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Morris tribune. [volume] (Morris, Minn.) 1880-2000, June 17, 1891, Image 1

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VOL. XVI, NO. 26.
THE 'JMHMVJE.
Published Wednesdays.
R. C. STEYENS,
k'ubllaber
OUcluI Paper of Sterens County.
WHEAT INVESTIGATION.
WEARY GRIND STILL CONTINUES
IN COMMITTEE.
A Number of Wituesses Testify as to tb*
Shipping of Wheat and Screenings—A
Groat Deal of liMi'Mtr l'ut iu Kvl
deuce.
ST. PAUI.7 June 10,—H. G. Stordock,
e^-AvanU-u of liie state penitentiary,
DOW a wheat lmy»r at Rothsay, was the
first jvit-acgs called by the committee
ami interviewed on the question of
dockage ami shipments from the country
elevators.
Ho s-iiit'i. he h.ul shipped some 6,000
buLi' 's Dnlnth in lt^t) and had suf
fered a loss of 5 cents per bushel by rea
son of the wheat being graded down.
He k ul also shipped to Minneapolis,
Wutic he L.d obi«iiied a better grade
but had bceu docked more. He was
Blue the dockage at Minneapolis was
fulv dun!) what it should have been.
In 'lMK ho shipped to Minneapolis and
IOSL L.iS grade on two-thirds of the
wheat shipped without cleaning.
conij .iaed to V»'eighmaster Reece at
Minneapolis and he made a special ex
amination of some of mv cars. Since
then I have had better weights.
I wish to state, without placing any
blame on the inspection department,
that it seemed to me they gave the ben
efit of the doubt to the shippers on line
wheat, but during the last season, I
fhink they gave the benefit of the doubt
to the terminal fellows."
His Own Standard.
The witness admitted in this connec
tion that he fixed his own standard on
line wheat, and that it was by this
standard he judged the department, »i}d
jie would not say positively that the de?
partment gave the terminal men the
advantage.
"How much commission do you re
ceive for buying wheat asked the in
spector,
Poes that concern this committee
Well. I get 2 cents per bushel, and hire
jay own"help. All I get is the ware
house and the money with which to buy
the wheat."
"Now, don't you collect 3 1-2 cents
from the farmer on every bushel of
wheat you buy
After some hesitation the witness $4'
jmtted that they did.
Looking Out fur Stordock.
"Now, why haven't you reported these
abuses, while ycu were complaining so
loudly of the inspection department?"
"It was a. matter of business with
me."
"Then you were not doing this out of
love for the public. It was merely a
personal matter"'"'
"Well, I think as n^uch of the public
as some other people. However. I am
working now for H. (Jr. Stordock. I
worked for the state of Minnesota and
the politicians for a good many years,'
found couldn't fill the bill. Now,
p,m not here tp complain against my
employers that is not what they ere*
ploy me for."
Mr. Stordock emphatically refused to
answer the question as to whether or
not he considered this margin exorbi
tant when the question was put to him
directly. He thought the companies
should charge some margin to pay the
expense of handling.
A lively discussion then ensued as to
whether the investigation should be ex
tended to the country elevators. Mr.
(Clausen wanted it extended there to
find out where the real fault was, and
to clear the department of charges made
against it. It wa3 finally decided
yestigate the country elevators',
llcgii'ating tli 3 Pries of Wlicat.
St.-PAUL. June 14.—Mr. Scott' was re
called when the committee reassembled.
After reviewing his testimony he was
asked if he knew anything in the condi
tion of the elevators which would d§
eeive the owners as to dirt. "No, I
can't say I do," he replied. At one time
the witness said Mr. Ruply said the
dockage placed on some wheat by Mr.
