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Newark evening star and Newark advertiser. [volume] (Newark, N.J.) 1909-1916, May 17, 1911, LAST EDITION, Image 9

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DEATHS.
ADAMY—Entered Into rest on May 16,
1911, Raymond E„ beloved son of
Adeline and the late Franklin P.
Adamy. aged 17 years, of 48 Spruce
street.
AVER1LI.—At her home, in Glen
Ridge, N. J., May 16, 1911, Anna
Decatur Barnes, wife of the late
Henry De Lord Averill, in the 62d
year of her age, of S9 Baldwin street.
BARR—At Nutley, N. J.. entered into
rest Tuesday. May 16, 1911, Mary Mac
Naught, wife of Andre\v> Barr, of 34
Grant avenue.
BECK—Suddenly on May 17, 1911, at
his home, 253 Ridge street, Louis
Rudolph, husband of Louise Beck,
aged 61 5-ears.
BERESFORD—On May 15, 1911, at her
late residence, 275% Orange street,
Isabelle, wife of James Beresford
BROWN—At East Orange, on Tues
day, May 16, Charles W., beloved hus
band of Mabelle Alberta Brown (nee
Schmid).
Funeral from his late residence, 75
Watson avenue, on Thursday, May 18,
at 8:30 a. m„ to Our Lady Help of
Christians Church, where a High
Mass of Requiem will be offered for
the repose of his soul. Interment at
St. John’s Cemetery. Worcester, Mass
CASSIDY—On May 17, 1911, Bridget
Cassidy (nee Reilly), at her late resi
dence, 65% Dawson street.
CUNNANE—On May lfc, 1911, Simon,
beloved child of Michael and Cather
ine Cunnane (nee Matthews), aged 3
years 2 months 26 days.
Relatives and friends of the family
are kindly invited to attend the
funeral from the parents' residence,
106 Bowery street, on Thursday. May
18, at 2 p. m. Interment In the Cem
etery of the Holy Sepulchre.
DE VOURSNEY—On May 16, 1911, at
Montclair, N. J., Abraham P. De
Voursney, in his 84th 5'ear, 446 Bloom
field avenue, Montclair.
DOWNEY—On May 17, Edward at his
late residence, 336 Central avenue.
DWYER—On May 15, 1911. Edward, be
loved husband of Annie Dwi-er (nee
I’Brlen).
GUERIN—At Boonton, N. J., May 15,
1911, Mrs. Nathan Guerin, aged 63
years.
HALSEY—Suddenly, at Orange, X. J.,
Wednesday-, May 17, 1911, William
Gurden, eldest son of the late Jacob
L. Halsey-, 115 Centre street.
HARTELL—On May 16, 1911, Alfred
Benjamin, beloved husband of Jean
Hartell, 204 Manor avenue, Harrison,
N. J.
HENDERSON—On May 16, 1911, Mary,
wife of Samuel Henderson, aged 63
years, 463 Washington avenue, Belle
ville, N. J.
JARVIS—Suddenly, on Monday, May
15, 1911, Alexander, l.usband of Sarah
Jarvis.
Relatives and friends, also Tri
laminar Lodge 112, F. and A. M., are
invited to attend the funeral serv
ices from 72% Columbia street on
Wednesday evening. May 17, at 8
o'clock. Interment on Thursday at
the convenience of family In Fair
mount Cemetery-.
LEONARD—At Rahway, N. J.. May
16, 1911, Mary A., widow of Silas P.
Leonard, aged 64 years. 47 Pierce
street.
McINTIRE—Suddenly, on May 15, 1911,
In New York city, Charles H.. hus
band of Effie K. Mclntlre.
Funeral Wednesday afternoon at
4 o’clock tn the chapel at the entrance
to Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.
MURPHY—On May 16, 1911, at Home
for Aged, Little Sisters of the Poor,
Bridget, widow of Thomas Murphy.
RIELLY—On May 15, 1911, Margaret,
beloved wife of Patrick Rielly.
Relatives and friends of the de
ceased arc kindly invited to attend
the funeral from her iate residence.
No. 966 Broad street, on Thursday,
May 16, at 9 a, m., to the Cathedral,
where a Solemn High Mass of Re
quiem will be offered for the repose
of her soul. Interment in the Ceme
tery of the Holy Sepulchre. Please
omit flowers.
SANDT—On May 16, 1911. at the home
of her sister, Mrs. Grant Henry, 26
Lincoln avenue, Amelia B. Sandt, in
, her 59th year.
SCHUG—On May 16. 1911. PMlIipine,
widow of George Schug, In her
eighty-third year. 830 South Thir
teenth street,
SUMMERS—Mrs. Olive Summers, the
beloved wife of the Rev. Joseph Sum
mers, departed this life Tuesday
morning. May 16, 1911, at 2 o'clock.
TIPLING—On May 15, 1911, Joseph A..
beloved husband of Mary H, Tipling,
543 Thirteenth avenue.
VAN DORN—Entered into rest on May
15, 1911, Helen, beloved daughter of
Eliza and the late Hliard Van Dorn,
aged 18 years, 20 Maiden lane.
WALKER—On Wednesday, May 17,
1911, Matilda Walker, beloved daugh
ter of the late Joseph and Anna
Walker, aged 78 years.
