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The star and Newark advertiser. (Newark, N.J.) 1908-1909, April 27, 1908, EVENING EDITION, Image 6

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IT^iU THE BEST SPORTING PAGES IN NEW JERSEYlIllH f
KING CASEY LIKED COOK NEUER'S DISHES OF FREE PASSES-BY ARTIST DENNIS
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FIRST ENFORCEMENT OF
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RESISTANCE
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UMPIRE
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“PLAY THE GAME” IS THE
SLOGAN HEARD IN LIFE
And BasebaU Players Are Not Alone in Following
Out This Instruction, for Every Loyal Person
Is Playing the Game ol Lite to
Win Ont in the Big Game.
BY TOM DUGAN.
DID you ever see or hear tell of a man who has
jumped into the public limelight as quickly as has
Manager Stallings, of tho Tigers team? Right in
tho home stretch where he was commencing his Eastern
League pennant race for tho year, this tall Southerner by
birth and a Northern man by adoption, has gained tho
pedestal of fame which few men ever get in such a short
time. As I stood with him under the grandstand at the
baseball park last Saturday and heard him explain his
line of baseball fight I was forced to admire hlm.for Ills
pluck. “I am not four-flushing,” said Stallings, "and I
don’t intend to do any such thing. I have never done It in my life and I
don't come from a stocl: that did. When I say that I am going to have a
baseball team hero the like of which never played for the patronage of local
fans, I mer.n just what that English indicates.
He Came Here Late.
Here I "m with a misfit team. I know that I came here, a mofith late
and I didn’t have time to get my tickets for the season’s game
ready, let alone tirm enough to get a team together. Within ten
days I’ll have a team that will make all the others step lively
I will have a team hero that will play the game. I am playing the
game to get one, and if I do now and then show a bit of temper I don’t think
tho Newark public is going to judge me harshly. I have never done anything
in my career as a baseball manager for which I feel now or ever did feel
that I should make any apologies. I am talking in this strain because of that
'rumpus with the umpire tho other day. When I tell you anything you can
bank on it, and when I say that I do not believe in umpire baiting you can
take it that I am in earnest. But I will not be robbed of my rights, tight
or no light. And I want to say now that when Pat Powers or any one else
says that this man that I had the row with never had a row with any other
manager in this league, it's a lie. I ean't put it any stronger. This same
man was mobbed on your very field here only last summer, yet Powers
says he never had any trouble. Baseball politics will not go with me. I am
in the game to make money. I made the Buffalo club—made It and I was half
owner of It; $53,000 my first year in that city. If I hadn’t played the game
do you think I would have made it?
He ta playing the Game Here.
“X am only playing the right kind of
a game when I protest against the
sending of any man to umpire in this
city who might do something that
would prevent the game being played
here, and I have the assurance of Chief
Cprbitt and of Captain Christie that
they will never permit an umpire to
c->me to this city and officiate on Sun
days Whose actions so arouse the fans
on week days that a police guard has
to be detailed. I will never see an
umpire abused by my team on or off
the field. But down in my heart I
know some umpires whose game it is
to play Into the hands of others and
then I will assert my manhood every
time and protect myself and play the
game as it should be played.”
gturtliiig Talk, Tills.
I didn’t have a remark to inject dur
ing the entire time that Sailings stood
there, with both hands shoved into his
overcoat pockets, looking me straight
in tho eye. When lie said “You can
hank on it that X never ll<” I lielleved
him then and there, for his manner in
Itself was so sincere. Ho said more
startling things, which 1 ventured to
remark might be kept under cover.
"Oh pshaw, you call that diplomacy.
I want to tell you that the public will
stand by You when they find you
honest and upright.”
Guess He Is Piny lug llic Giune.
