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The Barre daily times. (Barre, Vt.) 1897-1959, January 02, 1912, Image 6

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1912.
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MONTPELIER.
BETHEL.
THE BARUK DAILY TIMES, BARRE. VT.. TUESDAY, JANUARY
PLASTERS
I
A UNIVERSAL REMEDY
For Pains in the Back.
Equally effective for all
sorts of aclics and pains
the result of taking cold,
overexertion or strain.
Constipation, Biliousness, Indigestion, etc.
Brandreth's Pills
Entirely Vegetable,
RANDOLPH.
Dr. and Mrs. Oilman Wlic-cler, who
came from Uoston Saturday to remain
over Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. A. E.
Bass, left for their home Tuesday.
Miss Mary Wedgwood, who ha been
liere with her mother, Mrs. W. F. Wedg
wood, for ten days, returned to Chicope,
Mass., where she has a position in the
library serving as an assistant.
Mr and Mrs. Fred Densmoie came from
Korthfield, Monday, where they had been
passing the holidays with Mr. Dens
inore's parents, and remained over night
with Mrs. Minnie Miller at the W. H.
Cladding home before going to their
liome in Waterbury, Conn.
The remains of Mrs. Kimball Morse
were brought here on Monday from Hart
ford, Conn., and interred in the South
view cemetery. Rev. Fraser Metzger cili
ated, at the burial. The body was ac
cr.mpaiiied by Mr. Morse and his daugh
ter, Mis Riith Morsfl, Mrs. E. W.-Wil-liams,
who was Mrs. Morse's sister, Mrs.
Wla Smalley, another sister, who went
down from here, and others. They were
met here by friends and one brother,
Ororge Raymond, from Ludlow, Mrs.
Cora Robbing and Miss Carrie Lillie
vent down as farr as South Royalton to
meet the party.
CLAIMS BACON DESIGNED
THE FIRST AIRSHIP
Dr. Owen, Cipher Expert, Lays New
Honor at the Feet of His
Idol.
Detroit. Mich., Jan. 2. Following
closely on the announcement of Dr. Or
ville "W. Owen that his researches in
England for proof that Francis Bacon
wrote the plays of William Shakespeare
ore fast Hearing completion, conies the
allegation of the doctor that Sir Francis
is the inventor, or at least the designer,
of an airship.
"We haven't discovered the airship,"
Paid the doctor Monday, "but we havt,
found the descriptions of one in our ex
cavations in the river Wye, which are
undoubtedly the work of the man whom
we are certain ia the author of the plays
attributed to Shakespeare. And he, of
course, ia Sir Francis Bacon."
"When do you intend to make these
plans or descriptions public!" the doctor
was asked.
"Only when we find them in their en
tirety. Our real mission is to riml tha
plays and the conclusive evidence of their
authorship. When we have done that
we may turn to the other matter. But
ot present it is only secondary to us, no
matter what its significance to the world
of science may be." '
A Poor Weak Woman
As she is termed, will endure bravely and patiently
agonies which a strong man would dive way under
The fact it women are more patient thaa they ough
to be under such troubles.
Every woman ought to know that she may obtain
the most experienced medical advice free of charge
and in absolute confidence end privacy by writing to
the World's Dispensary Medical Association, R. V.
Pierce, M. D., President, Buffalo, N. Y. Dr. Pierce
has been chief consulting physician of the Invalids'
Hotel and Surgical Institute, of Buffalo. N. Y., for
many years and has had a wider practical experience
In the treatment of women's diseases than any othr physician in this country.
His medicines are world-famous for their astonishing efficacy.
. The most perfect remedy ever devised for weak and deli
cate women is Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription.
IT MAKES WEAK WOMEN STRONG,
SICK WOMEN WELL.
The many and varied symptoms of woman's peculiar ailments are fully set
forth in Plain English in the People's Medical Adviser (1008 pages), newly
revised and up-to-date Edition of which, cloth-bound, will be mailed free on
receipt of 31 one-3cr.t stamps to pay oost of mailing only. Address as above.
? AT THF. r.REAT FALL CLEARANCE
CLOTHING SALE
Men's, Boys' and Children's Clothing,
Furnishings, Shoes, Rubbers, etc., at
The American Clothing Co.
