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Newark evening star and Newark advertiser. [volume] (Newark, N.J.) 1909-1916, December 06, 1910, LAST EDITION, Image 6

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J YPES AND SCENES A T THE GA Y THE A TRICAL MASQUERADE BALL
Something Profitable to Know .\
TRUE ECONOMY in the purchase of a piano is not alone what
you pay, but what you get for your money in true musical worth and
the assurance of permanent satisfaction.
THE BEST OF EVERYTHING at present known in constructive
principle, material and artistic workmanship is represented in the
WISSNER
PIANOS ;
and a feature of interest is the fact that they arc sold at MANUFAC- N ■
TURER’S PRICES, with a small amount as a first payment.
WHEN YOU THINK OF BUYING A PIANO come and examine II '
our large assortment of high-grade Pianos. No house can offer you
better inducements. i
Send for ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE with reduced prices and ;
terms. j
USED UPRIGHTS AT GREAT BARGAINS . 4
We take a great many Pianos in exchange, including all the prami- . 1
nent makes, and, after having passed through our regular repair depart- i
ment, some are almost like new. We sell them at very low prices. 1
$90 $105 $125 $140
WISSNER WAREROOMS V§j
OPEN EVENINGS 1,1
603 BROAD STREET I
CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY TOUR ’ \
WASHINGTON
via 1
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1910
ROUND-TRIP RATES
$16, $15 and $13.50 from Newark
ACCORDING TO HOTEL SELECTED
Three-Day Tripjeoverlng all Necessary Expense* and Visiting «U the Prin
cipal Points of Interest at the National Capital.
Similar Tours January 19, February 9 and 28, March 1* and SO, April 14
and 27, and May 11.
Full information and tickets may be obtained from C. Studds. D. P. A, MS
Fifth Avenue, New York City, or Ticket Agents.
J. R. WOOD GEO. W. BOYD
j Passenger Traffic Manager General Passenger Agent
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THE snow fell. The snow fell si
lently. Not only did it fall silent
ly; it fell STEADILY—like any
well-bred snow. It spread a pearly
blanket o’er the sleeping city. Aha,
aha, ha! ha! ha! But not al! in the
hamlet were sleeping. Far be it; lots
and lots of the merry villagers had
spent the night in revelry. For was
it not the night of the fifteenth gran’
annual reception, carnival, masquerade
and ball of the United Theatrical At
taches’ Social Club? Right; you
guessed it the very first time—it was.
Cosette, little, flaxen-haired, dimpled
ii PROVES HE
IS A GENTLEMAN
OF DISTINCTION
John Drew Brings Maugham’s
Delightful Comedy to
the Newark.
PROCTOR HAS ONE OF
BEST BILLS OF SEASON
Other Lively and Attractive Bills
Offered at Local Play
houses.
TO be the thing today a play must
have distinction. “Smith.’’ the
offering at the Newark Theatre
this week, has several, including actual
comedy, a new situation or two, and
John Drew, who has been a gentleman
of distinction almost ever since he
made his Initial bow before the foot
lights.
His present role is excellently adapt
ed to his nonchalantly effective style
of humor. W. Somerset Maugham,
“Smith’s” author, hits given him an
endless—that is, as long as the play
lasts—series of clever, sometimes witty
lines, which are delivered by Drew with
a careful, appreciable regard of their
value. It is only when he (Drew) be
comes serious and tries to act it, that
one wishes he wouldn t, for pathos is
decidedly not his forte. But hie comedy
inevitably causes chuckles and hts
sentimental moments make the hearts
of matinee girls double up on their
usual methods of beating.
In the last few years the housemaid
Thousands now use This
Recipe for Cough Syrup
Easily Made at Home. Coats
Nothing If It Faila.
The speed with which this si/Dple home
* mixture takes hold of a cough and con
quers It will surprise you. 'Hie recipe
given helow makes more and better cough
syrup than you can buy ready-made for
$2.80.
Mix one pint of granulated sugar with
i3 piut of warm wafer, and stir for a
minutes. Put 2>.» ounces of Pines (fifty
cents' worthi in a pint Mottle; then add
the Sugar Syrup. It keeps perfectly. Take
a teaspoonful every one, two or three
hours , .
