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Newark evening star and Newark advertiser. [volume] (Newark, N.J.) 1909-1916, October 21, 1911, HOME EDITION, Image 1

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Newark Qfoemttct <^tar
===^==: ^ ===■-=. AND NEWARK ADVERTISER » -
ESTABLISHED 1832. NEWARK, N. J., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1911. RAIN TONIGHT AND SUNDAY.
ALLISON MACFARLAND IS HELD, CHARGED WITH MURDERING WIFE
EVENING STAR FINDS EVIDENCE WHICH MAY SEND HIM TO CHAIR
WARRANT
FOR STOCK
SALESMAN
Scores of Newarkers Said
to Be His Cus
tomers.
WARD SAYS HE BOUGHT
STOCK HE DIDN’T GET
New Yorker, After Fruitless
Search, Wants “Stock
Broker” Arrested.
The news that a warrant was issued
today by Judge Hahn in the First
Criminal Court for the arrest of A1 J.
Freeth, "stock broker,” will probably
cause a miniature panic among scores
of small investors, who have intrusted
him with their money. Q. H. Ward, a
Sew York man, made the complaint
before Judge Hahn today when Freeth
failed to appear in answer to a sum
mons that had been mailed to him at
his alleged home in East Orange. Ob
taining $213 under false pretenses Is
the charge.
Mr. Ward is a working man, and has
a wife and family to support. He told
Judge Hahn there are scores of men
in Newark lit the same circumstances
who had invested their money with
Freeth. He has been trying to find
him since August, but was told at his
former office at 185 Market street that
he had been gone six months.
The complaint alleges that Freeth
sold Ward six shares of stock in the
Chicago-New York Electric Air Line
Railroad Company, par value $100, at
a contract price of $35.50 a share, to
be paid in installments. 1 For four
years, the complaint says, Ward made
the payments, and in July last he made
the last payment, $213 In all.
when demanded the atook, Ward
—'gaya Freeth said he had none on hand,
but was going to Chicago to get $1,000
worth of It. When he returned he said
he had been unable to get any. and put
off delivery of the atock every time he
met Ward. The latter met him on the'
Street one day. Ward says, and again
asked for his stock, and Freeth said he
had five shares at the office. But when
Ward came to the office the stock was
not forthcoming.
Ward made complaint at the First
reclnct a w 3k ago and a letter was
sent to Freeth's supposed home In East
i (range. He did not appear today, (he
iiate set, and the warrant was issued.
The Chicago New York Electric Air
l.ine Railroad Company, in the four
years since Mr. Ward’s acquaintance
with it, has built only seventy miles of
track. But he claims it is a good in
vestment.
GETS WRIT IN FIGHT TO
OUST CHAIRMAN PARMLY
Chief Justice Gummere today
granted a writ for quo warranto pro
ceedings to show cause why Tyler
Parmly should not be removed as
chairman of the Democratic County
Committee. The writ, which was asked
for by Owen Conlon, is returnable next
week. Conlon asked for the writ two
weeks ago, but Justice Gummere said
at the time that he did not believe Mr
Conlon’s contention that the chairman
should be removed was right under the
facts submitted. He, however, gave
Borden D. Whiting, counsel for Mr
Conlon, permission to file particulars,
and today, after having perused them
carefully, he changed his mind and
• granted the writ.
SIMPSON WILL RLE HIS
PETITION FOR SHRIEVALTY
That Walter F. Simpson will posi
tively file his petition as independent
candidate for sheriff was announced to
day by Joshua Brierley, who in a com
munication to the Evening STAR says
that he saw the petition. Mr Brierley
also announces the fact that he will re
tire from the race in favor of Simpson
because lte knows Simpson "is a good
man."
Mr. Brierley feels sure that all the
members of the Citizens' Progressive
League of Essex county will vote for
Simpson.
m INJURED AS BOILER,
IN COLD STORAGE, BURSTS
NEW YORK, Oct. 21.—Mint persons
were injured, two seriously, by the ex
plosion of a boiler of the Greenwich
Cold Storage Company, at 402-404
Greenwich street, shortly after mid
night today. The boiler let go with ter
rific force, tearing the front of the
building, breaking gas mains and rip
ping up the sidewalk and covering the
tracks of the Ninth avenue elevated
line with debris. Traffic on the line was
held up for an hour.
The explosion was heard in the neigb
fcorhbod for blocks and caused the wild
Pt aort of a panic.
SELLS HER HAIR
TO SEE FILM PLAY,
THEN TRIES TO DIE
Newark Girl Attempts to Leap
Into Hudson from
Ferryboat.