255 No. Main St., A. Tomasi Block, Now in Progress
We have been in business twelve years and
we were never called upen to make a sale.
But the time has ceme to make a discount of
prices on our large stock fr the benefit ef
Barre and vicinity. We cordially invite yeu
all to come and see the bargains.
I The A
men
255 No Mi St.. A. Tonj.ii Block.
rams Went Over Bank on Worcester
Road Wagons Demolished.
Last evening, while men were drawing
ood to this city, the breaking of the
aniens on the rear team caused two
( the rin to he completed demolished
:nl a third one was badly damaged.
!ie teams had been to Worcester and
, ro on the return trip, the four being
ar tofretlKT. Jacob Nathan was ahead,
arob Udelcfsky next, Morris Rorkovitz
' iid and Harry Diamond fourth. When
hp harness on Mr. Diamond's horse
ioke, the animal ran into RockovitV
'g and his horse joined in the runaway.
Alien Udelefsky's team was reached,
!i runaways struck his wagon a gla.no
rt blow, became tangled up and went
I the bank, with the drivers under
a atli. Mr. Udeleffky went to their
v-nie and when they were taken out
; y were found to be not much injured,
it" the wagons were a complete wreck.
A daughter weighing nine and one-half
unds wag born at Heatori hospital Sat
iday to Mr. and Mrs. Al. Companion.
Edward T. Ryan of this city and
i-:s Ethel G. Long of Middlesex were
nrricd at 0 o'clock last night by Rev.
. F. lllomfield at the parsonage. They
tre unattended. Mr. Ryan is employed
by the Capital Hardware company.
The Y. M. C. A. kept open house lat
evening and the event was largely in
the nature of a reception to Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph Stratton and Fred Steer, who have
not been in the city long. Mr. Strat
ton is secretary of the association and
Mr. Steer, physical director. Refresh
ments were served and a musical pro
gram was rendered.
Emilio fiomez of this city and Miss
Eugenia lbanes of Nortlifield were mar
ried in the Catholic church in the lat
ter place Saturday. Mr. Gomez was at
one time a mernlter of the Queen's guards
in Spain. Mrs. Gomez, is also of Span
ish blood and has lieen living with her
brother in Nortlifield since her arrival
from Spain. They will reside in Mont
pelier. Miss Faye B. Meade, daughter of Mrs.
B. G. Webster, was married yesterday
at her home to William Gordon Bundy
of St. Johnftbury, Rev. J. Edward Wright
performing the ceremony, and using the
double ring service. Mendelssohn's wed
ding march was played by Mrs. M. Simp
son, during the rendering of which the
bridal party entered the bride on the
arm of her mother, her matron of honor,
Mrs. Mabel Osborne, the groom and the
liest man, Fred 8. Edwards. Miss Flor
ence Cole was ring bearer and Misses
Irene Short and Jennie Tomasi, flower
girls. Mr. and Mrs. Bundy will reside
in St. Johnsbury.
The Baptist parish had its annual
meeting last evening, with supper, roll
call and a business meeting. The treas
urer reported that $1,850 hod been raised
during the year, exclusive of benev
olences. The following officers were
elected: Clark, Mrs. Ella Leland; treas
urer, A. E. Carr; assistant treasurer,
C. C. Holmes; benevolence treasurer,
Mrs. Ralph Paine; deacons, George Wood
win, C. C. Holmes; deaconesses, Mrs.
Alma Hibbard, Mrs. George Goodwin,
Mrs. Ella Leland, Mrs. E. M. Crossett,
Mrs. Orville Davis; trustees, George
Goodwin, Fred Robar, Fred Thayer, Ed
ward Chase, Orville Davis, Ralph Paine;
Sunday school superintendent, C, C.
Holmes; assistant, Edward Lewis; sec
retary and treasurer, Mrs. A. E. Carr;
organist, Miss Mildred Holme.
EAST BARRE.
The annual meeting of the church will
be held in the vestry Wednesday even
ing, January 3, at 7 o'clock.
Gill lodge, No. 27, I. O. O. F., Rippling
Stream Rebekah lodge, No. 40, and Gran
ite encampment, No. 20, will hold a
joint installation at their hall Wednes
day evening. January 3, instead of Tues
day evening, as previously announced.
Please notice change of date.
Clothing Co.
Tarre. Vt,
AUx Core j, Pr.p.
