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Newark evening star and Newark advertiser. [volume] (Newark, N.J.) 1909-1916, February 04, 1910, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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of Essex, versus Patrick J. McGuiness
which was decided against McGuiness
by Supreme Court Justice Swayze. Jus
tice Swayze did not ait in review- of tin
uase by the Errors court.
The civil service act was passed bj
the Legislature In the first year of th<
term of Governor Fort. It had beer
recommended by him In his annua
message. The commission created b\
Uie act began work sis soon as com
missioned. and sketched out the plar
of operation of the law. deciding as tc
What should constitute the classified
service. Disputes arose and were set
tled as to the status of officeholder;
under the act There was not a gen
eral acceptance by the counties and
municipalities, and few took advantage
■ of the law. Among those that did were
the county of Essex and the city of
Newark.
The county Board of Freeholders was
controlled by the Democrats, and tlie
Democratic county officers were con
firmed In their positions. The offices
under the Common Council and Mayor
of Newark were Democratic, and the
act was adopted for them. The Board
of Works was Republican, and the Re
publican employees became fixed in
th ir positions. In 1909 a Republican
Board of Freeholders and Common
Council came into power. In the case
of the freeholders they were advised
by counsel to disregard the civil service
liov, as It was unconstitutional. Ac
cordingly, when the new board organ
ized, it elected an entire list of new
county officers und sought to oust the
Democratic incumbents.
The latter refused to give up, and the
dispute was carried to the courts in
two actions, one involving the position
of P. J. McGuInness, the Democratic
county collector, and the other the
position of Dr. Daniel Elliott, the Demo
cratic county physician. It wus agreed
to hold a truce until the courts should
decide In these two cases, and more
particularly, in the case of County Col
lector McGuInness. The Elliott case wus
decided last year unfavorably to Dr.
Elliott, and Dr. William McKenzie, the
Republican claimant, ussumed the
office. The McGuInness case Is that
which is settled by today's Judicial
. opinion, which opinion settles the whole
controversy, und, us tile. civil service
law was invalid when the Republican
appointments were made, they were
entirely legal. Ail the Republicans will
take their offices and the Democrats
will be ousted.
The litigation in this ease was pro
longed, und towards Its close It In
volved points that made the court sit
up and take notice. Did the Legis
lature have the right to delegate any of
its power to an appointive commission?
That was a stumper for the advocates
of the law. Could the Legislature place
the control of municipal and county ex
penditures for any purpose In a State
commission?
A question asked by the court dur
ing an argument by counsel led to a
i t hearing and furnished the first hint
that the court was not disposed to look
upon the civil service act with a
friendly eye. The decision lias already
been discounted. It would have been
a great surprise if the decision had
been the o.ncr way Governor Fort,
who has been wedded to the law. with
all Its glaring faults, has also expected
an adverse decision, and if it hud come
out in time he would have embodied
in His annual message some plan of
i ntending the act to do away with its
unconstitutional features. He will now
probably make the matter a subject for
a special messugc, but the Legislature
will not again try to tie up the local
governments to a State commission.
For months political leuders ull over
the State have Iniri their "ears to the
ground" awaiting the final decision of
ihe Court of Errors and Appeals in the!
famdus McGuinness-Rooth case, which
was regarded ns the test and precedent
by which all other cases must stand
or fail, and which would determine the
ccr-gtltutlonallty <jt the civil service
act Tt can be understood why this
suspense was so intense when it is
said that the positions of thousands of
office-holders all over the State have
been In Jeopardy—hanging by a single
thread, so to speak. Leaders of both
parties have conferred and discussed
and surmised as to what the decision
would be. and were agreed that Its ef
fect would he more far-reaching than
any ruling the higher court lias made
In years.
While the decision effects Newark,
Jersey City. New Brunswick und Rah
way, these bring tho cities which have
adopted civ!' >crvlce, it is of particular
interest to v-wurk and Essex county,
where the most positions are at stake,
and where the test case originated. Es
sex county has been the “storm cen
tre,” so to speak, in the civil service
vrw, because it was the first and only
county to adopt civil service regula
tions In their entirety. As a result of
thin there are today more than 500
office-holders, employees of the city
had county, who will he directly effect
ed. This Includes not only clerks, but
men who nre supposed to he heads of
county und city departments.