This gives almost Instant i-euef. and
UBUallc stops a deep-seated cough inside
of 24 ‘hours. Splendid, too. for whooping
ooogh. chest pains, bronchitis, hoarseness,
etc The taste is oleasont. and It Is Just
laxative enough to help cure a cough. Its
tonic properties restore tire appetite, which
a cough tends to destroy.
This recipe Is now used in thousands
of homes in the United States and Can
ada. Ita popularity has resulted In many
imitations—none of them as good as the
old successful forrnnla. It will not work
unless you use the pure, genuine Plnex.
-which Is the most, valuable concentrated
<,om pound of Norwegian white pine ex
tract. and contains the necessary quantity
of arutatcol and other healing pine ele
ment*.
A guarantee of absolute satisfaction, or
money promptly refunded, goes with thle
recipe. Your druggist ha." Ptnex or will
gat tt for you. If net, aand to The Plnex
Oe„ Ft. Wayne, nd.
I
Cosette, the stage carpenter’s daugh
ter, shivered as she stood exposed to
the elements whirling in fury through
Belmont square. It was 4:06 this morn
ing. It seemed as though that Spring
field car would never come. By the
maid’s side stood her sweetheart.
"Joe, dear," cooed the girl, manipu
lating two bewitching dimples, “did you
have a good time, Joe?”
“Yes, my love, but, by yiminy, you
gotter cut out this flirting with that
wine agent.”
Tears started to the little girl’s eyes.
“But, Joe,” she pleaded.
Her words fell on deaf ears. .The
biting cold assailed Joe’s ears and he
adopted the simple expedient of using
his mitts for muffs.
Curtain.
Tt was not until dawn was breaking
that the merry whirl ceased at Krueg
er's Auditorium, which was the scene
of the playfolks’ revel. The great hall
was almost uncomfortably filled, but
it was a case of “the more the mer
rier,” and all hands enjoyed the night
to the utmost.
From Wee Shop Girl to Haughty Show
Girl.
Throughout the hours preceding mid
night the throng gathered until at the
cltmax of the carnival, the grand
has been the heroine of more than one
I theatrical offering, but never has she
! appeared to better advantage than us
presented by Mary Boland in "Smith.”
Miss Boland has invested "Smith” with
the unusual—in theatrical circles—
charm of common sense. The \vorld to
; "Smith” is an excellent place, and she
j looks out upon It with a phyosophloal
! placidity that finds expression in the
quaint opinions that first attract lie
| senBe of humor and then win the heart
| of the brother of Smith’s mistress, who
has come back from a long stay on a
farm in Rhodesia, filled to overflowing
with Ideals anent sincerity and simple,
honest modes of living
Thomas Freeman (John Drew), who
owns a farm >n Rhodesia, return.; in
London to visit U> s’* .er, Mrs. Dal1
Baker, and to ind a wde. He finds his
sister and her set <■ tuged in the pui
suit of shallow, selfish pleasures, think
ing solely of themselves and of ways to
make time fly. Ills sister has no chil
dren. nor does she want any; one of
her friends, Mrs. Rosenberg, has a
baby which she seldom sees; another
friend, to whom he was engaged in his
younger days, is living on the bounty
of her dressmakers, with the idea of re
paying them when she makes a good
| match. There is also another person
i who is the final straw in Freeman's
great load of disillusions. He is Alger
non Peppercorn, "tame cat” by profes
sion, whose business is to make life
agreeable for Mrs. Dallas-Baker, in re
turn for luncheon invitations, opera
tickets and motor trips.
Emily Chapman, the girl to whom
Freeman was engaged, lays a trap for
him, into which he gallantly thrusts his
head, asking her again to marry him
Next day. after hearing of his ideals
and hi:; hopes, and influenced more ot
less by the thought of ending her days
on a lonely farm, she releases him.
His sister's utter selfishness is re
vealed when she hides from Mrs.
