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Morris tribune. [volume] (Morris, Minn.) 1880-2000, December 05, 1888, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91059394/1888-12-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XIII. iNU. 50,
Published Wednesdays.
ple
€. STEVENS,
Publisher.
CMgreis Assemble* «ntl RecelTM
the Annual Recommenda
tion* Um £ievtttv««
The Document Touches Briefly
Upon the assembling of congress Presi
dent Cleveland submitted his annual
message The document follows:
To the Congress of the United States:
As you assemble for the discharge of the
duties you have .assumed as the repre
sentatives of a free and generous people,
your meeting is marked by an interest
ing ml impressive incident, with the
expiration of the present session of con
gress. the first century of your constitu
tiomil existence as a nation will be com
pleted.
Our survival for 100 years is not suf
ficient to assure ns that we no longer
have timbers to fear in the maintenance
with all its promised blessings of a gov
ernment founded upon the freedom of
the people. The time rather admonishes
us to soberly inquire whether in the past
we have always kept in the course of
safety or whether we have before us a
way plain and clear which leads to hap
piness and to perpetuity. "When the exper
iment of our government was under
taken. the chart adopted for our guid
ance was the constitution, and departure
from the lines there laid down is faiiure.
It is only by a strict adherence to the
direction they indicate and by restraint
within the limitations they fixed that we
can furnish proof to the world of the
fitness of the American people for self
government.
The equal and exact justice of which
we boast as the underlying principle of
our institutions should not be confined
to the relations of our citizens to each
other. The government itself is under
bond to the American people, that in
the exercise of its functions and powers
it will deal with the body of our citizens
in a manner scrupulously honest and
fair, and absolutely just.
It has agreed that American citizen
ship shall be the only credential neces
sary to justify the claim of equality be
fore the law and that no condition in
life shall give rise to discrimination in
the treatment of the apostle by the gov
ernment.
The citizen of our republic in its early
dav rigidlv insisted upon full compliance
with the" letter of this bond and saw
stretching out before him a clear field
for individual endeavor. His tribute to
the support of his government was
measured by the costs of its economical
maintenance, and he was secure in the
enjoyment of the remaining recompense
of his steady and contented toil.
In those days the frugality of the
filain
S&°
11
Liiwii.. ^fcipli, i [nm.T%^rnmiSi»
OB
Nearly All Subjects of Interest to
tbt GOTOTBMtttt.
The Democratic Tariff YieTrs Upheld—
The Indian Question Discussed—
Various Recommendations.
-peo­
was stamped upon their government
and was enforced Dy the free, thought
ful and intelligent suffrage of the citi
zens. Combinations, monopolies and
aggregations of capital were either
avoided or sternly regulated and re
strained. The pomp and glitter of gov
ernments less free, offered no tempta
tion and presented no delusion to the
people who, side by side in
riendlv competition, wrought for
the ennoblement and dignity of
men for the solution of the problem of
free government and for the achieve
ment of the grand destiny awaiting the
land which God has given them. A cen
tury has passed. Our cities are the
abiding places of wealth and luxury
our manufactures yield fortunes never
dreamed of by the fathers of our repub
lic our business s^ien are madly striving
in the race for riches and immense ag-
Itions of capital outrun the immagi
i of their undertakings.
The Question of Trust*.
As we view the achievement
of
sistfi in exacting from
aggre­
gated capital, we discover the existence
erf trusts, combinations and monopolies,
while the citizen is struggling far in the
rear, or is trampled to-day beneath an
iron heel. Corporations which should
be the carefully restrained creatures of
the law and the servants of the people
are fast becoming the people'^ masters.
Still, congratulating ourselves upon
the wealth and prosperity of our coun
try, and complacently contemplating
every incident of change inseparable
from these conditions, it is our duty as
patriotic citizens to inquire at this stage
of our progress how the bond of the
government made with the people has
been kept and performed. Instead of
limiting the tribute drawn from our
citizens to the necessities of its econom
cal administration, the government per
ig from the substance of
the people millions, which, unapplied
and useless, lie dormant in its treasury.
