OCR Interpretation


The Denver Jewish news. [volume] (Denver, Colo.) 1915-1925, November 22, 1922, Image 6

Image and text provided by History Colorado

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91052360/1922-11-22/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

GOLDSTEIN'S
Bread
None but the best is our
Standard and our success
proves that the public de
mands it.
We ship every where
Goldstein’s
Bakery
2518 West Colfax \
Phone Main 4327
Furs repaired, remodelled and mode
to order
Furs, Capes and Coats
at reasonable prices
FURS
All our Furs are guaranteed to be
mode fnwn best grade of skins.
COMPARE PRICES WITH QI’AL
ITV OF OCR FI RS.
Engel’s FUR Store
Main 3073 434 Sixteenth St.
Silk Elastic Hosiery Abdom
inal Belts, Trusses, Invalid
Chairs, Arch Supporters,
Hospital and Sick Room
Supplies
Established 1874
Tha
J. Durbin Surgical Supply Co.
1632 Welton Street
Telephones Main j
n ~ -a
IF YOU ARE IN THE
MARKET FOR A
GOOD USED CAR
MAKE IT A POINT TO
SEE OUR ASSORT
MENT OF HIGH
GRADE USED CARS
All Are in .41 Mechanical
Condition Having Been
Thoroughly Overhauled
Coder tlir Personal
Supervision of
Harry B. Leeman Himself
Denver’s Well-Known Auto
mobile Mechanic
EACH CAB
CABBIES A
Leeman Guaranteed
and are
PRICED RIGHT
HARRY B. LEEMAN
507 Broadway TeL South 7115
B -■
The Lehrer Garage Co.
I. I.EHRER, Prop.
Oil and Gasoline, Repairing
ar.d Supplies
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Phone Champa 5733
1491 Irving Street
Corner Irving and West Colfax
WM. DOMINICK
High Quality Goods
NONE Better
DYER, PISTONS. ELC.IN WRIST
PINS, MIGROMETER-RINGS
Dalton & Batch genuine silent trim
ing gears, look for trade mark
825 Broadway
llfurs
Fine Furs and Garments at
Big Reductions.
A small deposit will secure any
fur until wanted. Let us tan
your hides and make Into tine
furs, robes and rugs, and we can
remodel, repair your old furs to
look new at a reasonable price.
Furs made to order, stored and
insurtHl. reasonable price. We cull
for and deliver orders.
L. FINKELSTEIN
1610 Tremont Champa 3257
[For your next Dutch Lunch try
Werner's Delicatessen
17 South Broadway near
Ellsworth
Phone South 7248
Full line of $
Milwaukee Sausage
nml |
Home Prepared Meats
Feniga asd Domestic
..CHEESE..!
I of quality 1
We cater to those that wants |]
better Goods. |j
| 'HWdu&rf . I
| Cor. 15th O Larimer Sts. 1
Now selling $lOO,OOO Mer- !
| chandi.se Stocks j
| I m night from manufacturers x
11 who were glad to unload at a [
| j big discount, this licing THEIR x
j j season's end. j
j | BARGAIN HUNTERS [
| TAKE NOTICE. \
OCULISTS' PRESCRIPTIONS k
Our Specialty S||
9 Eyas Examined I
TORIC OPTICAL CO. E
ISIS Stout street S
Phone Champa 1374—1378
Good Work
and ,
Repair Ep
NEW method
CLEANERS & DYERS
2009-11 Champa Street
Phones Main 3189, Champa 7237
VISIT THE
Wm. Penn Grill
Lunches and Sandwiches
for Picnic’s
■ Kosher Delicatessen,
. Soft Drinks and
Lunches
HARRY W. COHEN. Prop.
Cor. 18th and California
Music
10c FOR 6 pJf&TS
I And one G-exposure film devel
oped. First order only. To prove
our superior Kodak finishing, by
our new process.
C. B. AUSTIN CO.
428 17th St., Denver.
!
i Manufac- , # Catering
| Candy W Eat. 1872 IceCtPam
The Windsor Farm Dairy Co
“Honest llilk from Clean Cow*'
Main 5138-513?
1855 Blake Street, Denier. Colorado.
OUR WEEKLY LETTER
FROM-NEW YORK
THE ELECTIONS IN NEW YORK
AND WARSAW —JEWISH CAN
DIDATES HERE AND THERE.
A Reception Where the Gueeta Had
the floor—The Coming of Clemen
eeau and His Jewish Stories.