BROTHER SAYS MOVING
PICTURES UNHINGED MIND
She Has Been Acting; Queerly
for Past Few Years,
He Avers.
Declaring that his sister, Miss Eva
Smith, 20 years old, who attempted
suicide by trying to leap off a Lucaa
wanna ferryboat in the Hudson river,
sacrificed her hair a short time ago to
get a few cents to see a moving-picture
show, Joseph Smith, of 189 Seymour
avenue, went to New York today with
the intention of having her committed
to some asylum.
He says that the young woman is
Irresponsible, and that in the last few
years she has acted in a way that has
frequently embarrassed the family.
Moving pictures, he says, have unbal
anced her mind.
Her father and mother have been
separated for years, and instead of liv
ing home with her mother and brother
she worked In this city and New York,
staying away from home as much as
possible.
A year and a half ago she was taken
to the Webster Home In New York and
a position found for her. After work
ing a few days she disappeared, and
her employer reported the loss of a
diamond ring. East September she
went to work with her brother in a
local Jewelry factory.
She held the position only a short
time, and since then had been seen only
at intervals by her brother .until two
weeks ago, when she returned home
with her hair cut off.
iBLUECOAT FORCED
TO OMIT, SUICIDE
Alexander Taggart, of East Or
ange, Drinks Carbolic Acid
at Home of Friend.
Despondent because he was told to
resign from (he East Orange police
force, Alexander Taggart, who before
donning a blue coat had served five
years In the navy and six in the army,
committed suicide by drinking car
bolic acid in the home of a friend,
Patrolman Philip Flannery, of 100
Clinton street, East Orange,* lhis after
noon.
Last Monday Taggart, who was 26
years old, was before the Police Board
on charges of having taken a drink of
liquor on October 3 and of having been
asleep on his post on September 28. He
was found guilty, but Instead of being
dismissed was permitted to resign be
cause of honorable service in the army
and navy.
Until recently he made his home
with a relative, Hamilton Taggart, of
Llndwood place. East Orange. Follow
ing his trouble with the police board
he went to live with Patrolman Flan
nery. He failed to get up at the usual
time today, and when one of the Flan
nery family went to his room he was
found dead with a half-filled bottle of
carbolic acid nearby.
DISABLED Cl DE LINER
ANCHORS N IR HOG ISLAND
NEW YORK, Oct. 21—A wireless
message from Sandy Hook today said
that the Clyde line steamer George W.
Clyde, which broke down yesterday on
her way from Philadelphia to Norfolk,
was anchored this morning twenty
mos nnrt of Hog Island in 10%
fathoms of water. The Old Dominion
liner Hamilton, which passed the dis
abled steamer at 4:40 a. m.. said she
was blowing signals of distress and
asking for a tug to tow her in.
A wrecking tug is believed to have
reached the steamer early today. The
Clyde left Philadelphia Thursday, car
rying freight hut no passengers. Her
shaft broke at 10 o’clock yesterday
morning and she Immediately dropped
her anchor.
10 HURT, SOME FATALLY,
IN HEAD ON COLLISION
CLEVELAND. O.. Oct. 21.—Two
Cleveland, Southwestern and Columbus
Interurban cars came together In a
head-on collision at Kamms Corners,
just outside the city, at 8 o’clock today.
Ten people are reported Injured, several
of them fatally.
WILL TUNNEL MOUNT ROYAL.
OTTAWA, Oct. 21.—The Canadian
Northern Tunnel and Terminal Com
pany, Limited, a subsidiary of the
Canadian Railway Company, has an
nounced that It had perfected plans for
tunneling under Mt. Royal to effect an
entrance Into the heart of the city of
Montreal.
SOFT JOBS
KEEP DIRT
IN STREETS
Alderman Says Works
Board Has Too Many
Deskmen.
DEPARTMENT OLD MEN’S
HOME, SAYS A MERCHANT
Condition, lie Adds, “A Dis=
"race to City and an
Imposition.”
"There is no doubt of the fact that
the streets in this city are dirty and
that for the amount of money spent
yearly we ought to show better re
sults." This statement was made to
day by David Wolff, a member of the
Market Street Business Mon's Associa
tion.
"The street cleaning force is a home
for old men, and, In a measure, a
charitable Institution,” said Mr. Wolff.
“I do not say that all the old men
should be gotten rid of, for some of
them ought to be taken care of, but I
do say that there is some 'dead wood'
on the force that ought not to be
there. Some of the men are not de
pendent . ; on their own efforts and
can get along without working. These
men should be discharged.”
Mr. Wolff was asked to mention some
street that he thought was especially
dirty.
