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Newark evening star and Newark advertiser. [volume] (Newark, N.J.) 1909-1916, July 19, 1913, HOME EDITION, Image 7

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The Little Heiress
By Couverneur Morris
Illustrated by (he faniou.i Ameri
can artist. K. M. Crosby.
i , - _
(Copyrighted by Charles Scribner’*
Sons.)
The Little Iteiress had a hunted
look. And It was not the hunted look
of the girl who is hunted for herself
alone. Nor the hunted look that the
hunted wears In full flight when the
chance of capture Is balanced by the
chance of escape. Under fair condi
tions (had she been worth but one
million, or even two), she might, like
the nimble jack rabbit of her native
plains, have furnished rare sport.
From tw*. hounds, or even half a
dozen, she might then have run like
a ghost, foreseeing the strategy of
their pursuit and vanishing finally,
with a burst of speed and a joyous
laugh. But she was weighted In the
race by many more millions than
two. On the day of her birth the
first million had come to her In the
form of a cheque, the signature In
her grandfather's trembling and hon
ored hand. On the envelope inclosing
It he had written: “A Ne3t Egg, for
Baby."
But after that the millions came
to her. In sad ways and in sad words.
First the heart that most loved her
ceased to beat, and the busy fingers
that had vied with Paris and Flan
ders In sewing for the baby were
still. And they gave the baby more
millions, but for a long time could
not dry her eyes. When she was 10
the old grandfather died, and, though
they gave her banks, and ranches,
and oil wells, and mines, she cried
for him. And after that she became
the one flower in the heart of a stern
gray man who owned many gardens.
Him she loved with all her strength,
and called my father with Immeasur
able pride.
Though there were never any lit
tle girls for her to play with, she
wae not very different from the gen
eral run of them. When she ran.
furiously she got red In the face,
when she fell down and bumped her
nose It bled, and when her stomach
ached ihe mSwleil. i up t‘
lions had not yet begun to weigh her
down. It may be that there were not
enough. But many more were on
the, way and, as before, to pay her
for'the death of somebody she loved.
She waited up one Christmas eve till
very late for her father to come
home. He had telegraphed that he
•would come. He would come, the
•secretary told her, over his pet rail
road In his pet car with his pet en
gineer at the throttle, and he would
make such time that the country
•would gasp. But the great man came
heme »im it w
pected, and in a conveyance in which
he had never ridden before. He came
feet first into the big house, carried
by soft moving men in high silk hats,
and he rode in a plain black coffin
■with silver handles. But they would
not let the Little Heiress look at his
face, and she learned somehow—from
one of the servants, I think—that
“fire had added to the horror of the
accident.”
But to comfort her there came her
father’s la’ <► une i
present of the railroad that had
killed her father, and other railroads.
He gave her this million and that—
may be a hundred of them and more,
but she could not be comforted.
Thus all those Who really loved the
Little Heiress passed out of her life,
and she was taken to live with her
father's sister. Aunt Katharine, who
learned to love her after r while.
Aunt •, Katharine and her husband
lived when their household was sta
tionary In one of several houses. They
had two white ones, made of marble
one that stood on a corner and looked
over Central Park, in New York city,
and one that was In Newport and
looked over the ocean.
• • *
The Little Heiress had a hunted
look. All the afternoon she had been
hunted with cards and cut flowers.
And now she was being hunted by the
phalanx Of shlrtrronts.
It would surround her, then It would
open to let forth the Little Heiress
and a shlrtfront with which she lmd
agreed to dance. As a rule, she looked
very little and like a child against the
man with whom she was dancing, and
when It was time to tell him that Hhe
could not sit out the next dance with
him In the conservatory she had to
turn up her face to him to do so. And
then she looked so little, so sweet and
enticing. Just the Way a pansy looks,
that, as one man, the phalanx ground
Its teeth.
“lit I were poor,” she. thought to
herself, “there might be a man or two
waiting for me,(she had Just seen her
face, that was SO like h pansy, In a
long mirrar). blit now it has to be Just
shirtfronts."
The face that the Little Heiress
liked to look at was rather a proud
young face, that kept itself apart
. from the phalanx. When the man
who owned the face thought that it
was his duty to dance with the Little
Heiress he would cut through the
phalanx as a yacht cuts through
water and ask her. And she would
be ready for him with her gladdest
smile; Just such a smile as the beau
tiful lady Wore when the hero res
cued her from the horrible sea mon
ster. But gladdest smiles, and the
little hand on his arm. made very
little impression on Proud Face.
When, for hospitality received, or any
reason as good, it was his duty to
ask her to dance, he asked her; when
It was not his duty, he didn't. “He
won't ask fne again tonight, sighed
the Little Heiress to herself, "so don't
stop, music—don’t stop.”
But the music stopped, and Proud
Face, conducting the Little Heiress
to Auut Katharine (and the advance
guard of the approaching phalanx),
bowed and aaid it had been a pieas
ufe, and left her. Then the hunted
look came back to her, and before
she could smile upon her tormentors
she hgd to deal with a restlesB tear.
