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Morris tribune. [volume] (Morris, Minn.) 1880-2000, November 20, 1889, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91059394/1889-11-20/ed-1/seq-2/

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i I V N O 1 8
The Tvxbnnc.
I Z S K V E N 8
ing.
ii'*
Up to date "•J95 causes have been
found for the Republican defeat in
Ohio. There are six back counties yet to
hear from.
The sickening tragedy of the judicial
hanging of Joseph Ilillman, the murder
er. at Woodbury, N. J., was never ex
ceeded by the sickening tragedy of auy
murder in this countrv.
President Harrison is one man who
viieves a woman can keep a secret. He
has
entrusted the copying of his mes
sage to his pretty typewriter girl, when
e
would
n o
trust it to any
A raud
a n
Red and black are the devil's colors, it
is
said. Those were the tints in which
tlie Anarchists of New York recently
looonxtv.i
a hail
in winch they celebrated
thvir \viv. -ies.
Among
the
mottoes
were one or two suggestive enough, iiko
iiie following: "If you assassinate us
with Gatling guns, we will dynamite
you:" "'Our sileneo in the grave is more
powerful than words can be."
a y i w a s
n a
in
w i
N i a a u a
that
on vvuich ground was broken for the ca­
at San Juan del Norte, on the Atlan-
tic
side of the coast. Impressive out of
tii iv iimon it must have been when, as
?uo: as the laborers had begun work
their picks and shovels, the popula
tion. both Catholic and Frotestant, flocked
to
the churches and celebrated the event
A general holidav was observed.
Catholic and Protestant.
The scenes at the dedication of the new
Catholic university in Washington would
iiave made our Puritan forefathers turn
over in their graves. At the banquet in
honor of the occasion were the president
and vice president of the United States
and several of the cabinet officers. The
secretary of state made a speech congrat
ulating both Catholic and Protestant on
the freedom we enjoy. The Presbyterian
president himself spoke a few kindly
words.
Cardinal Gibbons, of Baltimore, and
Bishop Gilmour, of Cleveland, represent
to the full the spirit of American patriot
ism that throbs in the warm hearts of
Catholics born and bred under the Stars
and Stripes. The Catholics of the new
time recognize the American spirit as
fully as anybody alive. Cardinal Gib-
i)ons
believes in the separation of church
and state, and in the reading of the Bible
by the common people. In his dedica
tion sermon at the university Bishop
Gilmour used these words:
Catholics have no contention with public schools
or state schools as such. They are willing to ac
cept them in America, as thef have dona ia Eu
rope. on condition that the child shall be taught
religion and the la-.vsof morality
When Talmage's church was burned
in Brooklyn, among the first to call on
him with words of sympathy -were some
Roman Catholic priests. He and they
had worked together in a common cause,
in a fight against immorality and skep
ticism. In the same fight, in the holy
crusade for education, for morality, for
the spiritualizing of the race in this age
of materialism, Catholic and Protestant
can afford to sink all sectarian bitterness
and clasp hands.
Who Own the United States?
Thomas G. Shearman is a rich man, a
lawyer, ulid a member of the church left
by Ilenry Ward Beecher. Mr. Shear
man is also an enthusiastic single tax
man, and opposed to the absorption of
the land of the United States into a few
hands.
He has been looking into statistics to
find out who at present own this country,
lie finds, to begin, that the rich are un
doubtedly growing richer and the poor
poorer. Of the wealthy persons within
liis own knowledge, there are forty-five
individuals and twenty-five estates worth
"rom $130,000,000 to §20,000,000. These
ieventv represent an aggregate wealth
)f 52*700,000,000, or over $37,55(0,000
•ach.
The figures show that at present one
ualf of the wealth of the United States
s owned by 40,000 persons. More than
wo-thirds of it all is owned by one-sev
ntieth of the population. The wealth
the country, evenly distributed, would
ive §1,000 per head to every man, wo
lan and child in the Union but one
v.-entieth of the population have got it
learly ail. It is probably not their fault
nore than that of false economic sys
em3 that causes riches to roll themselves
!i like this.
Pittsburg has sixty-seven millionaires,
Cleveland has sixty-three, while Boston
as two hundred. In three villages near
Tew York reside sixty persons whose
ggregate possessions foot up $500,000,
jJ. Four men in Chicago are worth
$20,000,000 each.
