OCR Interpretation


The Denver Jewish news. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1915-1925, June 28, 1922, Image 4

Image and text provided by History Colorado

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91052360/1922-06-28/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE DENVER JEWISH NEWS
OFI 11 K: 1. - K8 I AN KI.M K STIIKKT, DH.NVKK, ( OI.OKAIXI—PHONIC MAIN 2887
VI CTO It N’El HAI S. Publisher phokre SOMMER, Editor
MORRIS SAREMSKY, Advertising Manager
Entered at the Denver Poatoflh-c for transmission thru the mails an second-class matter.
si BBCRIP CION BA i BS
Two dollar* per year, payable In advance. Five cents per copy.
Advertising rapes on application.
THK I: I) I TOR IS NOT RKSFO.NSI RI.K FOR VIKWS KX PRESSED BY CONTRIBUTORS
\ NON VMOI’S MAM SCRIPTS Wll.l, UEIVEIVE NO t'ONSIDERATION
Address change Notify a- promptly of any change <-r addreea giving both the old
and new udders*
Ml-ximr Number*—lf ytl full to receive the weekly service promptly or regularly,
notify ns at once *<• Hint we may Invest (gate tin* cause
Rem it I slice Hive full naan- and ad.lgesa with remittances mailed to iusiire credit to
proper party.
EDITORIALS
JEWISH CALENDAR.
5082-1021
New Year’*! Eve ..Sun., Oct. 2
Tishrl l Now Year Ist day Mon., Oct. .‘I
Tlshri 2 New Year 2nd day Tues., Oct. 4
Tlshri 10 Youi Kippur Wed., Oct. 12
Tisliri 15 Succoth (First Day) .. Mon., Oct, 17
Tlshri lfl Succoth (Second Day) Tues., Oct. 18
Tishrl 22 Succoth (laifft Day)—Shimini Atxereth. Mon., Oct. 24
Tisliri 23 Siincliath Torah .. Tues., Oct. 2.1
Cheslivan 1 Itosh-Chodeseh Wed., Nov. 2
Kislev l Itosh-Chodeseh Fri., Dec. 2
Kislev 25 Chanukah (Feast of Dedication) Mon., Dec. 20
5682-1922
Telirt 1 Itosh-Cliodosch / Sun., Jan. 1
TpU'l 10 Fast Tebeth Tues., Jan. 10
Sh'vut 1 Itosh-Chodeseli Mon., Jan. 30
Adar 1 Uosh-Chodoseh Wed., Mar. 1
Adar 14 Purlin (Feast of Esther) Tues., Mar. 14 i
Nissan 1 Itosh-Chodeach - Thurs., Mar. 30
Nissan 13 Passover ( Prsach > Thurs., Apr. 13
Nissan 10 Passover (Second Day) Fri., Apr. 14 ,
Nissan 22 Passover (Seventh Day) Wed., Apr. 10
Nissan 23 Passover (Eighth Day) Thurs., Apri. 20
lyar 1 ltosh-Chodesc't ,«.Sat., Apr. 21)
Ivar IS Lag b’Onier .. _. .Tues., May 10
Sivan 1 Itosh-Chodesch .. Sun., May 28
Sivan 1 Sliuliuoth Fri., June 2
Tatumuz 1 Itosh-Chodeseh Tues.. June 27
Ah 1 Itosh-Chodeseh Wed., July 20
lh 1) Feast of Alt . Thurs-, Aug. 3
Ellul 1 Itosh-Chodesch Ellul . Fri., Aug. 25
5668-1922
New Year's Eve Fri., Sept. 22 :
Tishrl 1 New Year (First Day) ... .....Sat., Sept. 23
PROPOSED LIMITATION OF NUMBER OF JEWISH
STUDENTS IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES.
It has been rumored for weeks that Harvard University in
tended placing a limit on enrollment of Jewish students. The
rumors have finally crystallized into authentic fact. President
Lowell of Harvard, in a letter to A. A. Benesch of Cleveland, dis
cusses the question, and, while deploring the existence of Anti-
Semitism states, “If every college in the country would take a
limited proportion of Jews 1 suspect we should go a long way to
ward eliminating race feeling.”
An amazingly naive statement! How refreshingly child like.
Suppose you had a craving for liquor. Would diminution of your
liquor supply eliminate your craving? Suppose there were 100
hungry wolves and 100 fat lambs in a pen. Would you appease
the hunger of the wolves by removing half the lambs? Or, could
you, by this means, afford better protection to the remaining
lumbs?
