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Newark evening star and Newark advertiser. [volume] (Newark, N.J.) 1909-1916, August 05, 1911, LAST EDITION, Image 12

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ASBURY PARK
PRIDES ITSEEF OR
Said to Be Handsomer Than
Ocean Grove’s Famed Meet
ing House.
While the big auditorium in Ocean
Grove attracts thousands of Method
ists and the disciples of other creeds to
the famous camp-meeting seaside city,
through the promotion of attractive
.musical recitals and other noted reli
gious conventions. It must not be for
gotten that Asbury Park, the somewhat
worldly twin city to Ocean Grove, Is
prepared to contest at any time the
claim of the latter that It has ‘‘bottled
up,” so to speak, all the simon pure
goodness that radiates in that section
of New Jersey during the summer sea
son.
While the Methodists of the State and
especially such leaders of the denomi
nation as the Rev. Dr. Ralph Urmy, of
Morristown; the Rev. Dr. Thomas
O'Hanlon, former head of Pennington
Seminary; the Rev. Dr. Charles 1>.
Mead, of Baltimore; the Rev. A. C. Mc
Crea, of Jersey City; the Rev. Thomas
I. Ooultas, of Elizabeth, and the Rev.
Dr. William H. Morgan, of this city,
wfSB mistain Ocean Grove In its claim of
helng thbs "Holy City,” they neverthe
less will admit that the First Method
ist Church, the home of the demomlna
tion in Asbury Park, is without excep
tion the handsomest and best appointed i
sanctuary of Methodism along the New
Jersey coast.
Bven Mayor Frank Appleby, of the
Parfeites, and the retinue of big blue
ooats who preserve order on the beach
front and within Asbury's domain will
tail you that while Ocean Grove lays
claim to possessing a world-famed
camp-meeting house, when It
opmes to churches Founder Bradley’s
city has one of the finest Methodist
edifices along the Atlantic seaboard.
Tfce First Methodist Church of As
bury Park Is Indeed a model religious
institution, and the triple square-tow
ered Gothic architectural effect, en
henoed by the sharp-gabled roof, cathe
dral memorial wl-.dows and stone-faced
artfhed entrance, give It an exception
ally attractive appearance.
It Is constructed of pressed brick and
Is stone-faced.
The church, In its entirety, repre- j
•ents an outlay of over $60,000.
ECHO MEET BY C. E. SOCIETY.
The Christian Endeavor Society of
the Central Presbyterian Churoh will
hold an Atlantic City convention “echo
meeting" tomorrow evening at 7:15
o’clock, the service taking the place of
the regular night church meeting.
State President John T. Sproull will
tell of the recent convention, and a
number of the hymns sung at the At
lantic City meeting will be used. E. A.
Meyer will preside, and fans and Ice
water will be provided.
A Limerick.
Says the Kaiser to France: I’ve roek-o
To bounce off your meddlesome
block-o."
France replies;- “Don’t get skittish. ;
Remember the British;
They’ll keep your hands off of Mo- ,
rooco."
The Russians make the best immt- !
grants who enter Hawaii.
Don’t Imagine when you put a hy
phen in your name that you’re going
to cut a dash. *
Tf Luther Burbank is so smart why
can’t he give us the seedless water
melon?
By F. \V. Bourdlllon.
The night has a thousand eyes.
And the day but one.
Yet the light of the bright world dies
With the flying sun.
The mind has a thousand eyes,
And the heart but one,
Xst the light of a whole life dies
When love is done.
Jdhn D. Rockefeller admits great
BMtth la a burden But you didn't
ttanr htta adk for a lift, did you?
gust ■ Louisiana Lie.
A lighthouse keeper on the gulf of
lfexk® found the body of a fish the
other day which he otolms to be the
mtsstog link between the mythical
mermaid and the real thing. Tlhe head
warn orushed, but the body was exactly
Ilka that of a female, except for a
flsh'o tail In place of sookets for the
tegs. The skeleton, excellently pre
served, was sent to th j Louisiana His
torical Society.
Trusses and Supporters
23 William St., Newark, N. J.
THE PARIS UPHOLSTERING GO.
