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The new era. (Walden, Colo.) 1906-19??, February 07, 1907, Image 2

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FROM ALASKA TO CAPE HORN
A Pan-Amc 'can Railway, Greater. |
Project of Its Kind.
The gray plover nests in the sedge:
of Alaska, says E. B. Clark In the
Technical World; and when the shor‘
summer wanes, it leads its young in
perilous flight southward across plains
and mountain ranges and then, guid
ed by the coast-line, wings its way
steadily onward until it reaches It?
winter home In Patagonia. For more
than one-half of the immense distance
of its migration the flight course o!
the gray plover is almost coinc.d 'n
with the surveyed line for the project
ed Pan-American railway, a commer
cial connection between the northern
and southern continents that a few
years ago was . .-garded as the dream
of enthusiasts, but which to-daj has
passed far beyond the realm of vi
aions.
Men whose lives are well beh n<
them will probably live to see the dr;,
when they can make an unbroken tail
way Journey from the River Yukon
in Alaska to the River 1 i’.nay in Pata
gonia. This journey from the nortl'
to the south means more thru the
traveling of an immense oi tancc
within a short space of time, thougl
this thought alone is impressive.
It means the passing through alter
nato cold and heat, moisture and dry
ness, bare fields and green fields, tree
less plains and tropical forests, fertile
valleys and sterile mountains; I'
means acquaintance with men of
every hue of skin and of ever;
habit of life, it means the wedding or
the ends of earth.
Captured a Neighbor's Cat.
This last summer impels of llit
United States IlsJr commission w- .*
stationed at Lake M:iuho;fog, Me., .'•••»
the purpose of gatherlrg statistics in
regard to the finny trih.es which in
habit that region. The g ;<' s <> r *• '*
small hotel where they .i'i.ule their
headquarters were very much an
noyed by the too frequent npp< n-ranee
of a skunk, and steps were taken to
capture the offender.
A box trap was constructed, duly
baited and set. Through small holes
in the box the guests were highly
elated to learn the following morning
that their efforts had not lit en in
vain.
The fish commission men, thinking
It an unusually fine specimen, decided
to preserve its pelt, minus the,. objec
tionable odor, it' possible, nn< gently
handling tho box. they proceeded to
the lake, carefully lowered it into the
water, removing it when all life was
extinct.
This capture will probably not ap
pear in their- next report, as the ani
mal proved to be a black cat belong
ing to the next farmhouse.
A Lost Art.
A colored Baptist preacher chose
for his text “Noah and the Ark.”
Reaching the climax of his sermon, he
discoursed as follows: ••
‘‘An’ Noah labored hard an’ de ark
was finished. How did de Lawd know
it was finished? Noah telephoned de
Lawd he had done, and de Lawd tele
graphed back, ‘Get all de peepul and
animules and birds of de air in de ark,
de flood am begun.' ” A voice from
the congregation:
‘‘Brer Bumpus, de telephone and tel
egraph was unknown In dose days.”
“Go way, you, Brer Jones. Noah in
vented dem Instruments, but he done
forgot to put dem in dc ark, an’ dey
wuz lust In de flood. Macaroni dis
covered de telegraph on de Alps, and
Edson found de telephone on de Mount
* of Oranges.”
Emphatic, but Innocent.
Mrs. Richardson, author of “In
Japanese Hospitals in Wartime,”
writes of her Japanese attendant:
"When slie was not waiting upon me
she spent most of her time sitting
on her heels warming her little fin
gers over the ‘hlbachi’ and smoking
the most minute pipe l had ever
seen, which she promptly hid under
her feet whenever I appeared. She
had learned her broltdn English from
foreigners, and one day when I told
her she had forgotten something she
replied, ‘I am a fool,’ not being
the least aware that she had said
anything unusual.”
Patrons of Peak’s Island.
There formerly resided at Peak’s
Island. Me., an artist named Hatha
way. whose studio was located near
the steamboat landing. Tho character
of tha transient visitors which com
prised the bulk of travel to that re
sort was Illustrated by the reply the
artist gave to one of his patrons, who
remarked that probably he found few
purchasers of his works. "That is so,"
replied Mr. H., with a mournful shake
of Tils head; "the majority of people
who come to this place have $2 and
a shirt, and don’t change either while
they are here.”
In His Line.
"My man,” we say kindly to the
Individual whom we see taking a sly
swig from a bottle that he produces
from a rear pocket, "unless you are
more temperate in your habits you
will fill a drunkard's grave."
"Zat’s all ri’,” he informs us, grave
ly, "I’ve filled many of 'em."
"This is no occasion for Joking,” we
admonish him.
"Shert’nly not, pardner. I’m igvin’
it to you stranght. I’m shexton of a
enemetery.”
Burning It Up.
"Jagley slept in the lockup, I be
lieve. Drunk and disorderly, eh?"
•"Sh! He says he waa guilty of
arson.’’
“WJMrtV
"He thinks th:«. sounds better. He
ires burning his money, you know.*
EVIDENTLY WAS NOT CURIDUS.