The State civil service law was in
troduced in the Legislature of 1908 by
Senator Ernest R. Ackerman, of Union,
and was enacted a lt'.,v April 10 of that
year. Under tho law it was optional
with cities and counties to adopt clrll
service. The law only became opera
tive when the governing body of any
municipality or county by ordinance
or resolution decided to take advan
tage of Its provisions. In the event of
the governing body pot taking advan
tage of the law it was provided that
file voters of any municipality or coun
ty might, by petition, ask the governing
body to adopt such an ordinance or
resolution. This was the referendum
feature of the law. In cities of the
first and second class the signatures
of 50U citizens are required; in coun
ties and cities of the third class 200
signers were necessary and in boroughs
und other small places the law' required
the signature of 5 per cent, of the r,
1 stored voters.
A few months after it wus passed,
taking advantage of the terms of the
civil service act, the Democrats, who
were then in control In this city and
county, .sought to protect officeholders.
An ordinance was adopted placing the
city officers under civil service. Every
thing was done In conformity with the
law which had been passed by the Re
publican Legislature. This ordinance
was adopted in August. IMS. and be
came operative October t, 1908. Many
Democrats were appointed to office and
were plnced on the civl service list.
Many old clerks and department heads,
whose tenure of office was uncertain,
were also placed In the classified civil
service list. Republican clerks who
were dismissed by the then Democratic
Common Council were “taken care of
tey the Board of Works, then Republi
can. nnd the Board of Works Just us
flulckly and eagerly took advantage
«f the civil service act and placed
these clerks in the classified list.
The Board of Freeholders of 1907 was
I>»mocratle, and before the new Re
publican board took office |n
—- - 'T • _|_
December. 1908, the Democratic
board took care of the Demo
cratic county employees. placing
them in the civil service list. When
the Republican board camo In the
members refused to recognise the civil
service act and proceeded to oust the
Democratic office-holders. Out of this
grew the famous McGuinness-Bootn
case, which tested the constitutionality'
of the act.
Dr. P. J. McGuinness was the county
collector. He was a Democrat and
was one of those whose positions the
Democratic Board of Freeholders
sought to protect by civil service.
When the new Republican board went
Into power it appointed Richard W.
Booth as successor to Dr. MoGutnness.
Dr. McGuinness refused to give up his
position, contending that he was pro
tected by the civil service law. Hun
dreds of office-holders In the county
followed the stand taken by Dr. Jlc
Ouinness. Much confusion followed,
the Board of Freeholders refusing to
pay the old employees, who made u
demand for their money. Finally an
amicable working agreement was
reached. Dr. McGuinness and Mr.
Booth got together and agreed on a
salary division pending the determina
tion of a suit begun by Dr. McGuin
ness. Other office-holders who were
in the same position as Dr. McGuin
ness and Mr. Booth made similar agree
ments.
Eminent counsel were engaged on
both sides in Dr. McGulnness's suit,
and finally the case reached the Court
of Errors and Appeals. From the time
that the court considered the case there
were all sorts of rumors as to its final
disposition, and there seemed to be
sort of an "underground” message from
the court which said that certain pro
visions of the law would be declared
void and that these provisions would
affect the 500 or more office-holders In
Newark and Essex county.
The Court of Errors and Appeals first
took up the civil service law about
four months ago and at that time It
was reported that the court stood seven
to six against Its constitutionality, ln
sofur as It applied to other than State
service. When the matter was re
viewed several weeks later it was said
thut the court stood eight to five j
against the constitutionality of certain ,
provisions of the act. It was said then
that the opinion would sustain the con
tention that the State has the constl
tutlo al right to control the positions
under the State government through a
commission of four members appointed
from different parts of the State, but
that the right given to a governing
body of a municipality or county to
accept the provisions of the act by
resolution or ordinance would be upset.
It was furthermore stated that it was
the opinion of the court of last resort
that the Legislature has the right to
pass a civil service act, which act may
be accepted by referendum vote of the
people at a general election. In other
words, the opinion. It was claimed,
would uphold the constitutionality of
the State's power to regulate Its em
ployees. The people have the right, un
der such an act, to vote on accepting
or rejecting this regulating power of
such a commission, but common coun
cils or other governing bodies or free
holders cannot by resolution vest the
power of the people to regulate their
own affairs by a partisan or even a
non-partisan resolution or ordinance.
It has been expected right along that
the court would answer negatively
these questions put to counsel for the
commission on the supplemental argu
ment when the court asked If the Leg
islature, under such a government ns
this, couljd delegate to a common coun
cil power to accept for the people the
regulation of a commission, which com
mission was composed of citizens other
than those of the municipality accept
ing the act. Could the governing body
of n municipality exercise the power
of franchise of citizens in putting the
Internal affairs of the municipality un
der a State board?
