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Franklin's paper the statesman. (Denver, Colo.) 1906-1912, November 16, 1912, Image 2

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EXPOSITION AS
OBJECT LESSON
Progress Made In Plans For
Holding Big Celebration.
OUTLINE OF LEADING PARTS.
Committee on Plan and Scope of Semi
centennial of Freedom to Be Held In
Philadelphia In 1913 Issues State
ment Forecasting Pertinent Features
of Extensive Program.
By WHITTIER H. WRIGHT.
Philadelphia.—The committee having
charge of plana for the proposed cele
bration in 1913 of the semicentennial
of the freedom of the colored race in
the United States is making commend
able progress. The colored people of
Pennsylvania are taking a lively inter
est in the work as it is being outlined
by members of the committee.
The mechanical, trades and manu
facturing departments will reflect the
skill and efficiency of the race along
these special lines. It is proposed to
build a house, construct an engine,
paint a picture and serve a dinner, all
in the presence of those who come. A
great concert with smaller recitals will
show the progress of Negro music.
It is hoped to have a chorus of S,(XX*
voices to sing daily only the Negro
melodies, while the drama will L>e rep
resented by a play entitled “Fifty
Years of Freedom," by a Negro author.
Congresses of Negro business and pro
fessional men. such as the National Ne
gro Medical association. National Negro
Bankers’ association. National Negro
Press association. National Negro Bap
tist convention and National Negro Re
ligious congress, will be held.
What will be the civic benefit of the
exposition? The exposition, which has
been planned, will not only encourage
and inspire the colored people, but It
will be a lasting civic and national ben
efit in that it will help to allay preju
dice, for it will inspire a higher respect
on the part of the community at large
for the colored population when it
sees assembled in one place the prod
ucts of its handiwork. The white
people of the country know too little of
the good work of the Negro.
It will encourage the more despond
ent ones of the race to renewed efforts.
It will show them opportunities that
they have overlooked, and it will open
up opportunities for them to make
themselves better workmen. Too many
Negroes are discouraged because of
the still existent race prejudice which
they must face.
Where shall this exposition be held?
It seems fitting that an exposition
should be held in the state of Pennsyl
vania and in the city of Philadelphia
for many reasons. Pennsylvania is by
tradition the state most favorably dis
posed to the colored race. Here there
existed the mildest form of slavery,
which, indeed, compared with the con
ditions farther south could hardly be
called slavery at all. Here was uttered
the first protest against slavery in this
country. In 1088 by the German
Friends. Here the first society for the
abolition of slavery was organized and
is still in existence. The illustrious
Benjamin Franklin was its first pres
ident
Here the first law for the gradual
abolition of slavery was passed. Here
the first anti-slavery meeting was held.
In this state the underground railroad
had its beginning. Many of the most
illustrious names of Pennsylvania his
tory devoted themselves to the advance
of the colored people of this state, from
William Penn to Rudolph Blanken
burg, including Francis Daniel, Pasto
rious, Benjamin Franklin, Dr. Benja
min Rush, Bishop William White, Wil
liam Severn, Joseph Clark, Lucretla
Mott, Thaddeus Stevens.
Indeed Pennsylvania is rich in Negro
history. The first schools for higher
training of colored people, the first ex
periment of colored churches, was be
gun, and the first independent colored
churches came into existence within
the bounds of the state of Pennsylva
nia. Indeed the first record of prop
erty holding among colored people is
in this state, while there are some of
the largest businesses operated by
these people. Here are found the
largest secret orders, the oldest news
papers and mngazlnes.
Pennsylvania has the largest colored
population north of Mason and Dix
on’s line, and in proportion to this
population its colored people have
made a greater advance possibly than
the colored population of any other
state. The city of Philadelphia and
vicinity includes one of the largest
communities of colored people to be
found anywhere in the world.
If there is any place, therefore, in
which the progress of the race can be
shown to advantage it is in the city of
Philadelphia. And if there is any city
in the Union which should give an ap
propriation to the colored people to do
this It is the city of Philadelphia. Col
ored Philadelphians are known to have
taken part in the Revolutionary war.
and ns far back ns 1793 the records
show that the bravery of colored men
under most distressing circumstances
elicited the highest praise and com
mendation from one of Philadelphia's
mayors. And in the war of 1812 It
was a Philadelphia battalion which
volunteered its service for the protec
tion of this city. And from that day
to this signal service has been done by
the colored population.