"1 will take my own street,” he oiid,
“High street. Let me tell you that
High street is a disgrace to the city,
and It Is an imposition to permit it to
remain in the condition It now Is. The
street is always drty and especially
when It Is newly oiled. The oil used is
the cheapest kind and is the cause of
ruining carpets in homes.
"For the amount of moneywve Spend
annually to clean our streets they ought
to be In excellent shape. I do not want
to criticise unnecessarily, but It does
seem that conditions should be better
than they are now. I am not speaking
of Market street, because I know that
the pavement Is uneven and for that
reason It Is hard to keep It clean. I
am speaking now of smooth pavements,
where It is possible to have a street as
clean as it ought to be." *>
Mr. Wolff, like most of tile other men
asked to give their opinion of the con
dition of the streets, smiled at first
and said that it is unnecessary to give
an opinion, because any one can see
that the highways were dirty without
having to ask the question.
The consensus o'f opinion seems to be
that younger men could do better work,
and that some of them should be en
gaged Immediately, even though It Is
necessary to pay more for their serv
ices.
Of the citizens seen by a reporter on
this question not one thought that a
larger appropriation should be allowed
the Board of Works for street cleaning
purposes.
The pay roll of the street cleaning
department of the Board of Wonks for
the year 1»10 was $226,870.10. Dr. Charles
F. Kraemer, of the Board of Works,
admits that despite the expenditure of
all this money the streets are dirty. A
prominent city official, a member of
the Common Council, who asked that
hts name be not mentioned, when re
quested to tell how It would be pos
sible to keep the city’s streets clean
without spending more money, said:
"Cut down your pay roll. There are
enough men In the Board of Works
to take care of a city twice the size
of Newark. There are too many desk
Jobs and too many soft snaps.
"Look over the offices in the City
Hall occupied by the various depart
ments of the Board of Wrorks and you
will find that there are two men for
each Job. Instead of having parasites
in the department there ought to be a
wholesale discharge and then the
street denning force, the men that
actually do the work, ought to he In
creased and our streets kept cleaner.
The real workmen would then be paid
more for their work than they now
are.
"I favor paying street cleaners more
money," continued the alderman. "They
(Continued on Page a, Column Hi
MacFarland Children, Made Motherless by Deadly
Poison, Whose Father Is Now Charged with Crime
" IH’TIL AOBD *V4 YEARS. A
»♦ ♦-»-♦ ♦♦♦♦♦<♦>»«»«»»» A I
RAIN DASHES HOPES
OF SADDENED FANS

! “Dry Those Tears,” Becomes j
Chorus Mnnires Take
Their Swim at Park.
BY JOK M'GINNITV.
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 21.—"Rain,
rain, go away; come again some other
day." That's the cry by the baseball
bugs throughout the land these days,
but the weather man is bound to be a
factor ir. the 1911 world's series, and
daily ne i„ getting into print in every
city, town and burg on the map where
the population is interested in the out
come ot the big series.
The fans have gathered about in a
family circle and are singing, “Oh, Dry
Those Tears.” But the song is getting j
stale, and so are the singers and play
ers.
It s teeming rain here and the Giants
departed for home this morning, but
will return Monday to try It again.
The series has suffered a big setback,
for the heavens started to weep on
Tuesday, but fortunately i.ot enough
to block the third game. It has been
moist ever since, and four days' rest .
is new to both sides, and it seldom hep- |
pens during a playing senson that rain
prevents a team from playing four days j
In succession.
Many of the fans who came here Irom J
tlie West and other distant points
packed their duds today and sold their
tickets to speculators No one really
knew who was who as far as *he
pitchers was concerned, but the same
tatteries that worked a week ago. jtu
thewson and Meyers, and Bender and
Thomas, were likely ones according to
dope.
Everyone is blue here, and the play
ers of both teams are praying for Old j
Sol to get busy soon. It should teach j
the moguls n lesson, slid the sooner j
the season is shortened the better for j
player and fans, but not for the mag- j
nates. All Agure that to cut even a. |
week off the regular schedule would
mean a toss of thousands to the Arst i
division clubs, especially if the race
were close. It’s hard lines to call on |
the great diamond gladiators to per
form when Jack Front Is craving to |
show himself. At any rate the teams
will not play today
Connie Mack refuses positively to al
low the burning of oil on the grounds.
Some of the National Commission j
wanted the ground dried out that way
but Mack stated that It would do at
least *4,000 worth of damage to the
grass.
FIRE AND WIND FOLLOW
AVIATOR ELY’S DEATH.