It has been pointed out that under
the present act the members of a com
mon council could forestall the rights
of the majority of the people to name
to office employees of « municipality
whenever the dominant party saw that
at the approaching election the domi
nant party was bound to go out of
power. By passing the simple resolu
tion called for by the act, the dominant
party, which was going down to defeat
at the noils, could retain Its men in of
fice. thouyh the vote of the people
changed the political complexion of the
elective officers of the municipality.
HUDSON FREEHOLDERS AID
FIGHT ON BRIDGEMEN.
A resolution wa3 adopted by the
Hudson County Board of Freeholders
yesterday afternoon, authorising their
bridge committee to indorse the new
appointees on the Plank road, Jackson,
Bridge and Clay street bridges that
spun the Passaic river.
The resolution was pussed at the re
quest of the bridge committee of the
Essex County Board of Freeholders,
which has named new fuen for tho
bridges, all of whom are Republicans.
“BEAM HANDS” AT LEATHER
FACTORY GO OUT ON STRIKE.
Hugh Smith & Sons’ Employees
Demand Increase.
Fifteen "beam bunds" in the employ
of Hugh Smith & Sons, leather manu
facturers at 210-212 Central avenue,
walked out of the plant today when
their demand for Increased wages were
refused. The men now receive $9.50 a
puck and want $12.50. They say that
under the present scale they cannot
make more than $12 to $14 a week.
The men ere affiliated with Local No.
I of tho Brotherhood of Butcher Work
men of America. Walking delegates
say that when they watted on James T.
Smith today, he said he would not rec
ognize tho union or their demands. The
strikers will meet tonight at 8 o'clock
in Noll's Hall, Springfield avenue and
Jones street, and listen to ah address
by John Kennedy, general president of
their union.
PAROLE WOMAN ACCUSED
IN FIGHT OVER DRESS.
Charged with assault and buttery,
Mrs. Sarah Jaffe, 73 Monmouth street,
was paroled In the Fourth Precinct
Court today for the action of the grand
Jury.
Mrs, Ernestine D. Dennison, a dress
maker, of 53 Hillside place, declared
that Mrs. Jaffe became impatient be
cause a dress was not done when she
thought It should be. and attempted to
take the goods away. An altercation
followed, and Mrs. Jaffe struck Mrs.
Dennison, according to Mrs. Dennison's
story.
—■Ml—■—
Only One "BROMO QUININE, that Is ^ _ M
Laxatave Brpmo Qui*fo*g£f7)£ JL boa.
Cures a CcM In One Day, Orpin 3 Days W 25fl
f i
. ._... mChiZnk
I PETER BONNETT. EX-MAYOR
| OF ELIZABETH, A SUICIDE.
Shoots Himself and Dies Soon
After.
ELIZABETH, Feb. 4.-Peter Bon
r.ett, former mayor and comptroller of
this city, who has Suffered a long time
lrom a nervous disorder, committed
suicide at 7 o'clock this morning by
shooting himself in the mouth with a
revolver. A servant found him bleed
ing and unconscious on the bed in his
room, ana he died before the arrival
of a doctor. The bullet passed out
through the top of his head.
Last summer Mr. Bonnett made his
home in a sanitarium in Summit, but
came to Elizabeth for several hours
each day to attend to his duties as
comptroller. He never was the same
man after the death of a favorite sister
a year ago, and he declined to be a
candidate for re-election as comp
troller, an office he held for six years.
Air. Bonnett was born in Hew York
city sixty-nine years ago, and was a
bachelor. He traveled all over the
world as representative of the firm of
Bonnett & Schenck. In the early sev
enties he went to Elizabeth, where he
had extensive landed interests as one
of the heirs of the xBonnett estate,
which comprised nearly all the land
and waterfront at Elizabethport, south
of the Elizabeth river and extending
into Linden township.
In polities he was a Democrat, and
was a member of the Democratic Club,
Elizabeth Chess and Whist Club, Board
of Trade, St. John's Episcopal Church
and a member of the New York and
New Jersey Deep Waterways Com
mission.
SAYS HUSBAND’S CONDUCT
DROVE HER TO ASYLUM.
Woman Charges Cruelty in An
swer to Divorce Suit.