WARD—At Rahway, N. J„ on May 17,
1911, Clarence D. Ward, in his 55th
year, 428 St. George avenue.
PROF. ADAMS ENDS WORK
FOR INTERSTATE BOARD.
WASHINGTON, May 17.—Professor
Henry C. Adams, of the University of
Michigan, having practically concluded
his work of establishing a uniform
system of bookkeeping and accounting
for interstate carriers, shortly will re
lniquish his work for the interstate
commerce commission,
Charles A. Lutz, chief examiner of
accounts, and William J. Meyers, sta
tistician, will carry on Professor
Adams’s work.
TO TEST HANDBILL ORDINANCE.
MILLVILLE, May 17.—Jacob Adams
and Edward Smith, agents for a local
grocer}’ company, were arrested yes
terday by City Marshal Charles Biggs,
charged with distributing handbills
about the streets In violation of the
ordinance recently passed by City
Council. They were fined 35 by Mayor
W. Fred Ware. The grocer has em
ployed a lawyer and will test the case.
FUNERAL DIRECTr^S.
People’s Burial Co.,
380 Broad St., cor. 8th Ave.
89 Kearny Ave., Keamy, N. J.
WILL FURNISH FOB
$75.00
elegant caaket. covered with fine Meek broad
cloth, white or,silver gray plush, with massive
bar handles. 4'ngraved nameplate, lined with
ellk or satin, outside case, embalming, adver
tising, dressing, shaving, crucifix, candelabra,
gloves, chairs, hearse and three coaches to any
city cemetery. We furnish for
$45.00
a funeral that measures up to any trauit t uder*
taker $90.00 funeral. Funeral parlors froo.
| PHONE 257 BRANCH BROOK._
Newark Burial Co.,
534 BROAD STREET,
B.tw««n Brill*, and Lomtfardj
For $65.00
"e agree to supply Black Broadcloth, White
Plush, Imitation Oak Caaket. Handles. Plate,
Interior Lined Complete. Outside Pine Box,
Embalming, Newspaper Notice, Use of Rug.
Pedestal, Crepe. Camp Chairs, Hearse, 'Aree
Cc ,2hee eny City Cemetery. Servleee of Funeral
Directors.
Parlors for funeral In connection.
SOsT* Market. 534 BfOad St.
POSITIVELY FIRST-CLASS SERVICE AT
REASONABLE RATES.
COACHES FOR FUNF.RJCES. M.
.1. A A. W. HARTH. _ .
FUNERAL DIRECTORS ANT POACH OWN
ERS. TELEPHONE MARKET i.
_ OFFICE, JUS SOUTH ORA NOE AV.
WAREROOMB. m-S95 SOUTH ORANOB AT
WM. -F. MUU.IN.
UNDERTAKER.
*28 Lafayette street. Phone 160 Market
JAMES ?TTfULLIN,
Undertaker. 823 T^fayette street.
Phone 8102 Market. Branch, 28 Irving street.
FRANK “a7 FOLFtT
Funeral Director end Fmbalmer.
ML Lafayette street Phone 6738 Market.
CEMETERIES.
GLEN RIDGE CEMETERY
Franklin ar. and Joralemon et., Bloomfield,
N. J.: tel. 1648-J, Bloomfield. Plots, 4 graves
and over. $65 up. Graves, adults. $14.
LOST AND FOUND.
LOffT—On Tuesday afternoon, lady’s gold
watch, open-face, initials on back "A. II
M.,” and set with four diamonds; reward.
A. H. M., Box 85. Star Office.
IX>8T—Tuesday night, bunch of keye, ring
marked W. G. M.; reward. Return to 46 Or
ange st.
FOUND—Silver female terrier. 26 Fillmore sf.
AUCTION SALES.
NOTICE—On Wedneeday, May 24. at 2:30 p.
m., a car of lumber shipped to Winterbot
tom and Van Houten. Newark. N. J., by T.
D. Peteraon, Boston, Mass., will be offered at
public, auction at the Concrete Building Block
Yard, West Newark Branch, P. R. R. Co.
PRISONER TURNS COURT INTO
PRIZE RING; FELLS COPS.
CAMDEN, May 17.—On a wild ram
page yeBterday, William Jones, of 663
Ferry avenue, started to clean out the
office of Justice of the Peace Rouh,
when he was charged with assault and
battery on a woman, and it was not
until he was beaten about the head by
a blackjack in the hands of Constable
Roberts that the police were able to
land him in jail.
When Jones attempted to strike the
magistrate the constable interfered and
was given a punch in the jaw. A. F.
Holmes started in to separate the men,
when he was struck such a blow in the
face that he fell through an ppen door
into the street. The complainant against
Jones was Mrs. Mary English.
“TEDDY” GIVES ADVICE
TO ASSEMBLED PASTORS.
NEW YORK. May lS.-Former Presl
: dent Theodore Roosevelt told about
| 1,000 clergymen yesterday that mate
I rlallsm and paganism wcro a serious
menace to the welfare of the United
States; that men who blow up the
buildings of capitalists at the behest of
labor leaders are murderers, and that,
unless something is done to remedy
present conditions, the results will be
dire.