Take
One
Pain Pill,
then
Take it
Easy.
For Neuralgia, nothing ia
better than
Dr. Miles'
Anti-Pain Pills
Used by thousands)
for a generation
Those who have suffered from
neuralgic pains need not be told
how necessary it is to secure re
lief. The easiest way out of
neuralgia is to use Dr. Miles'
Anti-Pain Pills. They have re
lieved sufferers for so many
years that they have become a
household necessity;
"I have taken Dr. Miles' AntLFain
Pills for five years and they are the
only thing that does me any good.
They have relieved neuralgia In my
head In fifteen minutes. I have also
taken them tor rheumatism, head
ache, pains In the breast, toothache,
earache and pains In the bowels and
limbs. I have found nothing to
equal them and they are all that la
claimed for them."
J. W. SEDGE, Blue Springs, Mo.
At all druggists 25 doses 25 Cents.
Never sold In bulk. t
MILES MEDICAL CO., Elkhart, Ind.
. PLAINFIELD.
An Interesting Incident from War-time
History Recalled.
Hiram Russell of Cabot recently re
lated a strong; coine'dews to F. If.
llrutfee, the local uwiprtakor. I hi lVc.
14, the- body of "Aunt" Harriet Scott,
wife of Lieut. Scott, iml wlio died in
this town Dee. 11, was taken to Cabot
for burial. At the clm-i of tlie buna!
service Mr. Russell told Mr. Ilruflfee that
he had twice assisted at the burial o!
Lieut. Scott and now was asni.tiiig in
the final duties of Mrs. Scott's burial.
Lieut. Scott was an officer in the Civil
war. Mr. RiihscII was also a soldier in
that war and in Lieut. Scott's company
as was Willard Perry of this town. On?
day, while in a skirmish, Lieut. Scott
was mortally wounded. The comrades
did all they could for him, but he died in
a liort time. Fearing the enemy would
take the body, Mr. Kusiell made a nido
coffin of boards taken from a nearby
fence, in which they buried their lieu
tenant. Thinking that the home friendi
might some time wish to have the body
removed. Mr. Russell wrote the name of
Lieut. Scott on a slip of paper and
put it in a bottle, then placed it on
the grave. Later Lieut. Russell returned
to his home in Cabot. The local order
of Masons, of which Lieut. Scott was :i
member, wished the body of their broth
er brought home, and by the description
given by Mr. Russell the grave was
found by the Masons and the remains
were taken to Cabot, where Mr. Russell
again assisted in the burial.
Mrs. Ceorge Drown is visiting rela
tives in Stowe.
Mrs. Nettie Hutchins Is caring for
Mrs. Retsey Taft.
Miss Octavia Smith spent Saturday
in Harre with relatives.
A son was born Thursday, Dec. 28, to
Mr. and Mrs. Gardner Noble.
Mrs. Margaret Bolles of Barre visited
friends in town part of last week.
Harvey Warren was In Middlesex Sun
day and' Monday, visiting relativen.
Harley Tage spent part of last week
in Barre with his cousin, Leon Pago.
Mrs. Frank Page and son, Fred, of
Marshtield visited relatives in town last
week.
Miss Fanny Martin spent part of last
week in Waterbury with Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Abbott.
Mrs. Everett Bean went to Montpelier
Monday to visit Plummer Benjamin,
who is seriously ill.
Mrs. Ella Gale Bolles of Hcaton hos
jital, Montpelier, is ill at the home of
her father, Dr. F. P. Gale.
Mrs. Harry Dudley of Montpelier
spent Tuesday and Wednesday with Mr.
and Mrs. Hans Frcdrickson.
Mrs. Taylor returned to St. Johns
bury Thursday, after spending a few
days with Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Cutting.
Mrs. James Hooker and daughter of
South Ryegate are spending a few days
with Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Townsend.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Colby, Miss Ethel
and B. A. Colby spent Thursday in Wil
liamRtown with Mr. and Mrs. Henry
Waldo.
Stops a Deep-Seated
Cough in a Hurry
A Family Supply of Unequaled Cough
Remedy for 50c Money Re
funded If It Falls.
Cough medicines, as a rule, contain a
large proportion of plain syrup a good
ingredient, but one that anyone can make.