Alleging that her husband’s conduct
was the cause of her being committed
to the Essex County Asylum for the
Insane and that she was nut guilty of
tile misconduct churged in Ids petition
for divorce, Mrs. Katherine Kempfe,
wife of Otto Kempfe, of Harrison, has
filed, through Abner Kullsch, an uu
swer and application for alimony,
which will be heard on February 15.
The Keinpfes were married December
8, ls»0, by the Kev. William Kieb, tile
husband being a violin string maker,
with steady employment. In his
petition Kempfe charges that his wife
left home for periods of weeks at a
time. He is represented in the case by
Jones & Gleason.
Mrs. Kempt e denies any knowledge
of the charges made by her husband,
and recites liiuny acts of cruelty on bis
part, skying: "He daily abused and 411
treuted me for a year prior to July,
1905, telling mo to get out of the house,
and that If I did not he would throw
me out." She also says her husband
refused to support her properly, and
that it was necessary for her to sell
personal ornaments to raise money to
live on.
Shortly after the time she left him,
and while living at the home of her
brother, George Frick, Jr., a coal
dealer, of 64 North Fourth street, she
says she submitted to a medical ex
amination and us a result went to the
asylum for treatment She was dis-1
charged as cured a short time ago.
THE GOLD WATCH MYSTERY,’
OR ‘WAS SHE TOO HASTY?’
Court to Probe Melodrama of
Real Life.
Tlie sad, pathetic story of a lost gold
watch and the numerous persons who
were willing ami eager to take It in
and give It a good home, was recited
to the police of the Fourth Precinct to
day by Miss Rebecca Daumgaten, 19
years old, of 123 Broome street.
Miss Daumgaten said she found the
gold watch on the sidewalk In front
of S. > Bucherg's furniture store at 95
Broome street .last Tuesday afternoon.
S. Bucherg saw her find it. He de
manded, Miss Daumgaten said, that
she give it to him, since he happened
to know who lost it.
Alter she had an opportunity to talk
It over with friends and relatives, Miss
Daumgaten decided Hhe ,had been a lit
tle hasty and previous in giving up the
watch. So she reported to the police.
Captain Vogel sent Plainclothesman
Sebold out to investigate.
S. Bucherg told Sebold lie had given
the watch to D. Shelter,, of 211 Court
street. D. Shcher. In turn, had given
It to Abraham Naunchnick, of Bronx
ville. New York. D. Shcher said he laid
the matter before Justice of the Peace
Bernard Levy, of 97 Broome street.
Justice Levy was perfectly satisfied,
he said, that Naunchnick owned the
watch.
But Judge Herr, when he learned of
the story, was not so easily satisfied
as wus Justice Levy. He ordered that
S. Bucherg and D. Shcher appear in
court Monday morning with the watch.
Intimating if they did not, something
unpleasant might happen to them.
A. Naunchnick has no phone, and it
is a long, hard journey to Bronxville,
but there seems no other way out of It.
BIG ADVANCE TICKET
SALE FOR HARRIGAN BALL.
Annual Affair Is an Assured
Success.
A big advance sale of tickets tor the
William Harrtgan Association’s annual
dance in the Krueger Auditorium
March 17 was reported at the meeting
of the association held In its heud
quarters in Market street last night,
when tlie details were perfected. It was
also decided to celebrate Jefferson's
Birthday in a suitable way. A supper
will be one of thb features and there
will be several prominent speakers.
Under Sheriff Charles Reilly is chair
man of the committee of arrangements
for the dance and the sheriff is chair
man of the reception committee. For
mer School Commissioner Daniel F.
Delaney presided last night in the ab
sence of President Thomas J. D. Smith
and there were 200 members present.
YOUTH RUN DOWN AND
BADLY HURT BY TROLLEY.
Fifteen-year-old Frank Wolf, of 239
Prince street, was taken to the Beth
Israel Hospital in the Fourth Precinct
ambulance today with several bruises
and a bad cut over his right eye, re
ceived when he was hit by a trolley
car.
Wolf was crossing Clinton avenue,
near Avon avenue, when westbound
Bergen street car No. 126 struck him.
Dr. L. S. Hinckley, of 182 Clinton ave
nue, gave him "first aid" and then he
was removed to the hospital.
EVENING STAR’S
Proverb Contest
IN PRIZESs=n
Beginning January 27th Closes March 25th
C PICTURE REPRESENTS THE
llO* O FOLLOWING PROVERB:
» / »
[Same___
No-St.