482 BROAD STREET, COR. BRIDGE
Phone 884-W. Market
One Week Only—U-pc. Parlor Suit Reuphol
•tered In Tapestry, Silk Gimp; Frame* Polished
MW2*m g
Write or Phone-Man Will Call With Sample*
«
As bury Park's $60,000 Methodist, Edifice Regarded
Finest of That Denomination Along the Coast
Miss Ethel Pursel, Who Is Talented
Both as Pianiste and Church Organist
MISS ETHEL FURSEL, the accom plished organist at the Elizabeth Ave
nue Baptist Church, this city, w ho has been heard frequently in musi
cal recitals and concerts durtn g the past year, is also a talented solo
pianist. >
At a recent midsummer recital give n in Armstrong Hall Miss Purse! ren
dered classical selections from the wor ks of Schubert, Moszkowski, Mac
Dowell and Chopin.
Miss Pursel is a graduate of the M etropolitan Schools of Musical Arts.
The Christian Endeavor Bible read
ing topic for tomorrow will be "Les
sons from Great Lives.”
The annual convention of the Amer
ican Feeratlon of Catholic Societies will
open at Columbus, O., on Sunday, Au
gust 20.
The Rev. Samuel J. Skevington, pas
tor of the Clinton Avenue Baptist
Church, is away on hts vacation. The
flock will worship during August with
the Calvary Presbyterian congregation.
Fans and Ice water have been in
stalled at the People's Temple, 14 Cen
tral avenue, by the superintendent,
Mrs. Pattle Watkins Lindsay, the
evangelist.
During this month the Rev. James F.
Riggs. jr., will officiate as acting pastor
at the Sixth Presbyterian Church dur
ing the vaoattve absence of the Rev,
Robert R. Llttell.
The Rev. Dr. Jesse Hill, of Portland,
Me., will occupy the pulpit of the First
Presbyterian Church tomorrow and
until the return of the Rev. Dr. Daw
son. the pastor, *ln September.
The Rev. John McDowell, pastor ol
the Park Presbyterian Church, will be
a speaker at the general conference
session of Christian Workers, which
opened at the Woody School, North
field, Maes., yesterday, to continue ir
session until,the 20th.
Word has been received In this city
from the Rt. Rev. Bishop Edward S
Lines, of the Newark Episcopal dio
cese. that he and Mrs. Lines, who are
touring Europe, are thoroughly enjoy
ing themselves.
The Rev. Dr. William H. Morgan, ol
the Central Methodist Church, thl!
city, has succeeded the Rev. Dr. Meat
as leader of the young people’s dally
morning meeting held in the audito
rium, Ocean Grove. •
The Protestant churches throughou
the oountry, at the request of the Na
tional Federal Council of Churches
will observe Labor Sunday on Septern
bar 3. The various labor organization!
will be Invited to the special service)!
The Revs. T. Alrd Moffat, of th<
First Congregational Church, and Dr
Robert Scott Inglia, of the Third Pr^
byterlan Church, have left on their
vacations. Dr. Moffat’s flotft will unite
with St. Luke's Methodist and the con
gregation of Dr. Tnglis will worship
at the South Park Church.
After a stay of seven weeks on the
Pacific coast the Rev. and Mrs. Julius
F. Maschman, of the Summerfleld
Methodist Episcopal Church, have re
turned home. They report a most en
joyable. outing, and both were greatly
benefltted by the trip across the con
tinent.
Countess Eugenia Von Boos _Farrar,
“Tombs Angel/’ Who Will Visit Here
_- —
ISOLATION HOSPITAL’S
PAY-ROLL IS INCREASED.
The annual cost of maintaining the
Essex County Isolation Hospital was
Increased by vote of the board of man- <
agers yesterday by more than $2,000,
when an assistant to Dr. Henry E.
Ricketts, superintendent, was engaged
and the salaries of Dr. Ricketts and
Dr. W. J. Douglas were Increased by
$500 each.
Dr. Douglas, who was formerly the
assistant, has been placed in charge '
of the .Tuberculosis Hospital. His sal
ary was increased to $2,000. Dr. Rick- i
etts will now receive $2,500. The salary t
of the assistant. Dr. Joseph Morrow, ,
formerly of the Willard Packer Hos
pital, of New York, was not stated. (
The action by the board of managers
must be ratified by the Board of Free
holders. ,
Miss Mary McKeon was appointed to ]
the newly-created position of night su
pervisor of nurses.
ST. MATTHEW’S ANNIVERSARY.
Tomorrow being the third anniver
sary of the dedication of the church, a
special service will be held at St. Mat
thew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church ,
In the morning. The Rev. William C. i
Schmidt, having -eturned from hts
vacation, will occupy the pulpit. Com
munion will also be celebrated. There
will be no evening service. Both Sun
day schools meet at 9:30 a. m.
