OCR Interpretation


Newark evening star and Newark advertiser. [volume] (Newark, N.J.) 1909-1916, May 17, 1911, LAST EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91064011/1911-05-17/ed-1/seq-14/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 14

Sale Children’s Low Shoes
We will begin tomorrow a great sale of children’s low shoes in which are in
cluded samples and regular stock lines at from one-fourth to one-half less than
regular. Strap sandals, Roman sandals and ankle pumps with hand-welted and
turned soles. Arranged according to size on second floor centre tables. If the
children need summer low shoes make the most of this chance.
Children's Sample Low Shoes—Ankle ties and Roman sandals of tan or black calf, patent
oolt, via kid, black suede, red kid and velvet; in fact all of the new leathers and styles in chil
dren's summer shoes. Three lots, as follows:
Sizes 2 to 5; worth 59c to 1.00
per pair;* sale price rA.
special ..OUC
Children's Strap Pumps—
Three strap pumps, made of
fine patent colt, at the follow
| Ing prices:
Sizes 6 to 8; reg. 1.00, special 79c
Sizes Syj to 11; reg. 1.25, sp’l 89c
Sizes 11 Vt to 2; reg. 1.50, sp’l 1.00
Sizes 4 to 8; worth from 1.00
to 1.25 per pair; special
price . /
Children’s Roman Sandals
—Tan and patent colt Roman
sandals, of excellent quality.
Hand-sewed turned soles.
Strongly made.
Sizes 2 to 5; reg. 85c, special 59c
Sizes 4 to 8; rcg. 1.15, sp'l 89c
Sizes BYi to 2; worth 1.25 to
2.00 per pair; special | rirv
price . * .vfvr
C h i 1 d r e n’s T w o-Strap
Pumps—The popular “Foot
Trainer” last—made of tan
or black Russia calf.
Sizes from H to 8, per pair. . 1.15
Sizes from 8'/* to 11, per pr. 1.35
Sizes from 11 l/z to 2, per pr. 1.65
:r:r_. ■
1.00 Cut Glass Dishes at 59c
Here’s an “Opportunity” special that you will not care to
miss. We have quite a large lot of these pretty cut glass
dishes, but if you would wish to get just what you want we
would advise that you be among the first-comers tomorrow.
These dishes may be used for bonbons, jellies, nuts, olives, etc.
Five-inch round nappies, 5-inch handled nappies, card-shaped
dishes, including spade, club, diamond and heart. Good heavy
glass and brilliantly cut. Strictly perfect and all regular 1.00
goods; special Thursday, while they last. (No mail fa
or ’phone orders filled). VC
$1.00 Umbrellas and Parasols
We have just secured from a prominent manufacturer about
twelve hundred umbrellas and parasols which we shall offer
tomorrow at 1.00 each. The umbrellas have covers of fine,
closely woven cloth, jet black and tape edges; 26 and 28-inch
sizes for women and men; a splendid collection of handles to
choose from. The parasols are really beautiful; included are
guaranteed silk taffetas in the leading colors; embroidered white
linens, tan with colored embroidery and lace openwork effects;
soisette with silk taffeta or Dresden insertions; black and white
checks. Pretty handles and tassels. They’re g
extraordinary values at the price we name here... I»v/vF
& CO.
- -—_-_—j
STEEPLEJACK ON
SKYSCRAPER FLAG
POLE IS PLAYFUL
Women in Street Turn Away
in Fear as He Rolls
Cigarette. t
Thousand* of pedestrians stood and
watched In amazement George F. Wil
son as he painted at ease the flagpole
at the top of the Firemen's Insurance
building yesterday afternoon. Then to
make the crowd a bit nervous he took
a bag of tobacco from his pocket and
calmly rolled a oigarette which he
proceeded to smoko Just as though
he had been on terra Arms. Many
women who thought the man was In
danger turned away unable to watch
him perform a task which Wilson con
siders easy.
A reporter of the Evening STAR
shouted to him while ho was at work
and he had this to say. “No, 1 don't
feel a bit nervous up here. It's Just
as safe a* where you are standing. I
would rather do this than many other
things, and besides I get good pay."
When Wilson was told that the neck
of the reporter was hurt as a result
•< looking upward he slid down in such
• Jiffy as to cause alarm, and a shriek
Went up from the multitude below.
