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The star and Newark advertiser. (Newark, N.J.) 1908-1909, April 27, 1908, EVENING EDITION, Image 7

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InMLI ALL NEWS OF NEWARK SPORTS AND ATHLETICS
POINT SYSTEM TO DECIDE
MATINEE CHAMPIONSHIP
Snyder Suggests New Method
for Holding Speedway Races
This Year.
BY WALTER J. SNYDER.
At the regular meeting of the 1008
race committee of the Road Horse As
sociation of New Jersey, which will be
held tomorrow night at the Speedway
Club house, many matters of impor
tance pertaining to the matinee season
will come up for discussion.
Since tne success of the matinee rac
ing season depends upon the work of
this committee, Chairman William L.of
tus desires a full attendance of his
committee, in order to give each mat
i ter ariful consideration before pass
ing officially upon it.
At this time plans for the season
must bo formulated tor the assigning
of the various prizes to bo contested
for in the different events. The rules
of racing will have to be reviewed and
probably sKghtly revised, the assign
ing of the. stalls for the season at Wee
quahic Park, and the fixing of the
classes for the initial matinee, May 23.
Grent Year for Speedway.
William H. Lnftus, chairman of the
committee, and James M. Beldon, rac
ing secretary of the association, have
previously demonstrated their ability to
handle the work assigned them. The
numerous entrants to the various
events am" the large attendance at the
matinees in the past is ample proof
that they have always discharged their
duties In a satisfactory manner. This
year, however, they will have their
work cut out for them. More horses
will be raced in the matinees and every
indication is that it will he the greatest
year since the association was organ
ized. These conditions will naturally
result In more labor for the committee
and will require exceptionally close at
tention to details and the assigning of
tile prizes. Hence the necessity of tlfc
cooperation of the full committee.
Before placing In competition the fea
ture prize, the gold split-second watch
and chain that Theodore S. Miller,
owner of the amateur matinee cham
pion, Ida Gray, donated, the committee
should so frame tlio rules and condi
tions covering the winning of this valu
able prize that it could be contested
for and won by an amateur in the
strict sense of the word. Since it is th^e
intentio: and purpose of the associa
tion to encourage and promote ama
teur racing, the committee should ex
ercise extreme care to prevent the pro
MY TRUSS
WITHOUT BELTS
is not only the light
est, cleanliest, most
durable and most
comfortable appli
ance for Rupture,
but is the ONE
Truss of all trusses
whose principle and
application INSURE
Proper Holding at
all times, allowing
rupture to gradually
diminish in size and
severity until
CURED, when no
support of any kind
will be needed.
CHAS. CLUTHE, 125 East 23rd St.
Bot. 4th and Lexington a vs., New York City.
Hours, 9 to 5. Book Free.
RAILROADS.
TEW JERSEY CENTRAL
Corrected to January 26, 1908.
FOR NEW YORK.
Trains leave Broad and Ferry Street Station,.
6 15 6:50. 0:20, 6:40,' 7:00, 7:15, 7:30, 7:45, 8,06.
b 15* 6 30, 8:15. 9:0C, 9:16, 9:30, 9:46, 10:00, 10:20,
10:40. 11:06. 11:20, 11:40 a. in,; 12:00 n.; 12:30,
1:00, 1:30, 2:00, 2:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:03,
6:30, 5:50, 6:10, 6:20. 6:30. 6:45. 7:00, 7:10, 7:30,
7:55, 8:30, 8:56, 9:56. 10:40. 11:20 P. nr.: 12:01
night, 1:50 a. m. Sundays. 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:„6,
9:00? 9:25? 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30 a. m.; 12:00
n.: 13.30. 1:00. 1:30. 2:00, 2:30. 3:00. 8:30, 4:00,
4-30 6-00, 5:25. 6:00, 6:30, 7:00. 8:00, 8:2o, 8:56,
9:25, 10:00, ]0:.!0, 11:00 p. m.; 12:01 m.; 1:50 a. m.
For Elizabeth and Plainfield, 6:12, 6:50, 7:56,
8- 35, 9:55, 11:30 a. in.; 12:50. 1:16, 1:65, 2:35,
3:35, 4:25, 6:20, 6:38. 6:13, 7:46, 8:45, 9:30. 11:59
p. m. Sundays, 7:10, 9:06. 9:55. 10:55, 11:61
a. m.: 12:55, 2:43, 2:65, 6:4a. 7.3a, 8.40,
9:15, 10:45 j>. m. , ....
For Easton, Bethlehem, Allentown and
Mauch Chunk <6:50 to Easton). 8:35 a m.;
1 15 4:25 <6:38 to Easton) p. m. Sundays,
12:65, 4:55, 5:30 n. m
For Wilkesbarre and Scranton, 8.35 a. m..
4:25 n. m. Sundays, 4:55 p. m.
For Perth Amboy, 6:12, 8:35. 9.65, 11-30
a. m.; 1:15, 1:55, 3:36. 4:26. 5:38, 6:13, 8.45, 11:60
p. m. Sundays. 7:10, 9:05, 11:56 a, m.; 8.55. 8.40
P For Red Bank. Long Branch. Aebury Park,
etc.. 8:35 (9:66 Red Bank only), 11:30 a. m.;
(1*15 Saturdays! only), (3:35 Red Bank only),
4-25. 6:38, 6:13, 8:45, 11:50 p. m. Sundays,
except Asb’iry Park (7:10 Red Bank only), 9:06.
