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Morris tribune. [volume] (Morris, Minn.) 1880-2000, December 29, 1883, Image 4

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ATKRTIN&A PANIC.
JSfow a Homau C&tholf 3 Priest Kept
Congregation Seated
Hkll« a Fire Raged at the Attar»
The Flood at Onclnuati—
SkUr.'af Wrecks—Other
flsppeinass.
NEW YCSK, DOC. ?*. —A
pafcie was:
at Si. Pauls Catholic church, Harlem, on
Christmas day, by tuo coolnoss ef the pastor,
Father John MeQuirk, aad his assistant,
Father Patrick MeCabe. Two thousand per
sons were itnes^in,^ the eelobvut ion of sol
emn high 111a at 4:IJ a. in.,
when tho cracklhu* of fire was
heard.
IP
an instant the right
side of the alt.tr was ablaze. A murmur ran
through tho church and the congregation
itJse and prepared to flee. "Sit down, my
friends," calmly called cuit Father MeQuirk
"There is uo danger here." Obedient to the
dii-ection of their trusted priest they resumed
their seats and watched the flames shoot up.
They caiaa from a largo lasket of
wax flowers which had ignited from a candle.
The huge altar painting, the -Last Supper,"
was surrounded by live. Father MeCabe
climbed upon the altar and pieked his way
among a row of lighted candles seizing the
flaming basket he through it to the floor of
the church, when it was borne out of doors
by willing hands. A sigh of relief went
up from the spectators as the burning mass
disappeared. Father MeCabo descended
from the altar and resumed his duties re
gardless of the fact that liis hands and arms
were badly burned, and that a portion of his
vestment had i'e.'U destroyed his brave
exploits.
The 4Hio XUver Flood.
CINCINNATI,
Dec.
£7.—The
Ohio is still
booming and rising at the rate of four inche3
an horn-, with forSy^flve feet three inches in
the channel. Navigation is much delayed,
and boats are overdue on account of drift
wood. Business men in the bottoms are rap
idly removing their goods to places of
safety. The water crept up over Rivor
street during the night, and now covers
the ground floors of Rat and Sausage lows to
the do th of six inches. The inhabitants are
iiicvh rapidly to places of safety. In the
cast end, V.'a'ter street is flooded for niany
tquures. The cellars of many large business
houses on Front stroet are tilled with water.
Should the rise in the -Ohio continue
at the present rate for twelve hours the loss
will be great. At Newport the Licking is
stiil rising, though the danger is believed
to be over. No further damage to property
has occurred since the last repo in Coving
ton or Nevojort. On Rolling Fork, Hardin
comity, a %.w-mUl was washed away, and
Nick Peters and William Shanahon drowned
while endeavoring to save it. The mill and
building was valued at 6'.3,000.
The Fire Itueord.
HARTFORD,
Conn., Dec. 21.—A special to
The Herald states that tho factory of Reed
& Co., mansiiaeiurers of builiers' hardware,
at Higganum, Conn., was entirely destroyed
by with the contents. The firm em
ployed between taiity and forty hands. The
fire is supposed to have originated nestr the
furnace. The loss is not far from §50,000.
Insurance not known.
ATHOL,
Mass., Dec. 27.—C. M. Iit-e's shoe
shop was burned, causing a loss of §75,000.
Insurance, S4U,000. About throe hundred
hands are thrown out of employment.
Railway Wrecks.
NEW YOKE,
Dec.
27.
T-rmgr Branch freight train was thrown down
a high bank at Long Branch junction and
totally wrecked. Fredjrick Fiuneo, the En
gineer, was killed.
LOP.AINE,
Ohio, Dec. £7.—A collision oc­
curred on the N.ckei Plate about three miles
west of here between two freight engines.
Both trains were demolished and thirty
cars telescoped. Several carloads of stock
were killed. Damage §30,000.
Three Children Last
DES MOINES,
Dec. 27.—Tho three little
daughters of Mi*. Joan Kilgcre, living in the
north part of Harrison county, have inys
teriously disappeared. Men have been scour
ing the woods in every direction for them,
and fears are entertained that they have been
drowned. The last seen of them they were
strolling along the banks of River Sioux.
ClTenTp as Lost.
NEW YTIBK.
TROT,
Dec. 27.—The German bark
Middlesex which sailed from tliis port for
Bremen on August 25, and has not been
heard from since, ha been given up as lost.
She was commanded by Ca.pt. Kalinena and
had a cargo of reSued petroleum.
She was
1,191
tons measurement and was
owned in Bremen.
Two
JICB Irowne4.
CINCINNATI,
Dec, 27.—A Times-Star spec­
ial from Marietta, O., says: Ed. Mil Jen and
Frank Lor.-, oil men of Bradford, Pa., were
drowned in Du-di creek yesterday while try
ing to reach Marietta in a skiff. Their bod&e
have not been recovered.
The Coal Uti* Item.
TRENTON,
N. J., Dec.
27.—John H.
MRS.
Diehl,
formerly collector of customs in Philadelphia,
was found dea 1 in his b?d at Delanco. Coal
gas is believed to have cauised his death.
Died IVhile Holding an Inquest.