Higgins, his assistant, was not suffi
cient, but a second test sustained their
judgment. Gen. Barrett asked the wit
ness if he ever knew of a change in the
price of wheat to be ordered. He said
that on June 2, 188U, F. H. Irons or'
Sered an advance pf cents per bushel
en some vheai~, and 'the next day are:
Ruction of 3 cents per bushel'on certain
grades. Each member of the combine
was assessed to pay Irons $6,0CQ salary,
There was a committee who fixefl tfiQ
prices ordinarily, but iii.tW*
1 i cv UoCilLv
Iimi* ..^wi iLy to fix the prices
arbitrarily. The only member of this
committee he knew was a Mr. Cham
bers.
Charles Canning followed Mr. Scott
to the stand Tor a continuance of his
Examination.
1
"Did you never attempt to ascertain
whether you had an overage pr $
shortage in your eJevatorS" asked Mr.
i'My eievatpr ingn was sick and I did
pot last year."
The witness sai^ th^t it would not be
surprising it' the?" was an overage of
11,000 pushels in handling 50.000,000
purhcla. He thought a dockage of an
ounce to a bushel of wheat was too
much. Neither did he think one
fonrth an cmice would be right, but he
thought it could be done in less than an
ounce. He would not say thut he TiScf
ever docked Ies$ ^au: one 'ounce in buy
ing.
Tv'hat do you think of the ejrect of
posting 800,000
vx
damaged
Yfheat would bbi1-" was asked.
I Hunk it would rather bear the
wheat than bull it." He did not think
it would have affected the wheat in
Minneapolis if the Duluth wheat had
been posted, but it would have
Paralyzed the Baslne|
of the elevator in which the wheat VW
stored for
a
tune.
'Clausen and Canning fur-
pished entertainment most of the after
noon, beginning with a discussion of the
inspection rules and concluding with an
attempt on the part of Mr. Clausen to
discover the motive that led Mr. Can
ning to make complaint against the in
spect ion department. During the exam
ination Mr. Clauson made a statement
about the crop of 1800. The grain had
A green tinge, a condition never before
Noticed, and supposed to have been
caused by hot winds. Farmers com
plained against the grade, but when the
wheat went East it was graded still
lower. Mr. Clausen had Professor
Harper make a scientific examination of
the grain, and his letter proved that the
grades made by Mr. Clausen were too
liberal. lie could have answered the
complaints made by farmers by publish
ing the letter, but as it would be a de
fense for the Eastern buyers, who were
objecting to the grade and thereby in
jure the farmers still further, he on the
advice of Governor Merriam, did not
make the letter public,
if&>K
lion lie rrlre of Wheat Is Fixed.
ST. PAU., June 16. -Charles Canning
again took the stand when the wheat
investigation was resumed. Inspector
Clausen war. after him with several per
tinent questions, but the general answer
was "I don't recollect."
Mr. Erwm took the witness in hand,
but failed to induce him to rememberj
anything.
Mr. Canning corrected his statement.
made the previous day that the farmers
were compelled to sell their wheat early
and admitted that they could store it in
any of the elevators of the country uutil
ready to sell it. Canning admitted that
the farmers sold their poort .-t wheat in
the tall, which would naturally tend to
make the proportion of low grades
greater. And last, but not least, Can-:
ning admitted that he himself had taken
advantage of the re-inspection rule,
which he was condemning, and had
thought it nothing wrong.
At the afternoon session Deputy In
spector Hammond, oi' Duluth. was
placed on the stand. The witness knew
nothing as to the raising of the grade by
Cross, but he said the invariable rule of
the department was to deal liberally
with the shipper in grading.
George Tileston, of JSt. Cloud, gave
come interesting testimony on the way
|he line elevators regulated the price of
wheat in the country. He understood
these representatives held meetings oc
casionally and arranged matters, but
did not think there was a combination
to regulate arbitrarily the price of grain.
He understood that if at certain
seasons some of these elevators closed
that they share the profits of those run
ning.
Assistant Attorney General Childs
questioned the gentleman from St.