Rosenberg the fact that her baby Is
dangerously ill, so that her brldgf
I party may not be spoiled. Even the
i babyls death finds her indifferent. Un
consciously, in the beginning, and then
deliberately, Freeman turns to the de
mure, capable Smith, finding comfort
in her simplicity and innate honesty
Jestingly he asks her to marry him
and is refused wtth a straightforward
dignity that serves but to send his in
clination Smlthward in deadly earnest
Ten days later he asks her again am
she accepts. And so. leaving hypocriti
cal folks behind 'em, they go off, w<
suppose, to Rhodesia, to live happj
ever after.
Tlte seen#) between Mr. Drew anc
Miss Boland are enacted on both sides
with spirit. Miss Boland's characteri
zation of the serious-minded Smith
who has high ideas as to her calling
having been trained by no less a per
sonage than a real butler in a big
bouse, is one of the best things sh<
has ever accomplished. Hansard Shori
plays the despicable Algernon wit)
clear insight as to that young man'!
mental limitations, and Isabel Irving i!
effectively disagreeable as Mrs. Dallas
inarch, there was not a square yard
of the Auditorium unoccupied*. The
boxes were filled with prominent per
sons, while on the floor and in the
galleries could be seen all sorts of
fun-seeWng Newarkers, from the lit
tle shop girl, dancing with her hand
bag on her arm, to the haughty show
girl. Oh, yes, she was there. From a
dozen companies she came and did her
part to make the event one notable in
the gay life of the city. In fact the
hall was filled with theatrical and near
theatrical folk.
On your right, ladies and gentle
men, we have "Rube,” better known as
Edward Garslde Waddell; yes, the one
with the white gloves. EdwaTd was
considerably in evidence. He kindly
assumed the duties of all his associates
on the board of floor managers and
kept things moving right sprightly.
Interviewed on the subject Mr. Wad
dell exhibited his usual reticence and
said, evasively:
"After careful thought 1 have come
to the conclusion that the ball is a
complete success. The committee has
performed its duties faithfully, <and I
am of the opinion that everyone is
having a good time. Isn’t it pleasant
to see many light-hearted young people
enjoying themselves SO much?"
_ _•__
Baker. Lewis Casson makes the most
of a small part, and the other charac
ters who round out the performance of
"Smith” are Morton Stelton, as Mr.
Dallas-Baker, and Sibyl Thorndike as
Emily. The stage settings of "Smith”
are particularly pleasing.
ADELINE STANLEY CARRICK.
ONE OF SEASON’S BEST
BILLS NOW AT PROCTOR’S.
The bill at Proctor’s this week Is one
of the best of the season and there is
distinct novelty in every number. "The
Governor's Son,” George Cohan's well
known sketch, is the headline attrac
I tlon and the offering Is presented with
all the snap and go that has made this
one of the most amusing acts on the
vaudeville stage A capable company,
headed by Willie Dunlay, the Gov
ernor's Son, make the most of the many
laughable situations.
| Mrs. Gardner Crane and company, in
the sketch entitled "The Little Sun
beam." offer a most amusing line of
comedy, and the setting is quite out of
the ordinary. The Pullman car scene
is as realistic as It is amusing and
every detail of the sleeping car Is car
ried out faithfully.
Katherine Nelson and Elizabeth Otto
present a musical turn that is un
WHY YOU ARE THIN;
HOW TO GET FLESHY.
Discusses Causes of Thinness and
Gives New Method of Increasing
Weight and Rounding Out the
Form.
Prescription Accomplishes Wonders.
A treatment which anyone can prepare
cheaply at home has been found to in
crease the weight, improve the health,
round out scrawny figures, improve the
bust, brighten the eyes and put new color
into the cheeks and lips or anyone who
is too thin and bloodless. It puts flesh
on those who have been always thin,
whether from disease or natural tendency;
on those who by heavy eating and diet
have in vain tided to increase; on 'hose
who feel well but can't get fat, and on
those who have tried every ‘known method
in vain. It is a powerful aid to digestion,
nutrition and assimilation. It assists the
blood and nerves to distribute all over the
body the flesh elements contained in food,
arid gives the thin person the same absorb
ing qualities possessed by the naturally
fleshy.