During the late worldwar, Germany proposed to the United
States that it would go a long way toward reducing friction be
tween us and them if we should limit our ships sailing across the
Atlantic, sail only twice a week, and paint our ships in a designated
manner. Our government replied that the United States sailed the
high seas when and where and how she pleased.
As long as Harvard remains a public and not a private insti
tution, we Jews claim the right, as American citizens, of enroll
ment without this discrimination.
President Lowell is of the opinion that limitation of the num
ber of Jewish students would be in their own interest. Let him
restrain his philanthropic altruism. If Jewish students desirous
of a Harvard background are willing to pay the price in Harvard
gentile scorn and contumely in return for the advantages of higher
education and culture that is distinctly their own private and in
dividual concern.
We wonder if President Lowell contemplates placing a limi
tation on the number of Harvard Jewish professors. Harvard
would have ( in that case, a sorely depleted educational staff. Would
he also bar and limit the amount of money contributed by Jews to
Harvard’s endow-ment fund. We can not too emphatically con
demn this latest Harvard attitude. It is nothing more nor less
than a return to medieralism.
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
Surprise has been expressed at the great divergence of opinion
regarding the Jewish Congress. Delegates from 65 cities in dif
ferent parts of the country, and from 18 national and central or
ganizations assembled in Philadelphia on May 21-22, and unani
mously established an American Jewish Congress on a permanent
basis. This session marked the beginning of a new era in the or
ganization of American Jewry on a democratic basis.
This Congress is attacked in some Jewish quarters by the
assumption that 300 delegates have no right to b&ome spokesman
for the 3,000,000 Jews residing in America. These delegates, who
elected Nathan Strauss, president, and for vice-presidents, Honor
able Aron J. Levy Honorable Samuel Untermeyer and Dr. Stephen
S. Wise passed resolutions on the “Reaffirming Bill of Jewish
Rights,” as recognized under the Treaty of Versailles, and the dedi
cation of this Congress to the task of safe guarding all these rights,
up holding and carrying out the Minority Right principle into
action in all these countries, where such rights are demanded by
the Jewish inhabitants, deprecating Lithuania’s failure to carry
out agreements, and protesting religious repressions in Russia.
The assembly included communal workers, well known for
their philanthropic work, these delegates, some grey hoarded ven
erable Rabbi's, and young Jewish men of notable character, all
met on a platform that is important to all Jewry, as important
as is now the idea that the existing congresses send delegates to
a conference which ill furnish the basis for the convening of a
Federated World Jewish Congress.
Mention was made about the differences among Jews, and
confidence expressed that, “these differences would be adjusted
and, that soon a re-united Jewry will press on to victory,” as Dr.
Wise declared, “This is no place for Jewish partisanship and
sectarianism.”
Support for the committee of Jewish delegates, which is a
tower of strength to the Jews, in countries, where the struggle for
their rights continue, has been promised by the Congress. To lend
and carry out all projected activities, a substantial fund was
pledged by the delegates, individually and in behalf of various af
filiated organizations and communities. . .
THE AFFAIR AT ANNAPOLIS.
We are not alarmists. We have faith in America and its insti
tutions, in the rights and freedom of this great country. We can
not pass without protest the injury and indignity heaped upon
Leonard Kaplan, a Jewish student of the graduating class at the
United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. Senator Sutherland
of West Virginia, Kaplan’s home state, called the attention of
the Senate to the alleged indignity committed by the graduating
class, and attributed this indignity to racial and religious pre
judices.
The incident, which caused the trouble, was in perforation of
the inner margin of the last page of the book of the graduating
class, known as "The Lucky Bag,” this page containing a photo
graph and a short sketch of Kaplan, the apparent object of the
perforation being to suggest that the page could be torn out with
out defacing the volume, a very handsome and expensive publica
tion, printed on fine paper and with sketches and photographs ex
cellently reproduced. The photographs of all the members of the
graduating class are contained in the book, each with a short bio
graphical sketch containing ironical comment on the chief char
acteristics of the graduate.
Kaplan’s name is omitted from the index to the biographies.
There are two sketches to the page. On the page with Kaplan’s
photograph and biography, which is termed “an autobiography”
in the book, is a crudely drawn picture of a fictitious member of the
graduating class designated as "Porky,” of whom it is said that he
was "born in the Township of Zion, County of Cork, State of
Ignorance, Sunday, the 17th day of March, 1900.
