steele secretary of the com
mittee. Admission is 10 cents. The
public is invited to come and others
giving entertainments will please
keep off this date.
FOR RENT —Furnished room in
modern house, suitable for’gentleman.
Mrs. Mason, phone York 4G32.
We desire to thank our friends for
their kindness to our sister and aunt
in her recent illness and for their
sympathy and love to us in our loss
at her demise.
Mr. Henry Howard and Family.
Next week Mrs. Frank C. Payne
goes to Kansas City and Chicago on a
visit. She will be gone four or five
weeks.
The Abyssinia hotel now has on a
new dress, having been newly deco
rated. The modern accommodations
of this hostelry have made it a good
reputation over a large territory.
HEAR THE PEERLESS TRIO AT
WEST BROS.’ OPENING SUNDAY
EVENING. PLENTY OF TABLES
FOR EVERYBODY.
On June 7 and 8 there will be a mid
summer sale of millinery by Mrs.
Esther Morris at her parlors, 2953
Stout street. One hat given away each
evening.
The United Brothers of Friendship
and the Sisters of the Mysterious Ten
and the Juveniles of the city were in
full attendance at the People’s Pres
byterian church Sunday afternoon
when they listened to a short program
and a sermon by Rev. Hazell on the
occasion of their anniversary service.
The order is strong, especially in the
Temples, and made a most creditable
showing. The order is preparing to
send representatives to the national
meeting in Chicago soon. The com
mittee in charge of the sermon meets
tomorrow afternoon at 3 at 2733 Ma
rion street.
Baptist Sunday School Congress.
The next session of the nations
Baptist Sumln.v school congress wiK
be held at the Tuskegee (Ala.) institute
for five days, beginning Wednesday,
June 5. Secretary Henry Allen Boyd
deserves much credit for the part
which he has taken in this great move
ment for tiie imparting of religious
truth and the splendid methods held
out for those engaged iu Sunday school
work by which to obtain better re
sults.
THE STATESMAN-
THE STATE
POLITICAL
LEAGUE
Our Letter Box
The Statesman:
At a conference of colored voters
held in Colorado Springs March 11th,
1912, it was deemed expedient to form
what shall be known as "the State
League of colored Republican voters.”
The importance of the approaching
campaign is apparent to all and to no
class of citizens will more depend
than upon the Negro. The time for
general political activity is near at
hand and the Negro voter of the state
should plan to assume an aggressive,
positive policy, rather than be content
with a negative part as has too often
been the case in years gone by. True,
we have received a little considera
tion by occasional appointments here
and there, but no fair minded man of
any race or political faith will agree
that it has been proportionate to our
voting strength, nor at all in fair
compensation for our loyalty to the
Republican party. It is no exaggera
tion to state that fully three-fourths
of the Negro voters of Colorado re
gain consistently loyal to the Repub
lican party, in season and out. It may
be further safely urged that no other
class of voters in the state can show
such a large percentage of their num
bers adhering to the principles of the
party as can the Negro. That this ab
normally large percentage can be ma
terially added to by a display of the
sense of fair treatment and honorable
reward accorded to other races who
identify themselves with the Repub
lican party. It is not sufficient that
we alone know our own voting
strength. It is important that we also
impress the other fellow with it. By
a unifor msystem in organization we
may take a Ion gstep toward rectify
ing many of the ills of which we coin
plain.
The Republican party managers
confidently hope for victory in the ap
proaching campaign, and that hop**
must to a degree be based upon the
loyalty of the colored voters. By unit
ed effort we should do our utmost to
secure party success both in the
state and nation. But in doing so let
us not overlook our rightful due. Let
us display the manhood and courage
to ask for equitable recognition ami
make our request more effective by
showing the solidity of our support.
This State League should be an
fective means to a definite and si.
stantial end. We desire to join hamls
with local clubs in every town nud
city in the state.