City or Town__
NOTE—The EVENING STAR’S Proverb Contest 1» open to all persons re
elding In New Jersey, excepting employ eeb »,f the Morning and EVEN I NO
j STAR, and members of their families. Answers should not be cent In until
after the last picture has appeared. READ RULES CAREFULLY.
What Well-Known English Proverb
Does This Picture Represent?
Evening Star’s Proverb Picture No. 8
8*ar* Hold All Answers Until Close of Contest ^agjgr
- ^ # N
Evening Star’s Proverb Book
Will Help You
IN order that'all contestants An the STAR’S great
proverb contest may have an equal opportunity, the
EVENING STAR’S BOOK OF ENGLISH PROV
ERBS has been published and is NOW READY. The
book contains all of the proverbs that will be shown in
the contest. Its use to contestants in arriving at the
proper wording and correct construction of the proverbs
will prove indispensable.
It may be had at the Business Office of the STAR
upon receipt of 35 cents, by mail two cents extra.
MAIL ORDERS SHOULD BE ADDRESSED TO
The Proverb Contest Editor, The Evening Star,
NEWARK, N. J.
N. B: The EVENING STAR'S Book of EnuIIsh Proverbs Is the only pun
£« win«d’answe1'8 to «'• 8orie» <“>
COMPLETE LIST OF PRIZES
1 $1,100 MITCHELL AUTOMOBILE—F. L. C. I
Martin Auto Co.. 282 Halsey St.
2— $850 LAUTER-HL'MANA. STYLE O. EM- '
PIRE-The Lauter Co., G57 Broad 8t.
3— 1750 HALLET Sc DAVIS PLAYER-PIANO—
Hallet & Davis Plano Company. 007 r.ioad 8t. ,
4— $500 REO RU N A BOU T—Union Motor Car Co.,
27 Branford Place.
6— $200 THREE-PIECE MAHOGANY DINING- I
ROOM SET—Baumann-Froehllch Co., 4‘j-6i
Market St.
G—$200 COLUMBIA C.RAFONOLA-KdlEonia
Co., 57 Ha lacy street.
7— $200 THOU MOTORCYCLE-Herbert Austin,
SI Orange St.
8— $176 SEVEN-PIECE BEDROOM SUITE IN
BIRD’S-EYE MAPLE—Christian Schmidt
Furniture Co., 157 Springfield Ave.
8-1135 MASSIVE QUARTERED OAK SIDE
BOARD—Cowperthwalt & Van Horn Com
pany, 73-75 Market St.
10— 1100 FOUR-PIECE MISSION LIBRARY
SUITE—J. .1. Henry Muller. Inc., 113-117
Springfield Ave.
11— $100 GENTLEMAN’S GENUINE SOLITAIRE
DIAMOND—J. Wiss & Son®, GS3 Broad .St
12— IIU0 CUT GLASS PUNCH BOWL SET—C.
Hartdegen & Co.. 677 Broad St.
13— 1100 SET OF QUARTERED OAK DINING
ROOM CHAIRS. LEATHER UPHOL
STERED—J. J. Henry Muller, Inc.. U3-117
Springfield Ave.
14— $100 LADY'S DIAMOND SET 14 KARAT
SOLID GOLD WATCH-Frank Holt & Co .
Broad and Academy Sts.
16- 1100 LADY’S GENUINE SOLITAIRE
DIAMOND- .I. Wiss <& Sons. G83 Broad 8t
i6~*lU0 GENTLEMAN’S 14 KARAT SOLID
GOLD SWISS WATCH-Frank Holt & Co
Broad and Academy St®.
17- 1100 ORIENTAL RUG <3xl2)-J. Mullins &
Sons. 218 Market St.
18- $86 FOUR-PIECE PARLOR SLTTE-Dwver *
Company. 323 Plane St.
16—$76 MISSION HALL CLOCK-J. W Green
& Co.. 33 Market St. ^reene
20-175 QUARTERED OAK DINING TAB! E—
Crown Furniture Company, 74-76 Market St
TO ADDRESS CREDIT MEnT~~~
Dr. Albert A. Snowden, secretary of
the National League for Induatrial
Education, and executive officer of the
Newark University Board, will be the
speaker at the next noonday luncheon
of the Newark Association of Credit
Mei, in the Hotel Broad on Thursday,
February 10, at 12:30 o’clock. Dr’.
Snowden ib an authority on induatrial
education.
ril.f’.S CtlRKIl IN « TO 14 DAYS
PAZO OINTMENT Is guaranteed lo cure
any case of Itching, Blind. Bleeding or
Protruding Piles in 6 to 14 days, or
money refunded. 50c—Adv.
