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Morris tribune. [volume] (Morris, Minn.) 1880-2000, March 27, 1889, Image 6

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»'1 f. v.*
The Great War Syndicate.
By FRANK B. BTOOKTOK.
Aatbor
«r "Rudder Qi»|%N
MA»o«
Kil-
brt*ht," **The Bm Man of Om," "Th®
Christian* Wreck," "The Udy or the
Tiger," "The late Mrs. Noll," "The
Hundredth Man," "The Casting Away
or Mr*. Leeks and Mb*. Aleahlne," "The
toaBRiitcs," etc.
[Copyi iKited by P- F. Collier, of Collier's
Onoe
a Week, oitd published bgr BpociAl tmngWMBt
trlth him through the American I
Uoo. All rights reserved.]
fhe "overwhelming effrontery of this
demand caused the commander of the
Scafabasus to doubt whether he had to
deal with a raving lunatic or u Muster
ing fool- but ho informed the i^rson in
charge of tho flag of truce boat that L©
would give him fifteen minutes in which
to get back to his vessel, and that he
would then open fire upon that craft.
The men who rowed the little boat
were not men-of-war's men, and were
unaccustomed to duties of this kind. In
eight minutes they had reached their
vessel and were safe on board.
Just seven minutes afterward the first
shot came from the Scarabseus. It
passed over Repeller No. 1, and that
vessel, instead of replying, immediately
steamed nearer her adversary. The
director-in-chief desired to determine
the effect of an active cannonade upon
the new armor, and therefore ordered
the vessel placed in such a poiltion that
the Englishman might havo tlie best
opportunity for using it as a target.
The Scarabseus lost no time in availing
herself of the facilities offered. She was
a large an:l powerful sliip, with a heavy
armament and, soon getting the range
of the syndicate's vessel, she hurled ball
after ball upon her striped side. Kepellar
No. 1 made no reply, but quietly sub
mitted to the terrible bombardment.
Some of the great shot jarred her from
bow to stern, but not one of them broke
a steel spring, nor penetrated the heavy
inside plates.
After half an hour of this work the
director-in-chief became satisfied that
the new ai :nor had well acquitted itself
in the severe trial to which it had been propeller extracted it mattered little
subjected. Some of the air buffers liad
been disabled, probably on- account of
faults in their construction, but these
could readily be replaced, and no further
injury had been done the vessel. It was
not necessary, therefore, to continuo the
experiment any longer, and besides there
was danger that the Englishman perceiv
ing that hi3 antagonist did not appear to
be affected by his fire, would approach
closer and endeavor to ram her. *This
It was, therefore, decided to now test
the powers of the crabs. Signals were
made from Repeller No. 1 to Crab A,
In this manner Crab A was ordered to
immediately proceed to the attack of
the Scarabseus. The almost submerged
vessel steamed rapidly from behind her
consort, and made for the British man
of-war.
"When the latter vessel perceived the
approach of this turtle backed object,
squirting little jets of black smoke as she
replied to tho orders from the repeller,
there was great amazement on board.
The crab had not been seen before, but
as it came rapidly on there was no time
for curiosity or discussion, and several
heavy guns were brought to bear upon
it. It was difficult to hit a rapidly mov-!
ing flat object scarcely above the surface
of the water and although several shot
struck the crab, they glanced off without
in the least interfering with its progress.
Crab A soon came so near the Scara
bseus that it was impossible to depress
the guns of the latter eo as to strike her.
The great vessel was, therefore headed
toward its assailant, and under a full
head of steam dashed directly at it to
rim it down. But the crab could turn as
upon a pivot, and shooting to ono side
allowed the surging man-of-war to pass it.
Perceiving instantly that it would be
Several machine guns especially adapt
ed for firing at torpedo boats, or any hos
tile craft which might be discovered
close to a vessel, were now brought to
bear upon the crab, and ball after ball
was hurled at her. Some of these struck,
but glanced off, without penetrating her
tough armor.
These maneuvers had not continued
long when the crew of thecrab was read v
to bring into action the peculiar appar
atus of that peculiar craft. An enormous
pair of iron forceps, each massive limb
of which measured twelve feet or more in
length, was run out in front of the crab
at a depth of six or eight feet below the
surface. These forceps were acted upon
by an electric engine of immense power,
by which they could be shut, opened,
projected, withdrawn or turned and
twisted.
The crab darted forward, and in the
next instant tho great teeth of her pin
cers were fastened with a tremendous
grip upon the rudder and rudder port of
the Scarabseus.
Then followed a sudden twist, which
sent a thrill through botTi vessels, a crash,
a backward jerk, tho snapping of a chain,
and in a moment the great rudder, with
half of the rudder port attached, was
torn from the vessel, and as the forceps
opened it dropped to leeward and htlng
dangling by one chain.
Again the forceps opened wide again
there was a rush, and this time the huge
jaws closed upon the rapidly revolving
ecrew propeller. There was a tremen
dous crash, and the small but massive
crab turned over so far that for an in
stant one of its sides was plainly visible
$bove the water. The blades of the pro
peller were crushed and shivered those
jparts of the steamer's engines connect
ing with the propeller shaft were snapped
and rent apart, whilo tho propeller shaft
Itself was broken by the violent stop
a e
The crab, which had quickly righted,
now backed, still holding the crushed
propeller in its iron grasp, and as it
SH&KI amp from the Scarab^eu V its**
V
v.. .*
w%
tracted about forty feet of its propeller
shaft then, opening its massivo jaws,
it allowed tho useless mass of iron to
drop to the bottom of the sea.