“My dear,” said Aunt Katharine,
“somebody has put his foot through
your gown. You had ’ better go to
Therese and get her to put in a
stitch."'
The Little^Heiress had seen Proud
Face leave the room, and she thought
that If she hurried she might over
take him on his way to the smoking
room, and—just overtake him and
pass him. and that would be all.
She ran up the stairs.
“Why are you out of breath?” sail
Therese.
"Because 1 ran," said Hie I ittie
Heiress VT .nek-” Therese knelt
II 'Ilium II m «r
The tittle helreaa nnd the ahlrttront w Ith whom ahe had agreed to danoe.
at the Little Heiress’s feet and began
to sew the torn flounce to Its place.
“I ran after a man!” panted the Lit
tle Heiress.
"It is finished,” said ThereBe pres
ently.
"Thank you," said fhe Litile
Heiress. “Tell me that I look like
new."
"You look like a flower,” said
Therese.
Just as she reached the foot of the
stair Proud Face came out of the
smoking-room.
“You!” said the Little Heiress.
"I," said Proud Face.
"I've been to be mended,” said the
Little Heiress. "What have you been
doing?” .
"I have been smoking," said Proud
Face, "and now I am going to thank
your aunt for a delightful evontng.”
"But it’s so very early,” said the
Little Heiress.
"Not for me,” said Proud Face.
"You see, I belong to a great banker,
and if 1 oversleep he will get some
body else to stand In my shoes.”
"Let him," said the Little Heiress,
defiantly.
"And if I did," said Proud Face,
"who would pay brother’s expenses
through college, and who would keep
the. wolf from mother’s door?”
"I should think If you need money
so badly,” said the Little Heiress,
and although she was only perpetrat
ing a joke, she blushed at certain
thoughts which it aroused in her, “1
should think that you would rather
stay up town and try to marry me.
Lots of men do."
"Men?” queried Proud Face.
"Shirtfronts,” corrected the Little
Heiress.
Proud Face laughed.
“I've no doubt It would be very
pleasant.” he said.
The Little Heiress turned a fiery,
a defiant red.”
“Try It,” she said.
"Princess,” said Proud Face, grave
ly—sometimes he Called her princess
in u mocking lone — “turn your
face to the light and let me look at
you."
She turned her face obediently to
the light and her lips quivered.
"I Bee,” he said, very gently, "1
see.” And ho stood a while in
thought.
The Little Heiress took his hand
and placed it over her heart. He
could feel the heart beating and flut
tering against it like a distracted
bird.
"What does my heart say?” site
whispered. “What does my heart
gay?”
"But If I don't love you?” said
Proud Face.
"L will make you. ' said the Little
Heiress. She reached up her little
hands to his big shoulders.
”1 love you with all my heart and
soul,” she said. Her slim body rocked
and she held fast by his shoulders.
"I’ll give you the truest heart that
ever beat for a man,” she said.
But It was In Proud Fncc's mind to
shock her love to (he death.
"And how many millions will you
give me?” he asked.
"All that 1 have," she said.
"And h*w many have you?"
“How many shot are there in a
load?” asked the Little Heiress.
“How many roses In a rose house?
How do I know?”
Visions of ease and plenty assailed
Proud Face.
“I don't love you,” he said, after a
time, "but I will be good to you.”
“You will love me,” said the Little
Heiress. "I will make you.”
She stood upon the tips of fier lit
tle pink slippers.
"Take that to your mother,” she
said, "and say I sent it.”
"Mother—mother!" It was not
Proud Face, but Shame Face, who
knocked upon his mother's door.
"Come in!"
His mother lay in’ her bed, reading.
"Mother." he said, and again,
"Mother!”
"What has happened, my dear?”
"I am going to marry the Little
Heiress, mother."
She looked him In the face for a
long time.
"Do you love her, my dear?"
Shame Face buried his face in the
bedclothes and sobbed aloud.
* * *
But there was nothing shame-faced
about the Little Heiress. And she
returned to the ballroom almost blaz
ing with beauty. And as the shirt
fronts of the phalanx closed about
her, her eyes shone with a wonderful
proud light and she cried in her clear
voice of a little child:
"I am all mended, now—gentle
men!”
* • ♦
The Little Heiress had a hunted
look. Never since congratulations
were invented were any so cold as
those which she received. The very
night of the ball, after she found
that aleep would not close her ejres,
she sot up and ran down the hall in
her night gown and knocked ut Aunt
Katharine’s door. Aunt Katharine
was sound asleep, but she waked up
and made room at her side for the
shivering Little Heiress. When the
Llttie Heiress had stopped shivering
she hid her face In the pillows and
told Aunt Katharine thnt she was go
ing to be married.
"To whom?” asked Aunt Katha
rine, with fear and suspicion in her
voice, for she had been terribly afraid
all along that some undeserving, for
tune-hunting shirtfront would cap
ture the Little Heiress. The Little
Heiress said to whom; and at first
Aunt Katharine gave a little sigh of
relief, for he was a great favorite
with her, but then she began to feel
suspicious even of him, and after
sliding her arm about the. Little
Heiress and giving her a hug she
said:
"Are you sure he loves you?"