TOEONTO,
JJee. 27.—Dr. Beatty.tbe eoroncr
at Lambei ton, while holding an inquest on
the body of Mi s. GibI s, who was murdered
on Saturday, died su tdemy.
alone.
Frozen to leath at Home. plied Jones, as he discharged a tol at the
MANSFIELD.
Mass., Dec. 27.—Richard necro. The ball entered the eye anf pene
O'Hearn, 70 years old, was frozen to death in 1 trated the brain, causing death. Jo ues was
his home. He was a bachelor and lived jailed.
Die4 fa Cbinh.
N. Y., Dec. 27.—Mrs. Martha
Stevens died in a church pew at Moriah,
while the congregation were singing.
Trains De'ayed by Storm.
KIW YOKK,
Dec. »27?—All mails arrived
here from to 0 hours late, the morning
trains being delayed by the storm
The December ilurrieaae.
CHICAGO,
Dec. 27.—F oin 1 to 7, o'clock a.
m. the regular December hurricanc prevailed
on Lake Michigan, ana it is feared proved
disastrous to some of tli9 steam barge and
propeller fleet which are stiil in
commission. A captnin who camo in
during the night says large floes of ico aco
moving from the head of the lake, going
north, making navigation in view of hurri
canes extremely dangerous. Several passen
ger propellers running from Milwaukee to
oast shore ports are out.
Married In the Theat|fe
-^AOTSON, Ohio Dec. 27.—George A. Ofeer,
comedian, of Baltimore, and Mrs. Ada C.
Murray, of Chicago,-were married at Jones'
opera house in the presence of a large audi
ence. The stage was tastefully decorated
and t.'ue happy couple were the recipients of
many valuable presents At the conclusion
of the ceremonies Mr. and Mrs. Ober played
their part* in tie ^Unequal Match.*'
P. J. ELMQriST.
Watchmaker and Jewel£#»
a O E I S I N N
fe
*jp-
4v"
c?
O'DONNELL.
Her Pr«ltle*s Voyage to TeMtlfJr 'Hr
Her Late Hnnband'n Trial.
PHILADELPHIA,
Dec.
-7.—
Mrs. Patrick
O'Donnell, widow of the executed murderer
of Carey, the informer, has returned to this
city from England. She was seen at the resi
dence of her brother-in-law, John Maginley,
I'll Spring Garden street. She was very
tired, and for a long-time refuse 1 to talk
about her trip. Finally, however, she said:
'•I have just returned from London, whero I
arrived too late to testify upon the trial of
Mr. O'PonuelL"
"Wl af was the cause of that?" was asked.
"Others can tell you that -tt than
For three weeks I waite 1 for a su :un n
the trial, which I hourly expected to aoh
me. At the end of that time I started with
my brother-in-law, hopiug to reach England
iu tin1' to give my testimonev. We thought
that the trial would last much longer than it
did. and wen* shocked to lear ul%n reaching
Liverpool December 5th, that it was all-over.
We went to London and remained there as
long as there was the slightest hope of re
spite through the medation of the United
States government. When tho last chauoe
was abandoned we left."
"Did you oversee your husbands"
"No. He was under the influence of others
absolutely. I went \o help him If possible,
burving 111 the past, but I had no desire to
encounter the woman for whom he deserted
me."
vVhy was your testimony neglected or sup
pressed by the defense?"
"That I do not know. I believe I was de
ceived, however but why they did not send
for me earlier I can not tell. 1 lvgret that
they ever led ino to believe that they wanted
me. It cost ir.e a great deal of sorrow. I did
not wait till the end I couldn't lear it."
"What was tho nature of the testimony you
would have given
"It is of 110 use to tell that now. It would
not bring O'Doanell from his crrave."
THE QUESTION OF WAGES.
HANNON,
In the Coal
CouucU.
Troublous Times Ahead
KesiouH--Soeialltits In
Moss
Pa., Dec.
27.—There
are
lively prospects of extensive trouble in the
bituminous coal districts in Westmoreland,
Blair, Huntingdon, Be ford, Center and
Clearfield counties. The producers are ex
tremely reticent as to plans, but it is pretty
I g-.-nerally known that a reduction iu wages in
all departments of labor will be exacted
1 after December SI. The miners are said to
be well organized, and it is estimated that
i from 15,000 to 20,000 men have expressed
a willingness to co-operate and assist a general
strike which is laid down for the 1st of
I January.
San Francisco and Cincinnati were repre
sentod by proxies. The regular committees
CHICAGO,
—The Elizabeth &
Stevens, and heirs that on Juno 15, 1870,
that policy was surrendered and Sam
uel B. Stevens took out a now
policy for the same sum, and at
the same rate of premium, payable in
caw* of his death to his heirs, executors and
assigns that in June, 1856. Mary F. Stevens,
mentioned in the said policy, died, and at
seme subsequent date prior to October,
1509, Samuel Stevens married Eiiza M.
•Stevens. Mary F. Stevens left an only
child, a daughter, Mary Taylor, one of the
defendants to the bill, which was entered for
the purpose of determining which of these par
ties entitled to receive payment of the
amount of the policy, which 1 as been paid
into court. Tho juJge decided that the
amount of the policy be paid to Eliza M.