Every man on board the Scaraboraa
was wild with amazement and excite
ment. Few could comprehend what
had happened, but this very quickly be
came evident. So far as motive power
was concerned, the Scarabjeus was to
tally disabled. She could not direct her
course, for her rudder was gone her
propeller was gone her engines were
useless, and she could do no more than
float as wind or tide might move her.
Moreover, there was a jagged hole in her
stern where the shaft liad been, and
through this the water was pouring into
tho vessel. As a man-of-war the Scara
ka'us was worthless.
Orders now came fast from Repeller
No. 1, which had moved nearer to the
I scene of conflict. It was to be supposed
that tho disabled ship was properly fur
nished with bulkheads, so that the water
would penetrate no farther than the
stern compartment, and that, therefore,
i eh§ was in no danger of sinking. Crab
A was ordcrod to make fast to the bow
of tee Scarabserus, and tow her towwjl
two men-of-war who were rapidly ap
proaching from tho harbor.
*'ATt* LINE
SECTION OF CRAB A, SHOWING NIPPERS.
A. bomb proof roof B, water line C, interior
of crab D, joint of nippers E, arms of nippers
FF, rods of nippers connecting with electrio en*
inc G, teak lining to crab.
This proceeding astonished the com
mander and officere of tho Scarabfeus
almost as much as the extraordinary at
tack which had been made upon their
sliip. They had expected a demand to
surrender and haul down their flag, but
tho director-in-chief on board Repeller
No. 1 was of the opinion that with her
what flag she flew. His work with the
Scarabseus was over for k had been or
dered by the syndicate that its vessels
should not encumber themselves with
prices.
Towed by the powerful crab, which
apparently had no fear that its disabled
adversary might firo upon it, the Scara
bseus moved toward the harbor, and when
it had come within a quarter of a mile of
the foremost British vessel, Crab A cast
was to be avoided, for the Scarabseus off and steamed back to Repeller No. 1.
was a much larger vessel than Repeller
No. 1, and able to run into the latter and
win lr he* by mere preponderance of
weight.
The other English vessels soon came
up, and each lay to and sent a boat to
tho Scarabseus. After half an hour's
consultation, in which the amazement of
those on board the damaged vessel was
communicated to the officers and crews
af her two consorts, it was determined
which had been lying With the larger i that tlie smaller of these should tow the
vessel between it and the enemy. These
signals were made by jets of tleiise black
Smoke, which were ejected from a small
pipe on the repeller. These slender col
umns of smoke preserved their cylindri
cal forms for some moments, and were
visible at -a great distance by day or
night, being illuminated in tho latter
case by electric light. The length and
frequency of these jets were regulated
by an instrument in the director's room,.
Thus, by means of lon^fljfrr sliort-puffs,
with the prongj-j^c "ormtervals, a me§
|8"C6uld be projected into tho air as a
telegraphic instrument would mark it
upon paper.
disabled ship into port, while the other
one, in company with a man-of-war just
THE FIEST
GREAT NAVAL BATTLE
coming out of tho harbor, should rntflw
attack upon Repeller No. 1.
It had been plainly proved that ordin
ary shot and shell had no effect upon
this craft, but it had not been proved
that she could withstand the rams of
powerful ironclads. If this vessel, that
apparently earned no guns, or at least,
had used none, could be crushed, cap
sized, sunk, or in any way put out of the
fight, it was probable that the dangerous
submerged nautical machine would not
are to remain in these watera If it re
mained it must be destroyed by torpe
does.
Signals were exchanged between the
two English vessels, and in a very short
time they were steaming toward the re
peller. It was a dangerous thing for two
vessels of their size to come close enough
together for both to ram an enemy at the
same time but it was determined to
take the risks and do this, if possible
for the destruction of the repeller was
obviously the first duty in hand.
diflBoult to strike this nimble and almost proached Repeller Iso. 1, they kept up a
submerged adversary, the commander of
the Scarabseus thought it well to let it
alone for the present, and to bear down
with all speed upon the repeller. But it
was easier to hit the crab than to leave
it behind. It was capable of great speed,
and, following the British vessel, it
quickly came up with her. i
The course of the Scarabseus was in
stantly changed, and every effort was
made to get tho vessel into a position to
run down tlie crab. But this was not.
easy for so large a ship, and Crab A
seemed to hare no difficulty in keeping
close to her stern.
As the two men-of-war rapidly ap-
rteady firo upon her, for if in this way
they could damage her, the easier would
be their task. With a firm reliance upon
the efficacy of the steel spring armor, the
iirector-tn-chief felt no fear of the
enemy's shot and shell, but he was not at
all willing that his vessel should be
rammed, for the consequences would
probably bo disastrous. Accordingly lie
did not wait for the approach of the two
vessels, but steering seaward, he signaled
for the other crab.
When Crab made its appearance,
puffing its little black jets of smoke as
it answered the signals of the director-in
shief, tho commanders of the two Brit-
ish vessels were surprised. They had
imagined that there was only one of
these strange and terrible enemies, and
had supposed that she would be afraid to
make her peculiar attack upon one of
them, because while doing so she would
axpose herself to the danger of being run
down by the other. But the presence of
l™of
tb^e almost submerged engine® of
destruction entirely changed the situa
tion.
But the commanders of the British
ships were brave men. They had started
to run down the strangely armored Amer- I
ican craft, and run her down they would,
if tliey could. They put on moro steam
End went ahead at greater speed. In
such a furious onslaught the crabs might
not dare to attack them.
