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The star and Newark advertiser. (Newark, N.J.) 1908-1909, May 23, 1908, EVENING EDITION, Image 4

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G. E CONVENTION
OPENS IN SOUTH
PARK CHURCH
Forty-two Junior Societies Rep
resented at Gathering Wel
comed by Rev. Lumbar.
CENTRAL PRESBYTERIAN
GIRLS WIN BANNER.
County Superintendent Presides
Over Meeting—Badges
Will Be Given Out.
The Junior Christian Endeavor so
cieties this afternoon are holding their
annual convention in the South Park
Presbyterian Church. The forty-two I
societies gathered in Lincoln Park and,
headed by a brass band and Edwin A.
Meyer as marshal, paraded around the
park before entering the church.
F. Chester Bradley, county superin
tendent, presided over the exercises,
which included a welcome by the Rev.
Dr. Lyman Whitney Allen, address by
the Rev. W. T. S. Lumbar, of the Mt.
Pleasant Baptist Church, and a model
meeting conducted by the young En
deavorers.
The Russell banner given each year to
the society making the largest gain in
members was awarded to the Girls'
Junior Society of the Central Presby
terian Church, of which Mrs Edwin A.
Meyer Is superintendent, which was
credited with 111 new members.
Reports for the past year were pre
sented by Miss Florence Rhoads, the
secretary, and Mrs. William M. Berry,
treasurer.
Since the local union was organized
in 1892 by Mrs. A. B. Johnson, of the
Clinton Avenue Reformed Church, with
sixteen societies, twenty-six additional ,
societies have joined the union, which |
Is now the largest Junior union in New |
Jersey.
Badges which were to have been dis
tributed at the Christian Endeavor con
vention last October will be given dur
ing today's exercises.

TRAINS, OLD AND NEW,
AT KEER’S ART STORE.
Exhibit ot Great Historical In
terest Shows Progress of
Railway Construction.
In the window of Keer's art store,
917 Broad street, there is an Interesting
exhibit of ancient and modern railway
trains. The odd-looking engines of the
early thirties may be compared with a
photograph ofithe largest locomotive in
the world.
Modern safety appliances are shown,
including the Barnett connector, a de
vice which obviates sending men un- '
der cars to couple the brake hose.
The original drawing of the loenmo- ,
tive "Essc-x’’ built in Newark, 1836, by :
Seth Boyden, is loaned by Franklin ;
Phillips, president ol the Heines & 1
Phillips Iron Works, this city Mr. <
Phillips's father was apprenticed to i
Seth Boyden, and helped construct the <
‘‘Essex.” The photo of the famous
"Royal Blue," Central Railroad of New
Jersey, represents that train running
90 miles an hour.
The display is a joint exhibit by the
Central Rallrftad of New Jersey, Hewes
& Phillips and the Barnett Equipment
Company.
ALUMNI TO PAY
FOR MEMORIAL TO
LATE DR. SEIBERT
He Was Professor in German
Theological Seminary, Bloom
field, for 38 Years,
The Rev. Dr. F. W. Hoch.
A bronze tablet in memory of Prof.
George C. Seibert, Ph. D, P. D., who
was professor of New Testament
exegesis and theology in the German
Theological Seminary, in Bloomfield,
and who was lost at sea in September,
1902, will be unveiled In the main lec
ture hall of the seminary on the morn
ing of commencement day, June 4
The Rev. Dr. Frederick W. Hoch,
pastor of the Second German Presby
terian Church, Newark, and president of
the alumni, will present the tablet to
the board of trustees. The Rev. Dr.
David R. Frazer, president of the board,
will accept the tablet. The favorite
hymn of Dr. Seibert will be sung by the
students.
A committee of the alumni, composed
of the Rev. Dr. Hoch, chairman; the
Rev. J. A. Frey, of Paterson; the Rev.
E. Meury, of Jersey City, and the Rev.
R. Stein, of Sayreville, raised the money
for the. memorial. The committee had
the bronze tablet, 25 by 33 inches, made,
ind this inscription put on it:
"In loving memory of the Rev. George
2. Seibert, Ph. D., D. D., professor of
oiblical exegesis and theology; born
February 25, 1828; died September 9,
:902.” Below is the inscription: "Gal. 6,
14, 'But God forbid that I should glory,
save in the cross of our Lord Jesus
Hhrist, by whom the world is crucified
into me, and I unto the world.’ ”
Dr. Seibert was born in Germany in
.828. He was graduated from the Uni
versity of Marburg. In 1862 he came to
he United States. He was ordained
lere in the Dutch Reformed religion,
ind became pastor of the Third Presby
.erian Church.
Forty ye«rs ago Presbyterian pastors
>f Newark got a charter for a theologi
•al school for German young men. It
vas called the Newark Theological
school, and Newark pastors taught the
ew students in English in a small
fame house in Morton street, while the
ate Rev. John Guenther, pastor of the
>ld First German Presbyterian Church,
ind Dr. Seibert gave instructions in
Herman.