This flagrant injustice and this breach
of faith and obligation add to extortion
the danger attending the diversion of
the currency xf the country from the
legitimate channels of business Under
the same Jaws by which these results are
produced, the government permits many
millions more to be added to the cost of
the living of our people and to be taken
from our customers, which unreason
ably swell the profits of a small bul
powerful minority.
Governmental Favoritism.
The government, under a pretext
of
•a exersise of its taxing powei\ enters
gratuitously into partnership with these
favorites to their advantage and to the
injury.of a vast majority of our people.
This IB not equality before the law.
The grievances of those not included
within the circle of these beneficiaries,
when fully realized, will surely arouse
irritation and discontent. Our farmers,
long suffering and patient, struggling in
the race of life with the hardest and
most unremitting toil, will not fail to see,
in spite of misrepresentations and mis
J#aomg fallacies, that they are obliged
to accept such prices for their products
as are iixed in foreign markets where
they compete with tne farmers of the
world. That their lands are declining
in ralue, while their debts increase,
«HUi that without compensating favor
fbey are forced by the action of the
gpwrnment to pay for the benefit of
Mbam such enhanoed prices for the
fbings they need that the scanty returns
/}.•» ..-
Jfc.
u«tA.
V^
mjyr
^'"V"•"||'^"
of their labor fail to furnish their sup-
Etion.
rt
or leave little room for accumu-
Our workingmen, enfranchised from
all delusions, and no longer frightened
by the cry that their wages are en
dangered by a just revision of our tariff
laws, will "reasonably demand through
such revision steadier employment,
cheaper means of living in their homes,
freedom for themselves and their child
ren from the doom of personal servi
tude. and an open door to their ad
vancement beyond the limits of a labor
ing class. Others of our citizens whose
comforts and expenditures are measured
by moderate salaries and fixed incomes
will insif-t upon the fairness and jus
tice of cheapening the cost of necessa
ries for themselves and their families.
Pension Vetoes.
The failure of claimants to support
Claims against the government by
proof is often supplied by no better
consideration than the wealth of the
government and the poverty of the
claimant. Gratuities in the form of
pensions are granted upon no other real
ground than the needy condition of the
applicant, or for reasons less valid,
and large sums are expended for pur
poses of public buildings and other im
provements upon the represntatioos
carefully claimed to be related to public
needs and nee ities.
The extent to which the considera
tion of such matters should be subordi
nate and postpone action upon the sub
jects of great public importane, but in
volving no special private or partisan
interest, should arrest attention and lead
to reformation.
Public Iaad».
Repeated recommendations have been
submitted for the amendment and
change of the laws relating to
the appropriation of our public
lands to other uses than for homes of
honest settlers might be prevented.
Wlii le a measure to meet this conceded
necessity of reform remains awaiting
the action of the congress, many claims
to the public lands and applications for
their donation in favor of states and in
dividuals have been allowed. A plan in
aid of Indian management recommend
ed by those well informed as containing
valuable features in furtherance of the
solution of the Indian problem, lias thus
far failed of legislative sanction, while
grants of doubtful expediency to rail
road corporations permitting them to
pass through Indian reservations have
greatly multiplied.
The* propriety and necessity of the
erection of one or more prisons for the
confinement of United States convicts
and a postofiice building in the national
capital are not disputed, but these needs
yet remain unanswered, while scores of
public buildings have been erected
where their necessity for public pur
poses is not apparent.
A revision of our pension laws could
easily be made which would rest upon
just principles and provide for every
worthy applicant. But while our gen
eral pension laws yet remain confused
and imperfect, hundreds of our private
pension laws are annually passed, which
are the sources of unjust discrimination
and popular demoralization.
Internal improvements.
Appropriation bills for the support of
the government are defaced by items
and provisions to meet private ends, and
it is freely asserted by responsible and
experienced parties that a bill appropri
ating money for public internal improve
ment would fail to meet with favor
unless it contained more for local and
private advantage than for publip bene
fit. These statements can be much
emphasized by an ascertainment of the
proposition of federal legislation which
either bears upon its face its private
character, or of which upon examination
develops such a motive power.
At Peace with All Power*.