But they did not understand the n*
turpnor the powers of these enemies,
[n less than twenty minutes Crab A liad
laid hold of one of the men-of-war, and
Crab of the other. Tiro rudders of
both were shattered and torn away and
xrhile the blades of one propeller were
crushed to pieces, the other, with nearly
half its shaft, was drawn out and dropped
into the ocean. Helplessly the two men
of-war rose and fell upon the waves.
In obedience to orders from the re
peller, each crab took hold of one of the
disabled vessels and towed it near the
mouth of the harbor, where it was left.
The city was now in a state of feverish
excitement, which was intensified by the
fact that a majority of the peoplo did not
understand what had happened, while
those to whom this had been made plain
could not comprehend why such a thing
should have been allowed to happen.
Three of her majesty's ships of war,
equipped and ready for action, had sailed
out of the harbor, and an apparently in
significant enemy, without firing a gun,
had put them into such a condition that
they were utterly unfit for service and
must be towed into a dry dock. How
could tho government, tho municipality,
the army, or tho navy, explain this?
"flPWIJ"''"'
votis desire to know what had happened,
and what might be expected next, spraad
that evening to every part of tho Domin
ion reached by telegraph.
The military authorities in charge of
the defenses of the city were as much
disturbed and amazed by what had hap
pened as any civilian could possibly be,
but they had no feara for the safety of
the place, for the enemy's vessels could
not possibly enter, nor even approach,
tho harbor. Tho fortifications on the
heights mounted guns much heavier than
thoso on the men-of-war, and shots from
those fired from an elevation might sink
even those "under water devils." But,
more than on tho forts, they relied upon
their admirablo system of torpedoes and
submarine batteries. With these in po
sition and ready for action, as they now
were, it waa impossible for on enemy's
vessel, floating oil the water, or under it,
to enter the harbor without certain der
struction.
Bulletins to this effect were posted in
the city, and somewhat allayed the popu
lar anxiety, although many people who
were fearful of what might happen next,
left by the evening trains for the interior.
That night the news of this extraordinary
affair was cabled to Europe, and thence
back to the United States, and all over
the world. In many quarters the ac
count was disbelieved, and in no quarter
was it thoroughly understood, for it
must be borne in mind that the methods
of operation employed by the crabs were
not evident even to those on board the
disabled vessels. But everywhere there
was the greatest desire to know what
would bo done next.
It was the general opinion that the two
firmored vessels were merely tenders
to the submerged machines, which had
done the mischief. Having fired no guns,
nor taken any active part in the combat,
there was every reason to believe that
they were intended merely as bomb proof
store ships for their formidable consorts.
As these submerged vessels could not At
tack a town, nor reduce fortifications,
but could exercise their power only
against vessels afloat, it was plain enough
to 6eo that tho object of the American
syndicate was to blockade the port.
That they would be able to maintain tho
blockado when tho full power of the
British navy should be brought to bear
upon them was generally doubted, though
it was conceded in the most wrathful
circles that until the situation should be
altered, it would be unwise to risk valu
able war vessels in encounters with the
diabolical sea monsters now lying off the
port.
In the New York office of the syndi
cate there was great satisfaction. The
news received was incorrect and imper
fect, but it was evident that, so far,
everything had gone welL
About 9 o'clock the next morning Re
peller No. 1, with her consort half a mile
astern, preceded by the two crabs,
one on either bow, approached to within
two miles of the harbor mouth. The
crabs, a quarter of a mile ahead of the
repeller, moved slowly, for between them
they bore an immense net, three or four
hundred feet long and thirty feet deep,
composed of jointed steel rods. Along
the upper edge of this net was a series of
OF
THE WAR SYNDICATE.
air floats, which were so graduated that
they wero sunk by the weight of the net
a few feet below the surface of the water,
from which position they held the net
suspended vertically.
This net, which was Intended to pro
tect the repeller against the approach of
submarine torpedoes which might be
directed from tho shore, was anchored
at each end, two very small buoys indi
cating its position. The crabs then fall
ing astern, Repeller No. 1 lay to, with
the sunken net between her and the
shore, and prepared to project the first
instantaneous motor bomb ever used in
warfare.
The great gun in the bow of the vessel
was loaded with one of the largest and
most powerful motor bombs and the
spot to be aimed at was selected. This
was a point in the water just inside of
the mouth of tho harbor, and nearly a
mile from the land on either side. The
distance of this point from the vessel be
ing calculatcd, the cannon was adjusted
at the angle called for by the scale of
distances and levels, and the instrument
indicating rise, fall and direction was
then put in connection with it.
Now the director-in-chief stepped for
ward to the button, by pressing which
tho power of the motor was developed.
The chief of the scientific corps then
showed him the exact point upon the
scale, whip)} would be indicated when
the gun was in its proper position, and
the piece was then moved upon its bear-
OF CANADIAN CITY. HARBOR.
A, II. M. a Scarabseus B, Crab A C, Repeller
Mo. P, new fort E, old fort F. city G. island
EL. is land
ings so as to approximate gp nearly as
possible this direction.
The bow of the vessel now rose upon
the swell of the sea, and the instant that
the index upon the scale reached the de
sired point, the director-in-chief touched
the button.
There waa no report, no smoke, no
visible sign that the motor had left
the cannon but at that instant
there appealed, to those who were
on the lookout, from a fort about
a mile away, a vast aperture in
the waters of the bay, which was
variously described as from 100 yards to
500 yards in diameter. At that same in
stant, in the neighboring headlands and
islands far up tho shores of the bay, and
in every street and building of the city,
there wag felt a sh^rp shock as if the
ng&srlying rocks had been struck by a
gifl^Btic trip hammer.