Cloud as to whether he knew that
Frank Irons, of Minneapolis, furnished
price lists to all the lawyers of the
Northwest,
Mr. Tileston had undeifctood that he
did. The witness acknowledged that
it would appear that the elevator com
pany had been governed by the same
Told What He Had Heard,
ST. PAUL, June 16.—Mr. J. W. Pres­
ton, formerly a deputy grain inspector
at Duluth from 1885 to 1889, was the
first witness before the legislative in
vestigation committee. Ho had no
knowledge of any grain being shipped
out without inspection, but had heard it
mentioned that such was the case. He
went on to tell what he had heard from
"some of the other bov3,"
Mr. Preston attended to the out ship
ments, but he never knew of a kernal
being sent out without inspection. He
did not think that dirty wheat could be
transmitted from the bins into a boat
without the inspector knowing of it, but
before it would be possible to make the
discovery a considerable amount of dirty
wheat might be emptied into the boat.
However, it wras not the intention of
the inspectors to allow off grades or
dirty wheat to go out, and the inspec
tors, so far an he knew were vigilant in
the discharge of their duties.
No Collusion.
There was no collusion whatsoever so
far as he knew between the inspectors
and the elevator men, but there was
some trouble experienced in getting
wheat properly cleaned, the elevator
men desiring very naturally to get rid
of the wheat as it was put in the bins,
and the inspection served as a check
on this kind of business. The wheat
that was shipped {Tut without inspec:
tion was, he believed, that which was
on hand when the state inspection be?
gan. This was in 1885.
Mr. Preston testified that he knew
nothing about any screenings being
shipped, but neither did he know of any
empty cars being loaded with wheat in
the elevators at night. On cross exam
ination by Erwin, Preston said that it
was the duty of the state weighman to
look after the spouts from the bins
when a vessel wa3 loaded.
NO FRAUD THERE,
Experts Find Nothing Wrong in Dulut^i
Elevator Boolts.
DULUTH, June 14.—The experts at
work on the Duluth elevator books
claim that they will finish their labors
during the day,' and will then prepare a
voluminous report extending from 198(3
down to the present time. There wil|
be nothing to report of a fraudulent
nature.
KANSAS'ALLIANCE RETURNS.
Twenty-five Sab-Alliances Repudiate tl»e
Third J*arty.
CHICAGO,
Judiated
June ]6.—A special from
Topeka, Kan., says that the returns re
ceived by the Alliance executive com
mittee from the sub-alliances, which
were asked to pass judgment on the
work done tiie Cincinnati conten
tion, are far fro^h encouraging tp the
People's party politicians. It is known
that twehty-gve sub-Alliances have re=
the third party moveaieufc.
ifteep of these have
gt&te All'**— io the
_v,u anu ten to the Republican
state central committee. The Cloud
county Alliance has adopted the follow
ing resolution Whereas,' the South
was r.p,t^cpi-esented in the Cincinnati
convention and, whereas, we believe
the third party will disrupt the Repub
lican party to the benefit of the Demo
cratic pariy. thcrefo.rej be it resolved,
that 7e eibjindon the third party to re
turn to our past affiliation." These
resolutions, it is said, haye a double sig
nificance, because Cloud county is the
home of Senator Wheeler, the only Al
liance member of the senate.
Tliirty-one iu the Family.
DUBUQUE, Iowa, June 10.—Robert
Packard and wife, living on a farm near
New Hartford, Iowa, are tho parents of
twenty-nine living children. The old
est a injin 41) years eld. is married and
lives'on a farm adjoining the parental
homestead, The other twenty-eight are
stiU single and live at home. Only one
of the family is a girl. The first child
was born single, the next five births
produced triplets. The others were seta
of twins. The youngest child ia 10
years old. Packard and his wife are
healthy and enjoying a fcreen old age in
the midst of the ptunerous family.
£,otulou Uat-kmeu'* Strike Knded.
LONDON, June 13.—The bussmeivs
strike has been settled. The masters
concede a twelve-hour day with a slight
increase of wages. The settlement of
the strike is the cause of very general
satisfaction.
Abb.att Chosen Premier.
OTTAWA, Ont., June 12.—Hon. J. J.