In pursuance of a constitutional pro
vision requiring the president from time
to time to give the congress information
of the states of the Union, I have the
satisfaction to announce that the close of
the year finds the United States in the
enjoyment of domestic tranquility and
at peace with all the nations. Since my
last annaul message our foreign relations
have been strengthened and improved by
performance of international good offices
and by new and renewed treaties of am
ity, commerce and reciprocal extradition
of criminals.
Those international questions which
still await settlemeut are all reasonably
within the domain of amicable nations,
and there is no existing subject of dis
pute between the United States and any
foreign power that is not susceptible of
satisfactory adjustment by frank diplo
matic treatment. The questions between
the United States and Great Britain re
lating to the rights of American work
ingmen under treaty and international
comity in the territorial waters of Can
ada and New England, I regret to say are
not satisfactorily adjusted. These mat
ters were fully treated in my message to
the senate of Feb. 20,1888, together with
such a convention, concluded under
my authority with her majesty's gov
ernment on the 15th of February last
for the removal of all causes of misun
derstanding, was submitted by me for
the approval of the senate. This treaty
having been rejected by the senate, I
transmitted a message to the congress,
on the
23d
of August last, reviewing the
transactions and submitting for consid
eration certain recommendations for leg
islation concerning the important ques
tions involved. ^Afterward, on the l?th
of September, in response td a resolution
of the senate, I again communicated
fully all the information in my posses
sion as to the actiflp of the government
of Canada affecting the commercial rela
tion between the dominion and the
United States, including the treatment
of American fishing vessels in the ports
and waters of British North America.
The communications have all been, pub
lished, and, therefore, opened to the
knowledge of both houses of congress,
although two were addressed to the sen
ate alone. Comment upon or a repetition
of their contents would be superfluous,
and I am not awn re that anything has
since occurred which should be added to
the facts therein stated.
To meet an exigency created by the re
jection of the treaty I now again invoke
the earnest and immediate attention of
the congress to the condition of this im
portant question as it now stands before
them ana the country, and for the settle
ment of which I am deeply solicitous.
Sackvllle's ni«min»i.——*"^
Near the close of the month of October
last, occurrences of a deeply regretable
nature were brought to my knowledge
which made it my painful, but impera
tive duty to obtain with as little delay as
possible a new personal channel of diplo
matic interc urse in this country with
the government of Great Britain.
The correspondence in relation to thte
incident will in due course be laid before
you and will disclose the unpardonable
conduct of the official referred to in his
interference by advice and counsel with
the suffrages of American citizens in the
very crisis of the presidential election,
then near at hand, and also in his subse
quent public declarations to justify his
action, superadding impugnment of the
executive and senate of the United
States in connection with important
questions now pending in controversy
between the two governments.
The offense thus committed was most
grave, involving disastrous possibilities
to the good relations of the United States
and Great Britain, constituting a gross
breach of diplomatic privilege and an in
vasion of the purely domestic affairs and
ri.
-v °-iM-
1 u i i
Y y
essential sovereignty of the government
to which the envov was accredited.
paving.first fulfilled the just demands
of international comity by affording full
opportunity for her majesty's govern
ment to a*.~t in relief of tne situation, I
considered prolongation of discussion to
be unwarranted and thereupon declined
to further recognize the diplomatic char
acter of the person whose continuance in
such function would destroy that mutual
confidence which is essential to the good
understanding of the two governments,
and was inconsistent with the welfare
and self respect of the government of the
United States. The usual interchange
of communication has since continued
through her majesty's legation in this
city.
The Seal Flaherlea,
My endeavors to establish, by in
ternational co-operation, measures for
the prevention of the extermination of
fur seals in Behring sea have not been re
laxed. and 1 have hopes of being enabled
shortly to submit an effective and satis
factory conventional project with the
maritime powers for the approval of the
senate.
The Boundary of Alaska.