9- 55 to Rod Bank only. a. in. <1:55 Red Bank
only), 3:56. 8:40 p. m.
For Lakewood. 9:55 a. m. (12:50 Saturday,
only) 1:15. 3:35, 4:25 (6:13 Saturdays only).
Sunday* 7:10. 9:65 a. m., 1:66 p. m.
For Atlanta City, 9-65 a. in.: <12:50 Satur
days only). 3:35 p. m. Sunduys. 9:65 a. m.;
l ForP'T«nton and Philadelphia, 6:12, 7:55. 8:35.
9-55 11:30 a m.; ••12:60. 1:15. 3:35. 4:25. 5:38.
••6-13 7'45 8:45. 11:50 p. m. Sundays, 7:10,
, 05 9-55 10:65, 11:55 a. «.t 12:55, 1:56. 2:45.
Ii65. «“«. 6:30. *>6:45. 7:35. 8:40. 9:16. 10:45
PFor Baltimore end Washington, 7:55, 9:65,
11-10 a. ill.: 1:15. 3:33. 5:38, 6:13 p. m. Sundays,
7-io 9 55 11:55 ft. m.; 1:55. 3:55, 5:30, 6:45 p. m.
‘••Philadelphia only.
Telephone 5300._ _
CITY (AUVERTISEMEMTS. ^
rimncv. OF TUB HOARD OF EXCISE COM
° MISSIONERN OF THE CITY OF
NFCity'mll. April 23, 100S.
Tne following Is the U»t of names, residences
and places of business of persona making ap
nitration to this board for the granting of
n. ll snirituous, vinous, malt or
ter liquors anil not heretofore published
a°Name?B t°pfiS oVVuslUon Residence.
WHOLES AI aE— REN F7W A I/.
new1 “a r r Lie atio n - - & Itti a-: rs* l,i c e n ses
SEMSW. CO.. ^—,1. s(
Edwin H. %ifI^BWl5BV: Sam9P,aCe
Vhemann 171 W. Kinney st.Same place
Ferdinand Ruth," 223 Washington^,^enth st.
JoTnejUSODmnIy,tr.70fin™adkst..8‘:::|amc plan
tmifci % pvrmco*vst:.'iiv -sjzm
SermanKnollf;. 563-571 South C-g
T Schneider 2R Shipman st... .Same place
Joseph sonneiaer. Ri t.Same place
Samuel TRANSFER.
„ . £“Lhinr Bowery st.BRl Market st.
Morr rktaw^douSle transfers.
*vpd Kvaer. 104 Tlchenor st.Same place
Staler F. Rennlnger, 46 Montgomery st
RICHARD MILLER.
President pro tem.
JAMES F CONNELLY. _
Cdttf Clark. -- i>eU' hi ,1 —die, > ■
feesionally raced horse from entering
in one or two races at tho end of the
season and carrying away tho prize
from those horses that have raced at
every matinee for the pleasure of tho
donor'and spectators.
Point SjhIi-iii SntlHfnelory.
That tho point system is the most
satisfactory one by which to have this
feat o prize decided no one will deny,
but unless the conditions are framed
carefully it will permit unscrupulous
persons to take an unfair advantage
and defeat tho very object of lhe asso
ciation, the promoting of amateur rac
ing.
With no desire to appear in the
form of a dictator, I would suggest
that the commit'. :o adopt conditions
similar to the following, which will
permit every start r during the season
to try for the prize: In every heat
raced (trotting or pacing) during the
season there shall be a total of ten
points, dividing four to the horse fin
ishing first in each heat, three to the
horse finishing second, two to the third
horse and one to the fourth horse. Only
those horses that have started in four
races or more In as many matinees to
he eligible Ip the final counting, unless,
through Illness, lameness or accident, a
horse that has started In three mati
nees was prevented from starting In
the fourth, and the race committee was
notified i.i writing of the trouble at the
time it occu -ed, allowing them to have
a veterinary make the necessary ex
amination.
Should this examination result in
evidence proving conclusively the horse
is not in condition, it then is to bo
optional w-ith the committee whether
tho horse is eligible In the final count
ing. Should two or more horses be
equal (tied) at the conclusion of tho
season, the winner shall be decided by
the toss of a coin. ^
By the adoption of the above plan
every starter during the season will be
given an opportunity to try for this
valuable prize, which any owner would
be pleased to win. And it will serve
the purpose of the association—to en
courage the amateur and defeat the
professional.
There are few men who make such
an expensive donation as has Theodore
S. Miller, and his action is truly com
mendable. It is quite likely that Mr.
Miller was prompted to make this
valuable donation because of the suc
cess he has had with his mare Ida
Gray, who holds the amateur matinee
record of 2:13*4
ANNUAL BANQUET OF
ESSEX BICYCLE CLUB.