Speaking for myself as president of
the State League, I desire to state
that it is my sincere desire to act
fairly and absolutely impartial!} I
shall not ask and do not warn any
promises from any candiadte or party
worker whatsoever that cannot be
made with equal frankness and earn
estness to any member of our race.
Our demands for rightful recognition
should extend beyond those places
now designated as Negro jobs To
use our labors merely to fight each
other over places now* held by Ne
groes is, to say the least, harmful, if
not reprehensible. Let us hold all we
have got and battle for more l,et
the manhood and womanhood of our
race be more assertive in this cam
paign than ever before.
I shall be glad to receive sugges
tions at any time and from any one.
Respectfully yours,
GEO. W. GROSS
Pres. State League.
319 Caramillo St., Colorado Springs,
Colo.
May 1G, lb 12.
Mr. Chester Franklin, Editor.
Denver, Colo.
Dear Sir:
In compliance with instructions
from Geo. W. Gross, president State
league of Colored Republicans, I
herein hand you list of appointments
made by Mr. Gross as authorized at
the state meeting in Colorado Springs
March 31, 1912. The following you
will please publish in your valued pa
per:
Executive Committee —J. W lack
son, Denver, chairman; E. V. Camp;
A. J. Steele, Walsenburg; Ned O Ban
ion, Colorado Springs; M. J. Harris,
Pueblo.
Financial Committee —W. H. Gud
geil, Colorado Springs, chairman: P.
E. Spratlin, Denver; W. H. Green,
Colorado Springs; C. 1). A. Hush Pu
eblo; Oscar Walton, Canon City.
Publicity Committee —M. B. Brooks,
Pueblo, chairman; Thos. Campbell,
Denver; C. A. Franklin, Denver; P.
S. Simpson, Colorado Springs; Jos.
D. D. Rivers, Denver.
Committee on Constitution and By-
Laws —C. H. Bone, Colorado Springs,
chairman; W. H. Johnson, Colorado
Springs; W. H. Bess, Colorado
Springs.
GEO. W. GROSS,
* President.
O. W. BRAY.
Secretary.
THIS SPACE BELONGS TO
ZION BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL
ALWAYS SOMETHING DOING
9.45 A. M. Sharp. School Open for One Hour.
4
CANDIDATES WITHDRAW.
General Conference of Zion Chureh
Electa No New Bishops.
Charlotte, N. Q., May 28.—After tak
ing nine successive ballots extending
over a period of four days with no re
results the various candidates for bish
ops at the general conference of the A.
M. E. Zion church in session in this
city withdrew. Their withdrawal was
brought about by a committee consist
ing of Bishops Alexander Walters, J.
W. Alstork, J. S. Caldwell and Drs. W.
H. Goler, J. C. Dancy und W. L.
Hamblin, who had impressed upon the
candidates that the majority of the
delegates would not elect two bishops
at this time.
The eight bishops of the church had
previously recommended that no ad
ditional bishops be elected at this time. ,
but some of the delegates were op
posed to this program. A two-thirds
vote and twenty years’ service In the
ministry were necessary for election.
There were eighteen candidates at
first, but toward the last the fight nar- 1
rowed down to J. S. Jackson, financial
secretary of the denomination; George i
E. Clement, editor of the Star of Zion; j
It. B. Bruce, editor of Sunda}' School
Literature; It. S. Rives of Knoxville. 1
Tenn.; S. L. Corrothers of Washington.
J. B. Colbert and W. L. Lee.
After Bishop Caldwell had finished
reading the agreements pf the various
candidates to withdraw each of the
various candidates for the episcopacy
arose and secouded the proposition,
and an affecting scene followed. The ,
election of general officers was then
entered into with the following results: j
J. S. Jackson, financial secretary: G. i
E. Clement, editor of the Star of Zion;
M. D. Lee. general secretary; F. K.
Bird, manager of the A. M. E. Zion
Publishing House: R. B. Bruce, editor
of Sunday School Literature.