A pint of granulated sugar, with i pint
of warm water, stirred for 2 minutes,
gives you as good syrupa money can buy.
A SO-oent bottle of Pinex, mixed in a
pint bottle with home-made sugar syrup,
gives you a full pint of really better
cough syrup than you could buy ready
mixed for $2..'i0. There's a clear saving
of $2.00. Full directions in package.
And money couldn't buy a quicker,
better remedy. Takes hold at once, gives
almost instant relief, and usually stops
the most obstinate, deep-seated cough in
24 boura. ft stimulates the appetite, is
alightly laxative and has a pleasant taste
children take it willingly. Splendid for
hoarseness, asthma, chest pains and other
throat troubles, and unequaled for prompt
results in whooping cough.
Pinex Is a special and highly concen
trated compound of imported Norway
White Pine extract, and is rich in guaia
col and otber natural healing pine ele
ments. Simply mix it as directed with
sugar syrup er strained honey, and it is
ready for use.
I'sed in more homes in the V. 8. and
Canada than any other cough remedy.
Pinex has often been imitated, but never
successfully, for nothing else will produce
the same results. The genuine is guaran
tee J to gire absolute satisfaction or money
refunded. Certificate of iguartintea is
wrapped in each package. Your druggist
has Pinex or will get it for you. If not,
send to The Pine Co- Ft. Who. ImL
Mrs. C. E. Claflin Seems to Be Recover
ing From Injuries in Auto Accident.
While Mr. and Mra. C. IS, Claflin were
coming from Randolph in an automobile
on Saturday night and when near the
top of the hill, a short distancejrom the
old church, close by the house of John
Oilman, the car took a sudden leap down
the bank, throwing them both several
feet. One of the wheels of the machine
went down as far as the river, where
it finally rested. Mrs. Claflin was taken
by her husband to a nearby house and
Dr. Greene was telephoned for. Ho
came and took her home, but she did not
regain consciousness till Monday. It was
at first thought to bo serious, but she
was so much more comfortable at the
last accounts Miat her recovery is ex
pected. Mr. Claflin did not receive se
rious injuries.
Mrs. Clayton Saunders was taken to
Burlington last week for an operation
for appendicitis, at the Mary Fletcher
hospital.
Bethel lodge, No. 35, I. O. 0. F., held
their annual meeting recently and elect
ed the following officers for the ensuing
year: Noble grand, Charles L. Lilley;
vice grand, J. Wesley Collins; secretary,
L. L. Chamberlin; treasurer, O. P. North
rup; trustee, A. N. Newell.
Mrs. Edgar Rowe, aged 48 years, died
on .Thursday, after a long illness with
spinal tuberculosis. Mrs. ' Ellen ( Hull)
Howe, was born in Stratford. N. II.,
June 12, 18(53. the daughter of George
B. and May (Holbrook) Hall. On Sep
tember 1, 18i)l, she married Edgar C,
Howe and to them was born one daugh
ter, Grace Rowe, who with the husband,
survives her. The funeral services were
held Saturday at 1 o'clock, Rev. J. Wes
ley Miller officiating. Mrs, Rowe was
a member of the Methodist church and
was respected by all.
GRAN1TEVILLE.
Maple Leaf Camp, Modern Woodmen,
Transact New Business.
At a well-attended meeting of Maple
Leaf camp, No. 8302, M. V. of A.,
Thursday, Dec. 28, considerable busi
ness was transacted and the officers were
elected for the ensuing year as follows:
Consul, A. B. Jenkins; adviser, J. G.
Pirie; clerk, J. J. Sullivan; banker, Wal
ter W. Belville; escort, A. J. Letourneau;
watchman, Malcolm McLeod; physicians,
E. II. Bailey, N. E. Avery; three-year
trustee, A. J. Palmer; two-year trustee,
M. X. Smith; one-year trustee, William
W. Belville; chief forester, M. P. Sulli
van; special auditor, Ft F. Pirie. After
the meeting, the members adjourned to
the banquet hall and enjoyed an excel
lent supper. The whole was under the
excellent catering of Alex. McLeod, as
sisted by A. C. Rousse. As toastmaster
of the evening, A. B. Jenkins held sway.
Many songs, several well-rendered reci
tations and many reminiscences of the
past, which were royally received by the
members, made an excellent good time.