The clergymen were members of the
Federation of Churches and their
guests. "This materialism and pagan
ism will ruin this country If we are not
careful," he said. "That is our great
est danger today, and it is the first
duty of you gentlemen to got together
and take steps to remedy this condi
tion. You must do it, regardless of
your creeds or your denominations."
Colonel Roosevelt gave the dominies
some advice concerning preaching. He
said it was just as much their duty to:
decry crime committed by working {
people as it was their duty to ex
coriate high financiers and the rich.
BUTCHERS HELD FOR FIGHTING.
MAYS LANDING, May 17,-After se- j
verely beating Thomas McMahon until ;
he was pulled off by friends and his
victims took refuge in the cellar, Jacob
Gary, who tips the scales at 220
pounds, was oaptured by officers of the
sheriff after an exciting chase through
the pines along the river, who halted
him at the point of a revolver. Gary
counter-sued by having McMahon ar
rested for assault, claiming he struck
the first blow. Both men were held
under $300 bail. Both men are butchers, i
THINK BAG CONTAINED BODY.
BURLINGTON, May lT.-Rlver men
are excited over the mystery of the con
tents 'of a burlap bag, brought to the
surface In the glllnet of some shad
fishermen In the Delaware river, op
posite this city, but which rolled back
into the water. A horrible stench
arose from the bundle. Fishermen be
lieve the hag may have hidden the
body of some victim of a river tragedy,
and the police are further investigat
ing their story.
TO WED STROKE OAR.
ITHACA. N. Y., May 17.—Miss
Bertha Ozmun, of this city, is to be
married in Cleveland tomorrow to
Randolph Weed, the stroke oar of the
1909 Cornell crew. She will he the
second member of her family to wed
a Cornell athlete. Her sister Anita is
the wife of Nick Deshon, who was the
star pitcher five years ago. The cere
mony will be performed at the home
of the bride’s aunt in Cleveland.
TO HONOR HARVARD MAN.
CAMBRIDGE, England, May 17.—
Cambridge University has announced
Its intention of conferring upon Profes
sor Theodore W. Richards, of Harvard,
the honorary degree of doctor of laws.
PASTOR GIVEN RECEPTION.
ELIZABETH, May 17,-The Rev. j
John T. Kerr, who has JuBt celebrated !
his twenty-fifth anniversary as pastor
of the Third Presbyterian Church, was
given a reception last night by congre
gation members.
| IN THE WORLD OF FINANCE |
REALIZING SALES
TAKEN WELL AS
Score of Issues Sell from I to 2
Points Above Yesterday’s
Closing.
NEW YORK, May 17.-Stocks re
tained the gains made yesterday In the
early trading today, and although
changes were slight there were a num
ber of further advances. Early trans
actions were on a heavy scale. Louis
ville and Nashville gained H4 and
Denver and Rio Grande and Virginia
Carolina Chemical V The usual mar
ket leddcrs opened at about on a level
with last night’s close with the excep
tion of U. 3. Steel, which showed some
heaviness.
11 a. m.—The market took realizing
sales well, and although the list hesi
tated for a short interval the advance
was resumed more vigorously than be
fore. About a score of stocks sold from
1 to 2 points above yesterday's closing,
but only a few of the market leaders
were included in the movement, nota
bly Atchison and Southern Pacific.
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.
Following are the quotations of the
day's prices, as furnished through
Byrne & McDonnell, members of the
New York Stock Exchange:
Open 1:16.
Allis-Chalmers . 7% 7%
Allis-Chalmers pf. 30 30
Amal Copper. 64% 65%
Am Agri Chem. 59% 59%
Am Can. 12% 12%
Am Can pf... 36% 36%
Am Car * F. B4 55%
Am Car & F pf. 118 118
Am Cotton Oil. 53% 54
Am H & L. 4 4
Am H & L pf. 23 23%
Am Locomotive . 35% 39Vi
Am Loco pf. 106% 107
Am Smelting... 77% 79
Am Smelting pf. 105% 106%
Am Sugar.113% 119
Am Woolen pf. 92% 92%
Anaconda . 33 38%
At, T & S Fe. 112% 112%
At T & S Fe pf. 103% 103%
Balt & Ohio. 106% 105%
Brooklyn K T. 80% 80%
Canadian Pacific. 235% 235
Cent Leather. 28% 29%
Cent Leather pf. 100% 100%
Ches Sr. Ohio. 81% 82%
Chic Ot Western. 81% 22
Chic, Mil & St P. 123% 123%
Chic & N W . 147 148%
Colorado F & I . 31% 32V*
Col & Southern . 55 54%
•Con Gas . 145 146
D & H . 172 173%
Denver & Rio Grande . 29% 29Vi
Distillers' Secur . 36 36%
Erie . 33% 34
Erie 1st pf . 51% 51%
Erie 2d pf . 40% 40%
Gt Northern pf^. 128% 128%
General Electric . 159% 160%
Interborough Met . 19 19%
Interborough Met pf . 52% 53%
Inti 8 Pump pf . 88% 88%
Iowa. Central . 16% 16%
Iowa Central pf . 31% 31%
K C Southern . 35 35%
Louis & Nash . 148% 148%
Man Elevated . 138% 136%
M, S P Sr 8 S M. 138% 138%
Missouri Pacific . 50% 50%
Mn, Kan * Tex . 34% 34%
Mo. Kail S- Tex pf . 67 67
National Biscuit . 139 139
National I.ead . 54 54%
N Y Air Brake . 73 73%
N Y Central . 108% 109
N Y, Ont * West . 43V* 43%
Norfolk . 107% 108%
North American . 73% 74%
Northern Pacific . 127% 127%
Pac'f.c Mali . 24% 24%
Pennsylvania . 121% 172%
People's Gas . 104% 105%
Pittsburg Coal . 20% 20%
Pittsburg Coal, pr. 80 82
Pressed S Car . 33% 34%
Ry Steel Sp. 33% 34%
Reading . 158% 159%
Rep I & S. 31% 31
Rep I & S Pf. 95 95%
Rock Island . 30% 31%
Rock Island pf. 62% 63%
Southern Pacific . 117% 118%
Southern Ry . 28% 28%
Southern Ry pf. 67% 67%
Third Ave. 11% 11% I
Texas & Pacific. 27% 27%
To], St L & VV. 20 21%
Tol, St L & W pf.._ 49% 50% |
Union Pacific .181% 183%
United Ry Inv... 42% 41% I
U S Rubber. 40% 41%
U S Steel. 78% 80% ,
U S Steel pf. 119% 120
Wabash . 16% 16%
Wabash pf... 37% 37%
Western Union . 75 75%
Wis Central . 70 70
Westlnghouse El. 72% 74%
•Ex-dividend.