The coastal boundary between our
Alaskan possessions and British Colum
bia, I regret to say, has not received the
attention demanded by its importance,
and which, on several occasions hereto
fore, 1 have had the honor to recom
mend to the congress. The admitted
impracticablity, if not impossibility, of
making an accurate and percise survey
and demarkation of the boundary line,
as it is recited in the treaty with Russia,
under which Alaska was ceded to the
United States, renders it absolutely re
quisite for the prevention of national
jurisdiction complications that the ade
quate appropriation for a reconnoisance
and survey to obtain proper knowledge
of the locality and the geographical feat
ures of the boundary should be author
ized by congress with as little delay aa
possible.
Bight* of Foreigners.
It is much to be desired that some
agreement should be replied with her
majesty's government by which the
damage to life and property on the great
lakes may be alleviated by removing or
humanely regulating the obstacles to re
ciprocal assistance to wrecked or
stranded vessels. The act of June 19,
1878, which offers to Canadian vessels
free access to our inland waters in aid of
wrecked or disabled vessels, has not yet
become effective through concurrent ac
tion by Canada.
JThe due protection of our citizens of
French origin or decent, from claim of
military service in the event of their
returning to or visiting France, has
called forth correspondence which was
laid before you at the last session in the
absence of conventional agreement as to
naturalization, which is greatly to be de
sired this government sees no occasion
to recede from the sound position it has
maintained, not only with regard to
France, but as to all countries with
which the United States have not con
cluded special treaties.
Twice within the last year has the im
perial household of Germany been vis
ited by death, and I have hastened to
express the sorrow of this people and
their appreciation of the lofty character
of the late aged Emperor William and
their sympathy with the heroism under
suffering of his son, the late Emperor
Frederick. I renew my recommenda
tion of two years ago for the passage of a
bill for the refunding to certain German
steamship lines of the interest upon ton
nage dues illegally exacted.
In a message accompanying approval,
on the first day of October last, of a bill
for the exclusion of Chinese laborers, I
laid before congress full information,
and all correspondence touching the ne
gotiation of the treaty with China con
cluded at this capital on March 13, 1888,
and which having been confirmed by the
senate with certain amendment, was re
jected by the Chinese government. This
message contained a recommendation
that a sum of money be appropriated as
compensation to Chinese subjects who
have suffered injuries at the hands of
lawless men within our jurisdiction.
Such appropriation having been duly
found, awaits reception by the Chinese
government.
A Consulship for Cores.
Legislative provision is hereby recom
mended to organize and equip consular
courts in Corea. Persia has established
diplomatic representations at this capital
and has'evidenced very great interest in
the enterprise and achievements of our
citizens. I am therefore hopeful that
beneficial commercial relations between
the two countries may be brought about.
The Haytian Trouble.
I announce with sincere regret that
Hayti has again become the theatre of
insurrection, disorder and bloodshed.
The titular government of President Sal
omon has been forcibly overthrown and
driven out of the country to France,
where he has since died. The tenure of
power has been so unstable amid the war
of factions that has ensued since the ex
pulsion of President Saloman that no
government constituted by the will of
the Haytian people has been recognized
as administering responsibly the affairs
of that country. Our representative has
been instructed to abstain from interfer
ence between the warring factions, and
a vessel of our navy has been sent to
J2aytian waters to sustain our minister,
and for the protection of the persons and
prosperity of American citizens. Due
precautions have been taken to enforce
our neutrality laws and prevent our ter
ritory from becoming the base of mili
tary supplies for either of the warring
factions. Under color of a blockade, of
which no reasonable notice had been
given,and which does not appear to liave
been efficiently maintained, a seizure of
vessels under the American flag has been
reported, and in consequence measures
to prevent and redress any molestation
of our innocent merchantmen have been
adopted.
Foreign Relations.
In the vast field of oriental commerce
now unfolded from our Pacific borders
n« feature possesses stronger recom
mendations for congressional action
than the establishment of communica
tion by submarine telegraph with Hono
lulu. The geographical position of the
Hawaiian group, relation to our Pa
cific states, creates a natural interde
pendency and mutuality of interests
which our present treaties were in
tended to foster, and which make close
communication a logical and modern
necessity.
The wisdom of concluding a treaty of
commercial reciprocity with Mexico has
been heretofore seated in my messages to
congress, and the lapse of time and
growth of commerce with that close
neighbor and sister republic confirm the
judgment so expressed. The precise re
location of our boundary line is needful,
and adequate appropriation is now
recommended.