Stevens as executrix of Samuel B. Steven*
Dynamiters in Kentacky,
j„ .-'FEAXKFORT. K7.. Dec. 27.—An unknown
pcTfcm filled a beer keg half full of powder
and placed it near the entrance of tho court
of appeals room, put a fuso in it and fh-ed it.
TL- powder exploded with terrific force,
i breaking all the wiutlows iu the east side of
th^ ohi capital building, and also in the west
side the new wing. The governor offers a
itjw/.yd of 8500 for each party implicated in
tiw'sod.
fstatn^ to ilarrict Jlartiuean.
lirjo^'ON, Dec. 27.—The statue of Harriet
Martineau by Miss Whitney was unveiled in
the old south meeting house. There was an
add)ess by Mrs. Mary A. Livcrmore, and
.speeches by Wendell Phillips and William
Lloyd Garrison, Jr. The statue will be kept
in the meeting house
tion.
from Denison says a difficulty octenrred in
FoxV: saloon, in which Alexander McPherson
was dangerously cut in the left groin, and
Thames McCarthy stabbed in the left side.
McPherson will probably die. The cutting
seems to have been done by two brothers.
»'ho*» names are as yet unknown.
T^i/ .Vuruers.
NA«HVILLB,
Tenn., Dec.
TWO ROMANCES.
Out of Which Ended in
Sad Suioidew
NKW YORK,
1
Tho- nipturej between the Rochester &
Pittsburgh cempany and their malcontent
miners is not entirely adjusted, not with
standing reports to the contrary, andanun
defined feeliug of insecurity prevails in the
mining districts.
BAi.mioRETDec. 27.—The biennial session
I of the Socialist Labor congress has opened.
Tho meeting was called to order by Hugo 1
1 Vogt, secretary of the national executive
committee. A committee on credentials
was appointetL Twenty sections
or branch associations were represented.
LIPA,
for a time on exh/bi-
Gave Him a »ift.
NASHVILLE,
Teen., Dec. 27.—Pitts Webb,
colored, entered George Moore's saloon and
asked Jones, the barkeeper, for a Christinas
gift. "I'll give you a Christmas gift," re-
Stabbing AtTray.
GALVKSTON,
27.—,M FWUJY
City Samuel Jones, a leading railroad con
tractor, was shot and billed by William
Travis, a track boss. Jones was defending
If all, one of Travis employes, from the
latters violence, and met the death of a peace
maker. Another employe fatally stabbed
Hall in the abdomen.
A Desperate Convict
MALOXE,
N. Y., Dec. 27.—William Hatt-
field, an escaped convict from Michigan, was
arrested here by Sheriff StackwelL Hatfield
is tabbed tho sheriff, and also Allan Stack well
Hid wife. Hatfield was finally captured, af
[xv beiug shot through tho thigh. The sheriff
aad 80n are not dangerously hurt
Railway livldenL
Ntrw
YOIIK,
=30
.SLSS
Ainli assortment constantly stock RepairfUff nenjfcgr
DONE. JSIWP CPIJASUTI(L«{»CF CICVI^W. *-V-.
Dec. 27.—The Lake Shore
railroad declared the usual quarterly divi
lend of 2 per cent. The Michigan Central
ml f-yearly dividend is 3 per cent. The
.iiada Southern half-year^f dividend It
jercent.
',
V
•TV
itf
'"'1 'iin
a Very
Aat the Other la Oraace Flew*
er»—*8n eide of a Yeaa*
€!erman...4ot His.Girl
at Last,
Dec. ~7^-In the early dawn
of an August morning in 1889 two youn^
I men cross -d swrrds in mortal combat in a
seeh.de 1 spot not fur from Heiderhoff castle
on the Rhino. They had been rival suitoi-s
I for the hand of Fraulein Maria Marx, the
daughter of a wealthy gentleman who lived
in the caslle. The meeting was the outcomo
of a quarrel that had occurred between tho
young men when it leeame known that the
young lady had accepted one anil rejected tho
other. Tho duel progressed until, after a
feiut, one of tho young men fell to the ground
a corpse, tho sword of his antagonist having
passed almost through his body, llichard
Von Steiuberger, soil of the late Baron V011
Steinberger, of Bonn, and the be
troth of Fraulein Marx, was the
survivor of the fatal encounter. For
fcoino weeks after the deed his name was
kept from the authorities, but it eventually
Iccauie known. Von Steinberger's friends
ha 1 counseled liim to leave the country, and
while search was bnng made for him the sua
cossl'ul duel u eva ied his iirsu?rs and took
passage for this ci' v in disguise. Ho con
stantly corresponded with h:s betrothed, and
in a letter which ho received from her in
S »pfember last she stated that her famiiy
poi-sisted in attempts to induce her to
marry a wealthy land owner who
lived near the castle. She also said that
she was still i'sithfal to her vow and im
plored him to return to Germany and fulfill
hfs pledge. In answer to the letter Von
Steiuberger said that circumstances were
such tuat it was impossible for him to go
back homo for at least six years, and he
begged her to patiently await his return. A
little over a mouth ago he received another
letter in which she said her fanrdy would
never consent to the marriage :ui 1 she could
not vithstan i their repeated threats against
her. Thereupon young Steinbergor wrote a
letter releasing her fi om her promise.