From what he said I judge Stallings
is determined to play the game as far
as in his opinion it should be played
to bring about better results over those
existing here last year. Of these con
ditions I am not familiar with, but I
have heard a great deal. I heard that
one manager here fell into disfavor so
badly that in one circle Ills name was
never mentioned. Stallings doesn't give
a* rap whether or not his is. He has
the winning card, and he is playing it
right here now. He is going to
give Newarkera the best team that
money can buy, and when he docs it
there will be no need of mentioning
his name. The public will do it, and
the rest will come easy. Perhaps bet
ter than that *53,000 In Buffalo.
I guess everybody I met Saturday
was playing the game. I strolled into
a barber shop not a pebble's throw
from the Four Corners and sat in one
of the vacant chairs and gaked at the
sign over the glass, “Manicuring, 35
cents.” "he fellow who had charge of
the seat I selected lias the honor of
having a bald head. He. looked me over
and whispered ih dulcet tones, "Have
a hair-cut?” I looked at the sign, and
then asked the price of the job, and,
when told, I was willing. “Now,” began
the barber with the bald spot, "you
should do something to preserve your
hair. Singeing it would be the proper
thing. About six times of this and a
little attention and you will be able to
preserve your hair.” Now, why do I
draw the barber into this column.
That's easy. He was "playing the
game,” all riglfr, and I had to admire
him. I will give him a trial at the
singeing, all right, for I have to ad
mire his loyalty to Ills boss. It wasn’t
about my hair ho was concerned, but
he wanted to swell the batting average
for Saturday in his employer’s till.
Surely there is a good lesson to learn
fr m this.
Another Loyal Fellow.
Right back of me in the scorer’s
box Saturday cat a young man who is
well and, I must say, favorably known
hero, who has certain reasons to be
pleased whenever certain yells are
heard at the baseball par!:. lie heard
them there, and right away his loyalty
to liis boss jumped into his throat, and
he called me by name and said “What's
that mean?" “Why, John,” I replied,
“our office boys are not out hero jet.
Give us a chance." I was as loyal as
my friend John, at that, wasn’t I, Mac?
| Peter Hauck&Co. |
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JIMMY CASEY’S BEAVERS WIN IN A WALK
“Tacks” Neuer Gives Nine Bases
on Balls and Hits
Batter.
BY K1DDO.
They won In a walk. That would be
tho best way of sizing up the Beavers
yesterday afternoon at the local ball
yard. Mr. Neuer, our new, lean, lanky,
light-haired young southpaw from
Clark Griffith's stock farm, was cer
tainly charitably inclined yesterday.
Everything he'did was fr<Te, and wo
don’t suppose he tool: any money for
what he did. Nine of the Beavers
strolled. It seemed a great afternoon
for strolling, and the ten thousand or
more fans who strolled to the local
yard wished that they had taken a
walk in a different direction when
"Tacks" served them with a six-day
pedestrian stun*.
The BeaVors did not have to do any
thing but just brush up their, corns
and bo prepared for a walk. Neuer,
however, played favorites in the walk
ing line, giving Gentle Jimmy Casey
four free health walks to the first sta
tion. Casey turned his walks into runs,
WERE MADE TO
LOOK VERY EASY
The Newark academicians are a
proud lot today, because their sprinters
won the honors in the relay races held
Saturday at Philadelphia under the
auspices of the University of Pennsyl
vania.
At this meet the world’s pole vault
record was made hy W. R. Dray, of
Yale, who surpassed his record of a
few years ago by clearing the bar at
Vi feet 6% inches. Another world’s rec
ord was eqiialed when A.,B. Shaw did
the high hurdles in 15 1-5 seconds. This
was the record held by A. C. Kraenz
lein, of Pennsylvania.
SUNDAY’S RESULTS.
EASTERN LEAGUE.
Montreal 8, Newark 5.
Jersey City 4, Rochester- 3.
Providence 5, Toronto 3.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Cincinnati 4. St. Louis 0.
STANDING OF THE CLUBS.
EASTERN LEAGUE.
W.L.P.C. W.L.P.C.