Everybody is about the same, but certain
elements and organs of blood and nerves
are deficient, and until this is corrected
thin people will stay thin. The nutrition
stays In the body after separation by the
digestive functions instead of passing
through unused, when this valuable treat
ment of blended medicines is used. Prac
tically no one can remain thin who uses
It, for it supplies the long-felt need.
Mix in a half pint bottle three ounces
of essence of pepsin and three ounces of
syrup of rhuba-n. Then add one ounce
compound essence eardlul. Shake and let
stand two hours. Then add one ounce of
tincture cadomene compound (not carda
mom). Shake well and take a teaspoonful
before and after meals, drink plenty of
water between meals and when retiring.
Weigh before beginning.
i
It might also with propriety be men
tioned that Mr. Waddell added not a
little to the success of the occasion by
the imprompLu invention of a most
fetching step. It Is designed to be
used In the translocomotion of one’s
mortality across a waxy floor. A pret
ty feature of It is Its simplicity. Just
take about three hops, a couple of
skips, none or eleven jumps, then sll
1-1-1-de. Really, the effect approaches
the entrancing.
Others Were There, Toe.
But it must not be supposed that
Mr. Waddell was all there was to be
seen at the ball. Now,, there was Lou
Franks, w ho Is president of the club;
Augio Bois, Jake Metz, Able Eisner,
Dan Sweeney (now here was one you
simply had to see—he was the official
ticket taker); James Blake, corres
ponding secretary (say, Jim, how was
It you had your name In boldface on
the program?), and, an<^- well, to
give a list would *be nothing but re
printing a directory of Newark’s the
atrical colony.
But, as It has been mentioned, It was
at midnight that the climax of the
night arrived. At that hour a pair of
white gloves appeared In the centre
of the floor, accompanied by Mr. Wad
dell, and It was announced that the
usually entertaining. Miss Otto at t$e
piano presents a number of selections
In avmost finished manner, while Miss
Nelson sings delightfully.
Mullen and Corelli are a team of
acrobats that are so far removed from
the ordinary that they easily stand in
a class of their own. The comedy that
they Inject Into their act Is much
superior to the usual accompaniment
to an act of this kind, while their acro
batic work is the best that has been
seen In Newark In a long time.
The "Three Vagrants" do a musical
turn that Is a decided novelty and these
artists well deserve the repeated en
cores that follow their acts.
Howard’s pontes and dogs represent
the highest development In animal
training and their contribution to the
program Is one of the most entertain
ing features of the entire Mil.
Doc O'Nell, In a quaint monologue;
Luclle Savoy. In a series of artistic
poslngs and songs, and new moving
pictures complete the bill.
MANY ATTRACTIVE FEATURES
AT THE COURT THEATRE.
There ore so many meritorious fea
tures In the splendid bill which opened
a.t the Court Theatre yesterday after
noon that space would not permit a
detailed review. Suffice to say both
audiences thoroughly enjoyed the per
formances and every number received
hearty applause.
Nat Carr, the late comedy star of
the Wine, Woman and Song company,
scored a tremendous hit with his new
monologue.
Inza and Lorella, comedy acrobats
and sensational leapers, gave a be
wildering act. Walker and 111 presented
a neat and entertaining comedy sketch,
called "Just a Girl," while May Mc
Donald, a study In song, was one ol
the distinct successes of the program.
Reid and Smith offered a diversified
sketch of singing, dancing and comedy,
William Huegel sang illustrated songs,
Bessie, a sister of Maud, the original
kicking mule, is the feature of Torelll’E
dog an4 pony circus, which heads the
bill commencing with Thursday's
matinee.
‘CRACKER JACKS ‘ ARE APTLY
NAMED AT WALDMANN’S.
"The Cracker Jacks," a good nam<
for the show presented by Bob Man
chester, is playing at Waldmann’s
Theatre this week. Each act and eac]:
performer is worthy of special mention
for the work Is far above the average
usually seen on burlesuqe stages. The
comedians are funny, the women are
good to look at and the choruses are
really able to sing and give something
often missed in burlesque work—har
mony.