At the same iAstant the sky above tlie
rt
where the motor had descended was
kened by a wide spreading cloud.
This was formed of that portion of the
water of the bay which had been in
stantaneous raised to the height of about
a thousand feet. The sudden appear
ance of this cloud was even more terri
blo than the yawning chasm in the
waters of the bay, or tho startling shock,
but it did not remain long in view. It
had no sooner reached its highest eleva
tion than it began to descend. There
was a strong sea bree7.e blowing, and in
its descent this vast mass of water was
impelled toward the land.
it came down, not fain, but as the
waters of a vast cataract, as though a
'J*
y u
w ,s 1
i k i
TO
'^yw
fc*»
v
mountain lake, by an earthquake shock,
had been precipitated in a body upon a
valley. Only one Uge of it reached the
land, and here tlu- seething flood tore
away earth, trees and rocks, leaving be
hind it great chasms and gullies as it
descended to tho sea.
The bay itself, into which vast
body of tho water fell, became a scene
of surging madness. The towering walls
of water which had stood up all around
tho suddenly created aperture hurled
themselves back into the rJyss, and down
into the great chasm at the bottom of
the bay, which had been r.iado when the
motor sent ita shock along the great rock
beds. Down upon, and into, this roar
ing, boilitig tumult fell tho tremendous
cataract from cbove, and tho harbor be
came ono wild expanse of leaping, mad
dened waves, hissing their whirling
spray high into the air.
During these few terrific moments
other things happenod which passed un
noticed in tho general consternation.
All along the shores of tho bay and In
front of tho city the waters seemed to
be sucked away, tlowly returning as the
sea forced them to their level, and at
many points up and down the harbor
there waro submarine detonations and
upheavals of the water.
These wero caused by the explosion, by
concussion of every torjedo and subma
rine buttery in the harbor and it was
with this object in view that the instan
taneous motor bomb had been shot into
the mouth of the bay.
The effects of tho discharge of tho mo
tor bomb astonished and even startled
those en board the repellors and the
the crabs. At tho Instant of touching
tho button a hydraulic shock was felt on
Repeller No. 1. This was supposed to be
occasioned by the discharge of the mo
tor, but ^t was also felt on the other ves
sels. It wa3 tho same shock that had
been felt c:i chore, but less in degree.
A few moments aft there was a great
heaving mvoll of the sen, which tossed
and rolled tho four vc£sel3 and lifted
the steel protecting net so liigh that for
an instant parts of it showed themselves
above the surface iiko glistening sea
ghosts.
Experiments with motor bombs had
b§en made in. unsettled mountainous dis
trict's, but thla ut.:I tho first ono which
had ever oxcried its ow under water.
On ore, i:» the frri:-., and in tho city,
no one for an instant opposed that the
terrific phenomrnen widt had just oc
curred was in any way duo to the ves
sels cf the syndicate. The repellers
were in plain view, and it was evident
that neither' of them had fired a gun.
Besides, tho firing of cannon did not pro
duce such effects. It was the general
opinion that there had been an earth
quake shock accompanicd by a cloud
burst, and extraordinary convulsions of
the sea. Such a combination of elemen
tary disturbances had never been known
in these parts, and a great many persons
were much more frightened than if they
had understood what had really hap
pened.
In about half an hour after the dis
charge of the motor bomb, when the sea
had resumed its usual quiet, a boat car
rying a white flag left Repeller No. 1,
rowed directly over the submerged net
and made for the harbor. When the ap
proach of this flag of truce was perceived
from tho fort nearest tho mouth of the
harbor, it occasioned much surmise.
Had the earthquake brought these syn
dicate knave3 to tneir senses? Or were
they about tq make further absurd and
outrageous demands? Some irate officers
were of the opinion that enemies like
these should be considered no better than
pirates, and that their flag of truce
should be fired upon. But the com
mandant of the fort paid no attention to
such counsels, and sent a detachment
with a white flag down to the' beach to
meet the approaching boat and learn its
errand.
The men in the boat had nothing to do
but to deliver a letter from the director
in-chief to the commandant of the fort
and then row back again. No answer
was required.
When the commandant read the brief
note he made no remark. In fact, he
could think of no appropriate remark to
make. The missive simply informed
him that at ten o'clock and eighteen
minutes a. m., of that day, the first
boom from tlie marine forces of the syn
dicate had been discharged into the
waters of the harbor. At, or about two
o'clock p. m., .tlie second bomb would be
discharged at Fort Pilcher. That was all.
[to bf. CONTINUED.1
Justice Stanley Mathews Sum
moncd Before the Bar
ftlicUnivertiMt
He Had Been 111 for Some Time, and
the End was Not Unexpected—
A Sketch of His Life.
Tho Supreme Conrt and Senate Adjourn
v
immediately Upon the News «f
HU Death.
y^sSJSGTON, Jlajrch 33.—Hon. Stan
ley MatthewB, of Ohio, associate justice
jf the supreme court of the United
JStates, who has been seriously ill for
"Some time past, died at 10:30
4. m. He has been sick for three weeks,
although his original illness dates much
farther back. For two weeks past his
condition has been considered serious.
Dr. Johnson has been in constant at
tendance on him, and during the latter
part of liis illness, Dr. Lincoln has been
v, -iV1
•vy'?V
JUSTICE 8TANLBT
in consultation with him. In the eve
ning Justice Matthews was so much
worse that Dr. Johnson remained with
hifii during the entire night. He passed
away pea^ei'idly, All of his family with
the exception of'his son, were present at
the death scene.