When land was bought in Bloomfield
ind a seminary building erected the in
stitution was called the German Theo
ogical Seminary of Bloomfield. Dr.
Seibert resigned his pastorate in New
irk to teach in the seminary. Princeton
University conferred upon him the de
cree of D. D. At his death he left a
DEDICATION OF
TO LAST A WEEK
Allentown, Pa., Bishop to Ad
dress First German Evan
gelical Congregation.
Dedication services In connectior
with the new edifice of the First Ger
man Evangelical congregation, at Avor
avenue and South Seventeenth street
to be heli tomorrow, promise to be ol
unusual Interest. ' The congregatlor
formerly worshipped in upper Courl
street, and the corner-stone of the new
church was laid last November by the
pastor, the Rev. Daniel Schnebel. The
church was founded in 1858 and will
celebrate its golden jubilee In October
of this year.
The services will begin tomorrow
morning and will continue one week.
Bishop T. Bowman, of Allentown, Pa.,
will make the dedicatory address, and
will be assisted in the opening exer
cises by the R^v. P. T. Beck, of Phila
delphia. and the Rev. H. Gulich, of
Brooklyn.
Besides the choruses there will be
solo singing by Miss M. E. Eisele, Mrs.
| C. H. Wintsch, Miss M. Sigrist, E.
! Flocken and O. Sigrist. The officers of
] the church are: President, W. G.
| Schmaus; vice-president, C. W. Theuer;
secretary, M. Meierdirck; treasurer, C.
W. Kindelberger; trustees, F. Duth
weiler, Charles Frank, Otto Zacher, C.
H. Wintsch and Louis Walz.
CLOSED SUNDAY IN
MILLBURN UNDER WAY.
If the efforts of Chief of Police
Oliver, of Millburn, and Ernest L.
Smithers, chairman of the' Millburn po
lice committee, are successful it is ex
pected that Millburn will present an
altogether different appearance on
Sundays than heretofore. Efforts have
been made without calling in the aid of
the law to induce the different business
people to close their business places
on Sunday.
The barbers, both in Millburn and
Springfield, closed last Sunday for the
first time, and it is expected that the
other business places will follow suit
in a very short time. The two town
ships are so close neighbors that what
is done in one is usually followed in
the other.
FIFTY WOMEN TAKE
EXAMS. TO TEACH.
More than 50 young women from
New Jersey and adjoining States and
New England are taking oral examina
tions today In the Board of Educa
tion rooms. They are applicants for
appointments in the lowest grade of
public school teachers.
widow, seven sons and four daughters.
The annual meeting of the alumni will
be held in the afternoon, when officers
will be elected and the Rev. Dr. Hoch
will make an address on “Our Minis
ters' Troubles and Practical Propo
sitions for Their Improvement." In the
evening the commencement exercises
will be held. Three German students.
Ernest Derendinger, Arnold Grobard
and Albert F. Hahn, and three Italian
students will receive their graduation
diplomas from the Rev. Dr. Frazer. The
Rev. Dr. Vance, of Newark, will deliver
the address to the graduates.
NEWARK PASTORS
PARTICIPATE IN
N. E CONFERENCE
Revs. W. H. Morgan and C. L.
Mead Among the Local
Conference Delegation.
The Rev. William H. Morgan, for
I twelve years pastor of the Central M.
; E. Church, returned Thursday from
| Baltimore, where the General Confer
ence is transacting important business,
; including the election of eight new
bishops.
| The Newark Conference is represented
j in the General Conference by the Rev.
I Dr. Buttz, president of Drew Sem
inary; Dr. C. M. Anderson, presiding
'elder of the Jersey City district; the
j Rev. John Krantz, of the Methodist
Book Concern; the Rev. A. K. McCrea,
| of Paterson, and the R~ Charles L.
j Mead, pastor of Centenary Church,
Newark. Mr. Mead is chairman of the
committee on Epworth League, a very
important committee of the conference.
The lay delegates are Morris S. Daniels,
j of Roseville Church, Newark; James
j Joy, of Plainfield; Mr. Pearsall. Ridge
| wood; Dr. H. K. Carroll, Plainfield, and
a Paterson undertaker.
A report was made in favor of a union
! with the Methodist Protestant Church,
and there was a long discussion on it.
j The convention favored the proposed
union because the doctrine and polity
of the two churches are practically the
same. Bishop Warren, of Denver; Dr.
Goucher, of Baltimore, and United
States Senator Dolliver were appointed
a committee to visit the General Con
ference of the Protestant Methodist
Church, which is in session in Pitts
burg. The committee got a cordial re
r> a nti W.. * ___ . _ i. .
proposed union.
Some members of the Baltimore con
ference tried to have paragraph 248 of
the Book of Discipline, which prohibits
Methodists going to theatres, dancing
and playing cards, abolished, but their
efforts were defeated by a majority
vote.
An effort was also made to limit the
time ministers can stay in charge of a
church. Until eight years ago the time
limit was five years. At that time the
time limit was abolished and pastors
were allowed to remain in charge of a
church as long as the members want
to retain them. The conference voted
not to change the syste 1 now in force.