Baltimore ..3 1 .750 Providence ..2 2 .500
Jersey City.2 1 .067 Newark .2 3 . 400
Rochester ...2 2 . 500 Montreal .2 3 .400
Buffalo .2 2 .500 Toronto .1 2 .333
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
W.L.P.C.I W.L.P.C.
St. Louis ...7 -I .6361 Athletics ....6 5 .545
New York...6 4 .600! Chicago .5 6 .155
Cle\ eland ...5 4 .555! Detroit .3 6 . 333
Boston .6 5 . 543] Washington .3 7 .300
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
W.L.P.C.I W.L.P.C.
Chicago .7 2 .777] Boston .5 6 .506
New York...6 4 . 600 Cincinnati ..5 6 .500
Pittsburg ...6 4 .600 Phlla .4 6 . 400]
Brooklyn ...5 5 , 500|St. Louis.2 9 .182
SCHEDULE FOR TODAY.
EASTERN LEAGUE.
Montreal at Newark.
Rochester at Jersey City.
Buffalo at Baltimore.
Toronto at Providence.
AMERICAN LEAGUE.
Washington nt Philadelphia.
Boston at Neiw York.
Chicago at St. Louis.
Detroit nt Cleveland.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Philadelphia at Brooklyn.
New York at Boston.
Pittsburg at Chicago.
St. Louis at Cincinnati.
WAGNER TO PLAY AT ELIZABETH.
Clarence Wagner, the former Newark
High School boy, who entered profes
sional baseball a year ago and played
with Columbia, South Carolina. At
lantic League, has signed with Law
son’s Elizabeth team. Wagner's salary
was cut this spring, and he refused ttj
play in the South.
and they put his team comfortably in
the lead at the finish.
The Tigers' bats wefe busy on several
occasions, bui the walking stunt beat
them. "Digger” Stanley lived up to his
BEAN’S SKEETERS
WIN FIRST GAME

In Presence of 10,000 People
Jersey City Bests Broncos
at Hoboken.
Victory over Rochester’s fast
Broncos before a crowd estimated at
10,000 people was the feature of Joe
Bean’s Sunday blow-off at Hoboken
yesterday, where the Skeeters are to
play their Sunday games this season.
Pfanmiller. one of the champion bench
warmers of the Eastern League, went
to the rescue for Joe Bean in the
seventh inning, when Lew Wiltse
weakened and the Broncos seemed
about to get away with the game.
Ground'rules had to be established,
and were this not so a long hit by
Steamer Flannigan In the ninth Inning
would have been good for the circuit.
Henloj; pitched for Rochester, but the
Skeeters managed to bunch hits off
him in the se-jnd inning and scored
two runs.
The final score was 4 to 3.
SURROGATE’S NOTICES.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby Riven that the accounts of
the subscribers, executors of and trustees under
the last will and testament of Peter F. Flood,
deceased, will be audited, and stated by the
Surrogate and reported for settlement to the
Orphans’ Court of the county of Essex, on
Saturday, the sixteenth day of May next.
FIDELITY TRUST CO..
FRANKLIN CONKLIN.
MARGARET M. FLOOD.
Dated April 6. 1908. __
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby given that the accounts of
the subscriber, the administrator of the estate
of Annie Reilly, deceased, will bo audited and
stated by the Surrogate and reported for set
tlement to the Orphans’ Court of the county
of Essex, cn Saturday, the second day of
BENJAMIN F. JONES.
Dated March 23. 1908.
Benjamin F. Jones,
Proctor pro se.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice Is hereby given that-Hhe accounts of
the subscriber, administrator pendente lite of
George W. Collard, deceased, will be audited
and stated by the Surrogate and reported for
settlement to the Orphans’ Court of the county
of Essex, on Saturday, the second day of May
HARRY H. COLLARD.
Dated March 24. 1908.
Joseph A. Beecher,
Proctor. __
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice Is hereby given that the accounts of
the subscriber, the executrix of William F.