The Little Heiress hud been pre
paring herself for that question: but
her preparation went for nothing,
because when it came to the point
sho could not lie.
"I love him," she paid, "with all
my heart and soul, and I got him
alone in the hall and told him so,
and asked him to marry me. I told
him that 1 would make him love
me. if he would marry mo, and
finally he said he would."
"Does he love you?"
"No; but he’s going to; I'm going
to make him. Didn’t any man ever
tell you that if you would only
marry him he would make you love
him?”
Aunt Katharine was made very
miserable by what she had heard,
but she laughed.
•'Dozens of men have said that to
me,” said the Little Heiress, "doz
ens.
"But, dearie," said Aunt Katharine,
"your uncle and I won't hear of your
engaging yourself to a man who
doesn’t love you.”
"Why?” said the Little Heiress,
"He's poor and loveless and 1 give
him love nnd millions. If 1 were a
man and he were a girl everybody
would say 'how beautiful.!' ”
"Not if the girl didn’t love the
man," said Aunt Katharine. "The
man would be buying her."
"I. want him,” said the Little
Heiress. "Why shouldn’t I buy him?”
"Because you wouldn't want a man
that could be bought.”
"But r do,” said the Little Heiress.
"And, besides, he's going to love me."
"Until that happens," said Aunt
Katharine, “there mustn't he any talk
of engagements. 1 won't hear of It.”
"Nonsense!" said the Little Heiress.
Neither of them spoke for some lime.
The Little Heiress began to get very
sleepy.
“Aunt Katharine-" The Little
Heiress' voice was very sleepy.
“What?”
"I shall always be very good to
him."
Aunt Katharine set her mouth
firmly and did not deign to answer.
"I shall tlnd out when his birthday
is and give him' a railroad."
Another long silence.
“Aunt Katharine-"
"What?”
"Nothing.
When she had had her breakfast,
for she was up by 11 o'clock that
morning, the Little Heiress went to
see his mother.
"Please say." she burst out with,
"that you don’t mind my marrying
your son. 1 love him so, and I will
bo a good daughter to you and a good
wife to him always. Did he give you
the kiss I sent you? And may I give
you another, please? I want to kiss
everybody and everything that be
longs to him.” *
His mother's eyes were full of tears.
"Dear child,” she said, and she fold
ed the Little Heiress to her heart,
“you mustn’t think of marrying him."
“Just what my aunt says," said the
Little Heiress. "But why—but why?"
"He doesn’t love you," said his
mother.
“But he wlfl," said the Little Heir
ess. "I will make him."
"Ho is going to you this afternoon
to say that he cannot marry you."
Just as she had spoken the door
opened and in HE came.
"Oh," he said.
“Oh," said the Little Heiress. And
his mother left them. He was no
longer Shame Face, but Proud Face
again.
“Don’t tell me,” he said, "that you
meant what you said last night.”
"Mean It!” cried the Little Heiress.
"Why I am here but to tell your
mother that I love you and ask her
permission to marry you and say that
I will be a good daughter to her?”
He came forward smiling, but a lit
tle distressed.
“Walt," said the Little Heiress. "Is
it to be all for my pleasure and none
for yours? Do you want to kiss me?”
"I think," said Proud Face, "that
I can go so far as to say that 1 do.”
He came still further forward.
“Wait." she said. “Last night—did
you want to kiss me?"
Ho thought carefully.
"Not exactly, I think,” he said.
"Hut NOW you want to," cried the
Little Heiress, triumphantly. "That's
something — that’s something. Oh!
my dear love.’’
In spite of himself, the kiss thrilled
Proud Face to the heart.
"And what,” said the Little Hvireas,
"is all this talk of me giving you up?
1 won't.”
’Tt’s like robbing a cradle,'* said
Proud Face.
But the Little Heiress turned up her
fuce, which was so like a pansy, to
him, and there was an Immense seri
ousness in her eyes.
"My God!” began Proud Face, with
a kind of sob In hts voice, but he
could not go on, and ho said, "My
God!" again.
"How are you going to help loving
me," cried the Little. Heiress, “when
I love you so. Tell me. Are you
TRYING to help it?”
Proud Fuce thought for a moment,
and then he smiled.
"Perhaps I AM trying," he said.
"But you mustn't try NOT,” said
the Little Heiress. “You must try
TO. Think how happy you will he
when you do.”
“I am not worthy," said Proud
Face, “to kiss the dust on your lit
tle shoes. May I?”
“If you do,”- said, the Little Holress,
“I will kiss the dust on yours.”
"If I come to see you.” wrote
Proud Face to the Little Heiress,
"you will hypnotize me and I
won't be able to say what I mean.
Do you think it is easy to write?
And to confess that I am a fool?
Sure anybody but a fool would
love you. and most of the fools,
too, as I think. But this fool
doesn’t. Hate me—hate me! Hate
me!”