The annual business meeting of the
ladies' aid Rociety of the Presbyterian
church will be held at the home of Mrs.
Robert Mitchell, Websterville, on next
Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock. All
those wishing to go will phase meet at
Johnson's livery about 6:30.
WTLLIAMST0WN.
Mr. and Mrs. II. D. Casey have re
turned from their visit in Boston.
Prin. Carl Killam returned yesterday
from his vacation. The high school be
gins to-day.
George W. Savery wishes to extend
his appreciation and thanks to his
friends for the shower of Christmas post
cards.
The Home Study club will meet with
Mrs. Watson Thursday, January 4, for
a study in geology. Quotations from
Hugh Miller.
Regular communication of Summit
lodge, No. 104, F. A. M., Wednes
day, Jan. 3, at 7:30. Let there be a
good attendance.
Let there be & good attendance at thi
grange meeting to-morrow evening,
which is the installation of officers for
the ensuing year.
The annual meeting of the Williams,
town Cemetery association was called
January 1 at the town hall at 2 p. in.
Only a few members were present and
the meeting was adjourned one week.
It nmv not heVenerallv understood thai
everyone who owns a lot in the village
cemetery is a member of the association
and can have a voice in the meetings.
Heretofore too little interest has been
shown, especially at tho association
meetings. It is, however, an important
matter to all concerned. The village
cemetery is a sacred spot, dear to the
hearts of many of our townspeople..
Their interest therein should be mani
fested next Monday afternoon by a large
attendance at the meeting, when new of
ficers will be elected and important mat
ters of business considered.
WILL REMOVE ALL WOOD
WORK FROM WARSHIPS
Battle Practice Is Closely to Approxi
mate Actual War Con.
ditions.
Washington, Jan. 2. Every year the
battle practice in the American navy
more closely approximates the conditions
of actual warfare. Injhe spring practice
of the Atlantic fleet this year, the idea
of ridding a ship as far as possible of
combustible materials and woodwork
that might cause splinters in action is to
be carried out so far that the officers and
men of some of the vessels may not
even sleep "on the writ side of a plank."
The plans contemplate the removal of
all wooden boats, the bunks and the
wooden furniture. Not even the mess
tables will be left and the bluejacket'
will have to eat their meals squatting
tailor-fashion on deck.
More damage and loss of life has re
sulted on shipboard in time of war from
suffocating fires and flying splinters than
from shot and shell wound, therefore it
has been decided to determine just how
much woodwork can be dispensed with
when a craft clears for action.
The apnng practice of the fleet in the
West Indian waters, with Quant anami
as the base, will occupy ten days more
than two months, beginning Jan. 1".
After that is completed the big ships will
come north to the southern drill grounds
off the Chesapeake capes for the regular
battle practice.
nine vears it
year
. An
e nrtT
Ot i WKJ
aggregates a
of all deposits.
A PECULIAR
FACULTY
By ARNOLD TREAT
Copyright by American Press Asso
ciation, 1311.
I nm the black sheep of the family.
I never liked to study when I was at
school, and after quitting school I
didn't like to work. I remember that
aa a boy during the marble season I
took no Interest In the game except
"for keeps" and usually won all tho
other boys' marbles. When I came In
from playing the game with my pock
ets loaded down with alleys and aces
and ballseyes my father would look
at them wonderingly.
When I was eighteen I was put to
work. My employer owned a large
number of dwelling houses, and they
were mostly vacant. The reason for
this was that he would do nothing for
hl tenants. They were all mortgaged
to tho same man, who couldn't get the
Interest on the mortgages. The mort
gagee came Into the office one day
tearing mad and told my employer
that be didn't know how to manage
such property and the houses Blunt be
put into the hands of some one else.
Hart well, the owner, offered to put
the management lu niy hands, to
which Johnson, the mortapee, assent
ed. I suppose Hartwell thought he
could make me do what he liked. But
In that he" was mistaken. I offered a
big commission to ngeuts to recom
mend the houses and gave the tenants
everything thoy asked. The result
was that within a year I bad the
houses all occupied, ail In prime or
der and paying a good Interest on the
investment.