WESTERNERS LAND PRIZES.
BOSTON, Mass., May 17.—Two west
ern students at Harvard are the win
ners of the Bowdoin prizes this year.
The prizes are the highest honors
awarded in English literature. The first
prize goes to Roscoe R. Hessell, of
Seattle, Wash., and the second prize to
Hiram K. Moderwell, of Fort Wayne,
Ind.
At Dartmouth the Newton aiumni
prize for extemporaneous debate has
been awarded to George Maurice Mor
ris, of Chicago.
NO SUNDAY MAILS?
WASHINGTON, May 17.—A hill pro
hibiting any postofflce to remain open
on Sunday for the delivery of mail to j
the public was introduced In the House
today by Representative James R. j
Mann, the Republican floor leader. This
Is In line with the announced policy of 1
the postoffice department authorities. ;
AGED WOMAN STILL MISSING.
SWEDESBORO. May 17.—No trace
has been found of Annie Blackwell, the
60-year-old woman who disappeared a
week ago yesterday. The country dis
tricts have been searched without re
sult. A woman friend went to Phila
delphia yesterday to have a search
made of the- hospitals and other places
for her.
A delayed advrrtlrement brines only th« after
math of trade It’a the tint call that captuiaf
the proceaafbn of customer*.
JERSEY LOSS SMALL
FROM S. 0. DECISION.
TRENTON. May 17.—The decision of
the Supreme Court dissolving the
Standard Oil Company of New Jersey
will not cause any considerable loss of
revenue to the State unless the prin
ciple established should be extended
to Include the dissolution of other
street corporations from which the
State derives a large part of Its in^
come. '
The Standard Oil Company recently
filed wdth the State Board of Assessors
its annual report upon which the Stato
tax will be levied this year. The re
port shows that the company has an
issued and outstanding capital stock
of *398,328,300. of which *39,000,000 is in
vested in New Jersey. The assessed
valuation of its plant at Bayonne is
*16,000,000. This amount, being devoted
to manufacturing within the State, i?
deducted from the total capital stock
in computing the tax. The actual tax
for the year is only *7,897.
The American Tobacco Company has
also filed its annual report. It has an
outstanding capital stock of *11S.9S1.500,
on which the State tax is *9,696.
MILLION JASMINES ARE
SHIPPED DURING ONE DAY.
GALVEBTO.,, May 17.—All records in
the industry of shipping rape Jas
mines from Texas to Northern markets
were broken Saturday, when the ship
ments aggregated 1,000,000 buds of the
fragrant flower. In one shipment to
Boston there were two carloads of 230,
000 jasmines in crates and baskets,
and another carload of 120,000 jas
mines to Cleveland, while the ship
ments include Bt. Louis. Kansas City,
Chicago. Cincinnati, Cleveland, Boston,
Baltimore. Philadelphia, New York and
many small cities.
The jasmine season lasts but tw-o
months, and they grow In great abund
ance within fifty miles of the coast.
They are shipped In buds wrapped In
damp paper and develop en route, and
the Texas crop ranges from 6,000,000 to
6,000,000 jasmines.
RESIDENTS OF ROEBLING
SAVED FROM OCEAN LINER.
ROEBLING, May 17.—Friends have
learned that among the passengers on
the Wgst India liner Merida, which was
sunk off the Virginia Capes last Fri
day, were Mr. and Mrs. William Gum
mere, who were returning from their
hon-ymoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Gummere were among
the first to be aroused from their
berths when the collision occurred, and,
clad In their night robes, joined the
other passengers In their scramble for]
the decks, while the lifeboats were be- j
lng lowered. Mr. Gummere Is supcrtn- |
tendent of the steel mills here.
THE CHICAGO MARKET.