And the Little Heiress wrote hack:
“I draw the line at any further
humiliation. I give you up. Think
of me kindly if you can. We shall
not see ea*'h other any more, ex
cept by accident. I can’t think of
any more to say. Good-hye."
* • *
Though this answer was what
Proud Face told himHelf he had hoped
for, it came to him as something of
a shock. There were not, after all,
bo many flowers in the garden of his
life that he oarnd to have the Little
Heiress lifted from it, roots and all,
and set in some other garden be
yond the wall, where he could not
even see her any more. All that day,
and for many days, he would have In
the midst of his work a sudden sink
ing feeling, and would realize after
a moment or two that he was think
ing of the Little Heiress and how
that she was gone out of his life for
ever. He was not the least little bit
angry with her for having first an
nounced the engagement, and then
the disengagement. He met the looks
of his friends with un unabashed
look, and nobody dared ask him ques
tions. But tn his heart he was
ashamed, humiliated and troubled:
and he did not do his work properly,
and he felt his ambitions slipping
away from him. He felt obliged, too,
not to go any more into society for
faar that he would meet the Little
Heiress.
Meanwhile the shirtfronts gathered
once more about the Little. Heiress
and beset her goings and her com
ings with attentions.
“I will make you love me," one
would say.
“If you only can," she would an
swer earnestly.
"If you’ll only give me the chance.”
“Now Is the chance."
But the suddenness of the oppor
tunity always found the shirtfront
unprepared and left him stuttering
before the sweet gravity and readt
ness-to-be-made-to-love of the Little
Heiress.
* » •
Very late one night, as Proud Face
wait walking home from an ushers’
dinner, full of discontent, he passed
by Aunt Katharine’s house, and, look
ing up the shimmering marble face
of it, saw that in the windows of one
of the corner rooms there were still
lights.
’’The Little Heiress is still up," he
thought, and he stood In the shade
of a lamp-post and watched the
lights. It seemed to him that not fbr
a long time had he been In any em
ployment that was so pleasant. He
hoped that the lights would not soon
be put out.
"But they must go soon," thought
Proud Face, "goon.”
And with that, Just as If they had
been waiting for a signal, out went
the lights.
The next morning he accepted the
California branch of his firm and be
gan his preparations for the long
journey.
• * *
Whether or not a little bird told
the Little Heiress that Proud Fact
was going to shake the dust of New
York from his feet is unknown. It
doesn't matter. She wrote him a
note.
"Don't go without saying good-by.
If you could come Saturday at J.
You start Saturday at 5. don't you?”
When Proud Face came (Saturday
at exactly 3) he found the Little
Heiress expecting him.
"So it's good-by,” said Proud Face,
“and good luck."
“Yes,” said Little Heiress. "But
why did you stand so long and look
up at my window—the other night?’
"Oh," said Proud Fgce, and le
blushed.
“I watched you watch," said the
Little Heiress, “until I thought it
couldn't be good for you to stand so
long in the night, and then I put out
the lights and you went away."
"Yes," said Proud Face, "and then
I went away.’
"And now you go a Journey?” said
the Little Heiress.
"Shall we say good-by?’ said the
Little Heiress.
"Yes," «ald Proud Face. His voice
was very soft and tired. "Good-by.”
"Do you feel a little wretched, too?"
said the Little Heiress.
“Oh, yes," said Proud Face simply.
"And," he faltered, "will you write
to me when—you And happiness?
There’s an old absurd word ’rejoice,’ ”
he went on. "I would rejoice to hoar
that you were happy.”
"Between us,” said the Little Heir
ess. "there must always be good
wishes."
She held up her face that was so
like a pansy, h sad pansy, to Proud
Face, and they kissed. The Little
Heiress trembled a little. She knew
that she had shot her last bolt.
Presently, very shyly, she looked at
Proud Face, and she found that he
was beaming on her like the sun. His
face was like a boy’s.
"Oh!" said the Little Heiress, "Oh!"
And then, very timidly, she said:
“Shall you go now?"
"Now!" said Proud Face, in a voice
that rang like a bell. "I shall not
go."
"When?" said the Little Heiress.
"Never," said Proud Face.
"Oh,” said the Little Heiress, "they
will say that I have bought you."
"Not with millions," suid Proud
Face: "with loveliness.”
Aunt Katharine was surprised to
And them on opposite sides of a big
table. The Little Heiress still had a
hunted look, but it was an entirely
new kind.
(The End.)
LIBERAL CLUB DENIES
IT IS FREELOVER AFFAIR
NEW YORK. July 19.—Members of
the Liberal Club, which was called
"an organization of free lovers” \by
the wife of Professor Albert Arthur
Livingston, of Columbia University,
in her suit for sephration. Indignantly
deny the charge.
Everett Hamilton, treasurer, and
his wife, who Is secretary, gave out
an official statement, part of which
follows:
"The Liberal Club was founded in
1908 by; Alexander Irvine and Edmond
Kelly to provide an open forum for
the free discussion of social questions.
There are now 150 members. The
Rev. Dr. Percy Stlckney Grant, pas
tor of the Church of the Ascension,
is president, and his mother, Mrs.