Attendant at Cathedral Had More
Than Usual English Stolidity.
“While going through an English
cathedral,” said a returned visitor the
other day, “we noticed that all the
tombs except one had inscriptions ex
plaining them. Being curious to know
whose tomb it was that did not bear
an inscription l walked down to an
iron railing, the gate of which was in
charge of an old man We had en
tered this gate to view the tombs,
paying the customary sixpence admis
sion. Pointing to the tomb, which was
less than seventy-five feet from the
gate at which the old man was sta
tioned, I said to him: ’Beg pardon
but whose tomb is that one there? It
has no card on it,’ and I’m curious tr
know its history.'
“Looking up toward where I was
! pointing and peering through the
rather dim atmosphere of the church
the old man in the most pathetic tone
imaginable replied: ‘I don’t know
sir: I’ve never been up that far.’
"Supposing that he was a new
joiner I said: ‘How long have you
been here?’
Slowly but proudly came the reply
•Twenty-seven years.”
IMMENSE CONTINENT OF ICE
Has Accumulated in Greenland fo;
Untold Centuries.
The largest mass of ice in the work.
•s probably the one which fills uj
nearly the whole of the interior of
Greenland, where it has accumulated
.since before the dawn of history, li
is believed to now form a block about
800,000 square miles In area, and
averaging a mile and a half in thick
ness. According to these statistics
the lump of ice is larger in volume
than the whole body of water in the
Mediterranean; and there is enough
of it to cover the whole of the United
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
with a layer about seven miles thick
If it were cut into two convenient
slabs and built up equally upon the en
tire surface of "gallant little Wales’
ir would form a pile more than 120
mires high. There is ice enough In
Greenland to bury the entlro area of
the United States a quarter of a mib
deep.—London Tit-Bits.
Dreams and Their Influence.
Eight hundred persona, chiefly worn
en, belonging to different American
training colleges, have been giving an
interviewer their experience in dreams
and some surprisingly interesting in
formation has resulted. A writer In
an article devoted to the questloa saya
that dreams can be prevented by sug
geation and that neither seasons, days
nor montfis have any effect on them.
Children dream of events very soon
! after occurrence, while with "grown
! ups" the mors striking the event, the
limgcr is the Interval between It and
its representation in dreamland. The
articls concludes by saying that the
influence of dreams on real Ilfs is
much greater than is generally sup
posed.
Valet Watched Over Nelson.
Lord Nelson was a very sparing
eater, and never drank more than five
glasses of wine. Even had he shown
any wish to do so bis faithful valet,
Tom Allen, who ruled the admiral with
; a rod of Iron, would have Interfered.
A biographer tells how at a certain
| stage of a certain dinner "honest Tom
! Allen pushed in his bullet head with
an eager gaze at his master, and after
a little consideration approached the
admiral. ‘You will be ill if you take
any more wine.’ ’You are perfectly
right, Tom, and I thank you for the
I hint. Hardy, do the honors. And.
gentlemen, excuse me for retiring, for
my battered old hulk Is very crazy—
Indeed, not seaworthy.' ’’
His Day of Fate.
Death from snake bits Is somewhat
rare in South Africa, but a record case
is reported from the veldt. A Boer
named Johannes Smit had gone to the
mouth of the Selous river to shoot
crocodiles, when he had an exciting
encounter with a leopard. Smit would
undoubtedly have met hie death if a
large hound, which was accompanying
him, had not sprung upon the wound
ed animal, enabling 9mlt to fire a sec
ond charge. Almost immediately after
the incident, as he was passing through
thick undergrowth, the unfortunate
man was bitten by a poisonous snake
and his death occurred within an
hour or two.
Still Believe in Horoscopes.
Sir George Airy, the great astron
omcr royal, once stated that it was
by no means an uncommon occurrence
for them to receive letters at Oreen
wicli observatory from people asking
what the fees would be for horoscopes
which would show them what the fu
ture had in store. When they were
Informed that casting horoscopes was
no part of an astronomer royal’s
-•ii ties they seemed to lose all respect
for the office. When he informed
them, besides, that horoscopes wen
nonsense they wondered how suck a
simpleton had managed tp obtain such
a position.
Getting the Story Right.
A resident Irish landlord with an
estate of 30,000 or 40,000 acres, many
quaint stories are told of Lord An
j trim’s devotion to his home affairs.
Someone in great trepidation once
told him that somebody else had seen
the earl driving three cows along the
road, and he asked for Lord Antrim’s
authority to contradict a story so de
rogatory to hie dignity... "The mao
was under a mleappreheaffon," rn
plied Lord Aj trim; "It was not three
cows, but tw* • cows and a bull.’’
■ — —•
BRAND DIRECTORY
of the NORTH PARK
If any of the brands or addresses in this directory
are incorrect, or are changed at any time, you w ill
confer a favor by notifying the New Era at once.
In this way the directory may be kept accurate, and
will prove of value at all times.
3S
C. F. WEBB.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range
North Park.
“ sr
W. E. ZIPFE: .
I*. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range
North Park.