America i3 far richer than Great Brit
ain. The average annual income of the
hundred richest Englishmen is about
$450,000 the average annual income of
the hundred richest Americans is proba
bly §1,000,000. At the same time Mr.
Shearman finds that the average earn
ings of quite four-fifths of American
families do not reach $500 a year and
not a week passes that ^ien and mothers
and children do not starve to death in
this rich America.
Mr. Shearman concludes his paper:
Ths United States of America are practically
jvmed by less than 250,000 persons, constituting
ass than one in sixty of its adult male population.
'Within thirty years, the present methods of tax
on being continued, the United States of Amer
will be substantial^ owned by less than 50,000
ions, constituting leas than one in 600 of the
Keep Thanksgiving!
Let us keep it by all means. Let
If
It male population.
is plain that this cannot go on for
r.
us
keep it every year, all over the country
—north, south, east, west. Gather all
your family around you, every one.
Give your children the best dinner you
can afford. Let not ouo word of scold
ing come from your lips, let not a chid
ing thought enter vour heart. Let the
young ones have a rare day of perfect
happiness. Let them at least believe
they have something to be thankful for.
Sorrow and disappointment will come
to chill their bright young souls soon
enough. Let them say for at least one I
whole day: 1 am happy I am glad I was
born. For the time will come when they
cannot say that
What is more, if any of your children,
your relatives or friends, are estranged
from you, if you have parted in auger
and they have wandered away from you,
alone and in pain, go out to them this
day and bring them back. Bid them to
your Thanksgiving feast, and forgive and
be forgiven, for you need it as much as
they. The true and only philosophy of
life, if one would be happy, prosperous
and beloved, is to live constantly at
peace with all mankind.
Again, if there are unloved, unmated
^nes in your midst, bachelors, single
women who dwell alone, widows and
widowers, those lonely souls who are not
i -st best to anybody, bid them to your
feast, too. Make them feel for one day
in the year that there is somebody who
takes a genuine interest in them.
Did you ever think what it is not to be
th st best to any human being to have
not a soul who cares more for you than for
anybody else on earth? If you never did,
think of it now, you who have homes and
families. Remember the solitary, those
who have nobody to go home to, men and
women both: those who, with hearts full
of kindly emotions, yet are doomed to
walk through life unloved. Is there not
an infinite sadness in it?
What have you to be thankful for, dis
contented, disappointed man or woman?
1
with anthems and prayers of thanksgiv­
you have nothing else, yoi are to be
thankful for life itself. You have not
been so very happy in life that you feel
like giving thanks for it? Nevertheless
give tiianks. Consider what life is for.
It is struggle and strife mostly. Very
well. That is exactly what we want to
fie us for the lofty heritage of the human
soul. If we had no difficulties to wrestle
against, to develop the marvelous powers
of mind and body that lie latent within
us, we should be idiots and jelly fish.
Trouble means struggle, and struggle
means strength. See that you take it so.
Finally, if you believe in. the immor
tality of the soul, believe it to some
purpose. Remember always that you
are an immortal spirit, that nothing can
kill you, nothing can starve, hurt or
crush you. Whatever happens to you,
if you do your best, you will still be an
immortal spirit, developing a glorious
destiny, and nothing can alter that.
Therefore, no trouble or misfortune can
matter very much here, where nothing
is permanent but change.
If you have a trouble that you cannot
get rid of, don't go off alone and brood
over it. Ke&p yourself constantly busy
at some useful work. Help other people
all you can. Persistently keep bright
and jolly thoughts before your mind.
Carry this philosophy with you always,
and you can at length rise above all dif
ficulties, at length find out how to be
happy, though miserable.
A polite people, we Americans. Not
long since the wife of the Chinese min
ister in Washington, with a Chinese lady
friend, attempted to take a little fresh
air in the garden of the Chinese lega
tion building. They sat very quiet,
looking neither to the right nor left.
But in ten minutes a genuine mob had
gathered in front of the residence, and
was staring at the ladies. The throng
was not composed of the "lower class
es," either, but of the fashionable prom
enaders of Connecticut avenue. They
jostled each other #udely in their at
tempts to get a good view, and talked
loudly and coarsely about the women.
Some of their remarks were villainous.
Attendants came out of the legation
building and requested them to move on.
They would not. Not till a patrol wagon
and six policemen arrived to disperse
them did they budge an inch. Oh, yesl
Let us send some missionaries to the
heathen Chinese, by ail means.