He then eo*undtted suicide by taking mor
phine.
He IT as Bound ta Have Her.
BALTIMORE,
Doc. 27.—A romantic marriag*
occurred at the fashionable boarding-schooJ
of Mrs. Christian, iu this city. The contract
ing parties were Miss Gertie Dolan, daughter
of Mrs. Mary Dolan. a wealthy la:ly residing
in O.naha, Neb., and J. D. Reynold*, of Jef
feisou county, Pa. The groom met the bride
at the home of the latter in Omaha
a year ago. Mrs. Dolan objected
to Reynolds' visits, owing to the youthful
nessof Miss Gertie, sho being only 10. As
time wore1 on, Reynolds was forbidden the
house. The two met clandestinely at rare in
tervals. Mrs. Dolan heard of such meetings,
aud resolved to put an effectual stop to
them. She made arrangements to send
her daugh er to this city to school.
Gertie's objections were of no avail,
and she arrived at Mrs. Christian's
a few weeks ago. Special instructions were
given not to aiiow Gertie to leave the house
alone, or receive visits from a young man. In
fact, a general system of espionage was ar
ranged. Gertie managed to communicate
with Reynolds, an he came to Baltimore
last week and succeeded in arranging an in
terview with Gertie. A meeting was
decided upon at a leading hotel on
Friday last. Giertio was on time, but
Renyolds was delayed. Prior to his arrival
Mrs. Christian appeared at the hotel and con
ducteJ Ge: tie back to school. When Rey
nolds learned of this ho boldly visited the
school anl had an interview. Telegrams
between Mrs. Dolan, Mrs. Christian, Rey
nolds and Gertie followed, and at last Ger
tie's mother telegraphed her consent for the
marriage, and as a result the ceremony took
place. Thus a courtship which began in
Omaha en iod happily in Baltimore.
1
were appointed, after which the report of the
executive committee was presented and
adopted.
A Complicated Life lasaranee Case.
Dec. 27.—Judge Blodgett deliv-
c-red an opinion iu the case of the Union
Mutual Life association, of Maine, vs. Eliza
M. Stevens et al. The bill in this case stated
that Samuel B. Stevens in lS5o effected
an insurance on his life with the Uiiion
Mutual Life association of Maine in the sum
i of £l,2u0 for the benefit of his wife, Mary F.
The I'Kim a Bond Assanlt Case.
ST.
Lons, Dec. 27.—The Post Dispatch
special from Hiilsboro, 111., says: In the
Emma Bond case Minnie Pe'ti%
agister of Lee
Pettis, one of tho defendant?, was put on
the witness stand. Sho testified that her
brother Lee owned but one pair of red
striped stockings. The prosecution than sub
jected her to a long crcgi examination, evi
dently for tho purpose of oblaining some
thing contradictory to tfcc testimony of the
other members-of the family.
|Kiut in Kussia.
Dec. 27.—The workmen atld officials
of the railway works at this place engaged in
a riot, owing to the exactions of the con
tractors. One official w^s killed and several
workmen were injured. The ringleader of
tho rioters was arrested.
JSociallxtic Iti^ensioa
Dec. 27.—IHs»nsion has arisen
among the S ciaiis, leaders iu St. Petersburg
regarding the prevented of the appearance
in November of numbers of the students'
paper and the Nihiiist paper.
WeH Supplied with Canes an4 Um
brella*.
WAsniXGTOX
CITV,
k
Dec. 27.—A special dispatch
Dec. 27.«—Tho presi
dent received as Christmas presents, six
gold-headed canes and six silk umbrellas witl
gold and silver handles.
Tlie Cotton-Heed Oil IndMtfj.
[Cor. Cincinnati Enquirer.]
The cotton-seed oil business is a growing
industry. That is illustrated by a statement
made to me by Judge F.. W. Caviness, cf
Clinton, Miss. A traveler with an eye to the
possibilities said the judge asked one of our
planters: "What do you do with the seed
after you have picked the cotton"Throw
them back on the land," said the planter.
"Well, the time will come when cotton wilj
be raised for the seed instead of for the cot.
ton as now."
That tune is approaching. Now, instead
of manuring the laud with the seed, fme rnilfc
\re erected and large capital invested in ex
tracting tho oil. At present 206 pounds of oil
ere obtained from a ton of seed. The residuum
is packed into cakes iv-.ombliug in form large
ckee* or grindstones, shipped to England,
where I am informed the material is put
through arother process, and nearly as much
oil is obtained at the second process as in tho
first instan o. This would argue nearly six
hundred pounds of oil to a ton of seed. The
pulp is ground into meal after the oil is ex
tracted, and is often reshipped to America,
where it is used as feed for cattle and as a
fertilizer.