(Copyrighted, 1922. Jewish Correspondence
Bureau).
Every conceivable point of departure
can Ik* indicated between the election.;
which were held about the saute time
last week in New York and Warsaw,
and not a single point of similarity.
In Warsaw and throughout Greater
- Poland, including Eastern Galicia
there was a distinct Jewish issue.
[The issue was the election of the
Maximum' number of Jewish deputies
to the Polish Diet. Whereas here and
throughout the country, certain can
didates happened to 1h» Jews, and this
“Happened” for most part in districts
which arc* predominantly Jewish,
there was nothing accidental about
the Jewishness of candidates in Poland
and Galicia. There were Jewish
tickets in Poland and Galicia —tickets
1 which polled enormously lieenuse they
1 Were Jewish 'or because, thunks to
East Side Gift for Harding
(Bjr Pacific A AUaallc)
This flag, made by a Gold Star mother of New York's
East Side, was presented to President Harding by H. H.
Schlaacht '(right) as Armistice Day immigrant token.
I the foresight of the Jewish polite lans,
coinhinations were affected, with other
minority groups, such as the Germans
: mid Ituthcnians, who were as keen on
electing Germans anti Ituthenians.
a The combinations scored most suc
cessfully. so that the minority-bloc
with its eighty deputies of whom
about; half are Jews, will be the sec
ond strongest group in the new Sejm.
And there is also this great differ
ence betwen. say, the Jewish voter
in Buffalo and the Jewish voter in
Bialostock. The latter cast his vote
with the minorities lieeauae he wanted
» to Ik? represented by a Jew who
would shield him on the floor of Par
liament against political aggression
and physical violence. The ballot
thus liecause an instrument of protest
against the tilings for which the non-
Jewish majority of that Parliament
stands. The Jewish elector of Buf
falo took the ballot of his party and
almost always voted “straight.” There
was no “splitting in favor of a Jewish
candidate or a candidato who ‘'hap
pened" to be a; Jew.
Perhaps the quotation on "Happcn
, ed” can stand explaining. There is no
» sense in denying that party ticket*
are so drawn as to present a sem
blance of representation .for the major
racial or religious groups. It is not
accidental that certain candidato on
each the contending ballots are
Irish. Jewish and Italian. Nor is it
a trick of fate that Jewish candi
dates are chosen to run in Jewish
sections. And nobody minds that
parties frequently slate their tickets
so as to present a Jew fon the Jew
ish candidate on the opposing ticket,
causing Jew to run against Jew.
Thus Assemblyman Dickstein who at
tained popularity because of the
■ Kosher Bill, defeated Congressman
Meyer London, the Socialist. Thus
> also did Congressman Kossdnle suffer
, defeat at tin* hands of a Jewish op
ponent, while Congressman Perlman
■ was re-elected over a Jewish contest
ant. And just as it would hardly lie
fair to say that Perlman won be
cause liberal Immigration legislation
was written larger on his banner (the
only issne that may conceivably lie re
-11 gnrded as “Jewish”), so also would
j it be unfair to impute restrictive im
migration tendencies to the man that
I vied and almost tied for his place in
| Congress.
J It. may In* a mere coincidence, ami
;if so a very striking one. that the
1 1 Jewish voter in New York and the
Jewish voter In Warsaw’ did not elect
the Jewish candidates that ran on
Socialist, ticket London's defeat in
.[New York is as hard to explain as
THE DENVER JEWISH NEWS
the defeat the two Jewish candidates
on the Polish Socialist Party.
Meyer Ixmdon, above all, had as
k powerful backing and as strenuous
campaigning and sustained electioneer
iug as any candidate could desire. He
! had the most widespread Yiddish 1
■ newspaper literally going the limit for
him, which makes his debacle all the
more inexplicable.
* No more eloquent testimony is need- (
ed to show how popular Nathan |
Straus is thau the fact that hb{ son. (
Nathan Straus, Jr., was re-elected in
* hi* district to the State Senate by n (
, plurality eseeding that of llovernor
. elect Smith by aoniething like , r »,000 ,
| votes. The young Straus stands for ,
a gofld many of the things his father;
the veteran Jewish philanthropist, in
. nugurated. He follows his father In ,
{ his Zionism (and in the particular
brand of Zionism which his father
, more or less heartily espoused since
\ the Cleveland Convention). All around. |
I the overwhelming vote for Nathan
Straus Jr., is a touching tribute to the
, house of Straus ami rather creditable
( to the overfed Jewish silk-stocking ,
district which cast that rote,
t Comparatively little is known here
I of Carl Sherman/ the Buffalo Jew,
i who has oeen elected Attorney-(3en
i era I for New York State. Mention
■ was mude by his toasters of his vari
► ous Jewish connections and some em- 1
phasis was laid on tlie fact that lie
is a Zionist. But it is certain that
what swept him into office were not
his Jewish affiliations hut the Demo
ocratic landslide.