Bailey, deceased, who was assignee of Philip
J. Orben. assigned, will be audited and stated
by the Surrogate and reported for settlement
to the Orphans’ Court of the county of Essex,
on Saturday, the second day of May next.
ISABELLE B. BAILEY.
Dated March 23, 1908.
Woodruff & Stevens,
Proctors. _
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby given that the accounts of
the subscriber, executor of the last will and
testament of Minerva A. Seaton, deceased, will
be audited and stated by the Surrogate and
reported for settlement to the Orphans Court
of the county of Essex, on Saturday, the second
day of May next. ____
FIDELITY TRUST COMPANY.
Dated March 23. 1908.__
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT— .
Notice is hereby given that the accounts ol
the subscriber, administratrix of Albert
Schmid, deceased, will be audited and stated
by the Surrogate and reported for settlement
to the Orphans’ Court of the county of Essex,
on Srturday, the twenty-third day of May
LJSSETTE SCHMID.
Dated April 11, 1908.
W. Cleveland Runyon,
Proctor. _
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby given that the accounts ol
the subscriber, administrator of Mary Me
Fadden, deceased, will be audited and stated
by the Surrogate and reported for settlemenl
to the Orphans’ Court of the county of Essex,
on Saturday, the twenty-third day of May
JOSEPH P. McFADDEN.
Dated April 13, 1908.
Llntott, Johnson & Capen,
Proctors.
/
New Southpaw’s Control Was
Wretched—DeVore Plays
in Left Field.
name early In the game, when Umpire
Thomas Kelly was obliged to enforce
the dirt ordinance for the firBt time
this season. Since Pat Powers and his
moguls adopted the no soiled leather i
rule the umps have had their weather
eye out to see that the game was kept
spotless. Stanley got a new white ball
yesterday in the first session. He dug
in the dirt to take the smooth surface
off it when Umpire Kelly heard some
of the fans suggest getting a wheelbar
row and some sand to help Stanley out.
It was hard lines for Stanley to pitch
the spheroid without putting a shovel
ful of dirt on it, but Kelly was insistent.
With any kind of pitching Newark
might have gotten away with the game,
the Tigers making a strong bid for it In
the ninth inning when they tallied three
runs.
Johnny DeVore, who has been help
ing out Charley Dooley and his Pent
iums for a few weeks, and who was
purchased from the Giants on Saturday
by Manager Stallings, got in right yes
terday with the fans by choplng out a
nice single over Uouden’s head in the
second session, scoring the first run of
the game for the Tigers. He later
rapped another along the first base line
which he beat out handily.
Those Beavers will be the attraction
for this afternoon. The chances are that
Pardee will be sent in t6 stop them,
while Casey may take a chance with
Jack Harper, the old National leaguer.
SURROGATE'S NOTICES. ^ ^
NEWARK. N. J.. April 14. 1908.
Estate of Herman Schroeder. deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell.
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
executor of slid deceased, notice is hereby
given to the creditors of sakl deceased to ex
hibit to the subscriber under oath or affirma
tion their claims and demands against the
estate of said deceased, within nine months
from this date, or they will be forever barred
from prosecuting or recovering the same
against the subscriber.
HENRY H. SCHROEDER.
William H. Blain,
Proctor.
NEWARK. N. J.. February 17. 1908.
Estate °f Lawrence A. Reilly, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
administratrix of said deceased, notice is
hereby given to the creditors of saild deceased
to exhibit tn +he subscriber under oath or
affirmation their claims and demands against
the estate of said deceased, within nine
months from this date, or they will be for
ever barred from prosecuting or recovering the
same against the subscriber.
MARY E.. REILLY.
Schuyler 3. Jackson,
Proctor.
NEWARK, N. J.. February 19, 1908.