The delegates from the Newark Con
ference are taking a lively interest in
the matters before the conference.
ELECTED TO HEAD CHURCH CLUB.
Albert W. Harris, formerly first vice
president of the Men's Club of the Rose
ville Presbyterian Church, was elected
president of the club last night at the
third annual dinner. He succeeds
Ernest L>. Gould.
CONCERT FOR TRINITY M. E.
A musical and literary entertainment
will be given in Trinity M. E. Church
next Monday under direction of the
organist, Mrs. W. S. McCowan, assisted
by the choir and following talent: Miss
Elizabeth Haines Van Ness, soprano;
Miss Norma Whitfield, pianist; Ernest
S. Hilsdorf, basso; the Rev. Austin E.
Armstrong and Fred W. Romine, bari
tone. The proceeds will be for the
benefit of the church.
SALE FOR CHURCH.
Miss Whipple's class of St. Luke’s
£1. E. Church Sunday Schpol will hold
a sale of handkerchiefs, home-made
cake and candy In the church parlors
this evening. There will be a "Punch
and Judy” entertainment for the chil
dren.
Sundap Services in the Churches |
BAPTIST.
FIFTH BAPTIST CHURCH—The Rev.
Charles F. Stanley, pastor, will speak Sunday
morning and evening The subject of the
mornirg sermon Is. "The Self-Identification
of the Blind and Blessed and Ranlshed Beg
gar." The Misses Ruby and Flossie Stanley
! will sing at this service. The theme for the
evening sermon is "Sheep Stealing."
1 MT. PLEASANT BAPTIST CHURCH. Belle
ville avenue and Oriental street—W. T S
Lumbar, minister Morning worship at 10:45,
theme. "Tr.e Great Dispensations." Evening
worship at 7:45; theme, "The Startling Con
trast Between Christ and His Influence 6n the
Masses of His Time and That of the Church |
in Our Time." Bible school at 2:30 p. m.
Congregational mid-week service Thursday at
8 p. m.
SOUTH BAPTtST CHURCH. East Kinney
street, near Broad—Rev. T. E. Vassar, D. D ,
supply, pending the settlement of a paster.
Preach ng at 10:30 and 7:45 Morning tonic.
"Garden Beds and Borders." Evening. “The
Night, of Despair in the Wilderness." Bible
school at 2:30. Mid-week service on Thursday
evening at 7:15.
Sunday song program: "Lord. I Have l^oved
Thy Habitations." "Homeland." "My Faith
Looks Up to Thee." "God Is a Spirit."
PEDDIE MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH.
Broad and Fulton streets— Revj Thomas J. VII
Iera, D. D.. pastor, will preach at 10:30 on
"The Separating Cross.” Sunday school at 12;
William Battles, superintendent. Vesper serv
ice at 7:45. with special music by the choir.
Pastor’s evening topic. "Christ and the Com
mon People." Musical program. Te Dum, Nunc
Dimittis. "Holy Redeemer." Monthly choral
service next Sunday.
CONGREGATIONAL.
BELLEVILLE AVENUE CONGREGA
TIONAL CHURCH. 153-7 Belleville avenue
—Theodore Merrsll Shlpherd. minister. Men’s !
class. 9:30 a. m.: worship. 10:45 a. m.; pas- j
tor’s subject. "Personal Responsibility for
Good Government." Bible school. 3 p. m
Evening worship. 7:45 p. m., the Rev. O. M
Fisher, the East Side chaplain. of New
York, will speak. Fellowship meeting Tues
day at 8 p. m. Young People’s Society Fri
day at 8 p. m.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL JUBE ME
MORIAL CHURCH. Clinton avenue, corner
Wright street—The Rev. T. Aird Moffat, min
ister Morning worship at 10:45. Evening ,
devotions at 7:45.
CHRISTADELPHIAN.
CHRIST A DELPHIAN ECCLESIA. Iroquois !
Building. 2->2 Washington street. just j •
sou»h of Market street—Sunday morning at 10
o'clock. Bible Study School: at 11. memorial .
service. There will be no evening meeting.
EPISCOPAL.
ST. STEPHEN’S PROTESTANT EPISCO
PAL CHURCH. Clinton and Elizabeth ave
nues— Ser\ice* 8 a. m.. 10:45 a. m.t 7:46 p. m.
Sunday school i p. m.
TRINITY CHURCH. Broad and Rector
streets—The Rev. Louis S. Osborne, rector.
Holy Communion every Sunday at 8 a. m., and
first Sunday In month at 11 a. m.. with ser
mon Othe- Sundays, morning prayer and
sermon at 11. Sunday school at 3 p. m. Even
ing service 7:45. with sermon by the rector.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL.
CENTRAL M. E. CHURCH. Market and
Mulberry streets—The Rev. William H. Mor
gan. D. D.. pastor. 10:30 a. m. sermon by Rev.