When I got things running I had
nothing more to do, so I lit out into
the world for a bit of excitement. I
strolled down the street, with my
hands in my pockets and saw a red
flag out at the door of a handsome
dwelling. I'd P"t some idea of the
value of such property and thought
I'd go in and attend the sale. Ter
haps I would buy the property. I
hadn't any money even to pay the
percentage of the amount of purchase
demanded when the property is knock
ed down to the highest bidder, but
that didn't trouble me a bit. I had
the assurance of Satan himself. So I
went in and found a lot of bidders,
each one acting as if he was afraid he
would have the house on bis hands. I
estimated that the property was worth
a lot more than any of the bids. I
don't know why I did so. I only
know that I felt certain of it. So I
raised the last bid by $1,000. That
scared everybody else off, for I put on
a look as much as to say, "I'm bound
to own this property If I have to pay
double its value for It." The conse
quence was that it was knocked down
to me for f21,OPO. The auctioneer
called on me for the usual percentage
of purchase, which was $2,100. As I
had nothing but my wits to satisfy
him, I proceeded to exercise them. I
asked him if he would take my check,
and he replied. "Not without it being
certified." Then I asked him if he
would wait till I sent a check to the
bank for certification, and he sold he
would. Since I hadn't any check or
check book or bank for that matter
to draw on I was wondering what
move I should make next, when fhe
owner of the property rushed in and
asked if the sale had taken place.
When told that it hnd he sank in a
chair and moaned.
"I've got the money," he said, "with
which to pay off the mortgage."
"I thought the case must be one of
foreclosure," I remarked. "I've bought
the property dirt cheap. I'm ready to
sell it back to you for 75 per cent of
what it's worth. I consider it worth
$40,000. I'll sell It to you for $.10,000."
The man fretted and fumed and dick
ered, but at last he accepted my terms.
"Just you give me $9,000 for my
bargain." I said, "and I'll sign any
paper you like."
He agreed to do so, and I made
quick profit. Then I told him that
what I had said was true, and I
thought I could sell the property for
$40,000. He declined to bother with
me, but within a year sold it for
$65,000. It wns all luck. A railroad
terminal station wns put up near the
property.
I slapped that $9,000 around in all
sorts of Investments and every time I
put it In I pulled it out with a lot of
CASTORS A
Tor Infants and Children.
Tha Kind Ycu Have Always Bought
Bears tba
orCS
Bignatura
mrr- firs
- i
During a .portion of each, year
Ety? Bttrlfttijtmt (Jntflt (Smttpmt!!
seeks to reminJ the good people of Vermont that it is still serving their
interests and providing a safe depository for money. For nearly twenty-
Las carefullv Guarded the interests of its
is now returning to them interest at the rate of FOUR PER Mk
S. CENT, and paying all taxes Besides strengthening each jpijjr
the security for their deposits.
active and conservative policy that Las
followed from trie beginning Las produced a
- trtmnnm Am ocxrtJ vrT7'
1 1 U IV LJ LS.L.LJ JlVHiJ piiViiil
THOUSAND DOLLARS wLicL. witL tte
guarantee fund of more tLan FIFTEEN
The management of this institution
scrutiny of its pullisLed statements and its methods and seeks the patron
age of the people of Vermont Ly warrant of its record as a successful
Lank. All inquiries will receive prompt attention.
CITY HALL SQUARE NORTH.
Burlington, Vt.
other dollars sticking to it. Some
times I doubled it, twice I trebled it,
and on one deal I increased it tenfold.
When I had got a few hundred
thousand .together, I went home and
asked father how he was getting on.
He said he was very hard up. Our
Interview ended in my drawing him
a check for double what he needed,
then I sallied, out to look around for
more chances.
Not long after that a friend told me
that he had asked my father to ex
plain my success. My father told him
that I was no good on the principles
that govern ordinary mortals; that I
had no sense, no management in the
usual acceptation of that word in
short, that I was born for a ne'er-do-well,
but there was something in my
head somewhere to see things invisible
to other people.
My friend asked father if he thought
luck had anything to do with the mat
MILLIONS of
ELIXffiefSENNA
FOR COLD3 AND HEADACHES, INDIGESTION AND SpUR
STOMACH, CAS AND FERMENTATION, CONSTIPATION AND
BILIOUSNESS. WITH MOST SATISFACTORY RESULTS.
rT?!
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUPCO.