Justice Matthews was bom in Cincin
nati, July 21,1824. He was graduated
at Kenyon college in 1840, Btudied law
and was admitted to the bar, settling in
Maury county, Term, lie (shortly after
ward leturned to ineinuati. In IMG he
became v iliior of the Cincinnati Herald,
the first daily anti-fdavery paper in that
city, lie became judg-- of the court of
common pVa-j in ifa.i.ilton county in
1851, was state senator in 1855, and in
1856-(j1 v.'as United States attorney for
the southern district of Ohio. He served
with distinction in tlie Union army dyp-
k
ing the war but resigned his commission
as colonel in 188!$ to become judge of th§
superior court of Cincinnati. He was a
presidential elector on the Lincoln-John*
son ticket in 18(54, and on the Grant
Colfax ticket in 1808. He was defeated
as Republican candidate for congresa in
1876 and in the next year was one of the
counsel before the celebrated electoral
commission opening the argument in be
half of the Republican electors of Florida
and making the principal argument in
the Oregon case. In March, 1877, he*
was elected United States senator in
place of John Sheriban who had re
signed. In 1881 he was appointed asso
ciate justice of the Unitea States su
preme court.
Fl»(i nt Half Must in New York.
NEW YORK, March 23.—On receiving
the news of Judge Stanley Matthew?
death, which was conveyed to him by a
United Press reporter, Mayor Grant or
dered the national, state and municipal
flags to be displayed at half mast over
the city hall, out of respect to the mem
ory of the distinguished jurist.
Miu Matthew'x Marrlag* PoitpODAd.
NEW YORK, March 25.—The death of
Justice Stanley Matthews postpones tliS
marriage of his daughter, Miss Jeaa
nette, to Justice Gray, of the Massachu
setts supreme court. Miss Matthews is
nearing 150 years of age, while Justice
Gray, who is very tall, finely formed
and a well preserved man, is probably 6%
When you «le-ir« a plea-mit physic,
try Ht. Patrick's Pills*. T'ii'» v can al
ways be depended iifuti, and* !o not
nauseate the stomach nor gr'.pe tlie
bowc'.H. For sale by Fritz lliieUoalii.
50tf
St.Paul and Milwaukee and Chicago
That the Wisconsin Central touches the
most prominent points in Wisconsin,
and that it has more important, business
centers on its through line than any
other railway in tli'e Northwest
That the Wisconsin Central has made
an eiwiable reputation with its peer
less Dining Car Service
That the Wisconsin Central runs fast
trains on which all classes of passen-
fers
are carried with commodious and
istinct accommodation for all
That the Wisconsin Central has repre
sentatives distributed throughout the
country, who will cheerfally give any
information that may be desired and
that its terminal agents are especially
idstructed to look after the comfort of
passengers who may be routed via its
line.
For detailed information, apply to
your nearest ticket agent or to represen
tatives of the road.
WM. S. MELLEN, JAMES BABKEB,
Qen'l Manager, Gen'l Pass.dc Ticket Agt
MILWAUKEE.
F. H. ANSON,
agent forthe^sneral transaction of their,
business. A liberal and permanent
rrv
from the diary of tourists
commercial travelers,
business men and others
lias revealed:
That the Wisconsin Central has the
unqualified endorsement of all
That the Wisconsin Central has to-day
the most popular line between Minne
apolis, St. Paul and Milwaukee and
Chicago
That the Wisconsin Central is dialy
adding to its admirers as the recognized
Pullman line between Minneapolis,
Northwestern Passenger
Agent, No. 19 Nicollet House Block, Minne
apolis, Minn.
THE
MilS ft
_JBS
yiccideni Company,
387 BROADWAY, MEW YORK.
BENEFITS.
$5,000 for Death.
$5,009 Loss of Limbs.
$2,DQO Loss of Limb.
$2,500 Loss of Sight.
$1,250 Total Disability.
9€»oO Loss of One Eye.
##3 Weekly indemnity for
V 23 Weeks.
On® Sot of individual RegiitryPlatw
Included.
COST.
Four Quarterly Payments, a 10.00
Annual De^s, ,oo
#jmborship Foe, 5.00. STTTOO
IKPGKTAhiT NGT'CS.—Tho Traders
& Travelers Accident Co. of New Yoric
dsslro the services of one responsible
representative
in
each town to act aa
**9*
».
I". ni.e il poisi.n
ir. 'Urine siiiti Ionic
ar-
rungementwili be made with partleswho
Cfln fill the above-requirements. Addreso
C. S. SOfVEERVLLE, Sec'y-
MINNEAPOLIS & ST. LOUIS
RAILWAY,
AND THE FAMOrS
Albert Lea Route
Two Throve Trains Daily
FROM
ST. PAL MINNEAPOLIS
Oih-ioeigo
TO
Without change, connecting with tlie Fast
Trains of all Lines for tlie
East and Southeast.
The Direct and Only Line running Through
Cars between Minneapolis and
DES MOINES,
Via Albert Lea and Fort Dodge.
SHORT LINE TO "WATERTOWN, D. T.
SOLID THROUGH TRAINS^f
MINNEAPOLIS & ST. LOUIS
ami tlie lVitu-i^nl Cities of the Mississippi
Valloy,connecting )M Union Depot for
all points South and Southwest.