CHICAGO, May 17,—Rains in Russia
today weakened wheat prices here, j
Cable dispatches reported also that j
cheaper and larger offer* were being i
triads from Indin Resides, Argentine
weather and or- p proepfets appeared to ■
be highly favorable, and a fresh esti
mate put the United States export sur
plus ns high as 116.000.000 bushels.
Furthermore, there was a forecast of
ahowers tonight in the Dakotas and
Minnesota. For a while selling was
general. Later, however, offerings dried
up and a reaction followed. Opening
prices were % to % lower. July started
at 88% to 88%, a decline of % to %, but
rallied to 88%f<j>%.
Unusual activity was witnessed in
cats. Prices rose sharply on account of
fear as to the effects of dry weather on
the growing grain. Shorts and local
speculators were somewhat strenuous
buyers. July opened the same as last
night to % higher at 32% to 32%, and
advanced to 34',».
Corn rallied In sympathy with oa-s.
after being depressed by wheat for a
time July started unchanged to >4 off
at 32’i to 52*4, and recovered to 82%. . |
.Moderate trade and a steady tone wasi
the rule In provisions. First sales were !
5 down to a like amount up with July i
delivery 14.30 for pork, S.05 for lard and j
7.87’a for ribs.
THE COTTON MARKET.
NEW YORK, May 17.—The cotton
market opened steady at an advance j
of 1 to 3 points in sympathy with
steady cables, and during the first few j
minutes sold about 3 to 7 points net !
higher, with new crop positions rela- |
lively firm on covering and some buy- j
tug by old crop bulls. Continued dry ;
weather o'er the greater part of the
South probably helped the new crop j
positions also, but there was continued !
liquidation by July longs and fluctua- ;
tions during the early trading was j
somewhat irregular.
BANKER HAS BUT $2.
NEW YORK, May 17.—David A. Sul
livan. who was president of the Me
chanics and Traders’ Bank when the
panic of 1907 got that bank into diffl- i
culties and caused the collapse of.
Brooklyn banks in which he was in
terested, has to borrow money now to
live on. and his own property consists i
of a watch worth *2, according to his j
testimony in supplementary proceed
ings under a judgment obtained by the
Merchants’ Exchange National Bank. |
The testimony was filed in the county I
clerk's office yesterday. Sulliv an was \
asked if any legal actions were, pend- :
Ing against him and he mentioned sev- ;
eral in which large amounts are in- i
volved.
STATE BANK CLOSED.
GAM BIER, Ohio. May 17.—The Gam
bler Banking Company, a State bank,
was closed yesterday by order of the
State bank superintendent. J. A.
Holmes, of Columbus, was named 'o
take charge of the institution and'win I
up Its affairs. The bank was capital- ,
ized at *25,000 and had deposits and
assets of *130,000. Shrinkage of cer
tain paper held as assets and iijfcblltty
to realize on this paper at Its face .
value is given as the efiuse of the
failure.
Students of Kenyon College had
much money on deposit in the bank.
THE LONDON MARKET.
LONDON, May 17.—American securi
ties were irregular during the earlv
trading today. First prices were gen
erally lower, but later the market im
proved on covering, and at noon was
stead' and from >-4 above to % below
yesterday’s Nerr Tork closing.
PACKERS SEE CHANCE
IN “REASONABLE” CLAUSE.
Will Demand Reargument of
Their Demurrers.
CHICAGO, May 17.—Contending that
he United States Supreme Court's de
:ision in the Standard Oil ease, in
tffect, sustained the objections ad
vanced by the packers to the indict
ments against them, John S. Miller and
Jther attorneys for the beef trust, have
•nnounced that they would demand
Derniission for reargument of their de
murrers in Judge Carpenter's court.
N’otlce to that efTect was served on
United States District Attorney Sims.
The packers were indicted on charges
5f conspirtcy in restraint of trade.
They filed demurrers to the indictments
»nd took other steps to avoid being
wrought to trial on the charges. Judge
Carpenter's decision overruling their
demurrers apparently blocked their last
means of escaping trial. But the rul
ing of the Supreme Court that combina
tions in "reasonable" restraint of trade
nre legal, it is contended, applies to the
beef ca.se and may result tn the dismis
sal of the charges against them.
REPORT SHOWS LESS LABOR
COST ON PAPER IN CANADA.
WASHINGTON, May 17,-James B.
Reynolds, of the tariff board, presented
to President Taft yesterday the report
of the tartfr board on pulp wood nnd
print paper, analyzing the difference in
‘Oht In production of.these commodities
In this country and in Canada. It
shows a dfference of cost in the Item
of labor of 8 cents a ton more in the
United States than In Canada. The re
port is not made public.
FINANCIAL NOTES.
James C. Brady has been elected a
trustee of the Central Trust Company,
of New Tork.
May 24 is the date set for the com
mission Investigation in Boston of the
cut in Boston and Maine dividend.
The reorganization committee of the
Hall -Signal Company announces that
all stockholders who wish'to deposit
Iheir stock must do so on or before
June 1, with the Empire Trust Com
pany.
The preferred and common stocks of
the Highlander Mill and Mining Com
pany have been stricken off the regular
list of the Philadelphia Stock Ex
change.
Within a few days the La Salle
Street National Bank will make appli
cation for admittance to membership
In the Chicago Clearing House Asso
ciation.