21 |70 BRASS 11KD--JJ wyer a. Company, :122
l'lane St.
22—865 IT 1,1..MAN LEATHER DAVENPORT—
E. A. Kirch & Co.. 77 Market S't.
-.>—860 CHINA CLOSET—Dwyer lb Co., 322 Plane
Street.
24-860 GENTLEMAN'S CHlF-ER-OBE—E. A.
. T.1' A Company. 77 Market St.
-a—»H)k ULL TURKISH LEATHER ROCKER—
a. <!,eeue it Co., 33 Market St.
-6—8o0 IjADY'S diamond BROOCH—Jean R.
Tack. 367 liroad St.
27-860 PARLOR MIRROR. MAHOGANY
FRAME—Crown Furniture Co.. 71-76 Mai kit
St reei.
26—850 FIVE-PIECE SILVER TEA SET-R. S.
Schindel it Co., 7t,7 liroad at.
29— 850 LADY'S DRESSING TABLE—Crown
Furniture Co. 74 Market St.
30— ?5t* COMM 1 NATION BOOKCASE, IN MIS
SION STY I.IC—Cowperthwalt it Van Horn
Co., 73 Market St.
31— 130 LEATHER UPHOIJ5TERED MORRIS
< HAIR—Crown Furniture Co., 74-76 Market
Street.
32— 425 OPERA GLASSES—R. S. Schindel &
Company. 707 Broad 8t.
33— $25 GOLF SET—E. G. Koenig's Sons, 875
Broad St.
34— 125 LADY’S SILVER BAG—Jean R. Tack.
S57 Broad St.
35— 126 DRESS SUIT CASE—F. S. Green, 740
Broad St.
36— 925 KODAK—E. G. Koenig’s Sons, 875 Broad
Street.
37— 125 TOILET SET—Jean R. Tack. 857 Broad
Street.
38— $25 STRIKING BAG OUTFIT—K. G. Koenig’s
Sons. 875 Broad St.
39— 125 GENTLEMAN’S SAPPHIRE RING—
Jean R. Tack. 867 Brood St.
40— 920 LADY’S GOLD BRACELET—R. S.
Schindel & Co., 707 Broad St.
41— $15 LADY'S GOLD HANDLED SILK
UMBRELLA-M. W. Gardlnor. $47 Broad St.
42— 415 GENTLEMAN’S GOLD HEADED CANE
—M. W. Qardinor, 847 Broad St. v
43 to 62-4100-TEN PRIZES; EACH TEN DOL
LARS IN GOLD.
WILL BUILD PIER AND BATHS.
- | Special to the Newark Ht.r.l
TRENTON, Feb. 4.—With a capital
ization of $1,500,000, the Long Branch
Pier anti Land Company was incor
porated here today. The company is to
build piers, pavilions and baths. '
COLUMBIAN GUARDS TO GIVE BALL.
Tlio Columbian Guards with head
quarters at 120 Bank street, have Issued
Invitutions for u ball to be given at
Krueger's Auditorium .Thursday eve
ning. February 10.
OKjij;. ■ Jii.. yoLjtfcaili.. ■■-id-kailSi
PUBLIC TOSEE MINIATURE=
WHITE PLAGUE CAMPS.
| Unique Exhibit to Be Again
Shown Here.
An exhibit similar to that shown last
spring with great success will be
opened in the vicinity of the "Four
Corners" on Thursday. February 17,
by the Newark Anti-Tuberculosis As
sociation. The exhibit will consist of
miniature fresh-air equipment de
vices, models of open-air tents, vital
statistics regarding Newark, presented
in attractive forms, and multitudinous
other details having to do with tuber
culosis and its prevention.
The exhibit will be shown in four
different parts of the city in peribds
of a week. Through the work done on
the statistics of deaths resulting from
tuberculosis during the past five years,
the sections most infected with the
disease have been located. It is planned
to reach the people of these parts of
the city by placing the exhibit as near
their homes as possible. Places now
under consideration for the locations of
the exhibit are Branford place, Spring
field and Belmont avenues. Seventh
avenue and East Ferry street.
Ernest D. Easton, the executive sec
retary of the association, is continuing
his lectures on tuberculosis and the
work now being done towards its elimi
nation. Tonight he will lecture before
the Men’s Club of the Roseville M. E.