In New York, tlie re-election of
Justice Irving Lehman to the Supreme
Court is a flue, but not surprising,
thing, especially since, tieing listed
"Democrat-Republican,” he is prob.
ably al»ove either party.
Aside from tlie elections which pro
duced so little excitement that a sec
tion of the press deplored the fact,
things have lieen quiet in Gotham.
The new Zionist delegates. Dr. Arthur
Kupln and Dr. Hchmarya Levin ap
pear to lie resting on their oars. They
both have a good deal to say to
American Jews and hinted at some
things at the reception on Wednesday
at the Astor which differed from ,
other receptions of this sort in this,
that the guests had the floor to them
selves. Dr. Levin was his usual elo
quent, albeit somewhat oracular, self.
He was brilliant and scintillating as
usual, and fascinating. Dr. Itupin
was surprisingly eloquent for a think,
er, sociologist and theoretician whom
the vicissitudes the Zionist movement
turned into a ready reference library,
combined with an illuminatifag fact
machine and constructive, harshly
practical, statebuilder. As both Dr.
Rupin and Dr. Levin will be seen
and heard in many parts of the coun
try. there seems to l»e no need for
heralding them any further.
Additional interest will be focused
on the visit to this country of M.
Clemenceau. by the fact that his ar
rival will synchronise with the publi
cation of the English translation of a
collection of his stories of Jewish life
in Galicia, euphemistically enough en
titled “At the Foot of Sinai.” Writ
ten years ago, before the “Big Four"
wore even dreamed of. and before the
French Tiger achieved greatness and
retirement, it will be a stirprise to
many that such stories are extant.
Their publication at this happy mo
ment is due to Bernard G. Richards
that connoisseur of books whom des
tin cast for one role after another in
the Jewish national movement. With
out almndoing Jewish work, which he
has served for a score or more years,
more recently as Secretary of the
American Jewish Congress, Richards ,
has decided to indulge his love of
hooks by publishing some. And so i
the Bernard G. Richards Company lias i
come to be. Richards has brought out .
“Apples and Honey,” a collection of ,
Jewish children’s stories, and is re- ,
sponsible for introducing “Aspects of i
Jewish Life and Thought” to the I
THE COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
Uw Works Hardship on Imnipant
Women. Council Immigrant Leader
Discusses New Citizenship Act.
New York City—ln the October is
sue of “The Immigrant." the monthly
bulletin of the National Department
of Immigrant Aid. Council of Jewish
Woen, there appears a very thorough
discussion of the ifecent citizenship
legislation effecting alien women or
women married to foreign citizens.
The dangers and difficulties of this leg
islation known as the Calilo Act, are
thus analyzed by Miss Cecilia Ita
zovsky, the Department’s Secretary:
“On September 22, 1022, there was
enacted into the laws of the United
States, to take effect immediately, a
bill of far reaching importance to
women the world over. By this law.
known as the Cable Act, generally
speukinif. the right of any wtafcnan
to become a naturalized citizen of the
United States may not be denied or
abridged because of her sex or be
cause she is a married woman.
“When the news was flashed over
the world that America by this legis
lation had thus officially conceded that
every woman is un independent human
being; there was great rejoicing in
many quarters. The pen with which
President Harding affixed his sig
nature to the bill was presented by
him to Mrs. Maude Wood Park, who
led the dub-women of America in
urging the passage of this measure.
We, too, are in whole-hearted sym
pathy with a movement of this kind
and we congratulate the wyiuen of
America on the successful struggle
they waged to achieve their end.
Nevertheless we must face the grave
and inßubitable truth that while the
American woman gain by the passage
of the Cable Act, the foreign-born
women find themselves in a peculiarly
unfortunate aud ufthappy position as
a result of the clause which deprives
them of die privilege of assuming
their 'husliand’s dtizpnship.