Members of the oldest bicycle club Ir
Essex County, which was named aftei
the county, gathered Saturday night a1
Koch’s Hotel and there held tho thir
teenth annual banquet. They had f
good time, and after the banquet th<
members and their friends attended a
theatre party at Proctor's. New of
ficers were elected as follows: Colone
William R. Righter, president; Herberl
W. Knight, vice-president; Benjamin F
Coe, secretary and treasurer. Charles
R. Zakharlas, of Asbury Park, and R.
I. Perry, of Short Hills, were the new
members who were received into the
club.
During the dinner resolutions were
passed in memory of Samuel N. At
water, Frederick Bloemecke and Will
iam W. Winner, former members of the
club, who have gone into the great be
yond.
PUNISH TRICKY RUNNERS.
ALTOONA, Pa., April 27.—President
Carpenter, of the Tri-State League, has
promulgated a rule to stop players from
cutting bases. For such offense t he
player will be fined $25 and put out
of the game.
BASEBALL
TODAY
CHAMPIONSHIP GAME
Wiedenmayer’s Park
MEWARK vs. MONTREAL
Game Called 4 P. M.
CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby glVW* that the
following ordinances havo been passed by
the Board of Street and Water Commissioners
and approved by th« mayor of the city of
Newark, and pursuant to chapter 389 of tho
Flat© laws of 1895, are herewith published by
title:
An ordinance to open
VOOUHEES STREET,
from a point 435 feet west of Leslie street to
Fabyan place.
An ordinance to provide for tho grading,
curbing and flagging of
RENNER AVENUE,
from Osborne terrace to Clinton place.
An ordinance to provide for the grading,
curbing and flagging of
HEDDEN TERRACE,
from Runyon street to Hawthorne avenue.
An ordinance to provide for tho grading,
curbing and flagging of
NORTH SIXTH STREET,
from Bloomfield avenue to Holler parkway.
An ordinance to provide for the grading,
curbing and flagging of
EAST KINNEY STREET,
from Von Buren street to Elm road.
Adopted April 23. 1908.
FRANK J. BOCK.
President of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
WM. E. GREATHEAD,
Clerk of the Board.
Approved April 24. 1998.
JACOB HAUSSLINO,
apr 24-r.t _Mayor.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that tho
following proposed ordinance parsed a sec
ond reading and was ordered to a third read
ing at a meeting of the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners, held April 23, 1908:
An ordinance to amend /section 026 of the re
vised .ordinances of thd city of Newark (re
vision of 1902).
Be it ordained, by the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners of the city of Newark
that section 626 of tho revised ordinances of
the city of Newark (revision of 1902) be and
Uie same is hereby amended so as to read as
follows:
Sec 626. No occupant or tenant of any store,
dwelling or building of any description within
the city of Newark, his servant or employee,
shall sweep, throw or deposit or permit to
be swept, thrown or deposited any paper, dirt
or rubbish of any kind from his store, dwell
ing or other building, on, into or upon the
sidewalk or gutter in front of the premises
occupied by him, except the samo be contained
In receptacles, or deposited in the manner now
required by thd ordinances of the city of New
ark, undej^ the penalty of ten dollars for each
offense.
FRANK J. BOCK.
President of th© Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
WM. E. GREATHEAD.
apr 24-5t Clerk of the Board.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that tho
following ordinance has been passed by the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners and
approved by the Mayor, and pursuant to chap
ter 389 of the State laws of 1895 is herewith
published by title:
An ordinance to widen the sidewalks an
RUNYON STREET,
from Johnson avenue to Osborne terrace, from
14 to 17% feet.
FRANK J. BOCK.
President of tho Board of Street and Water
Commissioner*. __ .
WM. J3. GREATHEAD,'
apriit-St tuu.., _ I Cl. " o£ the Board.
PRINCETON FOOTBALL CANDIDATES HAVE FIRST
PRACTISE; CREWS ARE SHOWING MUCH PROMISE
Athletics at Old Nassau Are
Booming—Heyniger Is to
Pitch Big Games.

BY C. DEAN.
[Special Coreapondf-nce of the Evening Star.]
PRINCETON, April 27.—Spring foot
ball jpractise at Princeton has been be
! gun under the direction of J. B. McCor
! mirk, who was captain of tho 1907
eleven. Many of the candidates for the
1908 team have been unable to report,
however, for the daily drill, owing to
the fact that they have been occupied
\vith other athletic sports, such as base
ball, track and rowing.
Getting n Line on Them.
The object of the spring gridiron work
is to got a line on the men for next fall
and give them Individual instruction as
to training during the summer months
preceding the beginning of the real
work in September. As an inducement
for the candidates, several cups have
been offered for contests to be held in
the near future in which proficiency in
drop-kicking, punting, running in foot
ball togs, will be considered.
Baseball later feres.
Captain Eddie Dillon, of the football
team, has been unable to take part In
the football practise, as he Is playing
second base on the varsity baseball
nine.
A number of the freshman football
team are also playing baseball so that
the spring practise is lacking many of
the star players.
Hawing Season On.
The main event of the past week in
Princeton has been the beginning of
the rowing season. With pleasant
weather and (he lake in as good a con
dition as any rowing course in the
country, eight-oared shells have been
launched for the first time on Carnegie
Lake and every day about a hundred
candidates are to be seen at work un
] der Coach Titus for the big inter-class
| regatta to bo held on June 5, the day
preceding the annual Yale-Princeton
baseball clash.