David Morgan, of St. Paul. Minn.: subject,
"Christ the Supreme Teacher." 2:30 p. m.. 1
Sabbath school. 6:30 p. m.. Epworth League '
vesper service; Rev. David Morgan will speak.
7:45 p. m.. sermon by pastor subject, "The: ;
Hero of Appomattox." Phil Kearny Post, G.
A. R.. will attend In a body. Tuesday. 8 p. nr,
prayer service. Thursday, 8 p. nr, class meet- ■
Ing. All are invited to these services.
ROSEVILLE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, corner Orange street and Bath- ,
gate place—Dorr Frank Diefendorf. minister. |
Morning worship and sermon at lOrSO o’clock; j
subject. "Christ Among the Traders.’’ At
7:45 o'clock there will be a Memorial Day
service and General Horatio C. King will
speak on "Personal Reminiscences of the I
Great War." Men's meeting. 9:30 a. m.; Sun- i
day school. 2:30 p. m.; vesper service of the
Epworth League. 6:45 p. m.; Boys’ Vesper
Club. 6:45 p. m. Mid-week service for prayer
and ’ nraise. Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock. <
All are cordially invited to worship with us.
A special invitation is extended to all
veterans of the Civil War.
ST. PAUL'S METHODIST EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, corner Broad and Marshall streets
—.William C. O'Donnell, Jr., pastor. 10:30 a. j
m sermon: 2:30 p. m., Sunday school.
Music Sunday morning is as follows: Pre
lude. Andante. Benoist: offertory, Chopin;
postlude. Allegro. Mendelssohn. Evening—
Preludt. violin and organ. "Legende." Rohm: 1
offertory. violin and organ. "Berceuse."
A lard; postlude. Marche Milltaire. Clark. Mr.
Cornelius Jackson will be the violin soloist
at the evening service. James Philipson, or
ganist
TRINITY M. E. CHURCH—The Rev. Dr 1
McCowen pastor. Morning sermon by Dr. ■
Meeker, presiding elder. Evening sermon by
the pis tor; subject, "Hearing and Under- ;
standing."
PflKFIIYTERIAN.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Broad
street, near Mechanic—The Rev. David R
Frazer D. D.. pastor. Divine worship at
10:30 a' m and 7:45 p. m. Sunday school and
Bible classes at 2:30 p. m. Men's Bible Union.
2:30 Adult Bible class. 4; Christian Endeavor
meeting. 8:45. Prayer meeting Tuesday eve
ning at 8 o’clock. Meeting for men of the
church and congregation. Thursday. 8 p. ni.
Study of next Sunday’s lesson Friday eve
ning at 8 o'clock. _ , .
Sunday music program: Morning—Prelude,
choral, "O Welt, Ich Muss Dlch Lassen,
Brahma; anthem. ’The Radiant Morn." Wood
ward; quartet, "The Heavenly Vision," Bird;
postlude. Largo. Handel. Evening—Prelude,
Flute Concerto (first movement). Rinck; an
them. a legend. "While Yet the Christ."
Tsehaikowsky; quartet. "Still. Still with
Thee." Rogers; postlude. Flute Concerto
(Last Movement), Rinck.
7EW8MITH MEMORIAL CHURCH. Hud
son street, near Orange street—The Rev.
Edgar C. Mason, pastor. Sunday services:
Divine worship at 10:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m.
The pastor will preach at both services.
Sunday school at 2:30 p. m Christian En
deavor at 6:45 p. m. ' Welcome to all services.
PARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, corner
Belleville avenue and Kearny street—The Rev.
John McDowell, pastor: the Rev. R. H. M.
Augustine, pastor’s assistant. At 11 o’clock
the pastor will preach on "Come and See,"
and at 7;45 p. m. his them** will be "Young
People’s Questions About Social Evils.” At
L0 a. m. Intermediate Bndeavorers meet; 11
a. m. Juniors meet; 2:45 p. m.. Bible school;
6:45, Senior Christian Endeavor, at which
under Sheriff Mason will speak. Prayer
meeting Tuesday at 8 p. m. A cordial invi
tation to all services. Seats free
The music In the morning will be: Anthem.
"More Love to Thee, O Christ," Reed; of
fertory, soprano solo, "I Do Not Ask. O
Lord," Spross: choir response, "My Prayer
Is Unto Thee." Stebbins. Evening—Anthem.
"Fast Falls the Sun to Eventide.” Havens;
ihoruH "Jesus, from Thy Throne on High."
offertory, tenor solo. "Is He Yours?" Read.
ROSEVILLE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH;
*orner Roseville and Sussex avenues—Rev. W.
r. Chapman. D. D.. pastor. Services tomor
row 10:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. Sunday school
!:80 p. m. Christian Endeavor 6:45 p. m. Tues
tay evening meeting at 8 o'clock. Rev. H. C.
3 arm on will preach in the morning in exchange
vitn the pastor.
SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
Washington and James streets—The Rev.
Pleasant Hunter. D. D.. pastor. Sunday
services, 10:45 a. in and 7:45 p. m. Subject.