Church. Tuesday evening next he will
talk to the congregation and friends of
St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church on
"What the Public Can Do,” and on
Thursday will address the Neighbor
hood Home, at 555 Market street.
A meeting of the executive committee
of the association has been called for
this afternoon at 4 o-elock In the otfleo
of Dr. Leslie D. Ward, chairman.
ERIE RAILROAD ACCIDENT
CAUSES TRAFFIC TIE-UP.
Trains Held Up in Arlington
When Engine Breaks Down.
Owing to the breaking of u piston rod
on an Krie railroad locomotive, a train
full of passengers on their way from
Montclair to New York was bronght to
a sudden standstill in Arlington at
8:20 o'clock this morning. The train
which does not stop at the Arlington
station, was Just leaving the "cut" and
nearing Devon street when the accident
occurred.
So ubruptly did the train come to n
stop that the occupants of the several
coaches were given a shaking up, and,
fearing that something serious had
happened, they threw up the windows
and crowded out of the doors to sec
what was the matter.' They saw that
one side of the locomotive had been
roughly torn by the broken rod, and the
engine so badly disabled that it could
go no further.
A call was sent to the Krie yards in
Jersey City for a substitute locomotive,
but before it had arrived and the trains
resumed running aguin on schedule
time over an hour had elapsed.
FINDS SUSPECT HIDING
BETWEEN CHURCH PEWS.
Police Arrest Man Alter Many
Robberies.
Found by Roundsman Htlllman, of the
First Precinct, with one pew cushion
over him and one under him. between
two pews in Grace Kpiscopal Church,
Broad and Walnut streets, last night,
a man who at first gave his name as
Arthur P. Chase, 48 years old, of 612
Columbus avenue, but who later, under
severe questioning by Judge Hahn, In
the First Criminal Court, admitted that
his real name was Michael Forth, of
712 Columbus avenue. New York, was
held for further investigation. Just as
he was being led from the court room
It was discovered that after giving his
real name as Michael Forth, the initials
In his hat, which he admitted he had
bought himself, were "L. P. W„” cor
responding to neither of the names he
had given.
Small articles have been reported"
missing from time to time from Grace
Church, and the negro sexton of the
church stated to the court that he had
seen Chase or Forth loitering around
the church Wednesday night, as well.
A thorough Investigation will be made
by the police, to see if the man has or
has not a criminal record.
EIGHT NEW CLERKS GET
PLACES AT POSTOFFICE.
Growth of Business Requires In=
crease in Force. .
Word was received today at the post
office of the appointment of eight ad
ditional clerks to the fotce, following
the application made by Postmaster
I James L. Hays a few days ago. The
I increase in the business of the post
| office, which in the last year brought
the total receipts to over Jl,000,000, ne
| cessltated the increase in the force.
! The eight senior substitutes who are
to be promoted, bringing the total num
ber of clerks to 167, are Edward H.
Rosiem. William B. Heller. Charles A.
B. Cleary, William W. Melius, Robert
Gllllspie, Peter W. Hehn, Charles Cohn
and Louis F. Kautzmann, jr.
PIPF-SMOKER CAUSES FIRE.
A blaze started by a pipe which
somebody had been smoking In bed
caused JJO damage to the apartments
of F. Bergamo, in the Ansonla apart
ment liou.se, 1158 Broad street, today.
The apartments are on the third floor
of the building, and the report that the
"Ansonia” was on Are brought a big
crowd to tile scene. They were disap
poiuted. however, as the Areinen made
short work of what llttle^Are there was.
PLUM Prr
Engraver
WEDDINQ CARDS
nENUS
v dinner cards
PI IB QUERIES
I AR READERS
AIEREO HERE
Contest Editor Makes Plain
Points Upon Which Contes
tants Are in Doubt.
I PROVERB CONTESTANTS, |
TAKE NOTICE. $
I -
4- I BnlMUnH are requested <o £
| r«,ad the anaHen puhllnlied In +
4 thin column from day to day, «in
4 It will be utterly Imponnlble to J
J even attempt to annwer the thou- 5
4* aandn of lettern pernonally. If j*
4 you denlre any Information con- 1
^ cernlnjf the content make your 4
4* tjuentlonn brief. Write on one 4
T able of the paper only nnd ad- 4
4, drenn nil coiiiinunlcatlonn to »§•
4* Proverb Kdltor, the EVENING t
f S'l'An, Newark, N. J. 5
■«'4'++++++4+4+++++.H.++++++j.Ti
Today the EVENING STAR’S
Proverb Editor publishes answers to
jueries from the. thousands of con
testants who are striving to win the
rich rewards. Space forbids the pub
lishing of every individual letter and
as a large numbef of the inquiries arc
of a similar character, only those con
tabling the substance of all will be
used for examples.
