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Metropolitan news. (Chicago, Ill.) 1935-19??, May 31, 1935, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91055359/1935-05-31/ed-1/seq-8/

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Foster Career With Leland
Giants Interesting
Guenther Ball Tark, Oct. 24,
1®09—After a day of intermission
the Leland Giants and the Cubs
were able to conclude their third
gainc of this series. It had been
hoped that the two most talked
of pitchers in the series would op
pose each other, but the fans were
dkmppointetd when, at game time,
Ruelbach, instead of Brown, op
posed Foster.
The game opened with Zimmer
man, Shecknrd, and Sshuite strik
ing out on ten pitched balls in the
Cubs’ half of the first, while the
Giants started with Wallace, who
popped out to Sheckard. Harris
grounded out Tinker to Howard,
and Hill swung at a wide one for
a^ third strike. The second inning
Foster’s leg began to trouble him
i his leg had been broken in a
game with the Cuban Stars in Ju
ly. and for some time it was doubt
ful if he would be able to take
part in the series in any capacity)
and as a consequence Howard got
a base on balls. Stienfeldt, on a
hit and run, drove the ball past
Wallace to third a mile a minute,
letting Howard reach third.
Hoffman then laid down a bunt,
advancing Steinfeldt to second,
where Tinker scored him and
Howard, on a line double to deep
right center. Archer singled down
the right foul line scoring Tinker
with the third and final run of the
inning when Ruelbach hit into a
fast double play, Wright to Har
ris to Marshall. The Giants got
back one of these runs in their
half of the second when Payne,
ieigi-on man, Deat out a Dunt and
was sacrificed to second by Booker
bringing up Ball, who singled
sharply over second , scoring
Payne. Foster grounded out
Stienfeldt to Howard, and Wal
lace died out to Hoffman in center,
There was no scoring in the
third and fourth on either side,
but in the fifth the Cubs added
two more run-, on doubles by Tin
ker and Archer. An out by Runl
bach and a single third by Zim
merman. Sheckard ended the in
ning on a fly to Wright in short
left. In the seventh the Giants
threatened to tie the score by mak
ing three runs after one out, ant|
then closing the inning with the
liases full, when Wright hit into a
fast double play. The scores were
made in thia manner Moore, who
replaced Marshall at first, singled
down the right field foul line on
the second ball pitched.
Wright, by fast running, beet
out the bunt for a hit, advancing
Moore to secondj and gaining first
himself. Booker scored W right
and Moore on a long single ofT .he
rieht fence, going to second,
mipthe attemptettTfBL^’at ttre ’JrtlltP
on Moore. Ball skied out to Zim
merman. Foster hit the first ball
on a single to right, scoring Book
er. Wallace walked so did Pavne,
aiid with the bases still loaded,
Weight hit into the double play
already described.
The Cubs decided in their half
of the eighth to make things safe,
so Tinker on the first ball pitched,
hit over the fence on Leland ave„
for the sixth and final Cub run
of the game. The la.-t of the ninth
(Jound the Giants with their backs
to the wall and the strategy of
Rube coming to an end. In this in
ning the Giants opened with
Strothers batting for Booker and
getting a lift on an error by How
ard. Rube ordered Moore to sac
rifice, which he did. putting Stro
ther on second, Wallace then beat
out an in^eld bunt for a hit, plac
ing Strothers on third and himself
on third. Foster tried crossing up
the Cubs, pulling a squeeze play,
oq which Strothers scored and
Harris was thrown out at first
on the closest play of the series.
(So close that it almosc caused a
riot).
Hill, next up, hit one a mile n
minute towards the center field
THE STORY
RUBE FOSTER
THE GREATEST CHARACTER IN BASEBALL
Told Here For The First Time
By MRS. SARAH FOST ER
As Told To
j C. C. FRENCH
L v.
fence, but Hoffman, one of th >
greatest outfielders in the game,
raced back, and while at top speed
leaped up and speared this drive,
completing a somersault, but hold
ing the ball to end the game and
defeat the Giants in the most hec
tic series of Rube Foster’s career, j
Lineup and Score
Cubs: 2 base., ShccWi d, 1. f.; I
Schulte, r. f; Howard l^b; Stein-j
MUfea -*
feldt, 3 b; Hofman, c. f; Tinker
s. s; Archer, c; Ituelbach, p.