Stephen Grunt, was active in the
club's work. Miss Margaret Wilson,
daughter of President Woodrow Wil
son, is one of the active members, as
is Miss Caroline Morgan, niece of
the late J. Pierpont Morgan.”
MRS. CURTIS IS ROBBED
UNDER WRECK OF AUTO
GREENWICH. Conn., July 19.—The
fact that Mrs. George H. Curtis, of
New York city, was robbed of her
jewelry and a large sum of money
yesterday following the automobile
collision in the Boston Post road, in
which she was Injured badly, has just
become known. '
While Mrs. Curtis was lying under
the wrecked tonneau, thieves appro
priated her diamond earrings, a dia
mond ring, a string of pearls, a dia
mond brooch, several other pieces of
Jewelry and her purse. All of the ar
ticles, as well as the cash, were re
covered. but upon the urgent request
of Mr. Curtis no arrests were made.
DEAD PERSONS’ BLOOD IS
SAID TO CURE INFLUENZA
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., July 19.—
Claims to the discovery of a re
markable vaccine for the cure and
prevention of the troublesome,
"cold" known as influenza, are be
ing made by physician* of a medi
cal laboratory near Philadelphia, un
der the direction of Dr. Arthur
Parker Mitchins.
The vaccine is composed of the
dead organisms found In the blood of
a person afflicted with Influenza. Two
years ago Dr. R. J. Alien, a London
physician, conceived the theory that
tf “cold" germs were inoculated into
the blood of a person offllcted with in
fluenza a cuye wus bound to result.
He also maintained his theory would
hold good as applied to the preven
tion of the ailment, as well.
TO MAKE MILITIA LIABLE
TO SERVE OUT OF COUNTRY
WASHINGTON, July 19.—Complete
agreement has been reached between
the war department and the executive
committee of the National Guard As
soclation on the general outline of a
bill designed to make the organized
militia available for immediate serv
ice In any part of the world us a part
of the regular army.
The measure will be introduced in
Congress with the indorsement of the
war department and the State militia
authorities.
HAS PEEK-A-BOO DRESS
AND STOCKINGS; NO MORE
AUGUSTA. Ga.. July 19.—Miss Edith
Anderson, arrested for appearing on
Broad street clad In a llngerlo gown
with Inlaid medallions of lace and
wearing green stockings which
showed boldly through the medal
lions, was arraigned before the re
corder.
The recorder. In a lenient spirit, ad
monished the young woman that
hereafter she must clothe herself In
clothes of a little less revealing na
ture, and sent her away to buy a
petticoat.
LIB iARY CONTEST
THREE MORE PREMIUM RED LETTER DAYS
Search the Directory Below For Your Neighborhood
Merchant and Trade With Him
NEXT
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
■ .*s
ONLY A FEW DAYS REMAIN AND YOU WILL HAVE TO HUSTLE
The voting this week has been
heavy, particularly the past three
days. Everybody seems to be “on the
job.” The time is now here when you
will see the big contest become er
ratic. Enormous gains will be made
by one and another.
A FATAL MISTAKE.
Some workers in the contest are
disposed to single out some precinct
where votes in large numbers can be
cast, and more or less depend upon
their energies concentrated at this
point to win for them. This is a fatal
mistake and one that has brought
many to defeat in the past. It isn’t
an occasional gust of water that wears
the stone, but the steady and persist
ent drop, drop, drop that does so,
and the writer issues this note of
warning to anyone possessed of the
idea tjjat the route to success is not
the general effort. Every ballot box
should receive equal consideration
and uniform effort if you want to get
the best result.
We desire voters to understand that
if you happen to know of some
large vote which has been cast and
you find the following Saturday’s re
turns do not include same, it is be
cause all large votes coming from
any source at this time are audited
before they are included. This is a
precaution we must exercise in the
interest of all, and should in itself
convince you that we don’t propose
to accept anything for its face value.
We want to bring before your own
committee of inspection at the close
a clear, accurate set of figures that
will save you endless and avoidable
labor. We can commend in the high
est terms the reports of all mer
chants, and it is this careful policy
that enables us to intelligently do so.
THREE MORE PREMIUM RED
LETTER DAYS WITH WHICH
TO BUILD UP THAT
ENORMOUS TOTAL.
The next series of PREMIUM RED
LETTER DAYS will witness a.climax
along this line. A tremendous vote
was cast the past three days, which
will contribute greatly to the position
of certain of the contending forces
when the final count is made. The
campaign for this lucrative vote will
be on in full fledge next Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, and in con
junction with the voting which is go
ing on in the stores every day will
send the figures bounding to unex
pected heights. Understand this
PREMIUM RED LETTER DAY vot
ing is not entered in our regular tab
ulation, but is held intact to be pre
sented to the committee of inspection.