Proverb Editor—Myself and tap*
oral friends have been away visa
ing arid have Just returned to New
ark within the past few days. Due*
this bar me from the contest?
MRS. L. S.
No, indeed, it does not. As long as
you can guarantee the EVENING
STAR that you are a permanent resi
dent of New Jersey you can/enter the
contest at any time.
Proverb Editor—Last night was
the first I noticed your great /
proverb contest. It is such a won- j
derful affair that I have decided to
take part. What must t do to get
started? INTERESTED., '
All you need do to get sturted^is gel
the buck numbers; that Is, getfhe first
seven pictures that arc pigblislud to
date. And begin to solve ^he proverb
pictures that follow each jday through
out the contfcst, by buyin™ a copy oi
t’- • EVENING STAR dully. It will b„
well lor you to order the EVENING
STAR delivered to you regularly iioiu
your nearest newsdealer.
Proverb Editor—1 am deeply in
terested In your great prokerb con
test, not for the p.-izes alone, but
lor the entertainment and knowl
edge It affords me. Of course I
wish to answer the proverbs as
near correctly as possible, and vkish
to ask you U the prover’ book is
the same as a quotation book pub
lished some few years ago by the
EVENING STAR. MRS. J. M. J.
No, the EVENING STAR’I New
Book of English Proverbs Is entirely
different and has been published lor
exclusive use In this contest. There
is no other publication similar to this
book known to contain the proverbs
that are being used.
Proverb Editor—On several occa
sions you have practically the
same proverb under different
classification, and the wording is
slightly changed. For instance,
’’Fair words won’t feed a cat" is
classified under "words," while •
under the letter “F" you have it,
“Fine words won’t Red a cat."
Now, my question is: Is this
proverb called one or two different
proverbs, and will any one of the
two wordings be correct, or must
you have two coupdns in such cases
and send in both wordings.
LOCAL CONTESTANT.
Although there may seem to he a
number of reasonable answers to cer
tain of the proverb illustrations, there
is but one correct proverb, and con
testants will, by careful study of the
picture, be able to arrive at the right
one. The rules, state that the most
commonly used and familiar proverbs
have been selected. One of the two an
swers is right, but, of course, if you
are not satisfied with one answer, you
can send as many as you please. Write
each upon a separate coupon and be
careful not to Include more than 153
in ypur complete set.
An anonymous communication has
been received, from a man presumably,
who writes an erratic letter of some
thing he knows nothing about. He says
he doesn’t suppose it would be profit
abl.. to publish the substance of his let
ter. and Intimates that what he does
sav is x*lrl without malice, etc. He
complains about a previous contest con- ,
ducted by the STAR and says in brief:
Proverb Editor—How is It that
the prize-winners in your last con
test knew they had won prizes be
fore the announcement was made to
the general public? Is it not a fact
that they knew the answers?
HOPEFUL.
This is a ridiculous question to ask.
, as nearly every one must know that the
j STAR examined and Interviewed all
persons who were in line for prices In
their previous contest before announce
ment was made to the public. After
the identity of these contestants had
been fully proven and the STAR was
thoroughly satisfied that they were elig
ible and entitled to prizes, they were
notified bv letter, „ their photographs
were secured by their permission, and
then the announcement was made. But
they did not know the result of their
work until the STAR so notified them.
And the same method will be pursued
at the close of this contest. If "Hope
ful” Is in line for a prize he also will
knmv that he is a winner before the
announcement is made.
Proverb Editor—Wherever there
, are t,vo "ays, In your book, of put
ting the same proverb, will either
one count ns correct? That is. if
one is slightly different in wording?
Are all answers in the alphabetical
list? Are you sure the answer to
No. 3 Is ip the book? PUZZLED.
As stated before, there are different
versions or different wordings to the
same proverb, but there Is only one cor
rect answer to each proverb illusta
tion. No one knows whether or not all
of the answers are in the alphabetical
list. We are sure that answer to No. 3.
as well as all of the answers to the se
ries of proverb Illustrations, are con
tained In the book. *
Start today in the greatest contest
over conJucted in New Jersey. Order
the E\ ENING STAR delivered regu
larly. You tan order the paper by mall
from your newsdealer, or ’phone Market S
1830,
I*

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