Giants: Wallace, 3 base; Harris
2 base; Hill, c. f; Wright, s. s;
Payne, r. f.; Marshall 1. f; Moore,
1 b; Ball, c. f; Foster, p; Booker,
c; Strothers.
Cubs . 030 020 010 6
Giants .010 030 001 5
Batteries: Euelbach, Archer;
Foster, Booker. „
Harlem P) ayers Quit;
Former lafayett Players
New York, May 29—(ANP) —
No one seems to know just why
the Harlem Players closed Sunday
night after having received the
most auspicious send-off any group
of colored actors ever got for dra
matic work. But the fact remains
Uhat the- home was darkened Sun
day night after the last perform
ance and the doom of the new
diama in Harlem apparently
scaled.
Conflicting reports concerning
Uip closing are current, some al
leging that the failure of the
management to click with the'
casting office and the dissensions
which arose as a result caused fac
tions in the groups of players se
lected. The idea was to create a
reservoir of players from which
tim to time could be drawn the
ph s best suited for parts, but
here 'n Harlem, this idea didn’t
work mt so well.
Wh .tever happened, the Harlem
playe s developed several players
wh-- were just waiting for an op
pot nity like this to demonstrate
theii I'ility. Put the question nat
urally follows—where are they
going t 'emonstratc, if the Har
lem pla^ folded up?
At the same time, another croup
of players under the leadership of
Jack Carter was said to be aspir
ing for a break in Harlem and
wanted to get the Loew’s 7th Av
enue theatre, now standing vacant
at 124th street and 7th avenue.
Another group, more ambitious
under the aegis of Rose McClen
don and her cohorts, is staging the
show, ‘‘Waiting for Lefty,” at the
Rockland Palace Saturday night.
And so the eternal conflict goes
on and as a final gesture, still
another group is trying to put
“Stevedore” into the Lafaytte, fol
lowing the demise of the Harlem
Players.
Wins $15,000
Damages for
Loss of Arm
St. Louis. Mo., May 27—(AN
P)—John Edwards, 3i05 Laclede
avenue, whose left arm was am
putated when he was run over hj
:i freight train, received a $15,
000 verdict against the Terminal
Railroad association by a jury in
Circuit Judge Lnndwehr’s court
last Friday. I
Attorney or the railroad of
fered three m, esses “supposed”
friends of Edwuds, who stated
they had consp. with him to
fake a personal injury case
against the railr. . d and that he
was more seriously injured than
had been planned, hionits Sluy -
ton, 2005 Walnut stnet, said Eci
wards had been pushed against
a moving freight train by anoth
er member of the race, Dennis
Clark, now said to be dead. Oth
ers supporting this story and who
said they were present were An
nie Reeben, 2211 Carr street, and
Steve Turner, 2206 Chestnut St.
Edwards denied the statements
of the defense witnesses and as
serted he had never seen them be
fore they came into the courtroom.
He testified that he was crossing
the yards at Twenty-second street
on October 31, 1930, when a pas
senger train suddenly threw him
under a moving freight train on
the next track
His attorneys contended that
the engineer of the passenger train
should have stopped when he saw
that Edwards was cut off from
escape and in imminent peril. Ed
wards’ assertion that he was
olone at the time he was injured,
was supported by railroad em
ployes who said they saw no one
on the tracks immediately after
the accident.
Announce Rules For
Bridge Tournament
Play four deals at each table.
North always starts the deal.
First deal no one vulnerable.
Second deal, east-west vulnera
ble.
Third dial, north-south vulner
able.
Fourth deal, all vulnerable.
Trick Values
No trump: First trick 40; each
subsequent trick 30.
Spades or hearts: 30.
Diamonds or clubs: 20.