JOHN C. HOWARD.
P. O. address. Raijd, Colo. Range,
North Park.
m
T. JOHN PAYNE.
P. O. address, Pinkhampton, Colo.
Range, North Park.
CHARLES B. BERGQUIST.
P. O. address, Hlgho, Colo. Range.
North Park.
39
JOS. W. SLACK.
P. O. address, Rand, Colo. Range.
Nortn Park.
m
WM. NORRELL.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North and Middle Parka.
9000
HANSON & RICH.
P. O. address, Spicer, Colo. Range,
North and Middle Parks.
ED. GOULD.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Rang**
North Park.
ANDREW AND GRACE PETERSON
P. O. address, Hebron, Colo. Range,
North Park.
i^SSI
EVERHARD ft ISH.
P. O. address, Rand, Colo. Range,
North and Middle Parks.
SB
. WILL L. LATHAM.
P. O. address, Rutler, Colo. Range,
■■'orth Park.
in i
91
JACOB JOHNSON,
p. O address Walden, Colo. Range,
9H
JNO. C. I >TI.
P. O. address, Walden. Colo Range,
North Park. __
m ~
OWEN 8. CASE
p. o. address Walden. Colo. .Range;
North and Middle Parks.
nm
CASPER POX.
P. O. address, Pinkhampton, Colo
Range, Park. ,
CASPER FOX.
P. O. address, Cowdrey, Colo
Range, North Park.
39
C. F. STAPLES.
P. O. address, Hebron, Colo. Range.
North Park.
nSST
9339
LARS LARSON & BRO.
P, O. address Walden, Cole. Range
North and Middle Parks.
gjjn
JAS. MACFARLANE & SONS.
P. O. address, Hebron, Colo. Range,
North and Middle Park.
39
WM. McCONNAUGHEY.
P. O. address, Hebron. Colo. Range.
North and Middle Parks.
MARY A. KING.
P. O. address, Pinkhampton, Colo
Range, North Park.
MO3MAN "ft SON.
P O. address. Walden, Colo.
North Park
~39
Win. BROWNLEE. Walden, LV.o.
K i
KORDYCEBROWNI.EE. Walden, Colo
99
MAUD C. BROWNLEE.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range.
North Park.
M" — I (
AUGUST ANDERSON.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North Park.
mg'
ANNIE C. MATTHEWS.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North Park.
"S'
DAWSON & GREEN.
P. O. address, Hebron, Colo. Range,
North and Middle Parks.
~wT
JOHN MITCHELL.
P. O. address, Butler, Colo. Range,
North Park.
WO
WM. HEINEMAN.
P. O. address, Hebron, Colo. Range,
North Park.
mmm
39
WM. KERR.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North Park.
FLOYD B. RICH.
P. O. address, Spicer, Colo. Range
North Park.
GEO. H. MANVILLE.
P. Q. address, Hebron, Colo. Range.
North Park.
mu
J. 11. OLDENBURG.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North Park.
t jgg
D. W. McDOLE.
P. O. address, Butler, Colo. Range,
North Park.
HARRY L. BAUGH.
P. Oi address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North Park.
~wo~
WILLIS F. WEBB.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North Park.
CHAS. L. P. WINBCOM.
P. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range,
North Park.
WM. BENNETT
P. O. address, Butler, Colo. Raaab
North Park. w '
Wm
JAS. MARR.
P. O. address, Hebron, Colo
North and Middle Parks. 1 ’
39
MARY E. McFARLANE.
P. O. address, Walden. Colo. Range
North Park.
Wm
SAMUEL H. HAWORTH,
p. O. address, Hlgho, Colo. Range.
North Park.
-gg|
CHAS. BROWN.
p. o. address, Zlrkle, Colo. Rang'
North Park.
&SBRO
M 3
WM. R. MONAHAN,
p. O. address, Hlgho, Colo. Range
North Park.
331
henry c. riddle.
p. O. address, Walden, Colo. Range.
North Park.
NORMAN R. MCDONALD.
P. O. address, Walden. Colo. Range,
North Park.
~yjjj
PARK AND MONTHS A. BLEVIN.
P. O. address. Walden, Colo. Range,
North and Mid,:!.- Pairs.
~39
SOPIE ERICKSON.
P. o. address. Hlgho, Colo. Range,
North Park.
' MRS. I.AUGHOFF.
p. O. address, Walden, Colo. Rang#,
North Park.
m§ ~
Aj-eJsiX K. MARK.
P. O. address, Butler, Colo. Ranga
North and Middle Parks.
33
JAS. BONIS.
P. O. address, Spicer, Colo. Range,
North Park.
“am
-1
WM. ERICKSON.
P O. address, Spicer, Colo. Range
Morth Park.
3H
JNO. M. COCHRANE.
P. O. address, Spicer, Colo. Range
! s'orth Park.
ipa
AUGUSTUS E. nWINET.T.
Address (Lwdrf v, Colo kango North
: Park.
JNO. KIMMONS.
P. O. address. \V ti I n, Colo. Rango.
Norm Park.

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