The long pending boundary dispute
between Costa Rica and Nicaragua was
referred to my arbitration, and by an
award made on the 22d of March last
the question has been finally settled to
the expressed satisfaction of both parties
in interest.
The emperor of Brazil, in abolishing
the last vestige of slavery among Chris
tian nations, called forth the earnest
congratulations of this government in
expressions of the cordial sympathies of
our people. The claims of nearly all
other countries against Chili, growing
out of the late war with Bolivia and Peru,
have been disposed of either by arbitra
cfr bra lumt settlement Similar
cowTJNimn
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I O I V
JVDH.'IAJ. JFFU'KKS:
HO»»'C.JU."3UOWK, Utptrtei Judge*.
U. MUNHO, Sheriff.
K. 0. llKUiCSON, Tremmrpf.
SAMUI'I. LAKKON,
I'lcrk
l»l*trlCtOourt.
M.
CILTINAN,
Auditor.
I.. FL.
WKI.LINUTON.
LLEUIIRTI-ROF
WmL.OCOLTBa.Court
-IXTM. 0. BICKNEJMU
..VftSS
Pee4a.
(i*o. K. U.vRiaNii, .1 udije of Ptobate.
S. A. FLMIKUTY, Attorney.
II. L. IIlMK.BL'ltD. I'oroiiw.
I). T. WiusATON, Survivor.
W. onunitalouer.
County Supt. of Schools.
VILLAGE OVF1CBRB:
N. R. ftPi'iiti? I'resUleut.
8. A. Fi.Aiifr.«TV,
8. TjAitsox, ^OMUAUSH,
G. W. MAIWUAX.
W. 11. ROWKKH,
J*o. I).
UH,R»PIK,
Recorder.
W. J. Muxoo, Trvnaurer.
Hbiry UITTOHIN*
J. n. n.i,KSi'iK JMwerww"
UuT. WHBATO**', AsiM-wor.
B. ASUEHSON, Marshnl.
CHURCH DIRECTORY:
Co*a»EUATiofAL,ticv. J. B. Fairt»uk, FlttOT.
MBTIIOOIST. Kev. E. P. Robertson, Paster.
ROMAN OATIIOI.IC, KOV. (Ico. (in»kell, L'riert.
S«ASIlHAVt AN Hv Ami SI.1CAL Lt'THKHAV, Rev.
a.J. Anderson, of Scnudia, Pastor
CIVIC SOCI1TIHS:
|.-.p.'.4A.'. M.-.—Golden Sheaf Ledg* Ne
188, Meets 1st and 8d B&tnrdayg of each month.
O. c. HAHSON, W. M.
W. W. CiRiswoM), Sfc'y.
a.
A. R.
U. A. J. Overton Post, No. meets the
Second and FourtU Fridays of each raoatb
at 8 o'clock p. m.
N. R. SrUBR, Com.
H. T. IIKVANS, Adjutant.
A. 0.~~U. W.
lforrisLodg«. No. •. Meets each Tuesday
evening at their hall.
J. D. Qu.Lnr»,)|.W.
W. H. MILKS, Recorder.
SELECT KNIUHT3, A. O. U. W.
Scott Leglou, No. 18. Macts at Its hallthe
flrat&nd third Fridays of eaah month.
J, O. OliusriR, Co«r
W. H. MILES, Rec.
DIVISION NO. 1, A. O. H.
Meets Second Wednesday of each month,
In Its hall, at 7:30 P. M.
O. C. HANBON, Rec.
ti
C. P. MAGISJTIS, Pres't.
8. A. FLAHBIITY, R«C. Sec'y.
FATHER MATTHEW, C. T. A. SOCIETY
No. 760 of th« Catholic Total Abstinence
Society of America. Regular meetings flret
and third Sundays In each month In
Assumption Church, Immediately afUr
Mass. Visiting members respectfully in
vited. P.
A.
MCCARTHY, Prest.
E. P. O'BHIEN, Sec'y-
MT. LEBANON R. A. CHAPTER, No. 47.
Meets first Wednesday of each month.
JOHN HOUSK, H. P.