Condi Titus Busy.
Coach Titus has many tyros on hand,
and has made use of several rowing
boxes along the shore of the lake near
the new boathouse. Here he has be
gun to teach the new ones the science
of handling *lhe sweeps. These men,
who were members of the class crews
which met In the fall regatta last No
vember, have started in the eights, and
with them have been placed some of
tho more jiromising tyros, some of
whom have a considerable knowledge
of rowing from the athletic club crews
on which they rowed last summer.
Many men who took up rowing for the
first time last spring, when Coach
Titus intrduced the sport here, became
very proficient in the art through their
experience last summer on athletic club
crews.
The nuxelinll Team.
The baseball team has been doing
only fairly well. Although no games
have been lost since the first Virginia
contest on the Southern trip—which
was retrieved in a decisive victory a
few days later—still the work of the
squad has been unsatisfactory and
ragged. In the game with Lafayette
on Wednesday it was particularly no
ticeable, for through Infield errors and
loose play tho Easton, Pa., boys secured
a lead of five runs over the Tigers in
the fourth inning, the score being 7 to
2. Princeton woke up and played good
ball. Clark, who had relieved Drewes,
pitched wonderful ball, and the whole
team rallied as a man. The result was
that consistent hitting soon tied tho
score, and clever bunting won the
game in the ninth, the final score be
ing 8 to 7 in favor of the Jerseymen.
Princeton's Star Boxiunil.
Heyniger pitched Princeton to vic
tory twice against Harvard, twice
against Vale and once against Penn
sylvania. He will undoubtedly be called
on to twirl against Cornell this season
and againBt Penn. Either Clark or
Drewes had been expected to do the
stunts in the box. Clark is a good
pitcher in spots. When he is in good
form lie is as reliable as Heyniger, but
lie Is not a surety at any time. He
will, however, be put in against Penn
or any of the other "Big Six” who are
not so formidable on the diamond, Iley
niger being reserved for the sturdier
l’oemen. The first Cornell-Princeton
game will be played at Ithaca on Sat
urday, May 2.
PLAUTS BEST NEW
YORK NAVAL RESERVES.
L. S. Plaut baseball team played the
United States Naval Reserves of New
York on the Washington A. A. grounds
Sunday morning, and beat them by the
score of 15 to 4.
The Plauts have one of the strongest
teams in tho State and would like to
hear from such teams as tile Carteret
F. C., South Orange Field Club, Mata
wan, St. Mary’s, of Hackensack; Wash
ington A. A., Marions, of Jersey City,
and teams of good standing. Address
all communications to E. J. Bach, care
L. S. Plaut & Co. Yesterday’s score:
R.H.E.
Plauts .311522 2—16 18—1
Naval Reserves... 0 0 0 0 2 0 0— 2 2 4
Batteries—For Plaut, Maloney and
Leonie; Naval Reserves, Webber and
Kehoe.
TENNIS TEAM FOR DAVIS CUP.
NEW YORK, April 27.—That prepa
rations toward the make-up of ihe
American lawn tennis team which will
meet the English team in this country
in the international challenge matches
for the Dwight F. Davis cup are in
progress was made known yesterday ty
several of the top-class players who in
dulged in matches on the local courts.
The list In the order includes. W. A.
Earned, B. C. Wright, Karl Behr, R. D.
Eittle, Robert Le Roy, Clarence Ho
bart, E. P. Lamed, R. C. Seaver, Irving
C. Wright, F. C. Colston, W. J. Clothier
and F. B. Alexander.
Charles Beaman and John Wolff got an
early start toy City Island yesterday and
were well repaid for their trouble. Bea
man caught sixty-one flounders and seven
teen tomcods, and Wolff forty-eight floun
ders, twelve tomcods and three small black
fish. . , . k __. . . ... __
PITCHER TOM HUGHES,
TIGERS’ NEW RIGHT-HANDER
WHAT HEAD OFFICE
BOY HEABD AT
HIS OWN TABLE
BY HEAD OFFICE BOY.
SAY, did you got
a postal card
fro in the
Warren street un
dertaker? I heard
you was going to
get one, and the
funny tiling about
the guy who let the
cat out of the bag
was a lady who
knows the Mrs.
Warren street un
dertaker. She told
my sister at work
the other day, and
my sister was tell
ing of it at the
supper table when
my mother hroko In with “There you
are again. You don’t want the family
secrets known and yet you sit right
here, and tell everything in front of
him.” That “him” means me, and
right away I had to get out of the
room with the door closed between us.
But I got that much of the thing any
way. If you don't get the postal let
me know when I hand in my stuff for
tomorrow, and I will find out more
about It. Say, boss, did you know that
fellow who spoke to you yesterday at
tho gate. Look out for him. That is
one of Cosgrove's ily men, and ho is
trying to pump you to find out how
the team is going to wind up if they
koep Sullivan hero on the job. That’s
what I think he wants to know, but
anyway he is one of those “I want to
know fellows," and don’t tell him what
time It is if you don’t have to.