CHARLOTTE, N. C„ Oct. 21.—Fate
struck the Mecklenburg county fair
again last night, when it wiped out
every exhibit building on the grounds
and left the big area in the suburbs a
blackened waste, just three days before
the date set for the opening. The Arst
blo\/ to the enterprise came with the
announcement of the tragic death of
Aviator Ely at Macon, after the fair di
rectors had been advertising him ex
tensively as a drawing card. Lastnigfit
Are of unknown origin, discovered in
the grand stand, destroyed everything
innaramable on the grounds.
! t ROBERT, AfiEn « YEARS. ♦
♦ ♦
♦ ♦♦■♦ ♦ 4 ** **** ***** ♦ ♦ ♦-»»♦-»
5,000 CASES OF GASOLINE,
BEACHED INDICATE WRECK
POINT PLEASANT, Oct. 21.—Nearly
| 6,000 five-gallon cases of gasoline that
Moated ashore during the night Indicat
ed that a Standard Oil transport had
been wrecked somewhere off this coast.
I Each case bore the Standard Oil label.
The first case floated In about 10
o'clock last night, and practically the
whole population for miles along the
coast In this neighborhood spent the
night on the beach gathering them in
The life-savers up and down the coast
were on the alert and double patrols
were nut watching for other signs of a
wreck, but without success. It was
thick off shore today and there was a
heavy sea.
MINE EXPLOSION KILLS
AND INJURES OVER 100
PALERMO. Sicily, Oct. 21.—An ex
plosion has occurred in a mine at Tra
bonella. Over too persons were killefl
or Injured.
Best Service to California.
Standard or tourist. Latter peisonally con
ducted five times weekly without change;
herth it Waehlngton-Sunset Route, «82 sad
828 Cheatnut at., Philadelphia—Adr.
t
I
Formal Complaint Made After Several New
Features of Case Are Brought to Light
Telegrams Sent to Father-in-Law.
POISON BOTTLE LABEL CHANGED,
ASSERTS DR. WILLIAM V. GALE
Police Now Seek Motive for Crime, Believing that
‘Another Woman’ May Have Been Prominent
Figure in Tragedy.
| EVIDENCE SECURED BY EVENING
STAR PRIOR TO MURDER CHARGE j;
| - ;;
+ ~|~*si XCLUSIVE statement by Dr. William V. Gale, of 259 Roseville ave- «>
X j* nue, to the Evening STAR regarding the poison mystery:
T “When I visited the MacFarland home at 10 o’clock last Jj
+ Wednesday morning upon the request of Mr. MacFarland and found his J ’
+ wife dead I examined the ‘Bromidia’ bottle containing the cyanide of ■»
X potassium solution. . ’
J “The original ‘Bromidia’ label was on the bottle. Across it, beneath | ■
+ the word ‘Bromidia,’ was a small strip of paper with the words ‘Cyanide «*
X of Potassium.’ " >.
X When County Physician McKenzie examined the same bottle at 4 ' ’
+ o’clock that afternoon he found a white piece of writing paper had been • •
X pasted over the small label and covering most of the “Bromidia” label, on •>
X which was written in ink: “POISON—Cyanide Solution." >.
j J The small label across the original “Bromidia” label seen by Dr. Gale J ]
+ had been covered by this new white label.' Jj
X MacFarland was alone fn the house with his two little children during f
X the interval. ,.
X _
3 >■
i What Was the Motive?
Ilf MacFarland killed his wife, why did he do it? J*
If he is guilty why did he sacrifice his two innocent little children,
Ruth, 2Vi years old, and Robert, 6, making them motherless? !!
Was there another woman In the case? J"
Where and how did he spend his money? - J*
He denied his wife the comforts of ordinary dress. He was behind i.
in his rent. Yet he drew a good salary. Where did the money go? \ [
f ^ 111 j n n 111 n 11 i|"Hn|nf.‘ ’
ALLISON I '■ RLAND was today charged with the murder of his wife,
Evelyn Macrarland, who was found dead from cyanide of potassium
poisoning at 34<J*4*ark avenue Wednesday morning.
Positive evidence pointing toward MacFarland’s guilt was discovered ex
clusively today by the Evening STAR through Dr. William V. Gale’s descrip
tion of the fatal poison bottle.
Between the time the body of Mrs. MacFarland was seen by Dr. Gale
Wednesday morning and the time County Physician McKenzie performed the
autopsy Wednesday afternoon the label on the cyanide of potassium bottle was
changed. MacFarland was alone in the house with his two little children dur
ing this time.
(PASTOR’S EFFIGY
‘The Rev. Richeson’ and ‘Guilty
—Read Luke 17:2' Nailed
to Tree.