When on solid footing he explained
that he has been a steeplejack for the
past seven years. He learned his
trade from his father, who Is George
Wilson, and Is at the present time at
Baltimore engaged In the same dan
gerous work. Young Wilson said that
the first time he climbed a pole he
received a good thrashing from his
father because he acted timid.
“But since then, you bet, I have be
come an expert and am not afraid to
climb the tallest pole on the highest
building."
It was also learned that the father
has met with several accidents, but
the young man has thus far been for
tunate. Wilson Is but 25 years old nnd
lives at 29fi North Seventh street. lie
not very long ago painted fifteen poles
on the Hahne A Co. building Ho has
painted the two poles on the Park Row
building in New York. The highest
he has been at work was on the
Knickerbocker building, at Baltimore,
which rises to an altitude of some 300
feet.
He has been engaged to paint the
steeple on Trinity Church
REPUBLICANS REQUIRED
130 BALLOTS TO UNITE.
COUNCIL BLUFFS, la., May 17.
After taking 130 ballots W. R. Greene,
of Audubon, last night was nominated
by the Ninth congressional district
Republican convention to succeed for
mer Congressman Walter I. Smith.
The Democrats nominated W. F.
Cleveland, who had no opposition.
WILSON ON FLAGPOLE
OF FIREMEN’S BUILDING
V
HOFFSTOT ACQUITTED.
PITTSBURG, May 17.—After being
out an hour the jury In the case of
Frank N. Hoffstot yesterday afternoon
declared him not guilty of bribing city
councilmen to pass the bank deposi
tories ordinance.
W. C. T. U. SPRING MEET.
RIVERSIDE, May 17.—The spring
convention of the Burlington County
W. C. T. U. will be held at Bridgeboro
on Tuesday next. Dr. C. U. Mead, of
>rk, will bo the speaker at the
session.
s
Ladies’ Tailored
Shirt Waists
WHITE OR FANCY
=$1.50=
AT OUR FACTORY
46 FRANKLIN ST.
The Smith & Linnett Shirt Co.
JAMES C. TAYLOR, SECRETARY
OF COMMITTEE PLANNING
G. A. R. GETTYSBURG TRIP.
^
LINCOLN POST, Q. A. R.,
TO VISIT GETTYSBURG.
Outing to Great Battlefield an
Annual Event.
The members of Lincoln Post, G. A.
R., of this city, are planning to enjoy
another annual trip to the historical
Gettysburg battlefield In the near
future. These, pilgrimages of the local
veterans to the scene of one of the
most terrific battles during the Civil
War between the Union forces and the
Confederate Grays, fifty years ago.
have, through their success in the past,
become an annual feature, in which
many of the friends of the G. A. R.
participate. /
The outing to the famous field of
battle, in which thousands were slam
and maimed, will be a personally con
ducted one. and no pains will be spared
In making the several days’ pilgrimage
one of the most delightful excursions
that have been conducted under the
auspices of the G. A. R. in years.
The committee that ts perfecting the
arrangements consists of De Forest P.
Lozier, chairman; James C. Taylor,
secretary; George W. Lawrence, treas
urer; Alfred F. ShRrp and Ferdinand
Averback. The ladies will also be
taken along as the special guests of
the post and will add additional pres
tige and lustre to the scene.
The committee will soon announce
the full text of the plans and give an
outline of the various entertaining di
versions that will make the Journey
one long to be remembered.
It is expected that County Auditor
E. L. Conklin, Colonel A. J. Clark and
many other prominent local veterans
will accompany the party.
COUNCIL CELEBRATES.
GLOUCESTER, May 17.—Running
Deer Council No. 52, Degree of Foco
hontas. last night celebrated its eighth
anniversary with a reception, which
was attended by many guests. "Each
of the past officers was presented with
a. past officer's regalia, and Mrs. William
Martinez presented the council with a
handsome flag.
HEAT DELAYS WORK.
MILLVILLE. May 17.—The heat in
the glass factories has been so intense
this week that it is almost impossible
for the men to keep working.