A friend of mine is strongly of the opinion
that a process can be developed for obtaining
the oil from cotton seed as wliisky is now ob
tained from corn. What a big thing it would
be if a new drink could be manufactured out
of the seed! The country could then declare
its independence of the whisky pool and corn
tings. If the south would take to it as a
Irink as kindly as they do to it as a dressing
for food, no corn juice would go south. The
ii) is almost universally Urol in place of lard
ind butter for cooking purposes. I gotalong
ifter a fashion wit the cooking until i
earned that fact then, oh, myl oboma-!ga
fine would have wen welcome
Call and see me.
n.
Mjf &
CONDENSED NEWS.
Goternor-eleet Hoa lly gayn that hJi
health i* now auuost wholly re»t red.
There w la^k of raiu in Califoi aia,
Mild Uie farmer are mukiog loud complai ii.
The Houston (Texas) Post names
Johu Ilaucock, of Texas, for the ticket or
J684.
Mrs. Roseoranz, wife of Gen. Rose
cranz, died at VV'asuington after a lingering
illness of several months.
Ulysses S. Grant, son of, Willia u
Jesse Grant, a relative of Gen. Grant, was
arrestnd at Dalla*, Texas burglary.
Beeanso of unrequited love, Mies
Martha Williams, 21 years old, shot her^if
dead in a barn iu.Elbi idge township, 111.
Officer Smith was attacked at New
York bv Thomas Fiizpatriei leader of a pang
of ruflians. an the oliee:::an shot him dead.
The oil belt of Wyoming is said to le
twice as large as that of Pennsylvania, and a
railr ad is soon to be constructed through
the vi.-t.ricf.
Mississippi has gained 100 per cent,
in five years iu manufacturing industries,
having at this time $7,000,000 invested in
sue!: enterprises.
A band of desperadoes are terrorizing
the northern section of Gru o i count..
Texas. They recently killed two poisons on
burned a church and school-house.
In 1882 tlfe entire meat consular*!ion
of Eu*.ope, according to lh. Lou*.on lu
gra:'h, amounted to S.l!K),0iJ0 tons, and tli
total production to 7,:-»00,000 tons.
F. C. Breckenridge, a leading witness
for James Nutt, who killed Dukes, at Union
town, Pa., is in receipt of threatening latters.
one remarking that "Dukes is dead, but his
avengers live
It is currently reported at MeKers
port. Pa., that the 2,000 employes of the Na
tional Tube Works company will accept the
reduction of from 12).j to 25 per cent, an
nounced to take place January 1.
Mrs. Charles Ludwig, who moved in
the best society of Greenville, Pa., has
el op
sd with her husband's brother, deserting
her four children. She took her wardrobe
aud jewelry besides money belonging to Mr.
Ladwig.
Fifty armed men took tlirea persons
of bad reputation from a saloon at MoDade.
Texas, carried them to the outskirts, and
hanged them. Friends of the lynched men
came to MeDade, and picked a quarrel, when
a fight with shot-guns and revolvers ensued,
in which three meu were kdled, and one
badly wounded. Further trouble is antici
pated.
While a party was returning to Ouray,
Col., bringiu the bodies of the men killeu by
the avalanche, last Friday, at the Virginia
mine, another snowslide struck the sleds con
taining the corpses, carrying them 2,000 feet
down the mountain, whence they plunged 500
feet over a precipice, where they must remain
until spring. The party reached Ouray half
dead from exhaustion.
In the streets of Yazoo, Mississippi,
a partv of ne.roes fired uj»on a band le by
John F. Posey, a white business man, killing
Posey and two others, and wounding two
more. Posey had been insulted by a negro
and went off to collect his friends. The
negro did the same thine, and his band unex
pectedly opened fn e as soon as the Posey
party put in an appearance. The negro
leader was killed while resisting arrest, and
the city counsel, aiter an investigation, re
solved that the conflict was entirely personal,
and not the result of race rancor or political
difficulties.
The Work of aiischirf Makers.
LIVERPOOL,
Dec. 27.—The police who have
been investigating the cause of the explosion
of an alleged iufernal machine at Birken
head, state that it was the work of a party of
mischief makers, whose object were to
frighten people in the vicinity, and to Ret up
a dynamite scare.
THE MARKET^
CHICAGO,
Live Stock—Cattle—Market strong ex
ports £G('' 0.50 good to choice, [email protected] com
mon to fair, ¥4(^5.25 packers, $a.3o(l4.40
stockers. .5(^4.50. Hogs—Light grades, $5
5.55
mixed packers, [email protected] heavy shi
pers, i 5.C')(£.(}. 10.
Produce—Butter Fino grades salab
others duil fine creamery, S:j(i$3oc fair
good dairy, 2 )(025c: good to choice fresh 10!:.
!4( l-S.*: packing, OVllOc. Ei?gs—Neglecre 1
and dull fair to best ice-houw?,
pickled, 18(/7:-Oc fresh-laid, 2~ejt2K jJot
toes—liiiiy rose aud peacliblovv, [email protected] £0
good to fine.
St. Loniti.
ST. LOUIS. DE~ 35.
Wheat—Dull and lower N •. 2 red, ?1.01j-4
@31.02-i': cash, $1.02 December' $1.02}^
Januar'v,'$1.04-5£c{*I.U4®i February, $1.)0^
@$1.10^ May, No. S, red, [email protected]'J5c. Corn
Opened higher, declined, and closed
weak 47^(t'4S,^c, cash 48c, Decem
ber Jauuarv 4!J^'(a 50c, Feb
ruary,
a5a'fe55%e.