Extra tricks: Same as bid tricks,
except when doubled. Dou
bled, per trick, not Vul., 100;
Vul., 200.
Redoubled, per trick, net
Vul., 200; Vul., 400.
Part score: 60 points bonus for
less than game bid and made.
Game score: Not vulnerable, 300;
vulnerable, 500. (Game must
be made in one deal.)
Honors: Four in one hand, 100.
Five in one hand, 150.
Four aces in one hand, 150.
Slams: Small slam, bid and made,
not Vul., 500; Vul., 750.
Grand slam, bid and made,
not Vul., 1,000; Vul., 1,600.
Undertrick penalties:
Net Vulnerable Vunerable
Set Undoub. Doub. Undoub. Doub.
1 .... 50. 100.100. 200
2 .... 100 . 300.200 500
3 .... 150. 500.300 800
t .... 200 . 700.400.1100
5 .... 250 . 900.500 1400
G .... 200.1100.600 . 1700
Redoubled doubles the doubled
penaltis.
Revoke penalties: The value o(
two tricks for the first re
voke.
The value of one trick for
each subsequent revoke.
Provided, that the revoke penal
ty shall not affect any tricks
taken before the first revoke.
occurred.
Penalty tricks to be score as
though won in play.
Scoring will be net. Total your
score and your opponents’
score and tno difierence it
your net score.
The last registration for the
city-wide bridge tournament bein^
conducted by the Metropolitan
News is Tuesday, June 4, at 6 p.
m. Register now.
CLOTHING - FURNITURE
PIANOS
—VISIT THE—
Catholic
SALVAGE
ing or householfl ne
cessities. ^
NEW STOCI
Received Dailj
Catholit
Salvage!
Bureaux
3514 So. Michigan i
4049 So. State St. !
■ ■■ — -«I
M&A Furniture Co.
609 E. 47th St.
DREXel 8297
4- Rooms New Furniture Comp.
11 -Piece Bedroom Suite ... .
7-Piece Dining Room suit ;;j
2-Piece Living Room Suite
5- Piece Breakfast Set
2-RUGS.
COMPLETE $1J/V00
FOR ONLY ItAJ
E. Z. Terms To Suit E’ ery
Pocket
Your Old Furniture Taken as
Down Payment
The Sign of Good Shoe Rebuilding
<!>-ft
STOP—READ—LEARN
WHAT A LITTLE CASH CAN
DO TODAY—tomorrow may be
too late. We are selling Hous
es—flats for much less than the
original first mortgages, fore
closed by Loop Banks. If you
are interested in buying pro
perty give me a ring. I’ll giad
iy ceil and explain some of my
bargains. 1 can also make a few
first mortgages on High Grade
property South of 47th street.
For full information call my
office From 9 to 10:30 a. m.
4 to fi p. m.
EDWARD A. BOWEN
REAL ESTATE BROKERS
4731 S. Parkway
Atlantic 4504
-<*>'1
00 YOU PLAY
BRIDGE?
, THEN ENTER THE i
|
1 Metropolitan News
J City-Wide Bridge
TOURNAMENT
|IIMA C C AMJ afternoon
I June 5, o, and 7th E;:,NC9
f
L At Beautiful
^ ROSELAND
4711 SO. PARKWAY
SM0 Cash Prizes $|Q0
FOR FINAL WINNERS
1
\ SECTIONAL 4 A SECTIONAL
| DAILY PRIZES | L DAILY PRIZES
i REGISTER NOW
At ,
ETROPOLITAN NEWS or W.B. JACOBS
S. MICHIGAN AVE. 133 E 47th ST
I 2nd FL. — ROOM “E” DREXEL 5152
\ Read Our Bridge Column
Rules Of Play Which Will Be Condu cted „
I By
Our Bridge Editor Andrew L. Hill
REGISTRATION FEE $1.00
J REGISTER FEE MUST BE PAID BEFORE 5 P. M., JUNE 4TH
—AUSPICES—
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3506-8 So. Michigan Ave. Calumet 7197

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