MANY HOURS SAVED,
Anil tlie Only Line running Two Trains
Tn!ly
to Knnxns City. Leavenworth and Atchison,
making connections with the Union Pacific
and Atchison. Topeka & Sante Fe Railways.
connections made In Union De
pot wilh all trains of the St. Paul, Minneap
olis & Manitoba Northern Pacifle St.Paul
dHMiliitli Hallways, from and to all points
North and Northwest.
REMKAIBER, the trains of the Minneap
olis & St. Louis Railway are composed of
Comfortable Day Coaches, Magnificent Pull
man Sleeping Cars, florton Reclining Chair
Cars,and our Justly celebrated Palace Dining
Cars.
0^"150 LBS. OF BAGGAGE CHECKED
FKEI* Fare always as Low as the Lowest!
For Time Tables, Through Tickets, etc., gall
npon the nearest Ticket Agent, or write to
S. F. BOYD,
Gen'l "Pkt. & Pass. Agl ,MInneapolis,Minn.
ft 1 3 'A !,\-
}4 iind ii!'i--t popular scientific awtf'
f" i '"'I'll pawr and has the target!
of any inr» of Hrt clns^ in the worW,
l.niy illrtptrafcd. licst class of Wood Ennrav-
Inc^. wreklv. Penri for #ppcimei*
etipv. Price #3 n yeir. Kour month*' trial. 11.
MUfTN & CO., Sill Broadway, N.V.
AnCK'TECTS 4 BU1LDERO
#4 Edition of Scientific American. O
A f.io.11 suiMcs.i. Kiioii issue cmnnins /iolored
litpinto* of country and eitv residen
ce! or public IjuiMhil'S!. Numerous enKnivniKS
ft-"' full I li.n« nr'tl »|r ,it- tor Mic line i
i iii.m us contemplate bnililmtr. Frfe f'-'.'iii n year,
L-t•. II •..!.*. :t .V, A
1
tj«i-
I'rm.ISBKttS.
may be secur
ed by anply
inp to MPXN
PCTPP
CO., W 1) o
s**' have had over
!!•.•• mnde over
to- American and For-
titK. Send tor Handbook. CQTT—
13v fvintlrt'.'iitu:!.
I'OniJenct!
TRADE MARKS.
In nu.rfc I,? r«' ii^.Sfprc1 In tlie Pnt
etit- itilce, upoljr to jii'.
VN
A Co., mid procure
ir.:.i iil ii!i' p!"ttctioli. bend for Handbook.
fMPVK MJ UTS for books, charts, maps,
qiilciciy procured. Address
R1UXN dc CO., Patent Solicitor*.
QesnenAL OrncK 2U BHOADWAT# 1k X*
-v' &*%*vfef SL^^tV. •7^/&B*'* w 7v" 7^ r: *fc" trf-iV'^'^V '"JsTT'* 'T '4 -,* y 7 v&? K
learn of the diseases pecyliar,,.^
to their sex, there is a feeling'
of sympathy created withinr"-"
the breast for her well-being
and preservation of her health,,
TO THE WOMEN
WIIEN
we understand all
the anatomy and phy»
iology of women, an4
WEAKNESS.
On account of the intimate
connection of these diucasea
with the stomach, brain,
heart and liver, through the
sympathetic spinal system of nerves,
diagnoM* or locating of her diseases
Uity ail
ITilihard'n Rhcumalic Syrup has no
IT NEVER FAILS. IT NEVER FAIL8-
5T 13 A SAFE FAMILY MEDICINE.
TILE STEEL GEAR BUGGY.
opiates, Chii n, invalids and deli
:u
thoulu U. wulwut a.
uw.
/isttautn and ll'inlf.
it lr.»3 cured my indi^vslion, purified my liiooJ and
M.lc me :t wc.l 'woman, and 1 cannot say too mutli
.rai»c df both Syni| and I'iitslcrs.
Mrs. b. K. IIAKKS, Whitehall, Mich.
We
eqaal.
raiiuut be without il in our family
Mas.
MATTHEW WJLEY,
Muskegon, Mich.
ASU&S CURE FOR RHEUMATISM
at
I want about 10,OCX)
Bushels of Good Clean
Oats, for which I will
pay Highest CASH
Prices.
GEO. EJUI
HOT. 27 th, 188&
Restaurant
M. J. FOLEY, Prop.
A COMPLETE I.INE OF
FANCY GROCERIES, FRUITS,
CONFECTIONERY, CIGARS,
TOBACCOS, ETC,,
Ckmstantly on Hau4, .-
WARM MEALS AT
ALL
HOURS!
GIVE US A. CALL!
ALT, WWB® tJP
FSM, SALT & SMOKED
-MEATS-' .'-
KEPT CONSTANTLY ON Alt IK
Tour Patronage is Solicited
JOHN CAIRNETft
U yv/
I jrT "a*
v'-jvj&a
Practically Indestrn.-.tibie.
No Wood to shrink, break, decay or tvear om.
No belts or clips to become IOOM or ratile.
A gstr made entirely of steel, rivetsd together, C8B*
oot be broken, will last forever.
MANUFACTURED BY
THE ABBOTT BUB6Y CO., CHICAGO.
JIIHH J, PIMM
Has Two 2-seated Buggies for snk1 Cheap. He
is agent for the Abbott- Buggy Co., and
Stone's Patent Steel Gear Buggy.
General Blacksmithing
Done as usual, i
Sixth Street,
PRICE
i the old stand,
Morris, Minn.