Estate of Fannie Medcraft, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
admin’strator of said deceased, notice Is
hereby given to the creditors of saild deceased
to exhibit to the subscriber under oath or
affirmation their claims and demands against
the estate of said deceased, within nine
months from this date, or they will be for
ever barred fiom prosecuting or recovering the
same against the subscriber.
ARTHUR T. HEADLEY.
Will C. Headley,
Proctor.
NEWARK, N. J., March 23. 1908.
Estate of Alfred Connor, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
administrator of said deceased, notice is hereby
given to the creditors of said deceased to ex
hibit to the subscriber under oath or affirma
tion their claims and demands against th«
j estate of said deceased, within nine monthi
from this date, or they will be forever barred
from prosecuting or recovering the iam<
against the subscriber.
BARNARD CONWAY.
William C. Nlcoll,
Praetor.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby given that the accounts o
the subscriber*:, the executors of the last wil
and testament of Rachel F. Clark, deceased
will tae audited and stfeted by the Surrogate
and imported for settlement to the Orphans
Court of the county of Essex, on Saturday, th<
sixteenth day of May next.
IDA E. JELLIFF,
ELIZABETH E. SLEIGHT.
HENRY H. DAWSON.
Dated April 3. 1908.
Henry H. Dawson,
Proctor.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby given that the accounts o
the subscriber, the trustee under the last wil
and testament of Frances Qulmby, deceased
will be audited and stated by the Surrogat*
and reported for settlement to the Orphans
Court of the county of Essex, on Saturday, thi
sixteenth day of May next.
SAVINGS INVESTMENT AND TRUST CO
OF EAST ORANGE.
Dated April 7. 1$03.
PETER MAHER WAS A BIG
MAN, HAD A WEAK HEART
* N . . . ....
That’s Why He Didn’t Wade Through Some ot
the Dubs Who Faced Him in the Ring.
Had the Punch but Was Afraid to
Keep Going When Once Started.
- ■ - - .- - %
BY OLD SPORT.
I wonder what Is Peter Maher doing
these days. Only recently I saw where
he wanted another chance to enter the
roped arena and try his skill with the
mitts, but his offer to take on some
unknown met with a flat refusal. Peter
was a curious chap. He had • many
funny make-ups in his character, and
one of the worst of these was his heart.
He had no nlpre idea of the worth of
money than he had of how to square a
circle, and I believe he would try to
do that if asked. He made money, did
this fellow who was brought over here
by some New York wiseacres and
launched on the public as the “Cham
pion of Ireland.” I think that was the
funny stunt in Peter’s career. You
will often hear it said that Peter was
dug up in McGuinness’s brewery in
Dublin, and that one day while a party
of sporting men were on their way
through that institution of hops and
malt Peter’s build attracted the at
tention of a certain shady man of
sporting circles, who divined right away
that Peter w’ould be a good path
through which to cop some of the
Irlsh-Americans’ money. The truth of
it is that Peter never was inside of
McGuinness’s brewery, let alone work
there.
Peter Wn« n Rube.
As far as the fighting #ame was con
cerned, Peter was what we call in. this
country a "ruben,” clear p.nd simple.
He was a ’longshoreman and worked on
the Dublin quays after coming from
his home in Galway as a baggage
handler. He had never put a glove on
his fist, not even of the kid kind, when
he set sail for this country, and the
only thing he did have was a powerful
right arm, which, if swung properly
at the physcological moment, carried
terror and destruction with It. But, un
like Irishmen, Peter had a weak heart.
It is a wonder he ever won, a fair lady
because of his faint heart. I know in
one of his fights with Joe Goddard—he
SURROGATE’S NOTICES.
NEWARK^ N.^ J.. MarclTtof 1 M«T"'
Estate of Elizabeth M. Molloy, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George K. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
executors of said deceased, notice Is hereby
given to the creditors of said deceased to ex
hibit to the subscribers under oath or affirma
tion their claims and demands against the
estate of said deceased, within nine months
from this date, or they will be forever barred
from prosecuting or recovering the same
against the subscribers.
