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Franklin's paper the statesman. (Denver, Colo.) 1906-1912, September 28, 1912, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91052311/1912-09-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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PROMOTION FOR
C. B. JOHNSON
Chosen Financial Agent For
Fort Valley High School.
HIS CAREER AS EOUCATQR.
Former Instructor at Harbison Col
lege Becomes the Successor of the
Late J. H. Torbert as Traveling Rep
resentative of Well Known Educa
tional Institution.
By CLEVELAND G. ALLEN.
New York.—Professor C. B. Johnson,
financial representative of the Fort
Valley High and Industrial school.
Fort Valley, Ga. t is considered to be
one of the ablest educators among
Afro-Americans in this country. He
hns had wide experience in education
al work and is well qualified other
wise for the responsible position which
he holds.
During hi* northern tour in the in
terest of the school this fall Professor
Johnson maintains headquarters in
this city, where he is already meeting
with much success. As the successor
PROFESSOR C. B. JOHNSON.
of the late Professor J. H. Torbert
much will be expected of Mr. Johnson,
and from present indications he will
measure up to the most critical expec
tations of those responsible for his ap
pointment.
By training, experience and manner
he is amply fitted for his new post and
will put into his work'a. large experi
ence which will make him a valuable
addition to the faculty of the Fort Val
ley High and industrial school. He
lias the faculty of making and holding
friends, and his affable manners will
make his contact with the philanthro
pists of the north both profitable aud
impressive.
Bike most men who have won their
spurs and who rise to eminence in any
particular -field. Professor Johnson tells
a story of hard struggles in acquiring
his education. He was born in Green
ville. S. Cm and was educated in the
public schools of the city under Pro
fessor J. C. Martin. He walked a dis
tance of ten miles each morning to
reach school, but he does not regret
this early experience. After finishing
the public schools, acting upon the ad
vice of A. N. Robinson, one of his in
structors. he entered Biddle universi
ty, from which he was graduated in
1897.
He was one of the most prominent
men in college and took an active part
in college activities. Leaving Biddle,
he took up work in Harbison college,
in Abbeville. S. C., one of the strong
est of the Presbyterian schools in that
section. For fifteen years he remained
a member of the faculty, during which
time lie gathered a large and ripe ex
perience.
His reputation as an efficient and
cajiable teacher soon reached other
parts, and when Professor Hunt, who
formerly taught him at Biddle, but
now the principal of the Fort Valley
High and industrial school, was seek
ing for some one to represent the finan
cial work of the school he immediately
sought the services of Professor John
son. The promotion of Professor John
son to his new field meets the approval
of the large number of his friends
in educational circles throughout the
south.
He lias long been prominent in edu
cational circles of the south, and his
opinions on matters relative to the ed
ucational welfare of the race has of
ten been sought.
in the south lie wields much influ
ence and takes an active interest in all
matters pertaining to the welfare of
tin* race.
Professor Johnson has a strong and
fpreeful personality and is a man of
strong character. He is as active in
the north looking after the financial
interest of the school as if he were in
the classroom giving instruction to the
students. The rise to eminence in ed
ucational affairs of Professor Johnson
should serve as an inspiration to the
youths of the race to make good use of
every opportunity to thoroughly pre
pare themselves for their chosen pro
fession.
ZEALOUS YOUNG EDUCATOR.
Bright Future Predicted For Thomtl
D. Pawley at Jackson College.
Jackson, Miss.—Thomas Pawley,
who has been added to the faculty of
Jackson college, in this city, is one of
the most thoroughly educated men
among Afro-Americans. He brings to
the school a large experience gathered
from the New England colleges in
which he studied. He prepared for
college at the Moody school, in North
ampton. Mass., oue of the most noted
of the New England preparatory
schools.
He then entered Amherst college,
from which he graduated in 1911. Ac
tuated by a desire for higher educa
tion he entered Vale university, at
New Haven, where he did postgradu
ate work in sociology and education.
His work at Yale was largely along
the line he will follow in his work at
Jackson college.