J?E
BRA'S
^WiolaCREAM
THIS preparation,without
injury,removes Freck-
cuu^ les, Liver-Moles, Pim
ples, Black-Heads, Sunburn and
Tan. A few applications will render the
most stubbornly red skin soft, smooth and
white. Viola Cream is not a paint or
fowder to
cover defects, but a remedy to cure,
is superior to all other preparations, and
is guaranteed to give satisfaction. At drug
gists or mailed for 50 cents. Prepared Jbjr
6. C. BITTNER Sc CO.,
TOUEDO, OHIO.
Sold by FRITZ BUCKENTItf
Singer Sewing Machines!
t.
Sewini Maciine Oil,
Extras aEftepfr's
OT All
Kinds, for Sale by
A.
MCCARTHY
GO.,
&
Morris &rcmille, Mian.
novffltf
8!HIS Solid Gold Watch.
«„|(tl
for
SIOO. aotU bitaly.
I Ue wstt fi in the world.
fc mekvper* War-
15
both" Udfes*
s. wilb worka
knnd of pqual traSue,
11»t«e r'r.u'il in -!Uh Io«
fvrure cno free,
large and vnl-F
HoUJU'llold.
Th.-se umpia.
watch, W8 send
ifter you hare kept
i v n k e n i o s e
tofr^thor m(:
wlia may bavn called, tl: v vouc own ftroportv. Tbosu
vho write nt once cin l0 care of rcc-iinR tho Witlcit
Wcnuy aU eiprenj, ireijcht,et& Ai1dre»»
Stlnavadfe Co., Box glli
1'orttud,Hitiiiei
home for
,-v|-
1
ri
iA U
FV1(,
& «.? '**""*,* -i t* 'Wf
comes tlie more difficult.
Thus as a symptom of her
diseases she may have neu
ralgic
HEADACHE,
dizziness, unnatural emotions
and various delusions,amount
ing to mania, or may have
local paralysis, nausea and
vomiting, perverted appetite,
a dry, hacking cough, palpita
tion of the heart, oppression
and faintness, pain in the back
and kidneys, and every imaginable daeaie
as caused by reflex action.
Hibbard's Rheumatic Syrup
-A. COMPOUND
Containing rodophylura, Cntcara Sagrada, Unicorn Root, Black Cohotto and Poke
Root, with tonics and diurctics, with Salycilic Acid, Nervines, etc., etc, scientifically
combined and pleasant to take, all of them being specifics in their action, a* v«K at
laxative and alterative, that will restore action, subdue inflammation, and prove al that
the most astute physician or pathologist could suggest. Hibbard's Rheumatic Plasters
applied to the small of tlie back, or abdomen, or to any parts.that may be painfiii jr4
weak, will be found very beneficial. Reason teaches the lesson.
ons
9
11' vim cannot procure it of your druggist send dircct to us. Price %t.00 6 bottles Plastm
TESTIMONIALS WORTHY OF CONFIDENCE.
will find it the wst
Aiwa,,. loson, Spring, Sumaut.
Ten years I have been a great sufferer from dj»
nc|isia, neuralgic headache and other diseases, tub
oaid'b Rheumatic Syrup made me & well wonMa.
Mks A. D. Noolk,Jscksoo, Mkh.
Hibbard's Rheumatic Syrup entirely cured MS. I
think it the
best family medicine in the world.
MRS. LOUIS
Eunorar,
Wabash, lad.
TIE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF MOUIUS,
Morr'e, Stevens Co., HlUk
To Loan
On Improved Farms In Stevens, Pope sad
Big Stone- corintiee.
Money Advanced the day Application is Made,
If Securities are Satisfactory to
US-
County Order* and School Bonto fvitkilrilt
the Highest Market Rates.
IBTHEi PAC
11 RAILROAD
The Direet Line between
si*Paul, minneapollfi,
or
Dalntli
And all Points in-
Minnegc$%f Dakota, Montana,
Idaho, Washington Territory,
British fjgjjiwihia, Puget Sound &
ALASKA.
Express Trains Doiiy, to which are attached
PULLMAN PALACE SLEEPERS
X5r. -And
®SfEGANT DINING CABS.
N6 CH
Meat Market
A N E O A S
Between
Rt, PAUL AND PORTLAND,
On any class of Ticket.
ENftaKANT SLEEPERS FSSS
The only All-Rail Ltne to the
YELLOWSTONE PARK!
For failinform&tloh as to Time, Ifctee, Etc.,
Address,
CHARLES S. FEE.
General Passenger Agent. St. Paul.
W. M. ROMINE, Agent,
Morris. Minn.
MORRIS, MINN.
The Highest Price paid for
Grain of All Kinds, at All
Junes.
N. R. SPURR & GO.
Keep en hand Two Grades ot Choioe Family
Flour, as follows:
Olioiee,
(Snow Bird.
PJJBTQM WORK
Will at all time receive prompt attention.
Griats either Ground or Exciiangod ar
the owrcrs prefer.
CAUTION.
mnrt betaken In OeiiWwalili**
to have the Flour thoroughly warmed before
inixiug also, to keep the SpoiiRc In a warm
place until ready for Baking. By carefully
observing these simple precautions you will
get good bread every time whilo, ff neglect
ed, your bread will be poor and dark,no mat
ter how good the flour.
i, I /t .j ,.'. ^,1 n .„
VMllWAUKEfj,
3!B§mvL
Owns fttfd operates 8*650 miles of tho*^
oughly equipped road in Illinois, Wis
consin, Iowa, Missouri, Minnesota and
Dakota.