COUNTESS FARRAR TO SINO
AT MILITARY PARK HERE.
Wife of Archbishop Farrar’s
Nephew a “Tombs Angel”
Countess Eugenia von Boos Farrar,
of London, who recently sold her Jewels
to aid wives and children of prisoners
in London and New York, and who is
known as the “Angel of the Tombs
Prison,” in New York, will visit this
city tomorrow and will render vocal
selections at the meeting in Military
Park at 8:30 o’clock, under the aus
pices of the Men’s Club of the Halsey1
Street Methodist Episcopal Church.
It will be the first time Countess
Farrar has visited Newark. She has a
rich contralto voice and has declined
flattering offers to sing in opera, pre
ferring to devote her talents to re
ligious work.
Immediately after the meeting in
Military Park Countess Farrar will go
to Kearny, where she will sing in the
Beulah Methodist Protestant Church,
of which the Rev. J. Robert Cook Is
pastor.
Countess Farrar supports her prison
work by her singing and from her own
private funds. Her husband is a
nephew of Archbishop Farrar, of Eng
land. The title is hers. She has been
chosen chairman of the peace confer
ence in the Hotel Astor, New York, next
month.
, _
RHifflOUS NOTICES. _
BAPTIST.
FAffRMOUNT BAPTIST CHURCH. Fair
mount avenue, near Bank street—Preaching
10:60 a. m. by Rev. George Me Neely. 7:46 p.
m. by Rev. J. R. Schaffer. Sunday school at
9:46 a. m. All invited. 8eats free.
MOUNT PLEASANT BAPTIST GHURCH,
Belleville avenue and Oriental street—Rev.
E. S. Van Ness, pastor. Services 11 a. m. and
7-*46 p. ra. Morning subject, ‘‘The Passing of
Hell/’ Evening subject, “The Cure-all.” Sun
day school at 10 a. m. Midweek service, Tues
day, 8 p. ra. Y. P. S. C. E.. Thursday, 8 p.
m. Seats free, and all welcome. *
NORTH BAPTIST CHURCH, corner High
and Orange streets—Sunday services at 10:46
a. m. and 7:45 p. m. In the morning Rev, E.
E Lowans, of Orange, will preach, and In the
evening Rev. J. W. McDouall. Bible school
at 3:80 p. m. Christian Endeavor service
Tuesday at 8 p. m. Thursday praise and
prayer service at 8 p. m.
80UTH BAPTIST CHURCH. East Kinney
street, near Broad—Rev. Clark T. Brownell,
pastor. Morning service at 10:30; sermon by
Professor Albert T. Davis, of East Orange.
No evening service. Sunday school at 9:30.
Midweek service, Thursday, 8.
* THE FIRST BAPTIST PEDDLE MEMORIAL
CHURCH, corner Broad and Fulton streets—
Rev. Thomas J. Vlllers, D. D., pastor. Rev.
F. H. Divine, D. D., preaches 10:30 and 7:46.
Sunday school 12 to 1. L. Wesley Richardson,
superintendent. Everybody welcome at all
services.
CHRISTIAN SCIENTIST.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST. SCIENTIST,
Hill street, between Broad and Halsey—Sun
day services at 11 a. m.; subject,
''Spirit.” children Sunday sohool at 10 a. in.
A testimonial meeting Wednesday evening at
8 o'clock. Reading-room at 906 Wiss Build
ing. 671 Broad street, open daily, except Sun
day and holidays from 10:80 a. m. to 5 p. m.
CONGREGATIONAL.
BELLEVILLE AVENUE CONGREGA
TIONAL CHURCH—Rev. James A. Solandt,
pastor. Union services with Park Presbyterian
Church. The Rev. Harry Baldwin Roberts, of
ruckahoe, N. Y., will preach at 10:45 a. m.
No evening service.
THE FIRST CONGREGATIONAL JUBE
MEMORIAL CHURCH, Clinton avenue, comer
Wright street—Rev. T. Alrd Moffat, minister.
Worshiping with St. Luke's M. E. Church,
Clinton avenue and Murray street, 10:30 a. m.
ind 7:46 p. m. You are always welcome at
the Friendly Churoh.”
EPISCOPAL.
CHUROH OF ST. JAMES. Belleville avenue.
)pposlte Taylor street—Rev. T. Percival Bate,
■ector. Holy Communion 7:80 a. m. Sunday
ichool 9:45 a. m. Morning prayer and sermon
1 o'clock. Evensong 7:45 p. m. Commercial
nen especially Invited.