Annapolis belongs to the American people. It is a public insti
tution. The Jews are as proitd of this country as are the gentiles.
They fought the wars, the Revolutionary Wars, the Second war
with England, the Mexican war, the Civil war, the Spanish war,
the World war. They were ambitious, tenacions, proud. What
they did vitally influenced their lives. ’The world knows what the
Jews have done for America.
Officers who investigated the affair said that while eight Jew
ish members of the class certified to the register as either Jews,
Hebrew or reformed Jews, Kaplan wrote no religion. The case
and the inquiry, whether the authorities of the Naval Academy '
were responsible for the publication of “The Lucky Bag,” will be
brought forward again in the Senate, when the Naval Appropri
ation bill will be under consideration. J
Congrgationale
TKMI’I.K KMANIKL
Servlet's will be held every Friday
evening throughout the summer ut
7:4." o'Mock. Mr. lien Solomon will
ifad services Friday evening. All are
welcome.
BETH HA MEDROSH HAGODOL.
Pa-lly sorvices arc hol«l »:» tilt* Synn-
K og Clitfpo.l Htth anil Gaylord, at. «:S0
in the morning imd !, t ” l* l tin* eve
ning. Friday o vonimr services are
held at sunset. Saturday morning
services 'at !).
OHEB ZADEK CONGREGATION
Services will begin Friday evening
at S o'clock. Saturday morning at !>.
CONGREGATIONAL BETH OSEPH
Services will In- held at tlu* ('onre
lational Beth Joseph Wednesday
morning at Ht.'tO. Friday night at S p.
in.. Saturday morning at S;:iO.
SHEARITH ISRAEL
Siirariili Israel service** art' held
every morning sit. and Friday eve
ning at sundown.
MRS. FROMENSON, PALESTINE
SUPPLIES BUREAU, 55 FIFTH
AVE., NEW YORK CITY, UNITED
STATES OF AMERICA.
Dour Mre. Frouienson:
I linve cabled yon some time ago in
regard to our needs for linen, and I
notice from the New Palestine that you
have begun a collection of the necessary
supplies. Let me again write to tell
you how urgent the need has become
within the last few months. Ily an ar
rangement with the local Kupat Holim
(Workingmen's Siek Hencflt Society)
we have undertaken to do all the med
ical work for them, and one of our
duties is to supply linen to their many
field hospitals which they are establish
ing in such settlements as Nouns, Nn
halul. etc., and to their workingmen's
sanitariums in Safed. Cliadera. etc. Al
most daily demands for sheets, pillow
cases, pajamas, etc., come in. Our sup
ply is practically exhausted, particular
ly as we have opened a hospital of tiffy
beds in Haifa this month.' and 1 am
rather at a loss what to do. I cannot
Urge too strongly upon you the neces
sity of sending us. as soon as possible,
jail the linen that you have collected.
Please do not wait for any large ship
iments hut send us the stuff as it comes
in. The situation is very, very serious
indeed.
Sincerely yours.
(Signed) I. M. UUIiIXOW.
Director.
The Universe is based upon three
things: conscience. Justice and peace.
—Talmud. I
THE DENVER JEWISH NEWs
Modern Pastimes of Jewish Origin
By MORIS SAREMSKY
' AtlUrtier* ,
Although no organized forms of nth
lot its tire found in tint history of the
Jews, there art* numerous feats of
strength in biblienl instances related
which might have formed tlie fonnda
tion for nuHlern athletics and at. tin*
same time refute the insinuation that
the Jews have not any lighting Mood
in them. One need tally relate the
story of the all-night struggle of Jacob
who wrestled with a man until morn
ing anil the latter linding he could; no;
prevail over the former—"touched the
hollow of his thigh causing a strain."
After the combat the antagonists arc
sahl to have “blessed each other.
(Gen. .'ll!).
This is probably the llrsf instance
of a wrestling match in the history of
athletics —uml one recalls here the
practice among present day wrestler:
(and lighters) of shaking hands after
the bout. The same Jacob allowed a
remarkable font of strength when he
rolled a groat stone from tin* month
of a well at the meeting with I/>voifs
daughter, a feat which usually requir
ed the combined strength of a mini
her of Shepherds to accomplish after
their ret lira from the field. (Gen. -'«> •
Moses too showed pugilistic inclina
tions when he smote an Kgyption who
was in combat with a Jew: and in
the 4th century we are told of a visit
to Syria l»y Jerome when* he found
Jewish youths raising heavy stones
above their heads to develop their
muscles. (Jewish Life).