BATH BOOH FIXTURES
screwed up with
j
ANCHORS
{cannot work loose. The "\
anchor into which the screw 1
is inserted spreads at the inner 1
end. An immovable wedge
is created which no strain f
can budge. #
Come and see our line if
of Scbco Products r
A. R. WEICH
91 Broome Street
near Court Street
f

14 Styles
Each Style
*n in a Com
plete Range
of Sizes
and Widths
Black Suede
Pumps, Strap,
Welted Sole
Black Velvet
Pumps, Strap,
Welted Sole
Patent Colt
Pumps, Strap,
Welted Sole
Gun Metal Instep
Strap Pumps,
Welted Sole
Gun Metal Pumps
2 Straps,
Welted Sole
Patent Colt Blncher,
Oxford, Welted Sole,
New Round Toe
} ' ~r
I_
Gun Metal Gibson
Toe, Welted Sole.
\ Patent Colt, Gibson
) Tie, Welted Sole.
Black Suede Blacker Oxfords,
Welted Sole, New Round Toe.
Tan Vici Kid Blucher Ox
fords, Turned Sole.
Black Vici Kid Blucher Ox
fords, Turned Soles.
Black Velvet Pumps, Louis
XV. Heel, Turned Soles.
Tan Russia Calf Pumps,
Turned Sole.
■ Every manufacturer of shoes seems to accu- _ B
K mulate some stock for some reason or another. B
■ We being pretty large customers of this maker, he W B
k favored us with his surplus stock and gave us the W ^ ^ 00 5
C benefit of the loss he is forced to take in cleaning f^and 3^50 S
ff up his season's business. All are this year's make Footwear B
■ —good, snappy styles, every one of them .... B
JL1 11 ill!!-1 — "■>!■!! J.H .-1 . -.— ■ ■ H ■llggga^gr"IWiaiB—-—
We Make a
Specialty
—of—
Shoulder
Braces
and
Arch
Supporters
R. SCHUMANN
sLa„flr Trusses and Supporters
23 William St., Newark, N. J.
Advertisements fur the Star aud
all Newark aud N. V. newspapers
received at office rates, and far all
newspapers nnd magaslnes pub
lished. Advertisements for N. Y.
newspapers received before 0 p. m.
snpesr next morning. 794 Broad
at. -tutor B'ld*g>. Tel. BBBO Market.
" — ' — ' "w
AMUSEMENTS.
TROCTOR7s3Er
DAILY MATINEE 16e, 20e, 00c
Telephone 1040 Market
UNA AnEl.l.-BRINKER A CO., LIL
LIAN BURKHARDT A CO., OLD
SOLDIER FIDDLERS. DOLAN A
I.ENH ARR, DAVE FERGUSON, KIL
I.ARNEY GIRI.S, ANITA PRIM
ROSE, -WAHI.UN. TEKI.A TRIO.
Nights—tOc. aOe. 30r, 50c, 70c
CORSE PAYTON
STOCK CO.
PRESENTS
THE LION AND THE MOUSE
10c, 26c A 80c By CHARLES KLEIN.
Evenings NEXT WEEK—“THE OIRL
10C,JOC,30CA50C OF THE GOLDEN WEST.**
CARPET CLEANING
RYDER & CO.
22 MECHANIC ST.
VACUUM PROCESS
TV,I,. 404 MARKET
WONDERS WHY WILSON
CHANGED HIS OPINION.
Philadelphia Newspaper Asks
Timely Question.
The Philadelphia lam^jxer says edi
torially today:
"Governor Wilson says he was once .
opposed to the Initiative, referendum
and recall. Wonder what it was that
made him change his opinion regarding
them?”
"Governor Wilson says we will have
a DemociVtlc President next year, and
at the same time tries, to keep hla face
In one of those ‘lf-you-klss-me
I'll-tell-mother’ expressions."
REIBOLDT ASSOCIATION BALL.
Prepartlons have been made by the
Jacob Reiboldt Association, of the
Fourth ward, to handle a big crowd at
Its reception and May ball at the Turn
bull Auditorium, In Market street, to
night. Professor Mazzel's orchestra
will furnish the music for the evening.
Among those who will entertain during
the evening are: Harry Sheppel and
Percy Bennett. James Marr and Joseph
Burr, William Nott, James Mazzel,
Patsy Dobbs, George Reilly, William
Pietro and others. The committee In
charge of the affair is Jacob Reiboldt,
chairman: Peter La Gregor, Joseph
rassaic, Frederick Veitli and Robert
Reiboldt. The floor manager will be
Harry Sheppel, assisted by Percy Ben
nett and Philip Roach. The reception
committee will be headed by John F.
Monahan.
PICKEREL SEASON OPENS.