From
MINNEAPOLIS
AND ST. PAUI.
Running
DINING CARS
And elegant
SMOKING IIOO.M
.Sleeping Cars
TO CHICAGO!
And it also rims
sp|f»m!il day and
nijrht Cn.ieli»s are
through withiiul
change lor :is-cn
fjerx who fin nut
ride in slcepinK:ar
Dec.
28.
Rodiger & Mclntyre's circular of
this evening gives the following state
of the market: Generally weak, with
little doing. "Wheat January, opened
97%c, closed 96
%c\ Febinary. opened
98%c, closed y~%c May, opened $1.05%,
ctosed S1.04)4'. Corn January, opened
62^c, closed til%c February, opened (50}^c,
closod 59c May, opened fi^c, closed Gl^c.
Pork—Febinary, opened £14.70, closed $
14. c50.
May. Oats—Lower
and" slow at oO^.i^SO^ic cash, SlJ^e.
January
ot)2'c.
May. Rye—Slow at 54}^o
bid. Barley—Dull and unchanged. Whisity
—Steady at SI.14. Provisions—Dull and
lower. Pork—Jobbing 14c for old. Bulk
meat lower long clear, £7.1 7.~0, short,
ribs, [email protected] short clear, [email protected]
Bacon dull long clear and short ribs, 8£c
short clear,
8ac.
Lard nominal.
Sew York.
NEW YORK,
Dec.
20.
W e a o w e u a u e a v y N o
,, ,, i:rr.V 1 white, uouiiiial No. 1, red January, $l.l29g
Pebruai
:y. «1.14^1.15 Mare^
May, $1.20^Y'}1.2Jg. Coru
—Without quotable change and dull. Oats—
Shade better aud quiet western at H'.hg44c.
Provisions—Beef, quiet and unchanged pork,
quiet and steadv spot new mess, jglofa 15
lard, dull ioi lower steam rendered, .lo.
Toledo.
TOLEDO,
Wheat—Shade lower aud active No. 1
whito, £1.05 No. 2 do, 97c No. 2 red cash,
#1.01'(/' l.Oo December," $1.01%: January,
$1.03 February, $1.05 March, 1.07 May,
$1.11. Corn—Cash active, futures dull hi,h
mixed, 58c No. ,2 cash,
56a'c
DKTBOIT,
New Feai Goods
Comprising every novelty of the season ill
Clothin:
llemomb^i' we make it HjMH'iaUy oi" Cloi hiiij
UN we dovol«» om* ontirp iitloiilion to tliiK one
of {JOIKIN onlj-,
WE
Store Opposite lower Elevator.
t.
IT IS THK
ONLY ROUTE
J}r
TOUSOEIiLL
|1 tH Hft
'A
Razors gronnd suid sharpened.
Gr0Ceriand
25
peceinber,
oo'nc Januarv, 55c February, 58c May,
61&e: rejected," 50o no gra le.
Oats—Dull and steady No. 2 cash or Decem
ber, Saijc January, 34c asked May, o8^c.
Clover—5c higher and quiet prime cash or
December, $5.65 Junuary, $5.90 February,
$6 bid.
Milwaukee.
MILWAUKEE,
Dec. 26.
Wheat—Weak at 95%c for No. 2 hard
95c for No. 2 Decenber 05^0, January
30%c, February 'J7}-r,c, March $1.04}^,
May Corn—No. 2, tH)c. Oats—Weaker
sellers, 33c for No. 2. Rye—Firm No. 1, 62c
No. 3, 5t%c, Barley—Dull Ha S, OO^a,
extra No. 3, 48c.
|etjreU-
Dec. 2tl.
Wl»eat—Dull cash and December, $1.04
January, $1.04}-g' February, No. 3
red, cash. $1.03% No. 2 white, 9oc. Cora
Quiet No. 2, cash, 54%c. Oats—Qoiet No.
3 white, 26c No, 2,
RWARE, WATGHRBi
AND
VJRWELRY^,
EVERYTHING AT ROCK BOTTOM PRICES, Agent for the Chicago Cottage Organ.
y
Also in
Pail Varnishes,
ni s lei
Dec. 26.
Oood^ K)Id cheap unci ddivcivA fOMV part of
fh- Villope. Ccntrnctstaken for llonw. C'nrriejtH
»nd Sign Painting, Pupcrllnngingand Kalsomiu
ing.
8i*tl) gj Weft of Depot. Morris. Minn.
liAijLjSy w#
art* couiideni can plojiwe
bolla aiM to Nfjie, qualify, lit, mitl price. Try its.
Ohas. Wilson,
Paul, Mia Rallw'y
"The Royal Route."
This route is in all things always the best.
Buy your Tickets over it and be convinced of its superiority. This route lias
also issued a new map of the Northwest, which will be mailed free of charge on
application to
J. Ii Hiianl, T. W. Tcastlale,
General Traffic Manager. General Passenger Agent, St. Paul, Mina.