I'misual acts of courage aml brav
ery involving strength or skill are
found in the tale of Samson and Del
ilah and in the remarkable perform -
1101*0 of David who slew Goliath with
a small stone thrown from a sling.
With the conquest by the Unmans.
Jews came to look upon athletic feats
with ilcsdain been use the seeming pro
ficiency of the Homans and Greeks
made it appear to them (the Jews) as
part of foreign culture: for in fact
the Talmud delines athletics as Greek
Wisdom (Chochnios Yovouim) Baba
Kama SH—Soto -lb.
With the loss of their homeland it
is not at all surprising that athletics
dwindled out of Jewish life—for in
their struggle for existence, the more
, important undertakings of life's pre
servation and culture occupied their
I attention —which makes it the more
! remarkable that today we can point
I to such celebretles in the pugilistic
1 world as Abe At tel and B**nnv Leon
! aril —both lightweight champions in
I their time nrnl others.
Subscribe for the "Jewish News."
Announcement —
THIS IS TO CKKTIFY, after n thorough inspection that The RADIO CAFE \ TJ 7
Is strictly sanitary . \
( Signed ) CAUL DKLOCIITK. V \AJ
(Chief Inspector, State of Colorado.)
You will appreciate the air of refinement and service. Radio Concerts % ■
while you dine in Denver's Coolest Restaurant. 5:30 to 7P. M., 15th
St. near Arapahoe. CANO SENTER, Manager. 'v
—JJHMQ
$14,000,000
When the Colorado National opened for business last Monday
morning, the depositors in its Savings Department had to their
credit over $14,000,000.
This astounding total places them over $5,500,000 ahead of the
savings depositors of any other bank in Denver, and tenth among
all the national banks in the entire United States.
During the past four years the Savings depositors of the Colorado
National have drawn almost a million and a half dollars in in
terest.
Why not open a savings account here this week
e
4 ( /o interest on your deposits,
compounded semi-annually
COLORADO NATIONAL
BANK. ,
SEVENTEENTH CHAMPA
Foreign Exchange, Safe Deposit Vaults, Trust Service, Liberty Itouds llought and Sold j
Member Federal Bexerve Hyntein
CHARLIE CHAPLIN, MILLIONAIRE,
GUARANTEES SUPORT OF ALIEN
MOTHER.
Washington. I>. (*. lmmigration au
thorities are investigating the condl
tions under which Hannah Chaplin,
aged and shell-shocked mother of
Charles Chaplin, is allowed to remain
in the I'nited States. K. .1. Ilenuing.
Assistant Secretary of Labor, granted
a stay today to enable counsel employ
ed bj her sons. Charles and Sidney, to
present legal ground for permitting
Mrs. Chaplin to be a semipermanent
resident.
Mrs. Chaplin, herself an actress, it
was explained was mentally deranged
by shock In one of the first Herman
air raids on Loudon. After the war
her sons wanted to take iter to Cali
' fornia to give her environment and
treatment to ease her condition and
possibly restore her reason. After some
difficulty permission was given for her
to enter the Ctilted States for olie year.
This time has expired and the ques
tion has arisen whether a longer pe
riod of residence can be legally allow
ed. The Chaplin brothers gave usstir
jance that their mother never would
Where Everybody Goes
Phone Main 7081
become a charge on public charity.
They installed her in a cottage at Santa
Monica, Cal., with trained nurses and
expert medical ait tent ion’. Physicians
report, it is said, that Mrs. Chaplin's
mental condition Ims improved stead
ily. despite her age. and counsel have
presented a statement that Charles
Chaplin is worth more than $1,000,000.
ioi. lending that the extraordinary cir
' ciimstances justify some yielding in the
! legal harriers against admission of
a I either permanently or temporal'-
: ily mentalUy unsound.
If thou hast the means, enjoy life's '
1 innocent pleasures. —Talmud.
JEWS HAVE OWN SCHOOLS IN
WILNA.
Wilim—Enrollment of Jewish i»ni»il s
in the eleiueiitury, second and unlver
i sit.v classes in the Wilim district to
talled 3.700, in March, the total atten
dance in all schools and colleges num
hering 23 910.
There are 4.030 pupils in 32 Jewish
elementary schools, 1.027 in live Jewish
gymnasia. 303 among the Ota, students
in the two Russian gymnasia, besides
230 students in oue Jewish professional
school.
Others in attendance in the Wilim
''schools are Toles. White Uutlieuians,
Lithuanians and Russians.

xml | txt