IN THE CIRCLE
ON EVERY PACKAGE CFTHE
THE WONDERFUL POPULARITY OF THE GENUINE SYRUP
OF FIGS AND EUXIR OF SENNA HAS LED UNSCRUPULOUS
MANUFACTURERS TO OFFER IMITATIONS, IN ORDER TO
MAKE A LARGER PROFIT AT THE EXPENSE OF THEIR
CUSTOMERS. IF A DEALER ASKS WHICH SIZE YOU WISH,
OR WHAT MAKE YOU WISH. WHEN YOU ASK FOR
SYRUP OF FIGS AND EUXIR OF SENNA, HE IS PREPAR
INC TO DECEIVE YOU TELL HIM THAT YOU WISH THE
GENUINE. MANUFACTURED BY THE CALIFORNIA FIG
SYRUP CO ALL RELIABLE DRUGGISTS KNOW THAT
THFRE IS BUT ONE GENUINE AND THAT IT IS MANU
FACTURED BY THE CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO ONLY
NOTE THE NAME
PRINTED STRAIGHT ACROSS, NEAR THE BOTTOM. AND IN
THE CIRCLE. NEAR THE TOP OF EVERY PACKACE.OF THE K
GENUINE ONE SIZE ONLY, FOR SALE BY
DRUGGIST REGULAR PRICE SOe PER
SYRUP OF FICS AND ELIXIR OF SENNA IS ESPECIALLY ADAPTED TO THE NEEDS OF
LADIES AND CHILDREN. AS IT IS MILD AND PLEASANT GENTLE AND EFFECTIVE, AND
ABSOLUTELY FREE FROM OBJECTIONABLE INGREDIENTS. IT IS EQUALLY BENEFICIAL'
FOR WOMEN AND FOR MEN. YOUNG AND OLD FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING DRUGGISTS.
ALWAYS BUY THE GENUINE.
California Fig Syrup Cq
in Wags f
health, sooner or later, shows its value. ' No man can expect to go
very far or very fast toward success -no woman either who
suffers from the headaches, the sour stomach and poor digestion,
the unpleasant breath and the good-for-nothing feelings which
result from constipation and biliousness. But just learn for
yoursalf what a difference will be made by a few doses of
Tested through three generations favorably known the world over
this perfect vegetable and always efficient family remedy is univers
ally accepted as the best preventive or corrective of disorders of the
organs ofdigrstion. Beecham'srillsregulatethebowels.Btirtheliver
to natural activity enable you to get all the nourishment and blood
makingqualitiesfromyourfood. Assureasyoutry them you will know
that in your looks and in your increased vigoi Beecham's Bills
Pay, Bog D
Tte direction with mrrrt box ara
Sold everywhere,
t::::n:::.u::::..::::s:n:..:::::"
Furs at Reduced Prices!
1 $5000 Stock to Pick From
I MANY AT HALF PRICE
Buy your" Furs now,
Save money and have
I did bargains. Too
I. Steckolchick, 43 State St., Montpelier, Vt. I
Furs Repaired and New
1 -Pi
depositors and
Leen
surplus
t:T TV!
l - LXYU
capita stock.
PER CENT.
invites tLe closest
ter. Father said that while luck had
a lot to do with every man's success,
It had no more to do with mine than
with that of others.
"What la this faculty of seeing things
Invisible to other persona?" I asked of
my friend.
"Genius,'' was his reply.
I was no wiser than befort.
IN TWENTY-FIVE CITIES.
Mayors Inaugurated in Many Bay State
Municipalities.
Boston, Jan. 2. Mayors were inaugu
rated in 25 of tha 33 Massachusetts
citie yesterday. A few of the cities
have mayors who- hold over for another
year and others do not hold inaugurals
until a later date.
Mayor Charles S. Ashley of New Bed
ford was the dean among the city execu
tives taking the oath of office yesterday,
entering upon his loth term.
FAMILIES
GENUINE
t
ALL LEADING
BOTTLE.
MINIATURE PICTURE
OF PACKAG&
verr luM r.pecialljr to
la boxe 10c, 23c
before Christmas. .
your pick of splen
many to enumerate.
u
Garments Made to Order
H
?rftt
, ...
If
XIX
A
4
S3
ifSmmM j j
gcsNT. or ai.coholK II'! j
g --T y'tV,.r , y ' j!j (
.1 Mict. K cini R Kir-

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