ST. STEPHEN’S EPI8COPAL CHURCH,
;orner Clinton and Elizabeth avenues, will be
losed during the month of August for repairs,
rhe Rev. Edmund A. Wasson, Ph. D-, rector
if the church. Is spending his vacation in
/irginda.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL.
CENTENARY METHODIST EPISCOPAL
IHURCH, Summer avenue and Kearny street
-Services 10:30 and 7:46. The Rev. Isaac
Vood, D. D., pastor of the State Street Meth
dist Episcopal Church, of Trenton, will preach
nornlng and evening.
•CENTRAL METHO'DIST EPISCOPAL
JHURCH, Market and Mulberry streets—Rev.
Vllliam H. Morgan, D. D., pastor. 10:80 a.
n. , Sabbath school. 4 p. m., open-air Gospel
ervice In Military Park: Rev. George Dough
ty. pastor of St. Paul’s Church, will speak.
:46 p. m., sermon Yfr the pastor; Dr. Mor
gan's subject will be “Self-Reverence.” Tues
lay, 8 p. m., prayer service, Dr. Morgan in
diarge. All are Invited to these services.
ROSEVILLE METHODIST EPISCOPAL
IHURCH, Orange street and Bathgate nlaoe—
>orr Frank Dlefendorf, minister. Morning
vorshlp at 10:30 o’clock, at which the saora
nent of the Lord’s Supper will be ad mini s
ered. Evening worship and sermon by the
*ev. Dorr F>ank Dlefendorf, at 7:46 o’clock:
tubject, "Transforming the Pessimism of a
Jrophet.” Men's assembly at 12 m. Sunday
'chool 2:30 p. m. Midweek service for prayer
md praise Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock
Strangers are cordially invited to all the serv
ces of the church.
8T. JOHN'S METHODIST EPISCOPAL
2HURCH, Academy and Plane streets— (Jan
>ral class begun 10 a. m. and concluded t p.
n. The pastor, Rev. William R. A. Palmer,
^reaches 10:45 a. m., ' The First Sale of a
birthright ” and 7:46 p. ra., “Ezekiel's Vision
n the Valley of Dry Bones;’’ the H. M. Ran
iolph Association will be present by special
nvltatlon. 8 p. m.. SUndav school. 4:80 p. m.,
Sunday sohool sumumer lyceum. program by
dies Mabel Francis. 9 p. m., the Lord's Sup
per. Thursday, 9 a. m., annual exourslon to
belle wood Park. Other week meetings as
isual. Good music at an Lord's Day serv
ees and a hearty welcome for all.
8T. LUKE’S METHODIST EPISCOPAL
'HTJRCH, Clinton avenue and Murray street—
bev. James H. MacDonald, pastor. The paa
or has returned from his vacation and will
occupy the pulpit morning and evening. The
subjeot of the morning sermon at 10:80 will
oe “How to FI gilt.’’ In the evening at 7:45
Mr. MacDonald will begin a series of three
sermons or studies considered In two great
works of Action. The subject for this night
will be “The Study of Love,” ae drawn from
Victor Hugo’s great work, “Les Mlserables.”
Special music at all services. We extend a
hearty welcome to all to Join in these serv
ces. The First Congregational Jube Memorial
Church will unite with this church on the
Sundays of August and the first Sunday in
September.
The music for tomorrow wlU be as follows:
Morning—Triumphal Marche, Costa: duet fc*
soprano and alto, “He Oareth for Us All,”
Scott; offertory, Romance, Tschalkowsky;
RELIGIOUS NOTICES. _^
solo for tenor, selected. Mr. Burkhardt; post
lude, Poetlude In D, 8mort. Bvenlng^-Prelude,
“Spring Song." Mendelssohn (by request);
duet, for alto and tenor, “At Evening,”
Marston; offertory, Berceuse, Oullmant; solo
for soprano, selected, Mrs. Craig; postlude.
Allegro, Lemalgre. Lucy J. Stephens, organist.
METHODIST PROTESTANT.
BEULAH METHODIST PROTESTANT
CHURCH. Pomeroy avenue, corner of Maple
street* Kearny—Rev. J. Robert C. Clark, pas
tor. Morning worship 10:45 o’clock. Sunday
school 1:30 p. m. Christian Endeavor 6:45 p.
m. Song service 7:45 p. m- Special evening
service at 8 o’clock. The Countess Eugenia
Von Boos Farrar, the famous Gospel soloist,
will sing. All Heats free. Wednesday, prayer
meeting, 8 p. m. Friday, men’s meeting, 8
p. m.