Mrs. O'Brien, who lives next door to
us, wants to know if "Darby” O’Brien
has a freckle on his nose. I don't
know, do you? She says that, she had
a cousin who left Ireland some years
ago and ho had a freckled nose, and
maybe it is her cousin Darby who is
playing ball with the Tigers. I told
her that he had plenty of sand In his
carcass, and she asked me how I knew
what he had inside of him. You know
Mrs. O’Brien don’t know anything
about slang. She said to me this morn
ing “Arc you going to the game today?’’
j and I says “What do you want to know
i for? So as you can tell the old lady ?”
and she fired back “That’ll do now, go
make your little bow and be off.”
Sure if I was off she would be the
first ono to call me daffy. That's the
way with some of the harps I know.
They want to see you right, and then
when you are they want to see you tho
other way, and If you try to please
them all you would be up in the “sniff
out” house.
I have heard fellows on the car say
ing "What is the office boy driving at?”
You would think I was a carpenter, or
one of those fellows who wears a high
hat every time some one departs for
the other side of life. Now, if they
said, What, am I talking about? I would
not care so much, for sometimes I don’t
myself, and If I don’t how arc they
expected to? Anyhow' 1 want a place to
air my views, and if I can’t do it at
home without being aired myself why
I will continue doing it here. I am go
ing to butt into the game today, and I
will tell you something tomorrow. Yes
terday the fellows had their girls with
them and I didn’t have much time to
stand near any of them because fellows
nowadays are awful jealous if they see
a good-looking guy standing near their
girls. If I wasn’t good-looking—but
then, what’s the use of complaining.
- CITY ADVERTISEMENTS.
OFFICE of the • Board of Street and Water
Commissioners of tho city of Newark, City
Newark. N. J.. April 24. 1908.
Sealed proposals will bo received at this of
fice from 3:15 to 3:30 o’clock p. in., of Thurs
day. the thirtieth day or April, 1908. and
opened at tho last named hour, at a public
meeting of the Hoard to be held at Raid time
and place, for the flagging of the sidewalks
of the following streets:
MT. PROSPECT AVENUE,
from Heller parkway to Grafton avenue; and
FERRY STREET.
from Lentz avenue to Blanchard street.
Tho following Is about the amount of the
work to bo done, and the materials to be fur
nlshod In the construction and completion of
said work, and upon which bids will be
compared:
FOR MT. PROSPECT AVENUE FLAGGING:
Three thousand three hundred (3,300) square
feet of new five (5) foot flagging.
FOR FERRY STREET FRAGGING:
Twenty thousand (20.000) squaro feet of now
five (5) foot (lagging;
One thousand five hundred (1,500) squaro feet
of new four (t) foot Hugging;
Ono thousand (1,000) squaro feet of old flag
ging relnld;
One hundred GOO) square feet of cement side
walk 5 feet wide.
Bidders are not to state any price for ma
terials and work for which there is a fixed
amount provided for In the specifications.
Each proposal must bo enclosed In a sealed
envelope, properly Indorsed with the name
of the bidder and of lh«‘ improvement, and di
rected tb the Board of Street and Wuter Com
missioners of the city of Newark.
Bidders will state their prices in writing a9
well as in figures.
Bidders must specify in their proposals that,
should the above work bo awarded to them,
they will bind themselves to finish and com
plete tho same within tho following number of
consecutive working days:
Mt. Prospect Avenue Flagging—Fifteen (13)
dtt>M.
Ferry Street Flagging—Fifty (50) days.
The plans and specifications of the work can
be examined at the office of tho Chief Engineer
of the Hoard of Street and Water Comrrtisslon
ers at the City Hall. Said proposals to be ac
companied by the consent In writing of two
sureties, or a surety company qualified to <lo
business in New Jersey, who shall, at tho time
of putting In such proposals, qualify as to
their responsibility 4n the amount of such pro
posal, and bind themselves that, If the contract,
be awarded to the person or persons making
the proposal, they will, upon Its being so
awarded, become nls or their sureties for the
faithful performance of said work; und that if
tho person or persons omit or refuse to execute
such contract they will pay to the city of
Newark any difference between tho sums to
which he or they would have been entitled
upon completion of the contract and that
which the city of Newark may be obliged to
pay the person or persons by whom such con
tract shall be executed.
The Hoard of Street and Water Commission
ers of tho city of Newark reserve to them
selves the right to accept or reject any or all
proposals for tho above work, as they may
deem best for the Interest of the city.
Bidders and sureties are hereby notified that
under the provisions of tho seventh section
of the law creating the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners, approved March 2«, 1S91.
that the bond or bonds to be given for th<>
faithful execution and performance of said
public, work shall first be approved as to suf
ficiency by tho Hoard, and as to form by the
counsel of the Hoard, and no contract shall
be binding on the city or become effective or
operative until such bond Is so approved; and
the President, of the Hoard shall have power
to examine the proposed bondHmen under oath.
If ho shall so desire, or shall be so Instructed
by tho Board, but the Board will not bo bound
by any statement that may be made by such
proposed bondsmen, but shall have full power
and absolute discretion in tho whole matter,
and this provision shall be referred to In any
advertisement inviting bids for any such pub*
He work.
By direction of the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners of the city of Newark.
M. It. SHERRERD.
apr24-5t JiuUJJJ.. Chief Engineer.