Ifteenth chapter of First Corinthlan3. Sun
lay school at 12 o’clock. Christian Endeavor
rieeting. 6:45 p. m. Church prayer meeting
ruesday evening at 8 o’clock. To all of these
services a cordial invitation is extended.
Music program Morning—Prelude, "Ro
nance" in D flat, Lemare; anthem, "Thy
Mercy, O Lord." Woodman; offertory. "Lead,
fCindly Light." Buck; postlude, Gounod.
Svening—Prelude. "Meditation.” Dubois; an
hem, "Be Joyful in the Lord." Luarri
6elby: offertory, "Saviour, Bless Us Ere We
Jo," Gilchrist; postlude, "Offertaire" in E
lat. Wely.
SIXTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Lafay
»tte and Union streets—The Rev. Davis W.
L.usk, D. D., minister; the Rev. W. P. Van
rrles, assistant minister. Men's meeting. 9:45
i. m.; divine worship. 10:30 a. m. and 7:43
t. m. At the morning service Major Page%
leeretary to Commander Eva Booth, of the
Salvation Army, will speak. The pastor will
>reach in the evening. Sunday school, 2:30
v m.; Christian Endeavor. 6:43 p. m.. led by
Hr. John T Crammer; Junior church. 10:30
i. m. Stereoptleon lecture on "Niagara
ralls" Monday night.
Sunday music program: Organ prelude.
'Morning Song." Merkel; anthem. "The Lord
s Exalted." John West; offertory. Romance,
rour?; postlude, Marche Solcnnelle, Gounod.
Evening—Organ prelude. Prayer, Massenet;
inthem, "Jesus. Lover of My Soul." Beebe;
iffertory, Intermezzo, Delibes; postlude, Al
egro, Merkel.
SOUTH PARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
3road street and Clinton avenue—Rev. Ly
nan. Whitney Allen. D. D., pastor; the Rev.
Arthur A. Fellstrom. assistant. Morning
service. 10:30; afternoon service, 4 o’clock.
Dr. Allen will preach at both services. Sab
>ath school. 2;45 p. m.. Prayer service Tues
lay. 8 p. m.
SOUTH PARK MEMORIAL CHAPEL,
touth and Dawson streets—Sabbath school.
:30 p. m.; children s’service, 7 p. m.; Chrts
ian Endeavor service. 7:15 p. m Evening
ervicc, 8 p. m.. Mr. Fellstrom will preach;
ubject, "Voices.” Prayer service, Thursday,
p. m.
THIRD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, oppo
ite City Hall—Robert Scott Inglis. minister,
lervlces 10:30. a. m. and 7:45 p. m. Sabbath
chool. 2:30. Subject morning sermon. "The
"hlngs That Are Written." Evening service.
Memorial Day Sabbath exercises will be held,
’omrado George Ougheltrce. of Lincoln Post,
i. A. R.. a battle-scarred veteran. will
peak, giving his experiences on battlefield
,nd in rebel hospitals and prisons. instru
nental music by an eight-piece orchestra, and
>atnotic hymns will be sung.
WEST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Little
on and Eleventh avenues—The Rev. Harold
V Harmon, pastor. Morning worship at 10:45
(’clock; the Rev. W. Y. Chapman. D. D..
vi 11 preach in exchange with the pastor.
Evening worship at 7:45 o’clock; address by
Staff Captain Burrows from the national
icadquarters of the Salvation Army. Men’s
neetlng. 1^:30 a. m.; Bible school, 2:30 p. m.;
{. P. S. C. E., 7 p. m. Tuesday, S p. m.,
•rayer meeting.
REFORMED.
CLINTON AVENUE REFORMED CHURCH.
Lincoln Park—Prayer. 10 a. m.: divine worship
t 10:30 a. m. and 7:45 p. m. The Rev. A. M.
trcularius will preach at both services. Sun
lay school and Bible classes at 2:30; Chris
ian Endeavcr vespers, 7. Tuesday evening
rayer meeting. 7:45.
Sunday music program—Organ prelude;
tdagio from a "Noturno." Louis Spohr; an
hem. "Rejolco. Emmanuel Shall Come."
7evln; solo for offertory will be by the basso:
rgan postlude. "March Triumphal.” Jacques
/mmens. Evening—Organ prelude, "Ro
nanc**.” Svendson; anthem. “I Am Alpha
md Omega.” John Stainer; offertory. ”Sa
iour, When ' Night Involves the Skies.”
larry Rowe Shelly; organ postlude, improvi
ation on the closing hymn.
CLINTON AVENUE REFORMED CHURCH.
Jncoln Park—Prayer. 10 a. m.; divine worship
t 10:30 and 7:45. The Rev. A. M. Arcularius
rill preach both morning and evening. Sun
lay school and Bible classes, 2:30; Christian
Endeavor vespers, 7. Tuesday evening prayer
meeting. 7:45.
NORTH REFORMED CHURCH. Broad and
Bridge streets—The Rev. James I. Vance. D.