Two projects are on foot to shorten the
time between Europe and America. One
is to build a raftway from Quebec to St.
Charles bay, at the eastern extremity of
Labrador. In St. Charles bay is a deep
harbor, as free frsm ice in winter as the
one at Halifax. From this far northern
point a line of swift steamers would
make regular trips to England. If the
plan be feasible, it will shorten the time
from Chicago to England two and three
fourths days. The other plan for rapid
ocean transit is to land passengers from
this side at Mil'ord Haven, on the west
coast of Wales, and then ship them by
rail to Liverpool or elsewhere. Milford
Haven would also be the point of de
barkation.
Little by little etectricity is coming
into its kingdom as the universal motive
power. In Europe two farmers have
succeeded in working a threshing ma
chine by electricity transmitted from a
motor 1,000 yards away. It is said now
that P. S. Bates, of York, Pa., has in
vented an electric motor that excels any
yet discovered. It is claimed that, once
started, Bates' motor will work 100,000
hours without requiring attention.
The New York Times remarks that tlie
sultan is really a person of considerable
influence in Turkey.
When you make a speech away from
home, don't put too much leaHring into
it, or the funny men of the newspapers
will begin to cry at you, Encyclopedial
Fashion note: Tender hearted ladies,
who would faint at sight of the cook
killing a chicken for .dinner, are still
wearing anywhere from oiM to-fluc tads
on their hats.
MINNESOTA NEWS NOTES.
An
epidemic of
diphtheria has broken
out at Moorhead.
Litchfield will vote on the question of
bonds for waterworks Nor. 25.
Great excitement exists at Springfield
over the discovery of a vein cf nard coal
two miles west at town.
Louis T. Stunsgaard, who was accused
of wholesale mil estate forgery al St.
Paul, was acquitted by the jury.
Architect A. H. Haas, of St. Paul,, has
designed an ice structure "JaO feet high,
on tlie Eiffel tower style, for the car
nival.
Burglars have been working Stillwater
houses of late, and many prominent
people have lost valuable jewels anil
money.
It is said the English syndicate will
continue the profit-sharing system with
the employes of the Pillsbury mills at
Minneapolis.
Frank Wood is under arrest at Iloctor
on a charge of horsestealing. No less
than fifteen horses have disapjeared i
from that neighborhood this fall.
Marshal litkiluigton Booth, high mogul
of the Salvatioa Army, has been hntking
after his forces in St. Paul and Minne
apolis during the past week. They do
need watching, and closely.
The state dairv fair and cor ?ntiop
will be held at Mankato on thelUa, 11th
and 12th of December. Some liberal
premiums ars offered for the best speci
mens of butter and cheese. The railroads
will give reduced rates.
For the month of October State Oil
Inspector Nicols turned into the state
treasury besides his salary. Tlie
barrels of oil inspected in Ramsey
county numbered 3,213, in Hennepin,
1,650 and in St. Louis 1,050.
A Winona farmer's wife died recently.
He washed and dressed the body to save
expense, put it in a rough box and drove
to town for a coffin. On the way back
he met another man and traded "horses,
then continuing his funeral.
The Washburn-Crosby Milling com
pany of Minneapolis annonnces that by
September, 1890. the time when its lease
will expire on the Washburn mills in
that city, it will have a $2,000,000 plant
in operation in Dulutli. with a daily ca
pacity of 6,000 barrels.
The government operations at the
head of Lake Pepin, which have been in
progress through the summer, will te
closed up next month. It was intend ^d
to expend the whole of the a ppropi.Na
tion of $050,000 set aside for work tliore
this season but it is found that the low
stage of water prevents.
The Minneapolis school authorities are
endeavoring to suppress the habit of
cigarette smoking among the school
scholars. It was found by investigation
that in some of the schools all of the
boys and many of the girls are addicted
to the habit, and whenever a new boy
comes he is made to learn the habit.
A new United States customs station
has been established on the south shore
of Lake of the Woods, near the mouth of
Rainy Lake river, with Deputy Collector
of Customs Hamline R. Prosser in
charge. Its object is to stop the whole
sale plundering of Uncle Sam's forests
on the northern boundary of Minnesota.
Three out of a flock of twenty-four
white swans were killed by parties on
the steamer Pepin, on Lake Pepin, in
two discharges of a fowling piece. One
of the swans measured six and a half
feet from tip to tip and weighed twenty
pounds. It was secured by Dr. Estes,
who will have it mounted.