The vehicle usseel to open is entitled
“A Trial Marriage,” Here the compli
cations of twin brothers far difforeni
from one another In the mode of life
leads to many interesting situations
and give the entire oompany a chance
gran’ march would take place, tuxedoed
ones being given preference in the
column. The march was led by Mollie j
Williams, of Waldmann’s, and Harry
SheppoII, of Miner’s. ,
It is not amiss to note that Miss
Williams’s charms won enthusiastic
applause from the revelers and a bou
quet of American beauties.
On with the dance! By daylight all
had their fill of the terpslchorean, and
the committee began to arrange for
tho sixteenth annual grand reception,
carnival, masquerade and ball of the
United Theatrical Attaches’ Social
Club.
to show their real worth. Miss Kuby
Beoni, of mighty frame, can slug, and
makes a real actress of herself In the
way she adapts Herself to the part al
lotted her.
The olio Is especially strong, every
number being a top-notch act. Frank
Harcourt, with his twelve belles, Is
very entertaining and elicits much ap
plause for an original act. Miss Mollie
Williams, always welcome, has some
thing new for us this season. "Be
Danse B’Entlcement’’ Is the name given
a short bit of tragedy acted by herself
and Frank Fanning. Special scenery
and special lighting effects are carried
for this act. Miss Williams does very
well and shows what a versatile actress
she really Is. Williams and Brooks are
funny. The Phroscoffls Family of acro
bats need no Introduction. The show
closes with a “brainstorm of burlesque
comedy,” entitled "Daftydllls." It Is
very good.
“DREAMLAND” BEAUTIES
MAKE MERRY AT MINER’S.
Patrons of Miner’s Empire Theatre
this week have an opportunity of wit
nessing one of the best burlesque shows
this season. The “Dreamland” Com
pany Is Its title. Dave Marlon Is the au
thor of the book, lyrics and music, all
being written, composed and rehearsed
In this city. The play was produced
here at a professional matinee before
It took the road about a year ago. The
chorus was made up of thirty genuine
beauties, who sing many “natty" musi
cal numbers. Agnes Beider received
several ovations for her good work.
MISS CATHERINE COUNTISS
PLAYING AT THE COLUMBIA.
Appearing at the Columbia Theatre
this week is Miss Catherine Counties
in "The Awakening of Helena Richie,”
a play In four acts, taken from Mar
garet Deland's novel, by Charlotte
Thompson. *
The play follows the book very close
ly, retaining Its flavor and Its spirit
as well as Its significant Incidents.
RECEPTION TENDERED TO
THE STATE COUNCILOR.

The associates of Goodwill Council,
. Daughters of Liberty, tendered a re
ception to State Councilor Mrs. Jennie
B. Hayward and her staff at the -ooms,
248 Market street, last evening. Coun
cilor Loretta Rayner presided. The
welfare committee were in iharge of
the Interesting program.
State Councilor Havwnrd and sev
eral of the grand officers made brief
| addresses. A social time followed, with
refreshments. The newly-elected offi
cers of the council, who assisted s-t the
| reception, were Loretta Raynor, coun
cilor; Isabella Young, associate coun
cilor; Matilda Mayr, vice-councilor;
Sadie Robinson, A. V. E.; Monetta
Brown, recording secretary; E. C.
Willwerth, financial secretary; Annie
E. Rayner, trustee: William D. Neater,
inside guard; S. E. Van Doren, outside
guard, and Miss Volkner, guide.
PAGEANT OF MISSIONS.
"A Pageant of Missions," similar to
! the one at the Northfleld Summer
1 School, will be given In the Roseville
! Presbyterian Church, corner Roseville |
and Sussex avenues, Friday'night at 8
o’clock. The pageant will lie under the
j auspices of the Woman’s Foreign Mis
sionary Society of that church, and
1 will present the progress of "Western
I Women in Eastern Lands.” There will
I be no admission fee, but a collection
for foreign missions will be taken.
i
:iVIC CLUB COMMITTEE
DISCUSSES FIRE PROTECTION.
For Improvement in fire protection,
preliminary plans for Immediate action
were discussed yesterday afternoon at
a special meeting of a committee ap
pointed by the Civic Club, held at the
home of the chairman of the committee,
Mrs. James C. Corlies, 29 East Park
street.