JOSEPH REGAN.
BERNARD SMITH.
Hahn and Hahn,
Proctors.
.i.t ■>' rui uai y i<i, xano.
Estate of Mary Walsh, deceased.
Pursuant to tho order of George E. Russell.
Surrogate cf the county of Essex, this day
made, on tho application of the undersigned,
executor of said deceased, notice Is
hereby given to tho creditors of saild deceased
to exhibit to the subscriber under oath or
affirmation their claims and demands against
the estate of said deceased, within nine
months from this date, or they will be for
ever barred from prosecuting or recovering the
aame against the subscriber.
„ MATTHEW E. WALSH..
James R. Nugent,
Proctor.
NOTICE OP SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby given that the accounts of
the subscriber, the surviving trustee under the
will of Sarah M. Crane, deceased, will he
audited and stated by the Surrogate and re
ported for settlement to the Orphans’ Court
of the county of Essex, on Saturday, the
twenty-third day of May next.
JOHN B. VAN WAGBNEN.
Dated April 14, 1908.
Howe & Davis,
Proctors.
NEWARkTn. J.. April 7. 1908.
Estate of Mary P. Diethrich, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this daj
made, on tho application of the undersigned,
executor of said deceased, notice is herebj
£!w?*n to tJle c editors of said deceased to ex
♦ i t to the subscriber under oath or affirma
tion their claims and demands against th<
estate of said deceased, within nine monthi
from this date, or they will be forever barrec
from prosecuting or recovering the samt
against the subscriber.
_ HILARY FFRANGLE.
NEWARK, N. J.. April 9, 1908^
Estate of Mary Healy, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this daj
made, on the application of the undersigned
executrix of said deceased, notice tis herebj
given to the creditors of said deceased t<
exhibit to the subscriber under oath or affirma
tion their clams and demands aganst th<
estate of said deceased, within nine monthi
from this date, or they will bo forever barret
from prosecuting or recovering the sarm
against the subscriber.
T MARY ANN CLARK.
James M. Trimble.
Proctor.
NOTICE OP SETTLEMENT—
Notice Is hereby given that the accounts o
t£er1.?,uhscrlber* the administrator of the estate
J*®1®1 A- Nesler, C. T. A., deceased, will b<
audited and stated by the Surrogate and re
ported for settlement to the Orphans' Court o
the county of Essex, on Saturday, the nintl
day of May next.
_ . , JAMES C. BIORBN.
Dated March 30, 1908.
Frederick T. Hey,
Proctor.
NOTICE OP SETTLEMENT—
Notice is hereby given that the accounts o
the subscribers, executors of the last will an<
’ testament of John Martens, deceased, will b
1 audited and stated by the Surrogate and re
ported for settlement to the Orphans’ Cour
• of the county of Essex, on Saturday, the six
teenth day of May next.
» EHLER O. WETTYEN,
J. EDGAR DE CAMP.
Dated April 3. 1908.
J. Edward Smith,
Proctor; I
fought three fights with the dead pug—
Peter was told that Goddard was 111
and was hardly able to stand up. This
was true. "I am afraid of that fellow,”
said Peter, "for he knocked me al
ready." "Weil, he is sick and can’t go
very far," was Peter’s instructions, and
sure enough he went in and fought
Goddard, and won in the eighth round.
After the first round Peter came back
to his corner and remarked to his ad
viser, "That fellow isn't sick.” Ha was
told that he was and, furthermore, he
was informed that Goddard thought he
(Peter) was ill also. That settled it.
Maher took on courage and whipped his
man. This was In ’98, and several
months later, and in the same year,
Goddard went after Peter again and
finished him in one round. If Maher
had the same kind of a heart as he
had a right-hand biff, he would have
been champion of the world instead of
being an obscure citizen pleading for a
few rounds with an unknown to pick
up a few dollars.
Peter Wns Peetillnr.