H VANN IS, Mass., Oct. 21.—An effigy
of Rev. Clarence V. T. Richeson hung
today from the limb of a tall elm tree
In the yard of the Baptist Church, of
hlch the clergyman, accused of tl®
murder of Miss Avis Linnell, of this
ton, was formerly pastor. The effigy
was discovered at dawn today. Pinned
to the figure was a large placard bear
ing the inscription.
On a hoard nailed to the foot of the
tree were painted these words: Guilty
—Read Luke 17:2.”
The Scriptural reference is:
"It were better for him that a mill
stone were hanged about hlg neck and
he cast Into the sea than that he
should offend one of these little ones."
Another card, bearing the signature
i "Vig Committee,” requested that the
effigy be allowed to hang until 10
o'clock tonight, when It would be
burned on the Hyannls baseball
grounds
The deacons of the church, after a
I conference, decided to leave the re
[ moval of the effigy to the town au
thorities
The position of the effigy was such
that It could be seen for a distance of
about 1.000 feet on either side of the
j church, and most of the town's people
journeyed to the church to make a
close inspection of It.
The effigy was finally cut down by a
man whose home Is directly opposite
the church, and who objected to such
a grewsome object hanging there.
MRS. FAIRBANKS REPORTS
$10,000 JEWEL THEFT
CHICAGO, Oct. 21.—Mrs. Warren
Fairbanks, of Chicago, social leader
and wife of the son of former Vice
President Fairbanks, reported to the
police today that a bag containing
Jewels worth $10,000 had been taken
from her on a Pullman train en route
from Boston to Chicago a week ago.
fire wrecks summer resort.
WINCHESTER, Va., Oct. 21.—Capon
Springs Hotel, one of the noted sum
mer resorts in West Virginia, near here
was destroyed by fire, together with the
cottages and bath-houses, the post
office and Hannum’s store. The loss
will exceed $100,000.
Mukmt
i ms startling intormation was
turned over to Prosecutor Mott, who
verilled It.
This is how the Evening STAR un
I parthed the evidence:
When he returned from New York
Wednesday morning and found his
wife dead, MacFarland went to Dr.
Gale at his office, 259 Roseville avenue,
land said: "My wife has fainted!”
I Dr. f»ftle went with him to his house,
j When he saw Mrs. MacFarland he ex
| claimed, "Why, your wife is drttf,
i Have you any poison in the house?*
I “Cyanide of potassium,“ was MacFar
Jand’s hurried answer.
"Show me the bottle," the doctor
said.
The pnlson liottle bud Its original
label, with tbe word “Bromldla” across
It. Pasted Just below that word on tbe
original label was a narrow strip of
taper three-eighths of an Inch w ide,upon
wbleb was written In n due hand to Ink
the words “Cyanide off Potassium.'’
From the time Dr. Gale left the Mae
Fnrland home Wednesday morning un
til 4 o’clock In tbe ufternooa, when
County Physlclnn MeKenste arrived to
make on autopsy, MacFarland and his
two small children were alone In the
house. No policeman was stationed
there.
When County Physician McKenzie
saw the poison bottle its original
Bromidia label waa almost entirely
covered by a white paper upon which
was written in ink, "POISON—Cyanide
Solution." The small label reading
“Cyanide of Potassium" had been cov
ered up.
Besides this brand-new evidence the
prosecutor’s office has other facts, that
arouse grave doubts as to the truth of
MncFarland’s professions of innocence.
He says he obtained the cyanide of
potassium at his factory, the Crocker
Wheeler works, at Ampere, where he
was advertising manager. This is de
nied by the only man who handles the
poisonous solution at the Crocker
Wheeler plant.
MacFarland told the detectives that
he obtained the poison to clean Jew
elry. It is not used for such purposes.
When MacFarland was takon before
Sergeant Cosgrove, of the Fifth pre
cinct, from the detention room, where
he had been imprisoned, and officially
slated, he said he was 34 years old.
born in the United States and an ad
vertising manager.
"What is the charge?” he asked
iirmly.
"Murder!" the sergeant answered.
Captain Michael Long ordered that
MacFarland should be taken to the Sec
ond precinct at 2:30 o’clock this after
noon to be formally arraigned for mur
der.
Acting Judge Frederick S. Oehring
was informed of this arrangement and
prepared the complaint, which will be
officially made by Captain Long. The
prisoner will be committed to Jail with
out bail.
Before leaving the Fifth precinct
MacFarland asked the police to send to
his home for clean linen and his shav
ing outfit. While he shaved with ap
parent calmness, a detective stood by
fConttnned on PMte 3, Column 3.)

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