A Montana man has bought §10.000
acres of the St. Paul and Duluth land,
between Mille Lacs and Duluth, on
which he will start a large sheep ranch.
He claims that Northern Minnesota is
far ahead of Montana for sheep raising
in several particulars. He will ouy morfe
land if the experiment is successful. He
paid §4 per acre for the land.
In the case of Sheriff Brandenburg
against the county commissioners of
Otter Tail county, in which a verdict
was recently rendered by Judges Baxter
and Searle. giving to the sheriff mileage
for one prisoner arrested oh the west
coast, he having claimed double mileage
for OM' trip on the ground that he ar
rested two men, the commissiohers have
decided to appeal the case to the su
preme court of the state.
Myller Post No. 1, G. A. R., Stillwater,
has become possessed of a relic of the
late war, being no less than a list of the
guard mount at Libby prison in 1864. It
Had been obtained bv the late Comrade
A. A. Capron, when ne was an inmate,
ana he kept it sacredly. His brother,W.
M. Capron. the executor of the property,
presented this roll to the post.
This story comes from Faribault: A
man who lives north of here near one of
the lakes is said to have killed 134 wild
ducks one morning last week. On look
ing out of the window early in the morn
ing he saw ducks extricate their legs
from the ice that had formed around
them while resting in the water the pre
vious night. The man took a corn cut
ter, went down to the- lake and clipped
off their heads.
Deputy Dairy Commissioner Bertram,
of St. Paul, has returned from a trip on
the Manitoba railway as far as Benson.
He states that the country merchants ex
press great anxiety concerning the en
forcement of the food laws, and are re
fusing to handle adulterated goods, espe
cially baking powders and vinegars. In
many instance.?, since the report of
the chemical analysis of these goods by
the commissioner, country dealers hate
labeled the cans at their own expense,
indicating whether or not the powders
contain alum.
To Test a Ballet .Stopper.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18.—
A board of
officers has been appointed to meet at
Washington barracks, D. C., on Nov. 18,
or as soon thereafter as practicable, for
the purpose of testing in the presence of
the inventor, A. N. Plymouth, the mer
its of a device which he claims will af
ford protection to the body from rifle and
pistol bullets.
Senator Washburn Arrives.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18.—Senator W.
D. Washburn, Of Minnesota, ha# arrived
here after several months absence in
Europe. He will remain most of th?
week and then go to his Uoirte in Mirt
neapolis for a short time before congress
meets.
Seoretary Proctor Has ftttlgned.
RUTLAND, VI ., Nov. 18.—S*cret(ftljr OF
War Proctor has resigned as president of
the Vermont Marble company, and his
son, Col. Fletcher D. Prootor, has bwn
elected to succeed him.
The professors who preside over the
defitinies of the Harvard Annex for wo
men report that they cannot always sup
ply the requests for women teachers who
have taken the full course there, sogreafe
the demand is.
The movement to fcave"94
a day, instead of 12 o'clock twice a day,
is still struggling for life. This style of
naming the hours is in use on the Cana
dian railways over a distance of 8,257
miles, birt somehow it tra-w»kno f*rth«r
sooth.
E. 1*.
MORRIS, MINN., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20. 1889.
Greuenii Directoo
JUDICIAL OFFICERS
District Judge—Hon. O. 1/. Brown
COUNTY OFFIOKRH
WbprlfT—OtMirso U Munro
Trowsuror—A. C. Thorpe
t'UrW of District Court—Tlios. Thomusson
Auditor—Ueorge M. Uiltinttii
Holster of Deeds—1-. II. Wellington
i Judge of I'rolxite—I ieortfc E. Darling
Attorney—N A. Flaherty
(lorom-r—It. L. llulburd
Hurveyor--D. T. Wheaton
Court Commissioner—\V. I-. Colyer
County Hupt of Schools— Wm. V. Blcknell
VILLAGE OFFICERS
President—N. li. Spurr
Councilors —ieorue M. (illtinHli, Anton
Watzke, II n. Wolff, S C. Murphy
Treasurer—Samuel Larson.