C. Abbott has been requested to form a
cabinet.
Centennial Affairs Wound Up.
PHILADELPHIA, June 13.—Attorney
Samuel Hollingsworth, representing the
gentlemen comprising the centennial
board of finance, have made application
to Judge Butler, in the United States
circuit court, for their discharge. It
was stated that all the matters in the
hands of the board had been disposed of
and that they wanted to be relieved,
there being no other duties to attend to.
There was, it was related, a balance of
cash on hand amounting to $13,103.01,
which i v was proposed to donate to the
Pennsylvania museum and the historical
society.
MINNESOTA NEWS ITEMS
Faribault is to have n win fence fac
tory.
A farmers' institute was held at Alex
andria last week.
The Eighth Minnesota held a reunion
at Farmington Thursday last.
The St. Paul ball club will be trans
ferred to Duluth July 4, it is eaid.
Worthington's waterworks will cost
$16,000, The contract has been let.
The state supreme court has decided
that the lien law of 1889 is constitu
tional.
Blue Earth's militia company has
been mustered out. It fell below the
standard.
The twenty-fourth annual reunion of
the First Minnesota will be held at
Winona June 2':.
At Pipestone Walter Smiley was shot
in the thigh by Marshal Walkup, out of
mistake for a burglar.
The work of deepening the channel of
the Mississippi between St. Paul and
Minneapolis has been begun.
The State Firemen's association met
in annual session at. Jordan last week.
Three hnndsed delegates were present.
Otter Tail county citizens complain
loudly of illegal seining in the lakes of
that county. They want a deputy game
warden.
The Shakopee Mill company has made
an assignment. Assets, $50,000 liabil
ities, $37,000. Insufficient working
capital is the principal cause.
At the annual meetings of the Duluth
and Iron Range Railroad company and
the Minnesota Iron company, H. R.
Bishop was elected president.
Engineer De La Barre, of tho St. An
thony Falls Water Power company, has
already begun work on the preliminary
surveys for the new dam at Minneapolis.
The Winona, Minn., city council has
decided to advertise for bids for build
inga new high bridge between Winona
and the Wisconsin side of the Missis
sippi.
The bodies of Charley Coles and
Edward Berg, at Bird Island, whose
fate was uncertain, have been found
in the lake. Tliey were drowned while
fishing.
Col. Willis, who was oil inspector un
der Ciovernor McGill, has been ap
pointed oil inspector to fill the vacancy
caused by the resignation of Sam
Nichols.
Grand Rapids, Minn., has voted on
incorporating as a village by nearly a
unanimous vote. The election was con
ducted under the Australian law, and it
worked finely.
The Beau ford woods, five miles north
of Mapleton, have the appearance of
Wintfr, the army of caterpillars having
taken the leaves off of every kind of tree
except the butternut. In some places
they are over an inch thick on the
trees.
In the case of Jack Koch and Bob
Wood, charged with the murder of
John Bauer, at Eden Valley, last Feb
ruary, the jury brought in a verdict
of manslaughter in the second degree.
A motion for a new trial was at once
made.
The corner stone of the new high
school building at Duluth was laid
Monday. Ignatius Donnelly delivered
an address and other appropriate cere
monies followed. The building will
cost $300,000.
At Beaver Falls, Minn., the barns
and stables connected with the Syndi
cate house were burned with three val
uable horses, cows, cutters, harness,
etc. No insurance. The fire was of
incendiary origin.
The Winona city council has sus
pended Fire Marshal J. W. Ryan and
preferred charges of intoxication" and
misappropriation of fuu ds amounting td
over $400, given him by the firemen for
the purchase of uniforms.
Max Giniski, aged 5, and L* Katz,
aged 4, were run over and killed by at
motor train on the West side, St, Paul
They were playing on the street' cross
ing the track. "Jhe bodieg were terribly
manglpd.
The directors of the Little Falls,
Minn,, toller mill company, whose flour
mill was destroyed by fire last week,
have decided to rebuild as soon as pos
sible. The new plant will have a
capacity of 730 barrels and only the
most improved machinery will be used.