WITH INSURANCE MEN.
New basis fire Insurance schedules tor
the Texas rating board nre expected to
be ready for application on June 1.
William H. Kinney, adjuster in the
western department of the Fidelity
Phenli, will he chief adjuster for the
General Adjustment Company, of Pitts
burg.
F. A. Hancock has been made resi
dent vice-president at Chicago of the
Equitable Surety Company, of St.
Louis. W. E. Hart will be assistant
manager in charge of the Chicago
business.
The fire Insurance of the Bell Tele
phone Company, of Missouri, has been
■estored to the St. Louis agents. They
protested against the transfer of tho
line to Marsh & McLennan, of Chicago.
The Penn Mutual Agency Association,
composed of directors, officers and gen
eral agents of the Penn Mutual Life In
surance Company. Is holding Its annual
meeting at Memphis this week.
A committee of the Board of Casualty
and Surety Underwriters waited on the
committee on blanks of tho National
Convention of Insurance Commission
ers at the Hotel Manhattan, New York,
yesterday.
George H. Nickels, superintendent of
the claim department of the Fidelity
and Deposit Company, in New York,
has called a meting of accident claim
mon for next Friday. The idea is to
form a local organisation of claim men.
The Sun Underwriters, hacked by the
Sjun Insurance Office, has entered Mis
souri.
1.000 SACKS OF *100 ORE.
SALT LAKE. May J7.—Phil S. j
Shaughnessy, general manager of the !
Eudora Bell Mining Company, operat- i
ng In American Fork Canyon,
reports that he has on hand 1,000 sacks
M 1100 ore awaiting the melting of the
snows so that the freight teams may
haul it to the railroad. A dozen men
have been working at the mine all I
winter developing the ore body and
sacking the best which came In their I
way, until now they have a big lot on ;
hand. The tunnel is In between 1.S00 :
itid 2,000 feet. It Is now In a big body !
:>f low-grade ore. with a rich steak us ;
i core. This ore has been followed 400 j
feet, opening a large tonnage of mill- i
ng ore.
PENNSYLVANIA ALSO FINED.
NEW YORK. May 17.—The Pennsyl
vania, like the Pittsburg and Lake Erie, j
ia« entered a plea of nolo contendere (
to twenty counts of an indictment for
failipg lo adhere to the published scale j
of demurrage charges on a car of:
freight shipped from Ashtabula to the j
Cambria Steel Company, at Johnstown,
Pa., and it was also fined Si.000.
The offense was committed about j
three years ago. and it was shown to
the satisfaction of the court that con
ditions were responsible, the irregulari
ties having been subsequently corrected.
AVIATOR WAS HERO.
WASHINGTON, May 17.—That Lieu
tenant George E. Kelly, Thirtieth In
fantry, who was throw'n from his aero
plane at San Antonio May 10. met a
hero's death was the practical verdict
of the army board, w'hose report has
been received by Chief Signal Officer
Allen. The board says the accident
was due to efforts of Lieutenant Kelly
to avoid endangering men in the Kiev- i
enth Infantry camp, necessitating his
making a sharp left turn to avoid the
tents and thug straining the control.
GERMAN SAVINGS BANlO
772 BROAD STRBB5T
4 AND 3H% INTEREST
Assets over.$6,400,000.00
Surplus over. 350,000.00
Deposits made the first three days of every month draw interest
from the first of the month.
OPPICKRS
GOTTFRIED KRUBGBP. «r.sldant
John Flacker, l.t Vlce-Praa. M’-aael T. Barrett, M Vlce-Prea, ‘
G. Traotwela. rte’T ai4 Treat.
TftUSVtM
Michael T. Barrett. Au«. F. Kugera, William P. H oft man a
Willi' a H. Barkhonu Wm. II. F. Fiedler. Gottfried Kraogor,
Herman Bornemann. Jr* John Flacker, Robert A. Oebona
| Joseph 1C. Byrne, Chr W. FMfentpaa. Onrtavne Btaehlln,
^JohnJTBnrkhardt. F. Albert Hahn. Wm^O^Traut^et^^^^^
*-M-4~t+++++++++++*+++++***+
| LOCAL SECURITIES. J
*++*+m++++*++*++++++++++*
The hid and asked prices appended
are furalahed through KOIaele A Klngi
STOCKS.
GAS. ELECT,..U A..U TRACTION.
Bid. Adked.
Con Trac Co of N J. 764 774
Elisabeth Gas i.lrht Co. .. 30U ...
Essex A Hudson Gas Co... 142 145
G A E Co of Bergen Co... 32 35
Hudson Co Gas Co . 1S8 142
Newark Con Gas Co. 98 99
New Brunsw'ck LHA P Co 75 ...
Paterson A Passaic Gas Co 89
Public Service Cor ctfs.... 106 107
Public Service Corporation 119 1194
Pub Ser Gen Mort Bs, 1959 93 4 -9 4 4
Rapid Transit St Ry Co... 237
Somerset, U A M Llgh'g Co 65
S Jer Gas, Elec A Trac Co 134 137
bank and trust comi■ ant.
city Trust Co. 160
Essex Co National Bank.. 200 305
Essex Co Trust Co. 265 285
Federal Trust Co . 220 225
Fidelity Trust Co. 800 810
Tronbound Trust Co . 200 . .