Mr. Pawley gives evidence of a bril
liant future and bears the earmarks to
a degree of the ripe scholar. Al
though a product of two of the largest
and most influential of the New Eng
land colleges, he is extremely modest
and unassuming in his manner, ne
talks reluctantly of his achievements,
and it was with much difficulty that
the above facts relative to his life
were secured.
He represents the progressive type
of the young manhood of the race and
believes in deeds rather than words.
The securing of the services of Mr.
Pawley will mean much to the college
and will give much tone to the aca
demic side of the school.
He worked his way through college,
depending wholly on his own re
sources. He enters upon his new du
ties at the opening of the school well
prepared. Jackson college is one of
the largest schools in this section and
wields a wide influence.
Located as It is in the heart of the
black belt region of the south, it acts
as a beacon light and has guided many
an ambitious youth to the right path
of usefulness. The school has turned
out many graduates, all of whom are
doing excellent as educators and lead
ers umoug our people.
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN
ASSOCIATION PROSPERS.
Carlton Avenue Branch In Brooklyn
Shows Judicious Management.
At the first fall meeting of the com
mittee of management of the Carlton
avenue branch of the Young Men’s
Christian association in Brooklyn
held the third week in September, re
ports covering the different depart
ments of the work for the summer
were rendered.
The membership committee of which
Mr. Elias Tilghman is chairman re
ported an increase of thirty since the
beginning of the fiscul year, March 31.
Several new members have joined and
there has been quite a prompt re
sponse upon the part of those whose
membership expired during the sum
mer months.
Thus, with the number of new mem
bers secured and the renewal of ex
pired membership, the branch is
stronger numerically than it has been
for the past six months. By the care
ful and judicious management of Sec
retary Rufus M. Meroney the financial
condition of the association has been
kept in good shape and the branch
starts its fall work with a net balance
of $133.
Preparations for opening the night
school are well under way, and a large
enrollment of students is expected in
October. The English branches are
taught, and provision is made for
classes in stenography and typewrit
ing, also classes in Germatt and French
These latter subjects will be taught by
Secretary Meroney.
CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH.
Series of Anniversary Exercises Ends
With Great Platform Meeting.
The series of services in celebration
of tlie twentieth anniversary of the
founding of the Cental Baptist church
in Pittsburgh, has been well attended
and very helpful to the church, its
members and friends.
The anniversary exercises have been
in progress for two weeks and will
end on Sunday afternoon. Sept. 29, with
a great platform meeting and financial
rally.
Dr. George B. Howard, the new pas
tor, is meeting with much success at
this church which he is building up in
membership, influence and financial
standing by the loyal assistance of the
members. Mr. W. n. Skipwith. the
singing evangelist, assisted in the se
ries of meetings to the delight of pastor
and people.
Taborians Honor Mr*. Montgomery.
The annual meeting of the grand
temple and tabernacle of Knights and
Daughters of Tabor was recently held
in Springfield. O. The sessions were
harmonious and the reports showed
gains in numbers and in finance. The
members expressed their satisfaction
for the services rendered the order by
Mrs. Caroline Montgomery of Mc-
Keesport, I*a.. by retaining her in the
position of chief grand recorder for the
third consecutive year.
Brooklyn's Coming Musical Event.
Musical circles in Brooklyn are much
interested in the musical festival to be
given at the famous old Bridge Street
A. M. E. church on Thursday evening.
Oct. 10. Among the well known pro
fessionals who are to take part in the
exorcises are Miss Minnie Brown. Mrs
Daisy Tap ley and Professor James F
It. Wilson, the talented organist.
THE STATESMAN-
ICE CREAM
The Five Points Creamery Makes the
Best Cream in the City, and Retails
it at $1.25 per gallon. Special Rates
to Organizations and Churches.
Phone us, we will deliver promptly
817 E. 26th AVE. PHONE MAIN 4395
)
THE NAME OF THAT GOOD GIN IS
EL BART
MADE IN UNITED STATES
Egg,Why Send East, When Denver’Can’Supply.Your Wants?