D.. minister- ihe Rev Peter K. Hageman.
assistant. Sunday schools at 9:30 a. m a:ia
2:45 p. m.; East Newark Sunday school at
2:30 p m.; Y. P. S. C. E. at 6:45 p. m.
Preaching services at 10:30 a. m. and 6:4;»
p. m. At the morning service, in the absence
of Dr. Vance, the Rev. W. Warren Giles, of
East Orange, will preach, in exchange with
the Rev. Peter K. Hageman, on *'A Chris
tian Virtue and Its Reward." In the evening
the assistant minister, the Rev. Peter K.
Hageman, will preach on the topic, "Why
St. Paul Was Popular as a Preacher.”
THE NEW YORK AVENUE REFORMED
CHURCH—The sixtieth anniversary. Special
music. At the morning historical service the
musical selections will be: Jubilate Deo,
chant in E, Joseph Bamby; Kyrle Eleison,
Sir Arthur Sullivan; "Gloria Patrt." Henry
Smart; "Cantate Domino in C,” Dudley
Buck: "Deus Misereatur in A.” J. C. D.
Parker; offertory, quartet. -Call to Remem
brance.” Vincent Novello; "The Dresden
Amen."
Communion service at 3:30 will Include the
following llturgic numbers: "Benedlctus Qui
Venlt," A. J. Eyre; "Gloria Patri in F.”
R. Langdon; "Gloria in Excels!*" in E flat,
W. A. C. Cruickshank; "The Sanctus," W. J.
Clemson; Agnue Dei, A. J. Eyre; ’ The Le
mare Amen."
Evening, popular service with prominent
lay speakers. The music will consist of
••Magnificat" and "Nunc Dimlttis" from
service in F. Berthold Tours; soprano solo
with violin obligato. "With Verdure Clad."
from Haydn's "The Creation;" offertory,
chorus, "Praise, the Lord, O Jerusalem,”
Protheroe; "The Florence Amen."
UNIVERSALIST.
Rev. Henry R. Rose, minister.
CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER. Broad
and City Hall—Parents* Sunday at 11. Mr.
Rose'will preach on "Making Children Good
by Suggestion, or the Emmanuel Treatment
in the Home." Have you unruly children?
Does your son or daughter drink, gamble,
or worse? Are you a teacher and would you
like to control your pupils better? Have
you grandchildren or nieces and nephews?
This sermon will interest and guide you.
Sunday school at 10; kindergarten at 11.
Men’s class at 10. No evening service. Illus
trated lecture Memorial Day by Mr. Rose on
"America’s Four Wars for Liberty." Free.
Come! .
The musical program for Sunday will be:
Processional. "While I Seek;" anthem. "In
Humble Faith;" response after prayer,
"Nearer, My God. to Thee;’’ "Life’s Work,
march.
MISCELLANEOUS.
CHILDREN'S TEMPLE, formerly Chestnut
street station of the Pennsylvania Railroad
Ten Commandment Circle meets. Sunday even
ing 6:45 o'clock. Sunday evening, regular serv
ice, 7:45 o’clock, Mr. Joseph Wilde will be the
speaker. Thursday evening meeting of praise
7:45 o’clock. These meetings are undenomina
tional. All children are xhearlily welcome to
this temple. Come.
GOSPEL HALL, No. 104 McWhorter street,
corner Green street—Christians gathered unto
the precious name of our Lord Jesus Christ
meet at 10:30 every Lord’s Day to break bread
in remembrance of the Lord Jesus Christ. Sun
day school at 6 p. m. Gospel meeting at 8
p. m. On Tuesday, at 8 p. m.f prayer meeting,
and Thursday, at 8 p. m., Bible study. "Christ
died for the ungodly."
HEBREW MISSION, 125 Barclay street—
Service Wednesday and Friday evenings at 8
o'clock. Come, all welcome. Special meeting
of Jewish Christians and friends Saturday even
ing, May 30, at 8 o’clock. Come.
NEWARK GRADED UNION OF SUN
DAY SCHOOL TEACHERS will meet at 3 p.
m. Sunday in the First Presbyterian Church.
The lesson for May 31 will be taught In three
sections by the following: Beginners, Mrs. C.
E. Lund; primary, Mrs. I. C. Brown: junior.
Miss J. L. Baldwin. This will be the last
meeting until the fall.
RESCUE HOME. 81 Clay street—Sendees,
3:45 and 7:45, in charge ot' Sylas B. Colby
and friends, of Morristown. Don’t fall to
come end hear this wonderful man of God.
Good singing Short testimony. Everybody
welcome. Mrs. Robert La Roe, organist; Mrs.
J. G. Simmons, pianist; J. G. Simmons, musi
cal director
ST. PAUL’S COSMOPOLITAN RESCUE
MISSION—Rev. F. F. Smith will preach on
"God’s Great Blessings" in the evening.