WOMEN HOLD CONVENTION.
Missionary Auxiliary to Baptist State
Convention Held In Brooklyn.
The eleventh annual meeting of the
woman’s missionary convention, auxil
iary to the colored Baptist state con
vention of New York, was held in
Brooklyn on Wednesday and Thursday,
Oct. 30-31, and was largely attended.
There were delegates from most of the
churches in Greater New York and
from many in other parts of the state.
The sessions of the convention were
presided over by the president, Mrs.
D. I). Richardson.
The reports from the various organi
zations of which the convention is com
posed showed an increase in the vol
ume of work done over that of the pre
vious year. The president’s annual
address was fraught with many help
ful suggestions and timely information
concerning the work of the convention
in rendering assistance to many needy
persons as well as its tinaucial gifts
to missions and education.
The annual sermon to the auxiliary
was preached by the Rev. T. J. King
of Yonkers. X. V The Rev. Mr.
King urged the women to continue
their work of faith and labor of love,
assuring them of the hearty co-opera
tion of the main body in their efforts
to better the condition of our people
along spiritual and material lines. It
is said that this meeting of the conven
tion was the best in many respects of
any since its inception.
MANY SIDED LIFE OF
PRESIDING ELDER MIXON.
Founder of Payne University Active In
Recent Political Campaign.
Selma. Ala.—One of the most promi
nent ministers in tlie south is the Rev.
\V. 11. Mixon. I>. 1).. presiding elder of
the Huntsville (Ala.) district of the A.
M. E. church. He has been most ac
tive in the affairs of his church and
has been a delegate to every general
conference since ISSB and is one of the
four founders of I’ayne university, this
city, one of the best schools in the de
nomination. lie was one of the dele
gates to the ecumenical conference in
London a few years ago.
Dr. Mixon after receiving a prelim
inary training in the county schools
entered Selma university, where he re
ceived an academic and theological
training. He is prominent in fraternal
orders, having served as deputy grand
BKV. DIC. W. li. MIXON.
I master of the Masons of Alabama, su
preme master of the Independent Or
der of Brothers and Sisters Consola
tion, grand director of the Knights of
Pythias and grand auditor and grand
director of the Odd Fellows.
lie was a delegate to the recent bi
ennial movable committee of Odd Fel
lows and placed Grand Master Ed
ward 11. Morris of Chicago in nomina
tion for re-election, thus shattering the
•buncos of any other candidate for the
|X)sition at that time.
lie was one of the delegates thrown
out by the Taft forces at the recent
Republican national convention and
delivered the opening prayer when
Itoosevelt adherents formed the Pro
gressive party at the Congress hotel.
Chicago. He was most active in the
Progressive campaign, having deliver
ed addresses all over the middle At
lantic and New England states.
Dr. Mixon is in great demand as a
platform speaker and is the author of
! “A History of the A. M. E. Church In
; Alabama." He Is also the editor of
| the Selma News. Dr. Mixon is already
being asked by many of his friends to
run for the bishopric four years hence.
Teachers' Association to Meet Nov. 29.
President .1. E. Mason of the North
east District Teachers’ association of
Oklahoma is working assiduously for
the coming meeting of the organiza
tion, which is to be held In Wagoner,
Okla.. on Frid»y and Saturday, Nov.
2i) and 30. The association extends
throughout the counties of the old
Creek and Cherokee nations. Promi
nent educators, chiefly those in Okla
homa. will take part In the program.
Miss A. Bryant is secretary of the as
sociation. The sessions of the con
vention will be held In the courthouse
Rt Wagoner.
The Functions of Higher Education.
“I have no patience with unwarrant
ed attacks upon industrial education or
higher education.” says Dr. George
Edmund Haynes, professor of soda!
scleneo at Fisk university, “but I do
advocate that every man shall have ac
cess to such education as will develop
Ids highest powers. The function of
higher education is to develop the j ow
er of thought and emotion of tlie tal
ented lenders of our civilization.”