It is high time for all interested to
look about them and see if there is a
weak spot in their structure, and when
they find it, to get busy and correct
it. Some of you have need to take
this hint; in fact, the writer can point
to some of this in every working fac
tion. Where one crowd is strong an
other is weak, and where the latter
shows the fullness of effort another is
remjss. For example, Hahne & Co.,
in their votes reveal unusual activity
on the part of certain forces for the
very important support of the fair sex,
while there are some who are simply
availing themselves of what would
otherwise be a normal effort in this
direction. You may rest assured that
there is little likelihood of your favor
ite winning if your women folks are
not supporting you with the Depart
ment or Dry Goods store vote—and
there are five of them in the directory
below. The fellows who plunged into
the stores in general with their ex
penditures with every possible invest
ment in merchandise are the fellows
to whom the Contest Man will present
a library.
Just consider what a purchase at
Lissner's Millinery Store on PREMI
UM RED LETTER DAY means! Just
think how faithless you are to the
contestant in whose ranks you have
allied yourself when you waive aside
such a valuable opportunity. If you
could see the reports coming in from
this firm with totals running into the
thousands, you would appreciate the
worth of your opportunity there.
There are bargains all along the route,
and how prudent of you to select Pre
mium Red Letter Day and stampede
the contest merchants, as it were,
with the generous voting you can do.
Last week’s report found the Co
lumbus Club casting seductive glances
at first place in the race for good
books. The gain they made this week,
if followed up, will force the other
fellows to increase their pace a bit.
In view of the splendid uses the mem
bers could make of the fine collection
of books now contended for, we have
been expecting them to get more thor
oughly at it, and this week’s report
has confirmed these expectations. It’s
a pretty fight all along the route, and
will be more so now the days are
growing fewer.
The figures published today throw
little, if any, light upon the situation,
as voters must keep before them the
fact that we will have in our posses
sion the returns of many Premium
Red Letter Days by July .10, which
will not be entered, but will be pre
sented when the Contest Man as
sembles the committee of inspection
at the close of the contest. The Trin
ity Lutheran Church and many others
have been alive to the opportunities
offered through this special feature. A
majority of the five hundred thousand
votes will be easily offset when these
special votes are entered, consequent
ly our earnest advice to all is, be alert
for every opportunity; plan to cur
chase everything needed from the con
test merchants during these PREMI
UM RED LETTER DAYS.
St. Ann’s Church is at the game of
jump again, and many merchants are
behind in reporting; however, we hope
to have a full and complete report
from all to publish next Saturday.
The hustlers among St. Rose of
Lima Church are, indeed, faithful;
their hearts are set upon winning that
fine collection of books, and should
they fail to prove the victors it will
be because it was a physical impos.
sibility to win.
The Thirteenth Avenue School has
clung to second place for some weeks
now, ever ready to jump aboard and
take the reins, but the Y. W. C. A. re
fuses to be dislodged and rests se
renely for another week at the point
of honor. Apparently the latter has
determined to wear out the big black
type used many times in the head
lines to herald a leader. Still it
is conscious that it has foes in
the field who will fight every inch of
the way and put up an awful struggle
at the windup.
Remember that this is next to the
last week of the contest and you can
not afford to be indifferent to one
chance to vote, especially when we
view the relative positions of the
contestants. It’s anybody’s library
that infuses some extra “ginger" into
their spurt, and the spurting time is
here, for you have PREMIUM RED
LETTER DAYS BEFORE YOU. Buy
on these days for present and future
use and help secure the Library for
the contestant you favor.
A. O. JOHNSON.
32 Union Sq., N..Y.
CLASH ONE.
V W C. A. l,4tT.Hf!5
J3th Avenue School. 19)8,909
Central Avenue High School. 803*303
Y. M. C. A.:. 648,*04
Sussex Avenue School. 627.5‘.'1
Cleveland School. 840,377
St. Mlchael'a Hospital. 386,623
City Hospital . 310.182
Bergen Street School... 308!oi4
CLASS TWO.
B. F. O. Elks. 1,458.524
Knights of Columbus. 1,413,314
National Turn Vereln. 876.704
Clcneral Putnam Council, Jr. O. U.
, A- M... 890,892
Loyal Order of Moose. 468,360
Fraternal Order of Eagles. 337 489
A. D. S. Club. 233.507
F. & A. Masons.[ 191,880
Harmony Lodge, I. O. O. F. 1 (tv, 146
Hanoca A. C. l*3,4hrt
CLASS THREE.
St. Ann’s Church. 838.7*2
8t. Hose of Lima Church. 793*225
St. Joseph's Church and School. 978.215
fit. Peter’s Church and School. 926 113
St. Mary’s Church and School. 557.511
Trinity Lutheran Church. 319,
First Reformed Church. 419,127
Ht. Benedict’s Church and School.. 247! 940
»t. Antoninus's Church. 192,850
Following Are the Merchants Who Issue Votes in the Great Library Contest:
dry GOODS, LADIES’ ANI) MEN'S
FURNISHINGS AND GENERAL DE
PARTMENT' STORE SUPPLIES.
JkHND<o,
New Jersey's Grealcat Department
Store,
HEHTZBEKO'S, 369-671-673 Orange
H.hM. KLEIN, 468-470 Clinton Ave.