PRESBYTERIAN.
CUNTRAL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Clinton, Belmont and Madison avenues—Dr.
King will preach at 10:46 on “The Way God
Walks With Man.” 9:80, Sunday school. 7:45.
echo service, the International C. E conven
tion. Electric fana run at the services. Ice
water In main vestibule. A hearty welcome
awaits strangers and visitors.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Broad
and Mechanic streets—Divine worship tomor
row, at 10:30 a. m. and 7:46 p. m. Rev.
Jesse Hill, D. D.. of Portland, Me., will
preach at both services. Sunday school at 3
p. m. Adult Bible class at 4 p. m. Christian
Endeavor at 6:45 p. m. Prayer service Tues
day evening at 8. y
HIGH STREET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
High and Court streets—Rev. John J. Mo
ment, pastor. Tomorrow: Morning worship
10:56 o'clock; sermon by Rev. Herbert 8.
Brown, Ph. D.
'PARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, Union
services, 10:45 a. m., at Belleville Avenue Con
gregational Church.* 12:10 p. m., all depart
ments of the Bible school at Park church. No
evening service.
SIXTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, corner
Lafayette and Union streets—Rev. James F.
Riggs, Jr., acting pastor, will preach at 11 a.
m. and 7:46 p. ra. Sabbath school at 10 a.
m. C. E. Society at 7 p. m.
SOUTH PARK PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
corner of Clinton avenue and Broad street—
Rev. Lyman Whitney Allen. D. D., pastor;
Rev. W. D. Buchanan, aaelstant pastor. It
a. m., congregational worship; union servloes
with the Third Presbyterian and St. Paul’s
Methodist ovhurchee. Service In South Park
ohurch. Dr. Dougherty, of the St. Paul’s
Church, will preach.
SOUTH PARK MEMORIAL CHAPEL, cor
ner of South and Dawson streets—9:30 a. m.,
Sabbath school. 7 p. m., children’s praise
service. 8 p. m.. congregational worship;
stereoptlcon sermon oif-'VMlsslon Lands/* sub
ject, “Japan,” by Rev. W. D. Buchanan.
WEST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Little
ton - and Eleventh avenue*—The Rev.
H. C. Harmon, minister. Union sum
mer services with Ds Groot M. E.
Church. Service at 10:30 a. m. in West
:huroh, and at 7:46 p. m. In De Groot ohurch.
ftlble school at 9:80 a. m. C. B. meeting at
6:46 p. m. Church prayer-meeting Tuesday
at 8 p. m. Seats free and strangers welcome.
MISCELLANEOUS.
CHILDREN’S TEMPLE (undenominational),
7 Nichols street, near Eaclflc street—Children’s
spen-alr meeting In Lincoln Park tomorrow
afternoon 4 o’clock; Mr. J. L. Thomas will be
the speaker. Evening service 7 o’clock, li)
the temple. Thursday evening meeting 7:46
/clock. All children are heartily welcome. 0.
W. Edwards and Joseph Wilde, superlntend
snts.
CHRI6TADELPHIANS meet every Sunday,
162 Washington street, Iroquois buJldlng. Sun
day school and Bible classes at 10 a na.
Memorial service and leoture 11 a. in. by Mr.
William Brittle; subject, "How God Made
Himself Known to the World.” Stranger*
ilwa.ve welcome.
FIRST UNITED CHRISTIAN CHURCH. Of
North Arlington—Rev. James Queening will
preaoh at 9:16. Sabbath school 2 p. m. All
services will be held at the residence of R.
London, Duncan street, near Gold. Every
body welcome.
MILITARY PARK—Twilight vesper services
at 6:30 p, m., at the band-stand, under the
auspices or the Men’s Club of the Halsey
Street Methodist Episcopal Church. Special
linger expected, the Countess Eugenia Yon
Boos Farrar, the famous Gospel singer. Short
address, bright testimonies. All Christian
workers invited to cooperate. J. Robert C.
Clark, chairman.
RESCUE HOME. 16 Spring street—Tomor
row, services 3:46 and 7:45, will be In oharge
if the workers of the home. Speaker* who
or* expected are Mrs. George A. Simmons
and Rev James Queening. There will be spe
cial elnglng iwith short testimonies as usual.
A good hallelujah time in the Lord surely
e^peoted. Cool chapel with fans. Don’t fall
to be with us, both afternoon and evening.