THE PEOPLE’S TEMPLE. 38 Clinton street
—Tonight a gospel temperance meeting. Sun
day. i/:15 a. m., the remains of Mr. Joseph
Naylor will be brought to the temple, where
a funeral service will be conducted by Pattie
Watkins Lindsay. 4 p. m.. Dr. Robert
Littell. pastor of UnVed Presbyterian Church,
will speak. 8 p. m.. the Rev. John G. Halli
mond, superintendent of Bowery Mission, will
speak. Newark Evangelistic Band will furnish
music.
WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE
UNION, 12S Mulberry street—Sunday, at 4
o'clock. Dr. James Clayton Howard, pastor
Halsey Street Methodist Episcopal Church, will
deliver an address on the ‘ First Anniversary
of the Hague Peace Conference." At 7:45, Ed
ward Kearney will celebrate his twenty-first
anniversary. Special musical program.
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA
TION. 107 Halsey street—H. A. Cozzens. sec
retary1. Bible classes as usual. Mr. Brad
ford Williams, the noted evangelist, will
again speak at the men’s meeting to be held
in Wallace Hall tomorrow afternoon. 3:45
o’clock, his topic being "Beginning Again."
There will be both vocal and instrumental
music. The farewell meeting of Bradford
Williams will be held on May 31 and will be
open to men and women.
YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIA
TION, 14 East Park street—4 p. m. happy
hour service; the Rev. Roland S. Dawson,
of the Knox Presbyterian Church, Kearny,
will sneak. Miss May Trlnter will sing, and
Miss Vera A Bluth will give violin solos.
!*FORTHeTLITTLE FOLK*!
Interesting Items to Please tbe Children.
)^j==.ET)ITEV By UJVCLE^JACK==^
MARVELS OF THE SEA.
>
THE makers of ancient maps were
accustomed to introduce pictures
freply. In deserts there would
be drawings of lions, and aiong'rivers
they made "river-horses"—which is th -
meaning of the Greek words that ware
put together to make up "hippopota
mus.” As for the oceans, they were
filled up with any queer monsters that
came to hand. Of course, these pictures
helped to hide great spaces that would
otherwise have been staring blanks.
Besides. m£n understood little about
the strange happenings in the world
around them, and invented fairy tales
to explain these mysteries. It is not
remarkable, then, that so late as Co
lumbus’s time his sailors did not at all
like to think of sailing westward into
the unknown ocean full of fabulous
creatures and magic happenings. Even
with all that wise and studious men
have learned since, there is enough to
be met with in a long ocean voyage to
excite wonder and alarm.
Sailors may see auroras, the strange
“Northern Lights," the cause of which
is even now little more than guessed at;
they may be surrounded by water
spouts, which are not entirely explained
as yet; they may meet "tidal” (that is,
earthquake) waves, that rise from thirty
to sixty feet, or even more, above tho
surface; they may be amazed by “St.
Elmo's fire," the sparkling flames that
play about masts and rigging; they
may behold lightning in globe-form,
sheet flashes, or forked bolts; they are
sure to sail through the phosphores
cence that has but lately been traced
to annual life. Then too, storms and
calms, fogs and moonlight, bring
strange sights. Altogether, the ocean is
a wonderland that has new marvels
every day; the very color of the sea is
hardly twice the same.
LITTLE JACK HORNER.
Do you know that Jack Horner, of
Mother Goose fame, was a real person?
The story is that the Abbot of Glaston
bury, hearing that King Henry VIII.
had spoken with indignation of ilia
building such a kitchen as the King
could not burn down, sent his steward,
Jack Horner, to present the King with
a bribe, or peace-offering. This was
a pie containing the deeds’ of twelve
pianors. Jack, wishing to "takelpll,"
and thua provide for himself, lifted
the crust of the pie and took out the
deed to the manor of Wells, telling tile
abbot, on his return, that the King
had given it to him. Hence the old
rhyme:
He put in his thumb
And pulled out a plum.
Saying, "What a brave boy am I!"

THE PRIZE-WINNERS.
The correct answer to last Saturday's
geographical puzzle was Germany. The
following children were the prize-win
ners:
LAUREL B. COLLYER, aged 11. Pine
Grove avenue, Summit (box'of paints);
JOSIE HILDEBRANDT, aged 9, 176
Washington street, Newark (book);
VIRGIE VOGELIUS, aged 11, 225
Washington street, Bloomfield (book);
MORRIS KEMPER, aged 11, 129 Wlck
liffe street, Newark (book); EDWARD
CHAPMAN, aged 12, 24 Napoleon street,
Newark (box of paints); RONALD
ABERNETHY, aged 7, 79 North Thir
teenth street, New'ark (baseball).
ALBERT STEEBER.
A clever 8-year-old prize-winner of
the children’s puzzles, who lives at 154
Roseville avenue, Newark.
CHILDREN’S DEPARTMENT
UNCLE JACK’S PUZZLES--NO. 92.
WHAT COUNTRY DOES THIS PICTURE REPRESENT?