RUMORS FROM PARIS ON
TH? M’YEY-BURNS BATTLE
They Are to Fight for a Purse
of $20,000 and Stories
Are Afloat.
All the way from Paris comes the
story that Tommy Burns and Sam Mc
Vey are going to fight and that an
agreement has been made which for
bids the burly colored man Mac from
putting a sleeper over on Burns should
a chance present itself. Now, while
this is only a rurnor, there is certainly
something behind It to arouse such a
story. The sports over in Paris are
not as wiso to the inside workings of
the boxing game as those who stand
around the corner of Broadway and
Forty-second streot, New York. But
even these gents of Wisdom have been
fooled in their day, so how much easier
for the Paris greenhorns to be led to
slaughter.
Sam McVey has never done anything
for which the tight fans adjudged hint
entitled to step in the front rank of
champion pugilists. This same story
that says the affair has been "cooked”
also says that the men are to fight for
a purse of $20,000, a..d that it will take
place on Juno 13 next.
This Is certainly easy money, even
taking It for granted that the light
will be strictly an honest one. Sam
McVey would grow gray waiting in this
country for such a purse, and If the
Parisian stories about the fight being
fixed and that Burns will win, no one
can blame Sam for going into a deal
wherein he is to get a chance to cut
off a large slice of that purse.
The rumors of crookedness carry the
story that McVey has agreed to quit.
Well, those who are Interested can fol
low " 's fight up and see for them
selves. Perhaps these rumors are only
rumors, and again, perhaps, they have
some foundation.
At any rate, there will be no wagers
made on the fight on this side of the
p-nd unless Burns sends a letter over
to some of his friends Instructing them,
to get down on the fight. If McVey can
get a purse of $20,000 to battle for I
wonder what the Parisians would give
Jack Johnson to meet Burns. France
must be fighting mad these days. It
such purses are offered for second
raters like McVey, Jim Jeffries ought
to be able to get a million dollars to
go over and meet any man the French
| people might dig up for him.
ORANGE VALLEYS WIN
THEIR OPENING GAME.
Over 5,000 people saw the opening
game of the Orange Valley team's sea
son yesterday afternoon on the Valley
street grounds in Orange. The initial
game was a victory for the Valley boys,
who won from tho Hudsons by a score
of 2 to 1. Taggart pitched excellent
hall for the Orangeltes, and his team
mates backed him up well. The score
by innings:
West Hudson.0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0—1
Orange Valley..:.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0—2
Batteries—Chalmers and Reed; Tag
gart and Barrett.
Denf Mules to Piny Hull.
At the drawing^ for a ton of coal
for the benefit or the Newark Deaf
Mute Baseball Club at the New Audi
torium on Saturday evening, the win
ning number was held by John D.
Shea. The club will have Its new uni
forms ready to wear on May 2, when
the team will cross hats with the
Cuban Star A. C., of Passaic, N. J„
on the latter's grounds. The Newark
Denf Mute Baseball Club have a few
open dates and would like to arrange
for games with first-class amateur
teams for, the following dates'. May 9,
10, 16, 17, 23, 24; June 6, 7, 13, 14; July
4, 11, 19, 25, 26; August 1, 2, 8, 9, 16,
22, 23; September 5, 6, 12, 13 and Labor
Day, and offering fair inducements.
Address John B. Ward, 81 Orange
street, in care of New Jersey Deaf
Mute Society.
CITV ADVERTISEMENTS.
OFFICE! of the Roard of Street and Water
Commissioners of tho city of Newark, City
Hall.
Newark, N. J., April 24. 1908.
Scaled proposals will ho received at this of
flca from 3:15 to 3:30 o'clock p. m.. of Thurs
day. tho thirtieth day of April, 390S. and
I opened at the last named hour, at a public
meeting of the Roard to bo held at satd time
and place, for tho construction of aewere In
LOCKWOOD STREET,
from Ferry street to Lister avenue.
CLIFTON AVENUE.
between Grafton avenue and Montclair avenue.
MARKET STREET.
between Bowery street and Ferry Btreet.
FOUNDRY STREET.
between Ferry street to Passaic avenue, and i
■ . 5
WAYDELL STREET.
from Passaic avenue to a point about 600 feet
south of Kerry street.
The following is about the amount of the
work to ho done, and the materials to he fur
nished In the construction and completion of
said work, and upon which bids will be
compared: _
FOR LOCKWOOD STREET SEWER:
Eight hundred and eighty (880) feet of
twelve (12) Inch deep and wide Boeket pipe
sewer;
Ten hundred and forty (1.040) feet of ten (10)
Inch deep and wide socket pipe sewer;
One hundred and forty (140) feet of twenty
four (24) inch double strength pipe sewer;
Nine hundred (900) feet of six (6) inch pipe
I house connections;
I Ninety (90) feet of six (6) inch Iron pipe
house connections;
Nine (9) manholes with buckets complete;
One (1) sump complete.
FOR CLIFTON AVENUE SEWER:
Six hundred and fifty (660) feet of twelve
(12) Inch pipe sewer;
Nine hundred (900) feet of six (6) inch pipe
house connections;
Four (4) manholes complete.