For further information and through tickets, apply to
I A
Prices are very LOW
west of Minneapolis, isat tlio
LUNCH ROOM
G-. "w. JetclsisorL,
r?& Z 2 0
Ja
t=~* i
T.ANII
CHANGE OF C-^RS
Fi -tn
-ST. PAUL TO
COUNCIL HLTF'S
wlth
SLKEPINO CABi
Thr««ue!i
Without Change
to
ST. JOSEPH
and
KANSAS CITY!
By way of
SIOUX CITY AND
Council Bluffs.
YV. Al. UO.MiNE, Morris, Minn.
PIPES
B. K. COLE.
A
U
OpposiioConlrnl H.f^
H. H-u-totLins, L. H. SCHUMAN.
Line, Hour and Feei, Curat snfl
Plasterias Hair,
IERCHAIT TAILO '.
Provisions.Wflft It LiTilUFiW.
Job Printing in All Styles, at
Tribune Office.
AtlHiitic Ae.,
.T-
Op|x»Nio Lower Elovata^
nl
v
k
Give me a call, aad 1
Will gaaraatee
l: satisfaction.
Shop opposite Bank pi Jforris
22
Morris, Mima.
V,
fMTJCK
AT
W.-JILI
Kriti rs l'Ai.r„s, MINN.,/
JKovcmber "2ti,
Noflcc fs hereby given thai ifie -following
i.-imi'd w-ltler luis tiled nollee ofliis Intention
o make (ioj pr»:« tn .up}« ri of hisclaiin,
iMj lti»! said pro«rwi!i na uirtdo lH-J'«»r»* the
'lerk ol Coiirt l'url»tev.e ncouiiiy, at Morris,
11111( so-a, 011 Jautiao
K
!ack. T!ie buoyantcnc
___ •-v W.IUJ tin 1.- i.»
i
V
OC2
it
i i
ft S s
5T
0
i.
S S E* 5
,K
h, lt-vi,v}2: l.otiS^a
.a«:i(iu.«, -m ,td spi:iC'ali'Mi Xo. iM'Z and
uldiiii.iii.l i:*ic»ici r-pplicHtion Xo.
»r iin l.otn I, and 5an«l si '4 »»f I "V '4 sec
IOU
is, to.vni^O north, of range 41 went oiti P.
.d., Minn.
He names the following witnesses to prove
his continuous residence upon an i cultiva
tion of snid land, viz: Lewi* IIudso\, Kam
uel Heirt!, \j. It. Perkins and ('harles all
of Morris, «tevens county inne-ota.
8O1O B. X. JOHNSON, liesister.
LANI OFFICE AT BENSON, MINK.,/
November 28, 1883.
Notice is hereby n,,,,
"xrthy
llJC
p. M.,
AIU
IIik
yt
MSlmiii':
jf
i.jiiowlni,-
mmed r.etilor liaslil'd nolice o! his inrcnth n
10 make final proof support or hisclalm,
-Mid that wild proof will be made before f! e
o o i n -r v -v o -v s
iilliU .'i-ti-y 1I:. o!, viz:
MtlWi ni-e,
.!•»'
n
h'» ..f 8XV '4 e-i on tj, KU N. of r:ui.e
12
UINM-MIIA.
ll- naiii*K
V:»
tin* folh'H iim pwe
tion of, said land, vli: John Morlarty, Thom-
»il «»f Ai..r, .. .... a|.,u,
1
s.
SHORT
ME. i
inn ii-
ad 1 tic fn-st of a
-tWhe.i hy
»:oeriea,
Gjiaiigo,
Alii
lrisTiiE
ONLY 110UTK
Without
R.-a sier.
TJ. ••o!T. 1^*o-
Whorl Line in conmc
inn wiiu th." «-«r 'i e
li'i le jjrrd :-.i.d
v
ICQIiln .1 '•:••. :,e
a Hu'tirt f.lnt-, (^'ii.-a iiii"
•'•iiillMnI::' iill 1.' %'.•).•••
v itfi«t railway in
1
aiul St. Pau'.
VVi|
i
Itow'is ir«» o.). ril
ii S iriii ru II11
iv:t and kiUsi
'-uni-li.-K .-mil co iti«4Ctii
"-i i !»•-«-.
i!.-« m-iiii i.iu
rertch al! inc /»-.
ri Si west .nj F.
(It-scriptlou of
Kiiii-s nr.-r-- of tH*
»•«(. if iiiimrilly rin-»v.-.-s !h
ior' Line, atjd IJ -si
'iik-Asn, Milwaukee, i
ap
-UMSfO. Mi'.w.Tike
-Vf »I «v" «t:* 1
dale.
PC, Js!
er.K
tJhlC'l^O, IIIW:tI|k«*»». U .'I' .: 1, ,i •...
»-h.
Mi'-.va lk v. *v
omowoc.
Milwnu c. ....
Iu Chien.
«••«*«». Miiwuuk'
a ill.
'iiea^»s lleloit, in -e- :.
unt.
t'hicngo, E'rfii, Bockfo' .r,
•hlcasro, Clinton, Rock l^hmd asi S 1
'I'hls.
Chicaso, Cotin«dl Blutr-aid Omaha.