L. H. WKLLIHOTO.N, Sec'y.
BETHEL COMMANDERY, U. D.,
KNIGHTS TEMPLAR.
Meets seeond and fourth Mondays of eaeh
month, D. R. SUTHERLAND, E. C.
i. o7o. F.
Crystal Lodge, No. 182, meets at its hall on
-Monday evening of each week.
A. DKKAY, N. G.
fi. A. PEPPER, R. S.
THE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Will be open as follows: Weduesday and
Saturday afternoons from 4 to Wednesday
evening, 7 to 9, and Saturday evening, 7 io 10.
J. D. (riLi.ESPiE, Librarian.
BTTgraESS CARDS.
BO. E. DARLING.
Counselor at Law,
Practice In all State and United StatesCoorts.
Office over Ileigesou Aijausoii'is st«re.
A. FLAHERTY*
Lawyer.
County Attorney.
Attorney at Law,
MORRIS^
MORRIS, MINNESOTA
Office over Stevens Co. Bank. st23-8S
JJENRY HUTCHINS,
Attoriiej and Counseled at. Law,
MORRIS, MINN.
H. T, liEVANS,
Attorney at
Lam*
rr
W. REYNOLDS,
MINNESOTA
Attorney and Counsellor at Law,
Practices in all Courts of the State an
United States, and will take tmportaut case"
n the U. S. Land. Office.
Officeov«rr the drant County Bank,
HERMAN, MINN
A. MCCARTHY,
Notary, Public & Conveyancer.
Abstracter Examiner of Titles. Special
attention given v-~ business before the United
States Land Office ai.~ Pension Bureau, De
fective titles remedied anir £a '."..cteilt'lJReal
Estate, Loans and Insurance.
MORRIS, MINN.
JJ L. HULBURD,
Physician and Surgeon.
Physician and Surgeon.
Office over Spurr's Store.
Office Hours—8 to 10 A. M., and 8 too P. M.
n W.XAU6HAN,
yjr'
-. i,
"i.
Veterinary Surgeon.
Horses and slock treated
bf the day.
week or inenth
special rates. Veteri
ary medicines furnished
order. All calls prompt
iy attended to.
Otf Morris, Min&.
4—I J, •.*!, .L.
pit II. HARDY,
Veterinary Surgeom:
Office at Hardy & Co.'s Liyery Barn.
Will treat all DUenses of Horses and Cattle
Charges Reasonable.
Metropolitan Hotel,
Morri», Minn.
*. BUNNELL,Formerly of the Laks Park Hotel,
at Lake Park, Minn., Proprietor.
Tlio House has boon Thoroughly Renovated,
Rsfltted nnd Furnished, making it Strictly First
Claw mcvfiry ri'KjxTt, umi will lie conducted with
a view to the comfort of the commercial truduaud.
(h« travelling pablie
4 tv.
js
P»«w«iy»^j _ijiil|ii»t»»iiilil|
-if.'' '"•,
f'
1 $?
JTONB.
V.jSt-
COUNTY OFFIOSBB:
Qm,
j"
p. i
MORRIS, MIKXMOTA
1
W.
p.
MORRIS, MIMN
"Tsfrice over Chas. W. Rohue's drug store.
Dffleehou^s from
8
to
9
o'clock
j'clock p.
A. M.,
M.
CJ H. DULEY, X. 1L
and-
1
to 3
Physician and Surgeon.
My Office orer Larson & Nilson's store.
Atlantic Ave., Morris, MiiiSu
R. SUTHERLAND,
A.
Our Stock of
A. A. STONE & CO.
A Full and Complete Stock of
All Kinds of
Real Estate and Insurance Agenta
Loan and Investment Brokers.
Abstracters and Examiners of Titles.
Notaries Public and Conveyancers.
Special Attention Given to Collections.
Ocean Steamship Tickets to and from All
parts of the Old Country, and European Drafts
and Foreign Exchange, payable in All Parts of
the Old Country, for Sale.
Agents for the Singer Sewing Machines and
ISxtras.
The Public's Patronage Respectfully Solicited
We Endeavor to give Satislaction at all times
Morris Office, Pacific Avenue, opposite Jones*
Lumber Yard.