The thirty-fourth annual convention
of the Minnesota grand lodge, I. O.
T., was held at Masonic TemplerMiniie
apolis, last week." Thf} secretary's rp:
port shows a liieinbership' pf 7,02(5, an
increase of I'.OOO during the year,
loo delegates were in fttteftdatiee.
A Chvietlan
The G. A. R. encampment, which
has been in session the past week
at St. Cloud, closed Saturday. The
place selected for holding the next
encampment is Melrose. The encamp
ment elected V. H. Harris, of Frank
Daggett post, Litchfield, district com
mander, with A. G. Jaques, of Sauk
Center senior vice and Manning Can
field, of Long Prarie, junior vice.
A man whose identity up to this time
is, not established, made a ferocious
assault with a knife upon two women
who were entering their living rooms,
up stairs, at 240 Third avenue south,
Minneapolis. Neither woman was
dangerously wounded, although their
escape is somewhat wonderful. Their
names are Lottie Wheeler and Lillie
Cameron,
A man living at Roodhonse, His.,
has a deed to St. Paul and Minneapolis.
City Attorney Russell, of Minneapolis,
has received a letter from him. His
deed was given by an Indian chief
in 1767 to a tract of land beginning at
St. Anthony falls, and running south to
the Chippewa river, thence east 100
miles, thence north 100 miles, and
thence west to the place of beginning.
This deed covers all of St. Paul, part of
Minneapolis and the country immedi
ately south and east for 100 miles.
Whether the deed is worth anything or
not the city attorney of course doe3 not
know. Mr. Russell has so written to
the man. It seems that the matter has
been referred to government official#
Washington.
THE WEEK'S EVENTS.
News of Importance Given Brief Men
tion.
Sir William Gordon Cumming and
his bride will come to the United States
in the fall.
A syndicate of New Yorkers are nego
tiating for the purchase of The Boston
Journal,
H. C. Cross was elected president and
J. Waldo vice president of the*Missouri,
Kansas and Texas railway.
The committee of artists to select new
coin designs met at Washington, and
after examing about 300 rejected them
?y:. C-'•:
r,t 7v
NEW-
MISS MART THOMPSON
Has opened Millinery Rooms in Johnson's
lluildlng, corner of l'Mftli Btreet and At
lantic Avenue, where she will keep a
good supply of
MILLINERY GUMS
Of tbe J-.uto.st im.l Most, -Fashionable Styles.
DRESSMAKING
In Connection.
Evory effort will he made to ploaae patrons.
Ladles are respectfully invited to call.
CYRUS, MINN,
The Farmers' Union Creamery Co., of
Cyrus, Minn., will commence operations
on Monday, May 11th, 1891. Having se
cured the services of an experienced
butter maker of Wisconsin, the company
feel confident that they can please their
patrons in the article of Butter they will
manufacture.
All orders promptly attended to.
Leave orders with T. A. Callahan, Mor
ris, who will attend to the same.
Remember, we are on the
West Side, near the post office.
a E. DYE & GO.
BUSINESS CARDS.
JJ. T. BEVANS,
Attorney at Law,
MORRIS, MINNESOTA
W.REYNOLDS,
Counselor at Law,
Practices in all Courts of tlip. and'
United HUttes, ftncj will t(Ke Important oases
fi the U. 8'. Land OMce.
Office over tl\c Qrant County Bank,
H.r
O k V U I-
-„.*vention will be held
island, near Lake City, under
the auspices of John G. Woolley, July
19 to 20 inclusive. Mr. Woolley an
nounces that the convention will be "as
democratic) as alcohol, as unpartisan as
poverty, and as unsectarian as sin."
Able speakers have been engaged.
ft
PRICES LOW!