MATS LANDING, May 17.—Pickerel
fishermen are getting their rods and
reels In readiness for the opening of
the spring season, which will start Sat
urday, May 20. Large numbers of these
game fish Inhabit the waters of Lake
Lenape and the Great Egg Harbor
River, at this place. ,
I .1 II-*1«I
STORES EVERYWHERE. TELEPHONE 8747 MARKET |
SCHEUERS
Every minute of the day, looking; after YOUR interests and
n|( Tur also ours. When WE save a dollar in buying; we save a
(JR THE dollar for YOU, as we are able to sell OUR foodstuffs so
IflR much less. Do you see the point ? Cash applies In both
llUD directions—both buyer, and seller reap the benefits.
Moral: Purchase your food supplies frbm Scheuer’s Pood Markets.
NEW FULL CREAM <f r
CHEESE, lb. IOC
FAIRY SOAP, X-RAY J_
POLISH, YULCANOL, UP
PARLOR MATCHES, each
CALIFORNIA A A
CLARET,«ai.9oC
FEIGENSPAN’S, WIEDEN- Ar _
MAYERS, HOME. KRUE- HHl"
GER’S BEERS, case....
FINEST ELGIN CREAMERY
Butter
Only 25c Pound
Christian’s XXXX Minnesota
FLOUR
2*'A lb. bar
BAKRF.L 8.75
UNEEDA BISCUIT, J ^
ZUZU, /|P i
UNION-MADE BREAD, Til
Each.
California Port ftft
or Sherry Wine, JinP
Gallon. UW
Hunter, Wilson, flCA jj
Overholdt Ryes, JfjC
Bottle. |
Strictly Fresh
EGGS
Brand"6 TOIUatOeS Cans 25C
Rolled OATS 20c
JELLIES W 19c
Shredded WHEAT10c
Bird’s Eye Matches ■« 3c
Van Camp’s BAKED BEANS ?Ra
Grape Juice Hot. 8c 1
FRESH FISH
... —I
Long Island
Porgies, 3 lbs. for
Fresh Flounders, lb.
Fresh Herring, lb.
Fresh Whiting, lb...
Fresh Pol look, lb.. #•
Fresh Peroh, lb..
Fresh Hock Codfish, lb...lOe
Fresh Chicken Halibut, lb.14e
FRESH MEATS
p,g*’ **•'•19C
Forequarters Fancy Spring n.
Lamb, pound. faC
Fancy Sugar Cured Smoked ini.
California Hams, pound. | 92C
Regular Smoked Skin Back isi.
Rams, pound. |4'C
Sweet Pickle Plate Corned Beef. S3.
(Limit sale 10 lbs. toacustomer). lb. £mC
Snow White Kidney Suet. 12 lbs. n*
•1. Pound. »|C
Small Ends of Boneless Thick 1 qi.
Bacon, pound. | 4'~C
GERMAN EVANGELICAL
WOMEN’S CELEBRATION.
The women's society of the German
Evangelical Essex Park Church cele
brated Its thirteenth anniversary in the
Gottfried Krueger Grelsenhelm. Clinton
place, last night, with a generous pro
gram of general entertainment. Miss
Mildred Messner sang several selec
tions and the M. G. V. Hoffnung was
heard In choruses under the direction of
Jacob Fischer, its leader, while the
Roller family provided amusement In
the way of vaudeville. Bowling and
dancing topped off the event. On the
committee of arrangements were Will
iam Schmidt, J. Starzmann, Carl
Ruedlnger, Mrs. Doblsch, Mrs. Sohwtng
and Mrs. 6tarzmann.
A dala»ed advartfeamant brings only the attar
math of trada. It’a the flrat call that capture
tha proceaalon of cuatomars.
*
TRUE D. A. R., AT 108
CELEBRATES BIRTHDAY.
PHILADELPHIA, May 17.—Not
quite so well this year, Mrs. Elizabeth
Wonderly today celebrates her 108th
birthday in the Methodist Episcopal
Horae, Belmont and Edgley avenues.
Her many friends have remembered,
and her mail this morning was bur
dened with post-cards, the plan that
has been adopted in place of personal
visits.
Mrs. Wonderly is a real daughter of
the revolution, her father. William
Walker, having fought and been
wounded in the war for independence.
She was bom in Smyrna, Del., on Mav
17, 1808.
While not as well as in previous <
years, Mrs. Wonderly is not seriously
ill, and may live another year or two.

xml | txt