Irvington National Bank.. 120
Manufacturers' Nat l Bank 250 265
Merchants’ National Bank 256 266
Mutual Trust Co. ir.6 166
Nat Newark Banking Co.. 390 400
National State Bank. 220 2*0
North Ward Nat Bank ... 390 400
Union National Bank. 400 410
West Bide Trust Co. 246 256
Newark Trust Co. 155 160
I.7FE AND FIRE IN8URANCB.
American . 500
Colonial Life . 350
Firemen's . 490 ...
Nswark . 316
Prudential . 425
■OlfDI.
GAS. ELECTRIC AND TRACTION.
•Ber T'plke Co 1st 5s, 1951. 94 97
•C El Co of N J 1st 6s. 1940 93 96
Con Trac Co 1st 6s. 1933. 1044 106
Con L 11 A P Co Bs. 1938. 100
•E, P & O J Ry Co 1st 5s, 1050 95 96 4
•E, R St Ky Co gen 5s. T964 93 96
•G & E C of B C lBt 5a. 1949 102 103
•G & E C of B C gn 6s. 1954 96 97
•Hud Co Gas Co 1st 5s. 1949 104 1044
•J C. H A P St Ry Co 4s, 1949 7 7 77 4
•MAS True Co Bs, 1950_ 93 96 w
•Nwk C G Co con 5s. 1948 1044 106
•Nwk Gas Co 1st 8s. 1944.. 127 130
Nwk Puss R K con 6s, 1930 107 108 4
•New B L, H4FC 4s. 1939 80 82
•N Hud L, H A P os, i»38 100
•N Hud Co Ry 1st 6a. 1914 101
•N Hud Co Ry 6a. 1928_ 102
•N Hud Co Ry 5a. 1924... . 96
•N J St Rv Co 1st 4b, 1948 774 784
•or A C \ il Ky lot fis, 1938 93 96
•Paa Light Co 1st 5s. 1825 15
•Paa Light Co gen Is. 1837. 10* ■.«
•Pat A Pas Gas A Elec Co
con 5s, 1949 . 101 ...
•Plain St Rv Co 1st Bs, 1813 10*
•Rap Tran St Ry Co Bs. 1921 103
•Som Light Co 1st Bs, 1939. 103
•B, U & M L Co 4s, 1943. .70
*S J G. E A TCo 1st 5s, 1953 99 99 4
•T St Rv Co 1st con 6s.1938 *5
•U E Co of N J lot 4s, 1949 789i 79'i
MISCELLANEOUS.
•Hack Water Co 1st 4s, 1952 85 87
Long r>k Erie R R 6s, 1935 123 125
Mot A Essex Con 7s, 1916 110 112
•N T A N J T Co 1st 68.1620 102
•Tee Wnt.r Co 1st 5s. 1987 99
•Ella Adjustment 4s, 1922. 98 ...
CITY AND COUNTY.
•Newark 4s 1923. 99
•Newark 4s 1923. 98 ...
•Essex County 3,65s, 1925. 95 ...
•Essex Co Bridge 4s, 1944 . 99 ...
•Essex Co Hospital 4s. 1944 99 ...
•Essex Co Park 4s, 1944. .. 99
•High Pressure 34s, 1936.. 92 ...
•Nwk Stor Res 3>4s. 1935.. 92
•Newark School 3 4s. 1935. 92 ...
•Newark School 3 4". 1965 92 ...
Trenton School 4s. 1937.... 99
MISCELLANEOUS STOCKS AND
BONDS
Pat B A M Co 1st 5a 1929.. 90
Celluloid Co. 129
Joseph Dixon Crucible Co.. 260 ...
New Jersey Zinc Co. 395 ...
Singer Manufacturing Co.. 295 ...
•And accrued Interest
“THE NEW MINISTER” TO
BE PERFORMED AGAIN.
JERSEY CITY, May 17.-The
musical sketch, “The New Min
ister," which was played for two suc
cessive nights recently at the chapel
of the Bergen Reformed I'hurch of
this city by the members of the
Hoag Dramatic Society connected witjh
the chapel, proved to he so well ren
dered that it was requested to be ro
pe ated in the lecture room of tile Ber
gen Reformed Church next Fridav,
where an opportunity might be afforded
to a greater number of people to enjoy
an evening of good, wholeBome musical
comedy.
The warm reception accorded was
gratifying to the young members, who
have given so much time and conscien
tious work to its rehearsals, and also
to its efficient director. W. H. Brenne
seholtz, whose untiring labors resulted
In the production of this play with
such telling effect as to warrant its
third performance. The proceeds are
to be devoted to reducing a debt on the
chapel.
PANAMA CANAL BONDS
WILL SHOW U. S. CREDIT.
WASHINGTON, May 17.—Secretary
pf the Treasury MacVeagh announced
last night the offer of 150,000,000 of Pan
ama 3 per cent, canal bonds.
These are the first Federal bonds
which have been issued since the na
tional banking system was established
which do not carry the circulation
privilege. They are exempted as the
result of legislation enacted at the last
session of Congress.