FOR MARKET STREET SEWER :
Five hundred and eighty (680) feet of twelve
(12) inch pipe sewer, „ ,
Five hundred and forty (640) feet of six (6)
inch pipe house connections:
Four 14) manholes complete.
FOR FOUNDRY STREET SEWER:
Three hundred and eighty (380) feet of eight
(R) Inch deep and wide socket pipe sower:
Four hundred and thirty (430) feet of six
(6) inch pipe houBO connections:
Two (2) manholes with buckets complete.
WOR WAYDELL STREET SEWER:
Twelve hundred (1.200) feet of eight (8) (Inch
deep and wido socket pipe sewer:
'On hundred and fifty (1,060) feet of six (6)
inch pipe house connections;
Six >6) manholes with buckets complete.
Bidders nro not to state any price for ma
terials and work for which them la a fixed
amount provided for in the specifications.
Eacli proposal must, bo enclosed in a scaled
envelope, properly indorsed with the name
. f the bidder and of tho Improvement, and di
rected to the Board of Street and Water Com
missioners of the city of Newark.
Bidders will state their prices in writing as
well as in figures.
Bidders must specify in their proposals that,
should the above work bo awarded to them,
they will bind themselves to finish and com
plete tho samo within tho following number of
consecutive working days:
I^xkwooil Street Sewer—Forty (40) days.
Clifton Avenue Sewer—Fifteen (15) days.
Market Street S< wcr—Twelve (12) days.
Foundi'V Street Sewer—Ten (10) days.
Way dell Street Sewer-Thirty (30) days.
The plan* and specifications of the work can
bo examined at the office of the Chief Engineer
of the Board of Street and Water Commission
ers at the City Hall. Said proposals to be ac
companied by the consent in writing of two
Hurothw, or a surety company qualified to do
^business in New Jersey, who shall, at the time
<>f putting in such proposals, qualify as to
their responsibility In tho amount of such pro
I postal, and hind themselves that. If the contract
be awarded to the person or persona making
I tho proposal, they will, upon its being so
j awarded, become his or their sureties for the
I faithful performance of said work; and that if
| tho person or persons omit or refuse to execute
such contract they will pay to the city of
Newark any difference between tho sums to
I which he or they would have been entitled
J upon completion of the contract and that
which th> city of Newark may bo obliged to
i pay the person or persons by whom such con
mud shall be executed.
The Board of Street and Water Commisslon
I ers of tho city of Newark reserve to them
selves the right to accept or reject any or all
I proposals for the above work, as they may
I deem best for the Interest of the city.
• Bidders end sureties are hereby notified that 1
under the provisions of the seventh section
of the law creating the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners, approved March 28. 1891.
that the bond or bonds to be given for the
faithful execution and performance of said
public work shall first bo approved as to suf
ficiency by (ho Board, and as to form by tho
counsel of the Board, and no contract shall
be binding on the city or become effective or
operative until such bond is so approved; and
tho President of the Board shall have power
to examine the proposed bondsmen under oath. I
if he shall so desire, or shall be so instructed !
by the Board, but the Board will not be bound
by any statement that may be made by such ,
; proposed bondsmen, but shall have full power
! and ahsolute discretion in the whole matter,
' and tills provision shall be referred to in any]
advertisement inviting bids for any such pub- j
lie work.
Bv direction of the Hoard of Street and <
Water Commissioners of the city of Newark.
I M. R. SHERRERD. I
apifci-6t ....... Chit* Engineer,
OLD MAN FITZ
TO FIGHT BIDDLE,
Bob Fitzsimmons is at his home in
Dune-lien, where he is going through
hunts which he says will prepare him
[or his next go, which will be with An
:hony J. Drexel Biddle, of Philadelphia.
When or where this bout is to take
place Bob doesn't say, but he does say
that he can make as good a showing in
ihe ring as “Philadelphia” Jack
D'Brien.
SHAKE-UP AT LANCASTER.
LANCASTER, April 27—There lias
been considerable of a shake-up in the
Lancaster Tri-State team. As a dis
ciplinary measure Outfielder Hemphill
has been released indefinitely, and
Zamloch, formerly with the Philadel
phia Athletics, and latterly with Read
ing, has been substituted. Fertsch, who
was last season a pitcher with the
Eastern League, has been added to the
local twirling staff. Pitchers Foren and
Glendon are expected in this city early
this week, as is Second Baseman Fred
Raymor.
CITY ADVURTlSBMGtm.
DEWEY STREET OPENING, EDMUNDS
PEACE OPENING, GRANT AVENUE
OPENING, 1,ESI,IK STREET OPENING,
LAWTON STREET (FORMERLY SHERMAN
AVENUE) OPENING. SHERIDAN AVENUE
OPENING. AND SCHLEY STREET OPEN
ING—Assessment for Ueneflts.
Notice in hereby given that an assessment
upon nil Ihe owners of nil the lands and real
estate peculiarly benefited by each of the lol- •
lowing Improvements, namely:
The opening of
DEWEY STREET.
from Shaw avenue to Lyons avenue, according
to the provisions of an ordinance of the city
of Newark, entitled, “An ordinance to open
Dewey street, from Shaw #avenue to Lyons
avenue,“ approved July 1, 19117.