“Lot us tako for example the pres
ent immigration law's which confer
upon the foreign boru wife of a nat
uralized citizen the rights of citizen
ship upon her arrival at Ellis Island.
Up to the present time if it were
found that the alien wife'of a nat
uralized citizen was suffering from
some curable dlseuse she would uot
lie detained but would be admitted
to the United 'States. Or she might
. be treated at the immigration station
hospital. If necessary, wihout charge.
Now she will be regarded bh an alien,
and many of the privileges heretofore
granted her will be revoked.
"That the present practice concern
ing incoming alien wives of naturaliz
ed citizen* will have to be altered to
conform to this new law, we have no
doubt.
’Then too there Is the horrible dan
ger of deportation which may face
the alien wife of a naturalized citizen
for the first five years of her resi
dence In this country, unless she can
secure. In the interim, her naturali
zation certificate. Should the woman,
through accident or at child birth,
be taken to a public hospital l»e
--cause the citizen husband is unable
to pay for her treatment in a private
Institution, is she to be reported as
un alien who has become a public
charge? And, if she is ordered deport
ed. can any one view with complac
ency the terrible effect of separation
of wife from citizen hutdyind. and
mother from children who are also
citizens? It is easy to meet this ob
jection with the query, “Why should
not this alien woman have become an
American citizen?” —but the practical
difficulties of such ai step during the
first few busy years of the wife and
mother’s stay In the new country are
familiar to nil who have done work
with foreign-born women. It is doubt
ful whether the framers of this law
took into consideration these fearful
but possible consequences.”
THINK SAMUEL MAY QUIT PALESTINE
(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
London—That Sir Herbert Samuel
may relinqulqji his post! as the Pal
estine High Commissioner is the opin
ion of some of his Liberal colleagues.
For one thing it is thought Sir Her
bert may bo too ardent in his Zion
ism for the Ilonar Law Government
or for the. Conservatives should be
latter come into power. Moreover.
Sir Herbert is wanted by the Liberals
because he would return from Pal
estine with nn enhanced reputation,
reader in this country. The author of
the Aspects, a British Jew, chooses
to conceal his identity and erudition
behind the unassuming name of Ben
ainmy. which makes the publisher's
task just a little harder. With the
npproacliing appearance of Clemcn
ceau’s Jewish stories, “B. G. It.” auth
or of the “Discourses of Keidansky,”
Jewish publicist, Zionist worker and
Jewish Congress advocate takes his
place among the too few Jewish pub
lishers in this country.
| An Attractive Brunswick j
Cabinet Model
43 Inches High
$lOO
I The opportunity you have been waiting for—the ac
cepted phonograph of the day—priced within your means.
The Model “200” Brunswick is fully equipped with the j
famous Brunswick Ultona Reproducer—which plays all rec
ords —and the Brunswick All-wood Tone Amplifier—which
gives Brunswick tone its characteristic sweetness and
volume.
To buy any phonograph without first hearing The Bruns
wick is a mistake.
Convenient Terms
American Furniture Co.
Sixteenth at Lawrence
The
Southern Oil & Refining,
Company
A COLORADO CORPORATION.
A COLORADO BORN MAN AT THE HEAD OF IT.
Simply and earnestly desires all Investors to understand
that the last shares for sale by the company are rapidly
going at $l.OO per share, subject to raise without notice —
..A LIMITED NUMBER LEFT FOR SALE..
We Want the Pioneer Spirited—
The Honest and Honorable Investor
FRANK D. HINES
Suite 19 to 26 1608 Broadway,
Phone Main 7728 IXenver, Colorado
It is poor economy to wait for trouble before you avail j
yourself of my expert service. No matter what make i
your car is this attention is for your benefit. No charges j
made for inspection by expert mechanics. Free battery s
| service. §
Your old friend,
S. GOLDFARB
Branch 2 of the Lincoln Highway Garage.
2510 W. Colfax Champa 3966
ATTENTION
$ Have your Plumbing and Heating done by the
Pearl Plumbing & Heating Company
BEN PERLMUTTER, Prop.
; Tel. Main 2325 Estimates Furnished $
1466 Irving Street
I WEEKLY JEWISH PUBLICATION NEEDS i;
RELIABLE AND LI.VE-WIRE COR- jj
RESPONDENTS IN ALL CITIES. APPLY
T. K AHAN. 1260 47TH ST, BROOKLYN. N. Y. !
Ads in The Jewish News Bring Results.

xml | txt