lteeorder—W. W. liriswolit
Marshal— IVter lintl'iiey
nstices of the Peace—John 1). Uillespie,
O K Camp
Assessor— I). T. Wheaton
TOWN CLERKS
Franinas—1? E Solset.li.Jr, Nanh PO
Darnen—It llrtiKn, Morris
Scott—P Church, Morris
Stevens—John Daly, Morris
F.ldorado—A Mackenzie. Herman
Donnelly—John Klint Donnelly
Swim Lake—O N Dohlcn, Nash
Moore—Ilenry Fels, Hancock
IVpperton—Peter Pierce, Morris
Maker— Fred Domarus, Morris
Everglade—F W Heller, liraceville
Sy linos— W Schrapps. Morris
Kendsville— A Young, Morris
Morris—K Hull, Morris
llorfon— Dennis Dewane, Morris
llotlgea—C l'arli, Hancock
CHURCH DIRECTORY
Con rrcKfltlonal—Uev. H. M. Horrick, l'astor
Met! odist Rev. Kllery, Pastor
Uom an Catholic—Rev. Geo. Gaskel), l'rlest
Seam inavian Evaiifi'l Luth'n—Rev. I'. A.
Diotric ison.of ScaniJii:, I\:stor
CIVIC SOCIETIES
A. F. & A.M.—Golden Sheaf L«nlBe, No.
A-.'A.
STONK,
O'BKIEN,Sec'y
MT. LEBANON It. A. CHAPTER, No. 47,
meets first Wednesday of each month.
JOHN HOUSE, H.
L. H. WELLINGTON. Sec'y
KNIGTHS TEMPLAR,—Bethel Command
ery, meets 2d and 4thMondays of each month.
D.
SUTHERLAND,
C. C. HANSON. Kec
e
a
a
o
fl
o
E.C.
I.O.O.K.—Crystal Lodge, No.132, meets at its
hall on Monday evening of each week.
C. A. PEPPER, N. G'.
BA. C. THORPE, R. S.
THE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Will be open as follows: Wednesday and
Saturday aftei "noons from 4 to 6 Wednesday
evening, 7 to 9. and Saturday evening, 7 jo 10.
tT.
D. GILLESPIE, Librarian.
BUS tSTESS CARDS.
BO. E. DARjLING.
Counselor at Law,
Practice In al] S'.ate and United StatesCourts.
Office over He igeson «fc Hanson's store.
A. FLAHJSItTY,
Lawyer.
County Att orncy.
MORRIS, MINNESOTA.
^TM. C\ BICKNELL,
Attorney at Law,
MORRIS, MINNESOTA
OOVoe over Stevens Co. Bank, st23-83
JJ T, BEVANS,
Attorney at Law,
MORRIS, MINNESOTA
W. REYNOLDS,
Attorney and Oonnsellor at Law,
Practices in all Courts of the State and
United States, and will take Important cases
n the U. S. Land Office.
Office over the Grant County Bank,
HERMAN, MINN.
A. MCCARTHY,
Notary Public & Conveyancer.
Abstracter and Examiner of Titles. Special
attention given to business before the United
States Land Office and Pension Bureau. De
fective titles remedied and perfected. Real
Estate, Loans and Insurance.
MORRIS, MINN.
L. IIULBURD
Physician and Surgeon.
CJ II. DULEY, M. D.
s.
MORRIS, MIHN.
Office over Chas. W. Rohne's drug store.
Dfflcehours from 8 to 0 o'clock A. M., and 1 to 2
j'clock p. M.
Physician and Surgeon.
Jgyofficeover Larson & Nileon'a store.
Atlantic Ave., Morris, Minn.
R. SUTHERLAND,
Physician and Surgeon.
Office over Stevens County Bank.
Office Hours—8 to 10 A. M., and 3 to 5 P. M.
W.MAUGHAN,
Veterinary Surgeon.
Horses and stock treated
l,y the day,weekormenth
pecial rates. Veteri
medicines farnisbed
to order. Allcallsprompt
I y attended to.
6tf Morris, Mink.
Metropolitan Hotel,
Morris, Minn.
F.BUNNELL,Formerly of the Laka ParkH«tel,
at Lake Pnrk. Minn.. Proprietor.
i CIL1U jm
view to the cnnort of tho commercial trade ana
08
43
Q8
O
a
A
•|M
a
O
'd
O
a
O
08
.8
!#5,
meet fc 1st. .and 3d Saturdays of each month.