(Jliica^o. .Si»«ix City.Sionx
K«IN I.J.I V
to 1
Chicago, Milwaukee. Mitc'vcll ai»d ("h im
berhiin.
e 1.- Island, Dubuque, St, Paul and Min
neapolis.
Davenport, Caliaar, St. Pun! Mir:u
apolis.
PULLMAX and the FINEST
DIA1.Xo CAHS i.»i Hie wurl.j are run on the
main lines of the
CHICAGO, MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL
Railway, and every attention is paid o pas
sengersbv courteous fm.loves of the company
S. S. Merrill, A. V. H. Carpenter,
G-n'l Manager. Gr, Air*
J.T. Clark, Ceo. H. Heafford,
Gen'i Supt. Ass't Gen. Pass.Ag'U
For further information and thron^h tickft?,
applr to W. M. ROMINE. Morris, Minn.
LA CKOSSE
BUSINESS COLLEGE,
"Lit Crosse, Wis.
Scholarship $40
All branches of hook-kccping taujrhl com
mon schfol branches and pi *in and orna
mental peniiianslii|. Cheapest place to txiard
in he Northwest. Thorough
cTirse
in book-
Keeping less than any other College.
Oircuirs giving a full infoniiafion'sent bv
addressing J. L. WALLACE,
18. 1 La Crosse, Wis.
iniile
tiie soa
t" -"c thcn«an«ls
,f cases Fi'tni'.'tU t-u
nicilieal pun
u li^s been prow
•z 1: l::rora.'!i reputation
3nnmer°t s c-nnpt-ttjors Iwe mvariablt
Jhe i.ivc. in-iof tliU rea'.cdv to
.11 "LVj"ifOJSoinalv.•i :5 spcci ic infiuenc^
ell v.it.ioat 1. l, ay. X'C nvturiil lr.'.ct'.ons of the
l"«e animating ele
*.vart!.d ere given
r.'M .usci!
inetnau
of Ii:e V.Iiull I..
1
y iU^Cl!
nittserous obsoui-s c'l-c 'teJlun-i sk.JI w
v* yr-:-'.furii-'"rcretioa.
t«o ii»e iiiuiiljcTc, r**i c. v brain v»-ork.
that .hey can be rc**nrA perlect mnn.ioo^, und
u!»ca iort!ied^t.»»^ cf »f e"" vtea.
Ecrtfrsotaanyono. eoidC^n.Yby\h&*
f'J*TrSTS
3T» -i Tt. tTS.Su C7, tCL'je, MO.
fnn»cn^* an-.- .fcervjLit
Orjruilc WeAkai^s. Sy^hi iil* anj
iipr^unai Scieutitlc U**aiu:oiti sale and rar
rwn^.ifs. Di'onnirios Tiffed. Ca i or writ? Vr list
qofrtionstoboauswiMfnl by-h^su dc**irn^trrfcrn?cntbyiiaii
/TPrr-'on i CNFFRRFNTFR'NN ??N ?NO!!IN F-.V*OT*3?H-*R
Vara «Ofnoth!n» to ihf Ir art v iRr« r. I:
Addi*s«
nr.
r. r. ***. r»Irr*W— fkar#
0eoP^'3T"'1
st., £t» 2I«%
Successor u lr. Butts' ?C Xcnr
HARRS3REME5V C0.,al«.s.
1 f" ChrmUts mid S..lc PropH
I PROF, AMIS' PA3T1LU
ficMtDt
"flSM ^unf others who Buffer
•ruu ... \ous and Phys- ai Debil
ity, Premature F.xhaasiioa iDd
I their m^ny gloomy eonsf^quenwt,
x«. *ro *ti i radical!? cured
put np boxes. o. 1 (lasting a month). $3,
effect a cure, unlew in severe cas«»s. *5:
(lasting three months), #7. Sent by mail in plain ZvtZcn
**rh Bo*. Pamphlet de!cri*
Uag tiiia diteaee aad moUo of cure sem sealed oa appiicati«r
Nervous Exhaustion,
Premature Deca f,
Ijoss of Manhood.
An w-pa_e loili-bound Book of Advx*e to
Younc or Middle-aped Men.with prescriptions
fir Self-tre itment by a Rej»ulaj*_Ptiysici::ii.
iff°
DH, WARD 6 CO.
y
6BMT PDtTST oiireceipt of two thno-owit
J&11
stamps. Addicts
T. WILLIAMS A CO., MILWAUKEE, WO.
0a
RELIABLE SEIF-GURE.
!'avor:!f jirt'si-ri i i-i ,f „i.r tlio
most not,.. ...:a ^uc. es^l'.U .•.IH-CUHS-SSII JlicCJS.
(now r(11irt"iM'or tlio cure of \ert'ouf IDi'frilitfft
host Manf}'ra/ nes.t and Jlwti/.Seat
iuplain sealed envcloi)c/V!f.l)rujrtrists cin lilllt.
Address
Louisiana,
MTH
WHCHT'SINDIANVEGETABLEPIUS
I V E
Ikyicjaii Bilious Complaints
mfe to tike, being purely vegetable rid gwA
ing. Price 25 cts. All DnisKlsts.
&
4*

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