The call for the meeting was issued
for the purpose of having the various
women's clubs indorse a set of resolu
tions regarding the recent great Are
in Newark. The resolutions, which
were formulated by Mrs. Edward Gray,
president of Phllitscipema, and in
dorsed by the Civic Club a week ago,
suggest various Improvements In the
requirements for factory facilities for
fighting Are. These resolutions will be
sent to the city authorities when prop
erly indorsed. They were signed yes
terday by Mrs. H. F. Wessol, of the
Ray Palmer Club; Mrs. Corlies, repre
senting the Saturday Club; Mrs. Voor
hees, of the American Woman’s League,
and Miss S. Emily Hamblen, Mrs.
Reuss and Mrs. A. P. Mayhew, of the
Civic Club.
A more representative meeting will
be held at 13 Central avenue, the Social
Service building, next Monday after
noon, at the same time, when it is ex
pected all clubs will send delegates.
Plans were also made for a beneAt
whist, which will be given at Mrs.
Corlies’s home on the afternoon of De
cember 19. The proceeds will be de
voted to the Home Economic Associa
tion. Cards have been sent out for the
affair and a reply to Mrs. Corlies is
requested.
BREAKS ARM WHILE CRANKING AUTO.
MULLICA HILL. Dec. 6.—Freeholder
Thomas L. Munyan had an arm broken
yesterday while cranking his automo
bile. It is a severe fracture.
TRV STAR CLASSIFIED ADI.
COMMANDERY DRILL CORPS 1
IS TO TENDER RECEPTION. I
Sir Knights of Damascus Temple ™
to Be Entertained.
The members of ihe Damascus Com
mandery Drill Corps, Knights Templar,
will tender an Informal reception th.a
evening to the sir knights of Damas
cus and the ladles at the asylum, 751
Broad street. Under the direction of
Captain Dayton W. Jones the drill
corps will give an exhibition drill, ar.d
the arrangement committee will pro
vide an enjoyable program.
Refreshments will also be dispensed.
The sir knights will appear in uniform,
with swords and gloves. It Is a special
"corps night" affair and promises to
attract a large gathering.
The Templars who will attend will
include Eminent Commander Louis J.
Burgesser, William H. Oarnet, Edwin
W. Pierson, Andrew N. McKinnon, A.
J. Pronnle, the Rev. Dr. AV. H. Mor
gan. Wilson C. Ely, Frank Tanner,
Louis Maier, John Waferllng, Louis
Tinker, John P. Reed, Frank S. Holies,
Jacob Guliek, William H. Roberts,
George Haufler, George N. Walts,
Henrry W. Egner, jr„ Edward Issier, J.
Grave Porter, Frederick Schafer, John
P. Contrell, James A. Cartrlght,
Thomas A. Bullevant, John H. AVllklns,
Arthur Redding, Emil Lenk, A. W.
Baldwin, G. W. Backoff, C. G. Hahn
and AA’illiam Obner.
The wives and friends of the sir
knights will also be »p s-ial guests of
the drill corps.
MISSING MILITIAMAN MARRIED.
BEVERLY, Dec. (5.—Missing for the
first time In five years from his post
as first sergeant bf the local militia,
Clifford D. Elmes, of this city, kept hie
whereabouts secret until last night,
when the other militiamen learned that
Elmes went to Camden last Thursday
and married Miss Altec Marguerite
Fenimore, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Marter Fen 1 mors.
/
- -1 I
ESSEX COUNTY BREWING CO. j
.—.—-BREWERS OF-- J
High-Grade Lager Beer j
63 to 85 CLIFTON AVENUE v J
L. D. Phone 617- BB N«v*lk6M vfl
BOTTLING DEPARTMENT A
329 ORANGE STREET—L. D. Phon* 735-BB '
K A. IVI I r, Y T RAD B » U PPI.IRD
it
«.RJ ■ ■i'L-l-1 . .. .J.. I -- 1 - IT".?--W. f
| Eagle Brewing Co J
t NEWARK, N. J. J *
4- jfl
|
| Office, 28-40 HAYES STREET, Newark N. J. I 1
* L. 1>. Telephone 771 Homo BOSS +
! Pannich & Kiefer, Bottling Dept., Sd */££**&£ t 1

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