The opening of
EDMUNDS PLACE.
from Demarest street easterly about 100 feet,
according to the provisions of an ordinance of
the city of Newark, entitled, “An ordinance
to open Edmonds place, from Demarest street
easterly about 100 feet, or to the present ter
minus of said street,” approved May 17, 1907.
The opening of
GRANT AVENUE,
from Peshlne avenue westerly about 100 feet,
according to the provisions of an ordinance of
the city of Newark, entitled, “An ordinance
to open Oram avenue, from Peshlne avenue
westerly about 100 feet, or to the present ter
minus of Haiti avenue,” approved May 17, 19u7.
The opening of
LESLIE STREET.
from Shaw avenue to Lyons avenue, according
to five provisions of an ordinance of the city
f Newark, entitled, “An ordinance to open
Leslie street, from Shaw avenue to Lyons ave
nue,'* approved July 1, 1907.
Thu opening of
LAWTON STREET
(formerly Sherman avenue), from Peshlne ave
nue westerly about 100 feet, according to the
provisions of an ordinance of the city of New
ark, entitled, “An ordinance to open Sherman
avenue, from Peshlne avenue westerly about
100 feet, or to the present terminus of said
avenue.” unproved May 17, 1907.
The opening of
SHERIDAN AVENUE,
from Pcshine avenue westerly about 100 feet,
according to the provisions of an ordinance of
the city of Newark, entitled. “An ordinance to
open Sherldun avenue, from Peshlne avenue
westerly about 100 feet, or to the present ter
minus of said avenue,” approved May 17, 1907.
The opening of
from Shaw avenue to Lyonn avenue, according
to the provisions of an ordinance of the city
of Newark, entitled. "An ordinance to open
Kchley street, from Shaw avenue to Lyons ave
nue." approved July 1L l!X)7. has been prepared
by the undersigned Commissioners, appointed
by the Mayor of the city of Newark, and that
a report by a certificate In writing, with an
accompanying map and schedule, showing the
several assessments against the several own
ers peculiarly benefited as aforesaid, hag been
deposited in the office of the City Clerk of
the city of Newark, for examination by tho
parties interested therein.
Said assessment comprises all lots, tract®
and parcels of land ami real estate liable to
be assessed as aforesaid lying on both side®
of Dewey street from Shaw avenue to Lyons
avenue; on both sides of Shaw avenue and
Lyons avenue, from a point about 100 feet
east of Dewey street to a point about 100
feet west of Dewey street; on both sides of
Edmunds place, from Clinton place to
Dcmarest Htrect; on both sides of Demarest
street, from a point about 100 feet north of
Edmunds place to a point about 100 feet south
of Edmunds place; on both sides of Grunt
avenue, from Peshine avenue to Hunterdon
street; on both sides of Peshine avenue and
Hunterdon street, from a point about 100 feet
north of Grant avenue to a point about loo
feet south of Grant avenue; on both sides of
Lawton street (formerly Sherman avenue),
from I’oshlne avenue to Hunterdon street; on
both sides of Peshine avenue and Hunterdon
street from a point about 100 feet north of
Lawton street to a point about 100 feet south
of Lawton street; on both sides of Sheridan
avenue, from Peshine avenue o> Hunterdon
street; ’on both sides of Peshine avenue and
Hunterdon street, from a point about 100 feet
south of Sheridan avenue to a point about 100
feet north of Sheridan avenue; on both side®
of Leslie street, from Shaw avenue to Lyons
avenue: on both sides of Shaw avenue and
Lyons avenue from a point about 100 feet east
of Leslie street to a point about 100 feet west
of Leslie street; on both sides of Schley street,
from Shaw avenue to Lyons avenue, and ou
both sides of Shaw avenue and Lyon® avenue,
front a point about 100 feet east of Schley
Street to a point about 100 feet west of Schley
A "lot" represents an entire plot of land,
whether large or small.
All persons interested in said assessment
mav bo heard before said Commissioners on
Friday, the 1st day of May. 1908, at 2 p. m.,
at the Commissioners’ room, No. 1 (third
floor). City Hall.
Dated April 25, DOS.
WILLIAM DIMOND,
JOHN F MONAHAN, i
ADOLPH FI3PH,
apr25-5t _ Commissioner®. ^
PUBLIC NOTICE Is hereby given that the
following proposed ordinances passed a sec
ond reading and were ordered to a third read
ing at a meeting of the Board of Street and
Water Commissioners, hold April & DOS
An ordinanco to provide for the paving of
HUDSON STREET.
from Wallace place to Sussex avenue, with
brick
An ordinance tr» provide for the paving of
RIDOE STREET.
from 1-Rwood avenue to Montclair avenue, will
tel ford with hrkk guttrrr.
An ordinance to provide for the grading.
curbing and flagging of _ 9
SOUTH SIXTEENTH STREET,
from South Orting. avenuo to Sixteenth ave
nue, and from Madison avenue to Eighleenta
uvenue.
An ordinance to flag the Mdewalk, of
SUMMER PLACE. ,
from May .treat BO&.
President of tha Board of Street and Wateg
Comml,,loner.. ^ & ORE ATMEAD. *
apr 21-6t _. _. Clerk of Ua Board. .

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