A memorial service for Bishops Mar
tin R. Franklin and J. W. Smith, who
have died since the last session of the
general conference, was held Sunday
nfternoon. The report of the Woman’s
Home and Foreign Missionary society
showed that $11,000 had been raised
for missions during the quadrennlum.
Dr. W. IC. Pettiford. president of the
Alabama Penny Savings bank. Bir
mingham. and also head of the Nation
al Negro Bankers’ association, was one
of the speakers before the conference.
The closing session was taken up with
the final matters that had to come be
fore the delegates.
MAY CRISIS MAGAZINE.
Organ of Association For Human
Rights Grows In Public Favor.
lu the Crisis Magazine the col
ored people of the United States
possess for the first time a pe
riodical read largely by white
people. This Is as it should be.
There is little chance of appeal
ing simply to ourselves when the
power to right most of our
wrongs is In the hands of other
people.
Letters continually come to the
Crisis office from white folk
showing appreciation of the
work and the makeup of the
magazine. One of the latest
readers Is Mayor Brand Whit
lock of Toledo. This fact gives
especial significance to the May
Crisis. This Is a large number
and brings before the public the
great work of the Negro church.
On the cover is a picture of
the Baptist Institutional church
of Jacksonville, Fla., founded by
Dr. J. Milton Waldron, now of
Washington. There is a care
fully written article on the pres
ent condition of the church.
This has been written by four
unnamed leaders in these church
es and doubtless will arouse a
great deal of comment Anoth
er interesting article Is a con
sideration of the color line by
the celebrated Egyptologist, J.
Flinders Petrie of London.
Among the men of the month
are Abdul Baba, the great Per
slan religious leader, and the
military attaches of the United
States to Liberia. All readers of
the Crisis will be gratified at Its
new nnd large type, which makes
it much more readable and orna
mental In appearance. The Cri
sis has Just moved into its fine
new suit of offices on the sec
ond floor of the Evening Post
annex, 20 Vesey street. New
York city.
THE FIRST
PICNIC
OF THE 1912 SEASON
WILL BE GIVEN AT
BLOOMFIELD PARK
BY THE
ODD FELLOWS OO&* SfE*
The first opportunity for an outing with Out Door
Amusements, Boating, Basket Picnicing and the like
Best Music in Attendance ADMISSION 25c 4
|
MY $20.00 SUIT IS BETTER THAN $30.00 SUITS
DOWN TOWN.
In Style, in Fit, in Quality, I Lead. Call and see.
No trouble to show the goods.
N. FERRY, Merchant Tailor
1908 CURTIS STREET DENVER, COLORADO
INSURANCE COMPANIES COME AND 60
: BUT THE
UNION HEALTH AND ACCIDENT COMPANY
STAYS!
Union Health and Accident Policies Always Satisfy
Campbell, Mo., May 23, 1912.
The Union Health &. Accident Co..
Denver, .Colo.
Gentleme:
Received your check today for $19.30,
# being payment in full for my tprained
ankle. Please accept my sincere thanks
for your prompt and courteous manner
in handling this claim. 1 will heartily
recommend you to my aanociates who
rnay be in need of accident insurance.
Very truly yours,
(Signed) JNO. M. SNOW.
HOME OFFICE
CENTRAL SAVINGS BANK BUILDING *
vy
18th and Arapahoe Sts. Denver, Colo.
C. B. PRIOR, President. D. 8. ELEY, Sec-y-Trea.
The Prior Furniture Company
1814 CURTIS STREET
We buy, eell and repair everything tor the House, New and a.,.,.,..
Hand. Window Shades and Sewing Machines sold and reoalred «
clalty. CABH or CREDIT, and our Prices defy competition. ’ P *’
We are also BONDED BROKERS, and transact a STRICTIv be
LIABLE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Department; ROOMING hom.«
RESTAURANTS, REAL ESTATE and LOANS. MOUSES,
OUR MOTTO: “LARGE SALES, SMALL PROFITS."
Phone Champa 392. DENVER.
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