THE STATESMAN-
ICE CREAM
The Five Points Creamery Makes the
Best Cream in the City, and Retails
it at $1.25 per gallon. Special Rates
to Organizations and Churches.
Phone us, we will deliver promptly
817 E. 26th AVE. PHONE MAIN 4396
THE NAME OF THAT GOOD GIN IS
EL BART
MADE IN UNITED STATES
Why Send East, When Denver Can Supply Your Wants?
COLORADO BADGE AND NOVELTY COMPANY
Manufacturers of Badges, Banners, Flags, Lodge Supplies, Buttons, Seals,
Rubber Stamps, Steel Stamps, Society Pins, Metal Checks, Metal Signs,
Door and Bell Plates, Advertising and Jewelry Novelties.
Phone 6360 1752 CHAMPA ST., DENVER
The Pearl Barber Shop, located at
929 Twenty-first street, Is one of the
most complete and up-to-date ton
sorial parlors in the West. The pro
prietor, Harry Jones, needs no recom
mendation to the public. His years
of service in this line of work speak
louder than anything wo might say in
his behalf. Everything sanitary. Call
and give us a trial.
I HOLD UP THE HANDS OF THE RACE’S I
I STAUNCHEST DEFENDERS I
| THE RACE PRESS I
■ BY SUBSCRIBING FOR I
I “The Statesman” I
I Published at 926 19th Street, DENVER, COLO. I
I PHONE MAIN 7905 I
I Read the record of the progress of the 9
I Race all over the country, together I
I with the happenings of the cities of I
I the Rocky Mountain States :::::::: I
I THE FIRESIDE COMPANION OF THE I
I PEOPLE OF THE GREAT WEST I
I A Splendid Advertising Medium I
I Sample Copies Sent on Request I
I Hustling Agents wanted everywhere. I
I Address C. A. FRANKLIN, Editor I
I NO BETTER GIFT TO A FRIEND ONLY FIFTY CENTS FOR THREE MONTHS I
2
I. M. THO M AS
MOVING AND STORAGE.
The largest three-horse van In the
city; $1.25 per hour. Furniture and
china packing. Phone Main 4834.
2541 WELTON STREETJ
ARTHUR JACKSON’S
ORCHESTRA
Rehearsals Tuesday and
Friday Nights,
Public cordially invited
Phone Main 5300, Call for E. Caldwell
Rear 2746 Arapahoe Street
PHONE YORK 3597
WEBSTER’S
ORCHESTRA
(COLORED)
MUSIC FURNISHED
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
EMMETT WEBSTER, Manager
S' POMADE FOR THE HAIR
52 °
m We wish to advise our friends and customers that we 3
*** hare a full line of Toilet Preparations. Perfumes. Mani- J>
qj cure Supplies. Brushes of every description. Toilet O
g* Soaps, Cutlery, etc. M
5 The Denver Barbers Supply Co. |
t** 1527 Glenarni Street j h
U Formerly at 1008 18th St. , S
q n
< Phone Main 7221 Denver, Colo. g.
O i
a. POMADE FOR THE HAIR »
SEEING IS
BELIEVING
Tne finest and largest stock of Ladies
and Gents' slightly used clothing In
the West. Theatrical Gowns, Evening
Gowns. Fine Full Dress Suits for
rent. We buy and sell good clotMng
only. Also traveling men's samjVet,
new, at wholesale prices.
A. E. LEONARD PROPRIETOR.
THE
ORIGINAL
628 16th Street phone Main 6811
vtlfßlAs SO YEARS’
C*perience
Pa
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Designs
' FFf v" Copyrights Ac
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QixlflkJy aeoertsln oar opinion free whrtlscr su
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LL*«JHLm]y o-mfWsutuJ. HANDBOOK on I’AtriuA
rntlflL (Mdeet agency foraerurmc wtiputs.
I‘stXrus taken tbrough Mann A Co. reoelre
ydcflßbito, without Asms, In the
Scientific American.
A handeomelf lUoetrated eesMy. I Street «m
nrtwUon of any scieqUflo feurneL Terms. |» p
few t foar montha, CL Bold by aJI

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