JOHN B. SEILER (.1 GEORGE
FAATZ, Successor), 432-4-4 Lufay
L.°ROTH8TElN, 392-334-394 'A Hprlng
SoilMSEE 226-228 Springfield Ave..
corner Beacon St.
LOTUS V. TONERO, 367 389 Warren
St.
FINE CLOTHING FOR .MEN OH
WOMEN.
MARSHALL & BALL, Men's and
Ladles’ Ready-to-Wear Garments,
Shoes, Hats and Men's Furnishings.
KO 1CLI.HOFFEK BROS. & CO., 190
Market St., Clothers and Merchant
Tailors.
LIHSNEK'S.
Fine Millinery and Ladles' Wearing
Apparel.
FURNITURE, CARPETS, HUGS, ETC.
EDWIN A. KIRCH A CO., 77-79
J.""jUIHKNHY MULLER, Inc,, 113-117
Springfield Ave.
JEWELRY, WATCHES, DIAMONDS,
SILVERWARE AND ALL KINDS
OF REPAIRS.
HARTDEGEN A CQ., Broad, at West
P&l’K
GEORGE J. BUSCH, Springfield Ave.,
corner HitfJn bt>
CONRAD J. BROTHERLY, J72 Spring
field Ave.
J. J. HOCKENJOS CO.,
Hlil) Broad SI.
The Paint House ut (duality.
MEN'S FURNISHERS AND OUT.
" FITTERS.
WII.l.IAM MOHUAN A SONS. 839
\Vl“.\'i'1 SMITH, Broad and Bridge St*.
Where you will find everything tor
the woraingman
•'CALl.-M E-GRILL. That H My Nunic.
BE1TMAN A RICH, 236 Market 8t.
JULIUS SPINGARN, 119 Springfield
Ave.
FINE HAPS FOR MEN.
WILLIAM MORGAN A SONS, 61*
THE°aCAKLSON HAT STORE. 192
vlarkot dt.
the UNION HAT STORE, 223 Spilng
p 'uRlLUKER. 403 Springfield Ave.
BEITMAN A RICH. 236 Market St.
fine shoes for you and the
WHOLE FAMILY.
Every Style, Itilallty and Prlrc.
WILLIAM STORCH, 421 Springfield
Ave.
SOMMER'S BOOT SHOP, 483 Broad 8t
226-226 Springfield Ave.
HEKTZBEKG'S, 669 Orange St.
THE MORONG SHOE CO., Firemens
Building, corner Broad and Market
Sta., and 671 Broad St., Wlos Bldg.
CHARLES F. McLEAK, 477 Clinton
Ave.
JACOB DOLL dt SONS., Inc.
007 Broad St.
Pianos. Plano Players and Musical
Merchandise.
OUR DRUGGISTS ARE LOCATED
CONVENIENTLY TO ALL.
Study the lilat Carefully.
CRESCENT DRUG CO., 707 Broad St.
STUTZLEN'S DRUG STORE. 2*1
Springfield Ave., corner Sayre St.
RED CROSS PHARMACY. 263 Orange,
corner Nesbitt St.
PARKWAY PHARMACY, Dr. Roland
B. Grom., alt. Prospect Ave.. corner
Holler parkway: Consulting and
Analytical Chemist.
BTAEHLE’S PHARMACY. South Or
ange Ave. and Bergen St.
aCHREIBER'S DRUG STORE. K9
Broad, opposite Continental Hote*.
HAIN DRUG CO., corner Clinton PI.
and ltunyon St.
FRIED'S PHARMACY, "The Prescrip
tion Store,” M*. Prospect and Bloom
Held Aves.
SAM KAIIN, Druggist, Belmont Ave.
und Rose St.
G. F. TEMPED, Druggist, 212 Clinton
SIMON’S DRUG STORE, 210 Bonk St.
GOLD'S PHARMACY, Clinton and
Peshino Avis.
C. A. VON GEHRHN, Pharmacist, 200
Ferry St., corner Polk.
MEIGS A. DAUTEHBACH. corner Or
angu and Gray Sts.
SIMON-REIUEL CIGAR CO.,
785 11 road St.
Clgurs, Cigarettes and Smokers'
Sundries.
HARDWARE, HOUHEFUKNISIiiNGS,
MECHANICS' SUPPLIES.
MACK NET te DOllEMUH CO., 796-798
Broad St.
ARTHUR NUNGESSER. 601 CUnion
Ave. near Bergen St.
C. SCHNEIDER, JR., 432 Orange, near
Third 84.
JAMES K MEARS, 422 Springfield
Ave.
LOUIS KONWISEIt, 123 Hamburg PI.
Eastman Kodaks, Supplies, Develop
ing and Printing.
FINE MERCHANT TAILORING.
DEERIN Ac CO., 417 Broad St., corner
Branford 1*1.
HENRY SCHWINN, 242-244 Market
St. Est. 1876.
THE GROCERS, MARKETS AND
DELICATESSEN FOLLOW.
AARON WARD & SON, 961-963 Broad
St.
AARON WARD & SON. 679-881 Broad
St.