Public most cordially invited. J. G. Sim
mons, musical director; Mrs. Miller, organist.
SALVATION ARMY. 28 Belleville avenue—
Service nightly at 8 o'clock. Sunday 10:30 a.
m. Sunday school 2:30 p. m. Evening at 8
o’clQok. Open-air meeting at the D.. L. & W.
R. R. square at 7 p. m. A welcome to all at
all our meetings. Captain Lily Patrick and
Lieutenant Spencer in charge.
YOUNG MEN’S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION,
111 Halsey street—The Discussion Groun,
under the auspices of (he Sunday Club, will
be conducted through August In the Y. M.
O. A. gymnasium on S'unday afternoon* from
5 to 8:80 o’clock. On August 6 the discussion
will be led by Mr. William L. Brice, a busi
ness man. with the Prudential Insurance
Company. “Habits” will be the subject of
the discussion. Special music will be fur
nished. The fellowship lunch will be held at
S o'clock, followed by the “sing’’ at 6:46. All
men are Invited.
\Jp-to- Date jVgfceM' of
the XO omarix XV or Id
LAUGHED AT BLACK-HAND
THREAT; GIRL IS ATTACKED
PITTSBURG, Aug. 6— Miss Beatrice
Heckman, 18, daughter of a well-to-do
widow of Washington, Pa., who ignored
a Black-Hand threat on ‘Wednesday,
was attacked on the lawn In front of
her home, bound and gagged and left
nearly dead on the floor of a summer
kitchen.
Two hours later Sheridan Wrouth, a
dairyman, found the girl. It is believed
the attack was part of a kidnapping
plot. The Black-Hand letter declared
that unless $1,000 was deposited near
a spring the girl would be carried
away.
Mrs. Heckman, in her alarm, gave
the police the missive. but Miss Heck
man laughed at it. Her condition Is
serious.
WIELDING A ROLLING-PIN,
WOMAN CAPTURES BURGLAR
NEW YORK, Aug. 6.—Mrs. Florence
Taylor, of T76 Myrtle avenue, Brooklyn,
captured an alleged burglar In a novel
way yeeterday--she used a rolling-pin.
A policeman rescued the man, who said
he was Ignatz Goodman. «
Mrs. Taylor was baking In the kltoh
en of her home and her handB were full
of soft dough, when she heard a noise
at the dining-room door. On Investi
gation she discovered a man and made
a grab for him and her doughy hands
made It easy for the Intruder to squirm
away. Mrs. Taylor followed, rubbed
off the dough on her apron, and tackled
him again, this time with a rolltng-pin.
GIRLS GET THE VOTES, BUT
THIEF GETS BEAUTY PRIZES
NEW YORK, Aug. 5.—"We can't
lose," was the happy cry on Thursday
night of the Misses Helen Rhodes,
Lalonle Pattaty and Elsie Gunther
when the voting for “prettiest and
most popular girls" at the carnival of
the Bayshore, L. I., firemen showed
them bo far ahead that It was all over
but the shouting.
But they did lose. Early yesterday
morning, when the Bayshore police
force was mopping his brow at the
other end of town, a mean, mean thief
wrapped a brick In a handkerchief,
shattered Druggist Ulmschnelder’s win
dow and walked off with the prises.
GIRLS MEET AS STRANGERS,
DISCOVER THEY ARE TWINS
INDIANAPOLIS, Aeg. 5.—Whsn
Miss Marguerite Veall, of Wldhlta,
Kan., stepped up to a counter In a de
partment store here she was amazed to
see behind It an exact Image of her
self.
The girl behind the counter was Mlse
Marie Freeman, of Indianapolis. She
was startled at the likeness to herself
In Miss Veall.
Mlse VealJ told her foster-mother
about her experience, and together
they made an Investigation which
showed that she and Mlse Freeman
had been left at the same home and
that they were twins. Their real name
was not stated.
The twins were unable to express
their Joy at being reunited. They ray
they will remain together.
■II I
CITY ADVEKTI8EMB^
NOTICB.
Nolle 1, hereby given to {H JJKjjJS
eeted that the Certlftcate of I
the whole amount of *&* ?,<?.t.,^,aJ}^..f,,tIVTDKN
CARLISLE PLACE OPENING AND WlDAi'
LEHIGH AVENUE * GRADING. CUBBING
AND flagging,
MAPES AVENUE GRADING, CUBBING AND
FLAGGING,
SCHBIDER AVENUE GBADING. CUBBING
AND FLAGGING, „
SHEPHARD AVENUE GRADING, CUBBING
AND FLAGGING,
SOUTH TWELFTH STREET GRADING.