E. E. SOLSETII, Sr., Pre&U.
II. P. HANSON, Scc'y.
Cyrus, Minn., May 0,1891. 20tf
Don't Kiel
Because you can't buy Boots
and Shoes in Morris, but bear
in mind that we will receive on
or about March first, a large
invoice direct from the manu
facturers, which we intend to
offer from ten to fifteen per
cent, lower than usual.
It will pay you financially to
look us over before squander
ing your money elsewhere.
HERMAN. MINN.
HULBURD
Physician and Surgeon,
MORRIS, MINN,
Office over Chas. W. Roline's drug store.
Jfllcehotirg from8 to0a'oicpk J( ft. 'A'lfS 1 'to 2
A. MCCARTHY,
Nota**'
x^ablio and Convey
ancer.
Abstractor and Examiner of Titles. 3peolal
attention given to btisinosa before the United
SfratQs Land OfTlce n.n'd Pension Bureau. De
fective titles remedied and perfected. Heal
Estate, Loans and Insurq-nce.
MOltlllS, MINN.
It. SUTHERLAND,
Physician and Surgeon.
Office over Stevens County Bank.
Office Hours—8 to 10 A. M., and 3 too P.M.
W.MATJGHAN,
Veterinary Surgeon,
Monnis, MINNESOTA.
QEO. E. DARLING.
Counselor at Law.
Praetioein nil State aud United StatesCowrts.
Office over Helgoson & Hanson'sstore.
A. FLAHERTY,
Xiawyer.
MOKKIS, MINNESOTA.
County Attorney.
T^pi. C. BICKNELL,
Attorney at Law,
MORRIS, MINNESOTA
OffloeoyerStevensCo. Bank. st23-85
iHi
Isthu Uut lioUi-clUiId liCUl
PILES,
SALT RHEUM, ECZEMA,
mm
AND ALL
DISEASES,
Pric«i BO cents. Send 3 "two-cent, stamps foi' fr69
sample, box and book.
TAR-0ID COMPANY. Chicago, III.
H. L. HULBURD & 00., Agents.
MORBIB, Mtim
p. ft.
Abstracts
Fall'l'aymeat
TCPoT»TV»
AQT1Q
School Bonds
IP.
MM'
Notaries Pule. Compcii. Ocean Steamship Tickets.
FOREIGN EXCHANGE.
for
an'Ileal
Ocean Steamship Tickets
General Collection
General Land Office,
—Will hereafter be found in the—
3Sr©"W" Brick. Block,
With a Full Line of
STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES!
The Finest Line of Bottled Goods, Canned, Preserved
and Evaporated Fruits in the city.
Teas and Coffees a Specialty!
&.
MORRIS, MINN., WEDNESDAY, JUNE 17. 189J. $1.50 PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE.
•. A. MCCARTHY. E. P. 0'BHIBK.
MCCARTHY
MORRIS, MINNESOTA.
i farm Loans, School Bonds,
Low Rates.
Notarial and Conveyancing
arrangements whereby we can sell Tickets and take Secured Notes for same, payable in
fall. No\» is your chance to send for your friends iu tlfe Old Country.
Foreign Exchange, 8s?*a"
"Dc-n vie For Soldiers, Sailors, Widows and Orphans, procured and promptly
X^UIloIUXlO attended to.
SYVERSON & THORSTAD,
-Dealcfw in-
"11
i i y
New Stock of Crockery and Glassware!
Car Load of JBrai* and Shorts Just Received
Have alaa added a
LINE OF BOOTS AND SHOE^i
Which will sell for Cash at Bottom Prices.
Cash paid for Eggs and Potatoes. Highest Market Price
Paid for First-class Dairy Butter.
CALL AND SEE 3IE,-^-.
ILLFI
A Full and Complete Stock of
All Kinds of
IT MB E R,
Constantly on H^ntT.
Also LIME, CEMENT & PAINT.
S. J. Stebbins & Co.
Have a largely increased stock of Staple and
Fancy Groceries, Crockery, Glassware, etc.
Their stock of canned and evaporated
Fruits, Preserves and Bottled Goods was
never as large and cnoice as now. Fresh
Fruits and Vegetables always on hand.