O. C. HANSON, W.
\Y\ "YV. Ost iswor.D, Sec'y
J. A. R.—Overton Poet, No. 00, meets 2d and
4tli 1 "rldays of each month, at 8 o'clock
N. R. Si'UitK, Com
II. T. BEVASS, Adjt
A. O. I W.—Mot ri: l.oitrc, No. 55, meets
each Tuesday evening at. heir hall
E. W. RANDALL, M. W
Recorder
O. II.—Division No. 1, meets 1st Sun
da y Of each month, ill its hall, at7 H0 p. ni
GEO.
M.
ii. A.
GILTINAN,
FLAHERTY
Frcs't
Itee. Sec'y
C.T. A. SOCIETY.- Father Matrhew Socle
•„y. No. 7t!0 of the Catholic Total Abstinence
Society of America, regular meetings 1st and
3d Sundays of each month, in Assumption
Church, immediately after Mass. Visiting
members respectfully
invited.
P. A. MCCARTHY, Pres't
MORRIS,
Anti-Rusting Tinware!
Any Piece ol this Tinware which Rusts Out in
Two Years will be Replaced by a New One.
*3 SOLD ONLY 15 Y
BTONR
MORRIS, MIJN IN ESO TA.
Agents for a Full Line of Farm Machinery.
Contracts taken for Tubular Well and
Wind Mill Work.
J. D. GOOD,
(Established in 1869)
late Fiii
I, UIUUUI,/,
AND TINWARE!—»
FurniturE nf all IlBSGripiinnsI
ALL KINDS OF FARM PRODUCE TAKEN IN TRADE.
SSCoffins and Caskets Always on Hand$
ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLED.
A Full and Complete Stock of
All Kinds of
U E
Sash, Doors, Lai Stops, Etc.
Constantly on Hand.
Also LIME, CEMENT & PAINT.
&
IT
a
V
CO
«TJ
02
et-
O
O
OTQ
0
09
ct-
& DUMBLR,
l)L
uycinsrisr.
EDWIN J. JONES.
HOUSE & YOUNGQUIST,
DEALERS XIV
Of All Kinds.
Deering and Piano Harvesters and Binders Advance
Threshers, the Best in the World Hay Tools of All
Kinds Red Wing Wagons Buggies, Carriages
Pumps, Wind Mills, Feed Mills, Etc., Etc.
We Warrant All Goois to he First-Class in Every Particular.
-o
MY#
Handle none tut tlie
BEST GRADE OP BINDING TWINE.
Before Purchasing Twine or Farm Machinery, give us
a Call.
House & Youngquist,
MORRIS,
Miisnsr:
WORK
A.tJheTRXBUNE Office.
CLEAN, STRONG, AUTOMATIC.
-NO DUST OR ASHES-
REQUIRES NO ENGINEER.
For Further Particulars and Catalogue Address,
SAMUEL LABSOX.
For Cash or ia exchange fcr Conntry^Produce.
Wheaton
i.50 PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
^MajiKiS JEWELRY STORE.**
J. W. HARRIS, Proprietor.
—A Full Line of—
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silver Ware,
&cM &e., Constantly on Hand.
*A First-Class Jeweler aid Watchmaker Always ii Attendance.*
CALL AND EXAMINE GOODS!
LOUIS W. NOKTHCOTT,
—Jobber and Retail Dealer in
Music, Books,
Atlantic Avenue South, M.O IMS,
The Shipman Automatic Steam Engine!
Printers, Fanners, Jewelers,
Mechanics, Pupisg Water,
Saving Wood, Steam Launches,k
Fuel, lieroMMK.' Oil.
The Most Desirable Power in the
World for
NOTIONS, GROCERIES,
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes,
Crookerv, Grlass^weire. ©to
Bottom
Also, Agents for the Celebrated
STOUGHTON WAGON,
Norwegian Plow Company's Plow,
DUBUQUE, IOWA.
Atlantic Avenue, Between 5tli and 6ll» sts
Fred Bnckentta.
Patent Medicines,
Paints, Oils, Perfpgry, Toilet Articles, Wall Paper, Ets,:
Bridgeport
vgs?:?..v«.•
Brits, Hi
PIANOS.
lew Home and Eldredge Sewing Machines and Extras
Bterli
Mi
England
AND OTHER
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mm worn.
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POPE MANUFACTURING CO.,
janlliyl 291 WABASH AVENUE. HICAGO.
Larson & Nilson,
MORRIS, MINN.
JUaalerf in
DRY GOODS,
NILS A NILSON
CLOTHES
All|sf Which weJWii:
St.!<p></p>Prices,
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