CURBING AND FLAGGING,
SOUTH TWELFTH STREET GRADING,
CURBING AND FLAGGING,
TILLINGHAST STREET FLAGGING,
DELAVAN AVENU'E OPENING AND
WIDENING,
GRAIN STREET OPENING,
has been delivered to me according to law.
Said assessment comprises all the lots, tracts
and parcels of land and real estate »ying on
both sides of
LEHIGH AVENUE,
from about 160 feet west of Bergen street to
Osborne terrace.
On both sides of
MAPES AVENUE. •
from about 600 feet west of Bergen street to
Osborne terrace.
On both sides of
SCH EIDER A VENICE,
from about 826 feet west of Seymour avenue to
Osborne terrace.
On both sides of
SHEPHARD AVENUE,
from about 600 feet west of Bergen street to
Osborne terrace.
On both sides of
SOUTH TWELFTH STREET,
from Central avenue to Thirteenth avenue.
On both sides of
SOUTH TWELFTH STREET,
from Avon avfenue to Springfield avenue.
On both sides of
TILLINGHAST STREET,
from Osborne terrace fo Clinton place.
On both sides of
GRAIN STREET,
from South Twentieth street to Grove street;
on the east side of Grove street, from a point
about 100 feet south of the southerly line of
Grain street to a point about 100 feet north of
the northerly line of Grain street; on both*
Bides of South Twentieth street, from a point
about 100 feet eouth of the southerly line of
Grain street to a point about 100 feet north of
the northerly line of Grain street.
On both sides of
DELAVAN AVENUE,
from about 100 feet east of the easterly line of
Summer avenue to about 100 feet west of the
westerly line of Woodslde avenue; from about
200 feet south of the southerly line of Delavan
avenue to a point about 200 feet north of the
northerly line of Delavan avenue.
The owners of land and real estate assessed
In said Certificate of Assessment are hereby
required to pay the amount so assessed upon
them, and each of them respectively, to me at
my office, City Hall, on or before September
11, 191L
New**#, Aug. 4, 1911.
TYLER PARMLrY.
eug6-fit Comptroller.
SEYMOUR AVENUE PAVING, SHERIDAN
AVENUE PAVING, THIRTEENTH AVE
NUE PAVING—Assessment for Benefits.
Notioe Is hereby given that an assessment
upon all the owners of all the lands and real
estate peculiarly benefited by eaoh of the fol
lowing Improvements, namely:
The paving of
SEYMOUR AVENUE.
from Runyon street to Hawthorne avenue, ac
cording to the provisions of an ordinance of
the olty of Newark entitled “An Ordlnanoe to
provide for the paving of
SEYMOUR AVENUE.
from Runyon street to Hawthorne avenue,"
approved February IT, 1911.
The paving of
SHERIDAN AVENUE,
from Peshlne avenue to Hunterdon street, ac
cordlag'fo the providgns of an ordinance of
the city of Newark entitled, “An Ordlnanoe to
provide ior the paving of
SHERIDAN AVENUE,
from. Peshlne avenue to Hunterdon itreet,"
approved February 17, 1911.
The paving of
THIRTEENTH AVENUE,
from South Tenth street to South Twelfth
street, according to the provisions of an or
dinance of the city of Newark entitled, “An
Ordinance to provide for the paving of
THIRTEENTH AVENUE,
from South Tenth street to South Twelfth
street,” approved October 7, 1910, has been
prepared by the undersigned commissioners,
appointed by the Mayor of the city of New
ark, and that a report by a certificate In
writing, with an accompanying map and
schedule, showing the several assessments
agalnat the several owners peculiarly benefited
as aforesaid, has b'een deposited in the office
of the olty clerk of the city of Newark for
examination by the parties Interested therein
Said assessment comprises all lots. tracts
and parcels of land and real estate liable to
be assessed as aforesaid lying on berth sides
of Seymour avenue, from Runyon street to
Hawthorne atenue; on both sides of 8heridan
avenue, from PeshJne avenue to Hunterdon
street; an both sides of Thirteenth avenue from
South Tenth street to South Twelfth street.
A “lot" represents an entire plot of land,
whether large or small.
All persons interested In said nFsessment
may be heard before said commissioners on
Thursday, the tenth day of August, 1911. at 8
p. m., at the commissioners* roomp. No. 4
(third floor), City Hall.