When he first came to this country
and started out in the theatrical life 1
as a drawing card he showed his gen
uine character. Like most of the men
engaged in the theatrical business,
Peter always liked to know the size of
his box office before going in to do his
turn. But, unlike any of them in the
same line, Peter would hardly ever
stand at the door of the theatre. He
would take up his position on the other
side of the street and there attempt
to count the number of persons going
into the show. Of course he could not
get any kind of a count this way, but
that method seemed to satisfy him,
and no one else kicked. If there was
any easier way of robbing Peter thun
this it would have been hard to have
found it.
spitrAgate's notices.
NEWARK, N. J., March 27. 1508.
Estate of Elizabeth B. Nichols, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
administrator of said deceased, notice is hereby
given to the creditors of said deceased to ex
hibit to the subscriber under oath or affirma
tion their claims, and demands agatfist tha
estate of said deceased, within nine months
from this date, or they will be forever barrrd
from prosecuting or recovering the sama
against the subscriber.
J. BAYARD KIRKPATRICK.
NEWARK. N. J.f March 23. 3908.
Estate of Thomas C. Barr, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on ths application of the undersigned,
executors of said deceased, notice is hereby
given to the creditors of said deceased to ex
hibit to the subscribers under oath or affirma
tion their claims and demands against the
estate of said deceased, within nine months
from this date, or they will be forever barred
from prosecuting or recovering the same
against the subscribers.
LORRAINE H. RARR.
EDWARD J. MOORE.
Frank Bergen,
Proctor.
NEWARK, N. J., February 17, 1908.
Estate of Margaret Gordon, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
executor of said deceased, notice la
hereby given to the creditors of said deceased
to exhibit to the subscriber under oath or
affirmation their claims and demands against
the estate of said deceased, within nine
months from this date, or they will be for
ever barred from prosecuting or recovering the
same against the subscriber.
_ J. EDWARD SMITH.
NEWARK, N. J., March 20. 1908.
Estate of Catherine Donegan, deceased.
Pursuant to the Order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
executors of said deceased, notice is hereby
given to the creditors of said deceased to ex
hibit to the subscribers under oath or affirma
tion their claims and demands against the
estate of said deceased, ivithln nine months
from this date, or they will be forever banvd
from prosecuting or recovering the same
against the subscribers.
WINIFRED DONEGAN,
JOHN J. CONNELL.
Michael T. Barrett,
Froctor
NEWARK, N.J., March 21. 1908. .
Estate of William S. Qulnby, deceased.
Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
made, on the application of the undersigned,
executor of said deceased, notice Is hereby
given to the creditors of said deceased to ex
hibit to the subscriber under oath or affirma
tion their claims and demands against the
estate of said deceased, within nine months
from this date, or they will be forever barred
; from prosecuting or recovering the same
against the subscriber.
WILLIAM BEACH.
NOTICE OF SETTLEMENT—
Notice Is hereby given that the accounts of
the subscribers, tne executors of the last will
and testament of Catherine Henry, deceased,
will be audited and stated by the Surrogate
1 and reported for settlement to the Orphans*
i Court of the county of Essex, on Saturday,
i the twenty-third day of May next.
FREDERICK J HENRY.
■ MATHILDA LAUFENBERG (nee Henry).
Dated April 10, 1908.
Herbert Boggs,
Proctor.
NEWARK, N. J., February 15, 1908.
Estate of Charles H. Zwigard, deceased.
■ Pursuant to the order of George E. Russell,
Surrogate of the county of Essex, this day
p made, on the application of the undersigned
l executor of said deceased. notice is
» hereby given to the creditors of said deceased
‘ t(L to the subscriber under oath or
t affirmation their claims and demands against
* th® ®8t»te of. Mld deceased, within nine
months from this date, or they will be for
aame ^against* the ^ubacriber °r reCOVOrin* th»
Patrick J. Dolan. U FRANK ZWIGARD'
Proctor.

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