The government expects that the sale
pf these bonds will give a better idea
of the real measure of tile credit of
lhe United States government than has
sver heretofore been obtained. These
bonds are to be marketed as a partial
reimbursement of the treasury for
moneys expended on account of the
.•onstructlon of the Panama Canal.
BOARDS TO WORK SEPARATELY.
GLOUCESTER, May 17.-The Board
>f Health has passed a resolution re
luesting the State board to hold the
innuai conference of the officers of
he local boards of health separate
rom the annual conference of the New
Fersey Sanitary Association. Other
poards are also passing similar reso
utions, because they believe that bet
:er work can be done.
CANNED PEACHES MAKE FOUR ILL.
WILMINGTON. Del., May I7.-As a
•esult of eating canned peaches. Mr.
ind Mrs. Lewis Peters, of 609 Maryl
and avenue, and their two children, i
tged 4 and 7 years, are suffering from
ptomaine poisoning.
.vx -_x._ __
EISELE&KING
Member, of the N. r. Stock Exchange
Member* of the Fhlla. Stock Excheogo
NEW JERSEY
INVESTMENT
SECURITIES
A SPECIALTY
BROAD & CLINTON STS.
.MUTUAL BENEFIT BLDG.
Telephones 3820, 3821, 3822. 3823 Market.
--- — '■ ■
Byrne & McDonnell
Members of N. Y. Stock Exchange
776 Broad St., Newark, N. J.
WILLIAM F. KING
MANAGER.
TELEPHONE 1890 MARKET.
OFFICE
60 Broadway, New York
Charles A.Stonebam&Co
Mining Curb Brokers
54 Broad Street, New York
SPECIALISTS IN ALL
LISTED AND UNLISTED SECURITY
Up-to-date reports (SENT FREE)
rontnlnlnar latent authentic Information
on any stock you may be Interested tn.
ESTABLISHED 1861.
WARREN N. TRUSDELl & CO.
Dealers in Stocks and Bondi
Bank, Gan and Insurance StockB a Specially.
High-grade Investment Securities.
780 BROAD STREET
HARVARD HISTORIC ELMS
RAVAGED BY LEAF BEETLE.
CAMBRIDGE. Maes., May 17.—Five
of the historic elms in the Harvard Col
lege yard are being uprooted by work
men today. Other trees will have to
come down during the summer. After
I undergoing the ravages of the olm leaf
j beetle and the leopard moth, the trees
I have at last succumbed to an insect
| kno.vn as the bark borer.
It is doubtful If any of the elms in
the yard, many of which are nearly a
century old, can be saved. The col
lege has ordered 150 red oak saplings,
which will be planted to replace the
elms as fast as these are pulled down.
POLICE IN SEARCH OF
MISSING YOUNG GIRL.
BOSTON, Mav 17-—Miss Gertrude
Quimby. tho 15-ycnr-old daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. M. II. Quimby, of Audu
bon road, has vanished and the
police of all the larger cities have been
asked to aid in tho search that has
been prosecuted quietly by her parents
and by private investigators for the
Inst three days.
Although young. Gertrude Quimby
was so mature and so pretty that she
is known to have had several admirers,
but her parents are not inclined to
think that any affair of the heart had
to do with her disappearance.
-
FRESH AIR CAMP SITE
IS NOT YET SELECTED.
ELIZABETH May 17.—The Union /
County Christian Endeavor Union hay'v
not yet selected the site for the fre^n
air camp, but are in the hope of locat
ing it near a stream so that the boys
who will be admitted will have tlia
benefit of swimming as well as other
recreation under competent supervision
and instruction. Tho camp will h«
named "Camp Endeavor” and will open
on July 1.
It is expected that about thirty boys
a week will be accommodated, these
to be given a two weeks’ Vacation free
of cost. The boys from 11 to 15 yearn
of age will he from Union County dur
ing July and from New York city dur
ing August,
SUFFRAGETTES TO RAISE
$100,000 FOR BIG FIGHT.
i
NEW YORK, May 17.—Woman suf
frage leaders here have pledged thetn
ivleves to raise >100,000 to carry on
their campaign at Albany, where the
question of woman's suffrage is to come
up squarely for a vote in the State
Senate for the first time in more than
fifteen years.
CONTRACTS FILED.
These contracts were filed in the
county clerk s office today:
N. Brake, owner, with F. Krack, con
tractor. mason work. Si,575, Harrison
place and Alpine street, Irvington.
Cedar Grove Public Hall Association,
owners, with Jacobus & Fisher, con
tractors. all work. $5.'141*; Cedar street.
Cedar Grove.
G. Reiss, owner, with T. Herrman,
contractor, all work. ?! 1.850: South Or
anve avenue and Grove street.
J. Wright Clark, owner, with S Wil
son. contractor, plumbing and kindred
work, ?2.S70; 332 Mt. Prospect avenue.
Georgin- Fenwick, owner, with Wake
field. Sterne Co., contractors, all work,
J4.650: Elmwood avenue, East Orange.
A. ft Teresa Be Stefano, owners, with
C. Finger, contractor, all work. *6,000;
69 Mission street. Montclair.
Frances Spowers. owner, with Delp *
Pendorf. contractors, mason work. 3840;
Bay avenue. Glen Ridge Same owner
with W. Copestake, gontrae.tor, plumb
ing. heating and tinning work, $537i
same premises.
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