Dated August 4, 1911.
WILLIAM DTMOND,
JOHN F MONAHAN.
ADOLPH FIBCH,
aug4-8t Commissioners.
OFFICE of the Chief Engineer of the Board of
Street and Water Commissioners of the City
of Newark
NOTICE.
The final estimates for the following con
tract* will he presented to the Board of Ptrfcet
and Water Commissioners of the City of New
ark. fbr acceptance, on Thursday. August 10.
1911, between 8:16 and 8:30 p. m.. vis: For
the construction of the following sewers:
flTOYVESANT AVENUE FEWER.
OGDEN STREET SEWER;
And fbr the paving of
BKINKLE STREET,
from South Tenth street to Kent street;
VINCENT STREET.
from Ferry street to the Waverly and Passaic
Branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad;
ALYEA STREET.
from Ferry street to Henaler street;
CAMP ALLEY.
from Ctanp street southerly about 865 feet;
KENT STREET,
from Eighteenth avenue to Skinkle street.
Also for the grading, curbing and flagging of
FOURTH AVENUE,
from Fifth street to Roseville avenue;
HILLSIDE AVENUE.
from Watson avenue northerly about 712 fWA
All Objection* to the payment of said
mates must bd filed with me, In writing, dll
or before z o'elook of Thursday, August w,
1011.
Dated August 4* 1911.
M R SHERRBRD.
aug4-5t Chief Engineer.
NOTICE OF INTENTION—Board of Street and
water Commissioners.
Pursuant to a resolution adopted by the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners of
the City of Newark, at a meeting held the
third day of August. 1911. and ap
proved by the Mayor of the City of Newark,
on the fourth day of August. 1911.
notice Is hereby j#ven that It is the intention
of the Board of Street and Water Commission
ers of the City of Newark, under and by virtue
of provisions of the act entitled “An Act to
Revise and Amend the Charter of the City of
Newark,” approved March 11th, 1867. and the
supplement* thereto, and the aot creating the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners of
tfc* CTty of Newark, approved March 28th,
SRI, and other public laws of the Pftate of
New Jersey, to order and cause the paving of
JOHNSON AVENUE.
from Watson avenue southerly about 315 feet.
With tMrord pavement and three f8> feet brick
gutter*; together with all the appurtenance*
necessary to complete the same.
Such persona as may object thereto arc re
q dotted to present their objections in writing
to the clerk of said hoard, at the office of the
Board Of Street and Water Commissioners.
City Ball. Newark, on or before the expira
tion of fix days from date of this notice.
By Alfeetfon of ths Board of Street and
Whter Commissioners of the City of Newark.
M. R. SHERRHRD,
Chief Engineer.
Ntowasfc, N. J., August 4, 1911. aug5-5t
PUBLIC NOTICE Is hereby given that th*
following ordinances have been passed bf
the Board of StTeet and Water Commission**#
•nd approved by the Mayor of the City of
Newark, and pursuant to Chapter 3« of the
State law* of 1909, are herewith published by
title:
An ordinance to provide for the vacation of
a portion of
CHRISTIE STREET.
between Ferry street and Bonykamper avenue.
An ordinance to provide for the vacation of
that portion of
BONYKAMPER AVENUE,
located between the westerly line of Christie
I street, as laid out originally on the Frederick
Bonykamper map, and the westerly line of a
new Christie street, dedicated for public use
Jy P. Ballanttne 8c Sons, a corporation, during
one. 1911.
Adopted August 8, 1911.
WILLIAM MUNGLE,
President of the Board of Street and Water
Commissioners.
WM. B. GREATHEAD.
Clerk of the Board.
Approved Avgsst 4. 1911.
JACOB HAUSSLING,
Mayor.
PUBLIC NOTICB Is hereby given that the fol
lowing ordinance has been paSsed by the
Board of Street and Water Commissioners
and approved by the Mayor of the City of
Newafk, and pursuant to Chapter 36 of the
State laws of 1909. Is herewith published by
title;
An ordinance to open
VERNON AVENUE.
from 138 feet east of Leo place to Nairn place.
Adopted August 8, 1911.
_ WILLIAM MUNGLE,
President of the Boerd of Street and Water
Commissioners.
WM. B. GREATHEAD,
Clerk of the Board.
Approved August 4, 1911.
JACOB HAUSSUNO,
Mayo*. •
Don't "dopond on" » il<n la tout wtndom
Dw aa ad la Dm star.

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