It is t)ie Best Direct Route
between all principal points
in the Northwest, Southwest
and Far West.
For maps, time tables, rates of passaee
and freight, etc., apply to the nearest
station agent of the OniCAOO, MILWAT
KEH & ST PAI RAILWAY, or to any
Knilroad Agent anywhere in the World.
R. MILLER, A. T. H. CARPENTER,
General Manager. Qen'l Pans. & Tkt. Agt
F. F. TUCKER, Geo. H. HEAFFORD,
Ass't Gen'l Alan. Aes'tGen.Pass.ite Tfcfcnttfl
Milwaukee Wxscovoy.
It#'"For information in rcfC^otS^G
Lands and To^% us owned bv tlie CiutiAOO
MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUI, RAILWAY COM
PANY, write to U. (J. HAUGAH, Land
Commiseioner, Milwaukee, Wiscontltu
*»ijp
rf __ -. £v.
J. BERKIN'
J'ff uricTijr of lii«
THE MONARCH
HOBRi§, «L\N.
ji^SMUrla
And Cigars.
Miliafe Bottled Beer.
ALWAYS OH HAHD
I CURE
When I say CURE I do not mean -cly to
stop them for a time, aad then have :a re
turn again I MEAN JS RADICAL C«Jiikj.
I bar'e matle the disease ol
UTS, EPIXsEPSnr or
FAIXING SZCH3?£a3Sv
A life-long
study. I wabsakt raj rs.n-.-yly
CCKE the worst cage?. Because cUieio .have
taileil is no reason lor not uovr reocivmfT a care.
Send iitoace
for
a
treatise
MtopeaUxtbStrMt,
ADVERTISERS
OT advertising s:
45 to 49 Randolph St
Advertising Agency of
Bras! Boiler Kill EMULSION
One and Three quarters Miles South-East
from Morris, V
H. W.STONE &
v Proprietor^
s'
COLD
TrytheC
«fc.
to
and a J-'r?e
sr.1
it cure
v.onxE
Ol BIT 1t?FAI,UBI.E RESJSBi". Give
and
Oflioc. it ccets you Z'x &
trial
vja.
A3urees
ff.C.XCST, K5-C-., 1 sr^'-Bier. FS-£i*«5
Piso's Cure for Con
sumption is also the best
Cough Medicine.
If you have a Cough
without disease of toe
Lungs, a few doses are all
you need. I ut if you ne
glect this easy means of
safety, the slight Cough
may become a serious
matter, and several bot
tles will be required.
Piso's BraCEDT FOB CATABBH
gives immediate reiieC Catarrhal
virus is soon expelled from the sys
tem. and the diseased action of the
mucous membrane is replaced by
healthy secretions.
The "dose is small. One package
A ii-: II
application of Piso's remedy for
iitarrh. The comfort to be got
from it in this way Is worth many
times its cost.
Easy and pleasant to use.
Price. 50 cents. Sold by druggists
or sent by mail,
E. T. EUZELTIXK, Warren, Pa.
FLATNHi Proprietor.
Dctler In *11 kinds of
Fresh, TWed and
Salt Meats,
i
HACSAGE, FISH, *Cr
MORRIS. MINN.
c- others,who wish to examinj
in :s paper, or obtain estimate*
an in Chicago, will find it en fil««t
LORD&ThO^
SCOTT'S
OF PORE GOD LIVER OIL
SSE
HYPQPHQSPHITES
Almost as Palatable as Milk.
So disguised that it can be taken,
digested,
and assimilated by
the
most
MniltlTC stomach, wtieis the plain oil
cannot be tolerated and by tho com*
bination of the oil with the hypopbot.
is mucliL snore esSicacioas.
CesuurkaMe as a-flesh producer.
Persons gain rapldiy while taking lt»
SCOTT'S EMULSION is acknowledged bj
Physicians to bo the Finest and Best prepa
ration in tho world for tlie relief and cure ot
CON8UKFTIOH, SCROFULA,
GENERAL DEBILITY, WASTING
DISEASES, EMACIATION,
COLDS and CHROHIC COUGHS.
The great remedy for Consvwpiiart, and
Wdstinj i'i Children. Sold by (*U Druggists.
•03 Sewine-Machlnel
erjre est a Ml?*
trade parts
placing oo rn&oMn
and goods whunc the peo
thfm, we will send t'poe to an«
a iu each locality,the vtry
sewinp-machine made in
tho woiUKviUh »U tho attachment*,
wii) »lso send n cousplet#
of our costly and vnltisblc art
in return we ask that VT»u
v u hat we srnd, to those who
cfi'.l nt your honie.nnd Alter *9
all shall bcconie yu»
nor-*. 'Ihi* pruri'i ninoliine U
rtcr tho Singrr patORts^
lave i un out: patents
un otit sold for with the
tti*.hments, and now sells for
t* Best, moat use
ib hinc the world. All U
No capital required. Plain,
brief inttnietioaa rireu. These who write to us at once can
rare free tbe beat tewinr-machinc in the worki. «nd tha
ftaeat lia«of works of hirb art ever sbown lo^Pthtr in America.
TAVSACOM SOX YlO, Ausustu, Maine.
CATARRH
£ly's Cream Ba
Cleanses ho Kanal Pa
1
and Hearing.
A particle Is applied latti•ehaeitrtl
Is aMn*eeabl(*. Prir«60r. sit DriiKgims «e by
ELY BROTHERS,S(i Warren Sr-.^ew YodU
itKM
*os.
'Prr r-
it
*^c
•to*
I
•'Il

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