MCCARTHY
E. B. WOODWARD,
W E
I Carry a First-Class Stock of
WatcBes, Clocks, Jewelry, Solid Gold Rings
Gold Pens, Pencils, Tooth Picki^
V:
SPECTACLES, EYE-GLASSES, SILVERWARE, *0.
o
FINE WATCH REPAIRING
[MORRIS
ItKi
t,
•k'
«.
A
I to do as Good Work in this Line as can be
It will Pay You to Give Us a Call.
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MORRIS, MINN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1888. $1.50 PER YEAR, IN ADVANC*.
H. MILES.
id all Seasonable Goods, is Complete.
•tftMHI
W.
J.
E
Singles,
I
Constantly on Hand,
Also LIME, CEMENT & PAINT.
Etc.
EDWIN J. JOMES.
MCCARTHY
Morris and G-raceville, Minn.
& co.
A.
MORRIS, MINNESOTA.
DEALERS IN-
ALSO-
WOOD. FEED, ETd
Cash Paid for Flax, Oats, Barley,
Kinds of Farm Produoe
(SPECIALTY I
i i I
Wolff & Thoele Bros.,
.V -fli
and
WIN* '"INUF'S'J'-''-Y''' A.''»--: "1 "".Y ^.JII&ASA^U^^ TV IN'W *I WY.1'1 F/'L
DUMBLE
SAMUEL LARSON.
For Cadi «r W axchange fcr Conntry^Prodnce.
J..* DICKINSON,
President.
Pflil Office at Hancock.
m*
Other
u'
WOLFF & THOELE BROS.*
IRIS, minnis#**,"
-Wti "fv-~
-if
fc
r*
r*
i
4
QOTXPyWOOD GROTE
ca .-i Three Miles Northwest of
H^_lSrCOCK MINNESOTA
Wheat on
C.W.ROHNE&CO.
DRUGGIST.
Ocniipoimding Prescriptions a Specialty.
ALSO A COKFX|IEXE LINE OF
Drugs, Patent Medicines, Blank & School
Books, Wall Paper, Paints,
Brushes, Oils, &c.,
MORRIS, lEuiijsnsr.
Larson & Nilson,
MGRitl», MINN.
iDaalera in
DRY GOODS.
NOTIONS, GROCERIES,
IM~ A TTE3 CLOTEBS
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes,
Crookerv, Glassware, eto
All|af Which w '"Mat
Bottom Prices.
**"e Celebs
STOTJGHTON WAGON,
Norwegian Plow Company's Plow,
ttril v DUBUQUE, IOWA.
Atlantic Avenue, Between 5th and 6th Si« iy
C. W. COMSTOCK.
Vice-President.
POPS
tc
STEVENS COUNTY
BREEDERS ASSOCIATION!
Completed Arrangemexrts by which I oair Offer
Greater Inducements to Borrowers than ever
Mora. With Gilt-Edged Farm Security you
can have Money on Your Own
Terms.
COME TO ME AND GET IT!
Rial EsfalE Insurance!
I have a Choice List of Farm Lands and Villuge Prop*
erty for Sale or Rent on Easy Terms. I also represent
the very Best Insurance Companies in existence.
Be Sure to See Me Belore Dealing Elsowhore!!
Offloe Orer Larson ft Nilson's Stor®.
WOOD FOR SALE IN CAR LOTS.
Feielsii, Freest
Firnii Coach
STALLIONS.
Breeding Stables at
FARM,
H. WELLINGTOH.
Floury Bran, Shorts.
Snow Bird" and Choice" Flour from River
side Roller Mill, and "Pest" and "Patent" from
Swift Falls Roller Mill4 Bran and Shorts
Always on Hand. Also Corn Meal, Buckwheat,
&c., &c.
GOOM DELIVERED TO ANY PART OF THEOITY!
-. -y'-Ar.i.,..•
'v
1
'5|-
E. H. HOLLMAM.
x- .. -y-r
KV
•Nj .\ ML8©2.
PRKSSER,
i-e'y Tiv«crvr
-IMPORTED
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