Choice Tobaccos and Cigars a specialty.
Eggs, Good Butter and all kinds of Veget
ables always wanted at the highest market
price. All kinds of goods will be sold very
low for Cash. Remember, S. J. STEBBINS
& CO. are always glad to see you, and will
do their best to serve you.
cn.,
S
Property in Stevens County.
pflQl For Sale, Rout or Exchange in all parts of the county. Alaoolty
At Cell XJOlJCtLiC property in St. Paul and Minneapolis to Trade for Farm Lands.
AY hat have you for trade? What do you want? Call and Examine our List.
Tnciinn'nnn Fire, Lightning, Cyclone, Tornado, Windstorm, Live Stock, Llfo,
xXJLoUJL Ctiuv/t?* Endowment, Accidental, Sick Benefit, Old Age, Total Abstainers,
or any Kind vou want. Take your choice. We can Insure you on the Cosh plan, InstalJ
ment'or
Plane, as you wish. Premiums Low. Call and see us.
On alt the Best Plau», at Low Rates of Interest. Straight Plaa,
J? Cll ill -LlUCV-LLO Installment Plan,On or Before Plan, I^oan it Building Association
Plan, or any other plan. Which do you prefer? Call autf SW us.
*ecorded. Taxes Paid. apem
Old Country. We have ^completed
p'rt*
WOTUltor
ttadMercaut,,cA8encyKas,nessaSpeoialty'
Government prosecuted.
Publio's Patronage Respectfully Solicited.
5
Tin, Sheet Iron and Copper Workers.
QE3STEFL.A.X-I J0i|8H0P.
Kerosene and Machine Oil for Sale. 1
Next Door to TMbune Building, MORRIS, MINN.
Household and EJdredge Sewing Machine for Sale,
Etc.
EDWIN J. JONES
J. D.
lst:
For Caeh or fi»exchange fcr Coaatry^Prodnce.
1.11 i I
Hi
•l a E 5^
-Fine Assortment oi-
Bedroom Suits, Parlor Suits,
Couches, Lounges, Writing Deskai
Chairs of All Descriptions, Carpets, Bed Springs*
Bod Quilts, Pillows, Oil Cloths, Mirrors,
Picture Frames, Etc., Etc.
HARDWARE, COOK STOVES, HEATiNG STOVES, CUTLERY,
FAR3I I3IPLE3IE3VTS, &c.
CALL AND EXAMINE GOODS AND PRICES!
If. ve have not got what you want, we will taka
pleasure in ordering it for you.
Respectfully yours,
xJ.
MORRIS
Di QOOD,
SetznuLel Larson,
Dealers :c
Mrsr goods.
NOTIONS, GROCERIES,
IE3:E_£OD"5r Zfcv/f-iiJDIEi CLOTHES
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS,
Hats, Oaps, Boots, Shoes,
Orookerv, G-lassware. ©to
All tf Vftlch v Wil I f,'! ft
Bottom Prices,
Also, Agents for tlie Celebrated
STOUGHTON WAGON,
Norwegian Plow Company's Plow,
DUBUQUE, IOWA.
New Brick Store, Atlantic Avenue.
WOLFF & THOELE
Will Constantly Keep on Hand a Full
Line of
Too Numerous to Specify.
Also a Large Variety of
One and Two Seated Baggies and Carts.
Among the Machines and Extras we handle are
the Osborne, the Minneapolis and Wood's,
HIGHEST PfilCE PAID FOR ALL KINDS OF GRAIN!
Come and See Us Before You Buy.
New dijLobirters!—
Ired Bfliiiin,
IPa/texit 3yCeciioin.es,
Paints, Oils, Perfumery, Toilet Articles, fall Paper, Ete.
Larson's New Brick Store, Morris, Minn.
At the RIBUNE Office.
MINNESCT
HISTX?Wl.CAt
i SOCIETY I
Historical 8ocirty~_
S NEW STORE!
lements-K
I

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