THESE people are out hunting in the jungle and according to the custom el the country they Inhabit they use
the elephant in their sport. If you take the first letters of the names of the objects shown In the small pic
tures you will find the name of the ocuntry. After you have found the answer, fill out the coupon below
and send it to Uncle Jack, EVENING STAR. Newark, N. J.
The three girls and three boys who send In the neatest correct answers can have their choice of a box of paints,
a good book or a baseball. If the name is not written plainly the answer will be rejected. Uncle Jack will publish
the picture of any prize-winner who cares to send him a photograph. , Tintype pictures cannot be used.
Only children under 15-years of age are eligible to compete. Be sure to place a two-cent stamp on the enve
lope, to avoid delay at the postoffice. The names of the prize-winners will be announce^ on Saturday, May 30.
ABEL EM’S PRIZES.
The two prizes of $1 each for two
selected complete lists of answers to
New Puzzles No. 267 were awarded to
Annadee, Newark. N. J.
Ess mi. Sliver Lake, N. •!.
ABEL EM’S COMMENT.
F. AITCHELL Is informed that we
have not the necessary space to publish
a complett solvers' list.
ANNADEE gives a cfever rhyming
answer to the transposition by AR
CANUS as follows:
ARCANUS caught my gateman
And with poetic guile.
Transposed him to a magnate
In charming mystic style.
pm. vm m&mzm&MmmamKift
I FROM THE POSTMAN i
$ L
■jmnmimtmBsmtaaK- mcm:m
The Star Juvenile Humane Society
will spend an afternoon at Hillside
Park the first week in June as the
guests of Uncle Jack. The manage
ment of the park has generously of
fered to throw open their gates free
of charge to all children who wear a
STAR button. Every child will also
be given free admission to all the
many attractions of the park, includ
ing the wild West show, the balloon
ascension, menagerie, merry-go-round,
roller-coaster, etc., and will also be
I
given a bag of peanuts. Look for the
announcement of the date in the Hu
mane Society column, which appears on
Mondays and Thursdays, and have
your buttons ready so that you may
not miss thi3 great treat.
EDWARD POLLOCK—Apply to the
city authorities in reference to the
matter you wrote about.
GERTRUDE PEMBLETON — Only
original stories by the children are ac
cepted.
MINNIE BIRKHAHN—Uncle Jack
would he very glad to receive the story
you have written.
Newark, N. J.
Dear Uncle Jack—I thank you v»ry
much for the book you have sent me.
I will try tolget a set of books. Yours
truly. STELLA BACH, age 12.
113 West street.
Dear Uncle Jack—I have received your
loving postal card that I should come
down to THE EVENING STAR office
and receive my book. I was very much
surprised when I received it. Wishing
you every blessing I remain, your friend,
OSCAR WURZBACH, JR.
404 Washington street.
———— • _ i ' ' ~
int YVbbKLY UJINI bbl.
TWO prizes of il each will be
awarded ti ls week for two se
lected complete lists of answers
to New Puzzles No. 269. Standard Dic
tionary is used for definitions: com
pound words are shown by (*), and
words out of dictionary order by (I).
Address replies to “Puzzle Editor,
EVENING STAR," and have same
reach this office within ten days.
Answers will appear In two weeks.
NEW PUZZLES NO. 269.
2,603.
DIAMOND.
1. The letter R. 2. A mere taste.
3 Coulter (Wright's Dial. Diet ).
i. Having color. 5. A sunspot (S).
6. (Mus.) Instrumental preludes, inter
ludes or refrains, as in songs, choruses
or other vocal works. 7. To pursue in
a manner to injure, vex or afflict.
TT- . .. ■ ,
HELEN VERPILLIEK.
Helen lives at 31 Clark street, New
ark, and is an enthusiastic reader of
the children’s department.
<
5. itsot.) frameworks or processes leu.
after the valves of capsules or the
dehiscent fruits have fallen, as in the
shepherd's purse. 9. Blockheads.
10. (Prov. Eng.) Ties. 11. The letter S.
MUSICUS
2.604.
ANAGRAM.
vVent great shine.
SITT DOWNS.
2.605.
NUMERICAL.
My 1 to 6 is a Chilean tree,
A wood prized for oars and rudders, you
see.
% f
Of the parsley family this is a genus,
Sure, it*3 5. 3, 2, 1, or my name isn’t
Dennis.
6. 4 stands for gold on a heraldic de- *
sign,
A dotted white surface—you see none
on mine.
REX.
2.606.
SQUARE.
1. Filaments of flax or hemp drawn
out or hackled. 2. Absent. 3. To fall
from the clouds in drops of water.
4. (L.) A northern constellation.
PARK.
ANSWERS TO NO. 267.
2,595—BY PARK.
FLIRTING.
2,59e—BY WEE FING.
C
PAL
P I R O L
PIERROT
CAR'ROCC IO
L O R C H A 3
LOCAL
T I S
O
2.597— BY MUSICUS.
P
PAS
PASHA
PASTERN
P A S T I C C I O
S H E C O O N
A R C O T
N I N
0
2.598— BY ARCANU8.
GATEMAN—MAGTSATp.^0 ^

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