AARON WARD & SON, 487 189 Or
ange St.
ROLL'S GENERAL MARKET, 673-675
Orange St.
GEORGE A. ROLL, Meats and Vege
table!!, 438 Clinton Ave.
D. DI DUEL, Imported and Domestic
Delicatessen. 474 Clinton Ave.
M. DESCH, Staple and Fancy Gro
ceries, 424 Hprlnglleld Ave.
A. M. WOELPER, Fine Groceries, cor.
Orange and Third Sts.
JOHN HEAKN.
208 North Fourth St.
Fancy and Staple Groceries.
FINE WINES AND I.HIUOH9.
FLEGEN'llEIMEK RIIOS.,
IOO Market St.
URANT A IIORUUN,
Good Printer*, 245 Market St.
Organizations having printing done
can secure a vote with every penny
hero.
UNEXCELLED TEA COMPANY,
425-A Orange St.
H, C. STHOUELL A CO., FLORISTS,
783 Broad St., near Murket.
DR. It. CHESLEH, D. O. S.
. 102 .Market St.
Eyesight Specialist.
DR. WHITE, INC.
104 Market St.
Scientific Dentist.
CONFECTIONERY, SODA WATER
AND ICE CREAM.
GEORGE E. W1NANS. 548 Orange St.
SUGAR BOWL, H. E. Sperry. Prop.,
8b Hamburg PI.
SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS ABOUT
I.AHELS OR THE REDEMPTION
FEATURES.
When you present Labels and Car
tons you should always have same
In neat packages. Write on the out
side the name of contestant you are
working for and the exact number of
votes. Redeemable on the second floor
of Huhne & Co. The following are the ,
labels redeemable:
ROSEVILLE VARIETY STORE,
E. liny Hrundagr, Proprietor,
Cor. Orange SI. and Roseville Ava.
LORO SALISBURY TURKISH CIGAR
ETTES.
We have arranged to redeem the
empty box at TEN VOTES each. This
is a tremendous opportunity for tha
men to vote and thousands will bs
doing It." Present the boxes to Hahn*
A Co.
BKL-UON TOILET PREPARATIONS
AND PERFUMES.
The empty boxes around Perfumes,
the labels on Talc Powder, ths empty
boxes or cartons around Tooth Pow
der and Paste, the empty boxes or
cartons around Face Creams or any
preparation of the Bel-Bon Company
are redeemable at the ratio of ONE
VOTE with each cent of the list pries
of the article when presented at
Hahne & Co.'s voting booth.
EL PASHA CIGARS,
Aaron Ward A Sons, Sole Distributors,
The bands on all El Pasha Cigars
redeemable for TEN VOTES each.
Place the bands in envelope, with
number of votes on otuslde, and pre
sent to voting booth at Hahne A Co.
WISCONSIN CREAMERY, Inc.
Independent of the Rutter Trust.
The Contest Management Invites
you to patronize this pure, wholesoma
product, for the empty box or carton
is good for FIFTY VOTES at Hahn#
& Co.
L. R. HUNT A CO..
Newark's Famous Home-made Bread.
Every label cut from thta bread,
good for TEN VOTES. Phone 1142-R
Wavcrly, or send postal to 179 Clin
ton place, and prompt delivery will
follow. Present label to Hahne A Co
THE HOME BREWING COMPANY.
The labels on this most excellent
Beer good for TEN VOTES each at
Hahne & Co.
CAMPBELL TOBACCO CO.
Well-known Smoking and Chewing
Brands,
Boka Chewing and Smoking, 19 votes
each.
Kentucky Long Cut Smoking, 6a
package, 10 votes each.
Kentucky Long Cut Smoking, 9a
package, 20 votes each.
Ktntucky Long Cut. V*-lb cans to
bacco. 60 votes each.
At Hahne & Co.’s.
OTTO BRANDT, Ine,
High Grade Mineral Waters.
Present the Labels at Hahne A
Co.'s. They will be redeemed for TEN
VOTES each.
WADSWORTH CHOCOLATE CO.
Candy Box Covers redeemed ONE
VOTE for each cent of purchase, at
Hahne A Co.'s.
LEHMAN’S SANITARY HANDKER.
CHIEFS, IN SEALED PACKAGE.
Packages redeemable at purchase
price at ONE VOTE with each cent.
At all haberdashers and dry goods
stores. Present to any contest merchant.
HIGH CLASS MOVING PICTURES
AND PHOTO PLAYS.
A special ticket, good for P1V E
VOTES, will be Issued with evening
rerformunee*. and TEN VOTES with
all matinees.
COURT THEATRE, Market and High
Sts. __
ARCADE THEATRE, Broad-Halsay
New Sts.
IDEAL THEATRE. Broad St., next to
D„ L. & W. R. R. y
PLAZA THEATRE. Sprlnglield. near
Fairmount Ave.
ROYAL THEATRE, Broad and Brldga
Sts.
BELMONT SQUARE THEATRE. Bel
mont and Sprlnglield Aves.
—Adveru»«maBh

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