COLORADO BADGE AND NOVELTY COMPANY
Manufacturers of Badges, Banners, Flags, Lodge Supplies, Buttons, Seals,
Rubber Stamps, Steel Stamps, [Society Pins, Metal Checks, Metal Signs,
Door andJßellJPlates.f Advertising and Jewelry Novelties.
Phone 6360 - 1752 CHAMPA ST., DENVER
The Pearl Barber Shop, located at
929 Twenty-first street, Is one of the
most complete and up-to-date ton
sorial parlors in the West. The pro
prietor, Harry Jones, needs no recom
mendation to the public. His years <
of service in this line of work speak <
louder than anything we migh£ say in
bis behalf. Everything sanitary. Call
and give us a trial.
I HOLD UP THE HANDS OF THE RACE’S I
I STAUNCHEST DEFENDERS I
I THE RACE PRESS I
I BY SUBSCRIBING FOR I
I “The Statesman” I
I Published at 926 19th Street, DENVER, COLO. I
I PHONE MAIN 7905 I
■ Read the record of the progress of the 9
■ Race all over the country, together I
I with the happenings of the cities of I
I the Rocky Mountain States :::::::: I
I THE FIRESIDE COMPANION OF THE I
I PEOPLE OF THE GREAT WEST I
I H
I A Splendid Advertising Medium I
I Sample Copies Sent on Request I
I Hustling Agents wanted everywhere. I
■ Address C. A. FRANKLIN, Editor ■
I NO BETTER GIFT TO A FRIEND ONLY FIFTY CENTS FOR THREE MONTHS I
■ l ; . { ■
2
I. M. TH OMAS
MOVING AND STORAGE.
The largest three-horse van in the
city; #1.25 per Hour. Furniture and
china packing. Phone Main 4834.
2541'.WELTON;STREET
ARTHUR JACKSON’S
ORCHESTRA
Rehearsals Tuesday and
Friday Nights,
Public cordially invited
Phone Main 5300, Call for E. Caldwell
Rear 2746 Arapahoe Street
PHONE YORK 3597
WEBSTER’S
ORCHESTRA
(COLORED)
MUSIC FURNISHED
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
EMMETT WEBSTER, - Manager
•mwt ,lirL ® ~~t
L\ POMADE FOR THE HAIR -
a ' ©
*r* We wish to advise our friends and cuatomera that we 3C
hare & full line of Toilet Preparations, Perfumes, Manl-
cure Supplies, Brushes of ever j description. Toilet v O
jg Soaps, Cutlery, etc. W
« The Denver Barbers Supply Co. |
1827 Glenarni Street H
U Formerly at 1008 IBth St. S
O PJ
< Phone Main 7221 Denver, Colo.
£ POMADE FOR THE HAIR W
SEEING IS
BELIEVING
Tno finest and largest stock of Ladles
and Gents’ slightly used clothing In
the West. Theatrical Gowns, Evenly*-
Gown'. Fine Full Dress Bults ft"
rent. We buy and sell good clothing
only. Also traveling men’s ssmples,
new, at wholesale prices.
A. E. LEONARD PROPRIETOR.
THE
ORIGINAL
628 16th Street Phons Msln 8811
vkUiiAa 60 YEARS’
■ V J J L J
™ t a w H j t ■
1 I 4 k I !• JJ
trade Marks
Designs
’YYYYY 1 Copyrights 4r
AQ7on# »endtng * sketch and deeerlptlwi mar
quickly aacwrt-aia our op4okm t r## whether an
rtivannin ta probabl y patent able. <*l 'm m«in ir n •
HANDBOOK on I’atebt**
adntlflfi. Oldest agency for securing paten la.
I’atKme ♦«>»" through Muim A Co. recelT#
W-rciaMotica, without charge. la the
Scientific American.
A b*ud*omel7 flic at rated weekly. largest <m»
ralafiun of airy arienttdc fournaL Twin, f i n
remf t four month#, 9L Sold by all newaiWalVra

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