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The Barre daily times. (Barre, Vt.) 1897-1959, October 12, 1912, Image 3

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'HIK HAllHK DAILY TIMES. 1SAWIK. VT.. SATURDAY. OCTOBER 12. 1012.
3
OpODDC
30C
noc
BEWARE OF IMITATIONS AND CHEAP SUBSTITUTES
BAKER'S .
Breakfast Cocoa
IS THE STANDARD FOR QUALITY
For all those whose occupations require clear
heads and steady nerves, as well as those in poor
health or of delicate digestive powers, it is the ideal
beverage. Prepared with milk or cream and sweet
ened to the taste, it is delicious, wholesome, abso
lutely pure, and of high food value.
TRAD&MARK ON EVERY PACKAGE
Booklet of Choice Recipes Sent Free
Walter Baker & Co. Ltd. - - - Dorchester,. Mass.
- Established 1780
ml I I y
V'l V'! .!Ji ,.;TW'Sr . "
OQODDC
non
sac
aoc
All Through a
Nickel
By F. A. MITCHSL
It seemed to me it was a blaze of
2 glory that passed me.
It Coming to a cross street, she stood
waiting for a trolley car. I waited
r directly behind her, and when she eu
- tered it I entered too. She dropped
into a seat, opened a portenionnaie and
poked among cards, samples and other
tilings, first carelessly, then eagerly
ind finally despairingly.
"Two," I said, holding out my ten
cent piece to the conductor.
; So unconscious was she of my very
! presence that she supposed I was with
not her and paying the fare for both.
Bhe told the conductor thnt she bad
spent all her money unUuowingly and
If he would stop the car she would get
aut. The conductor looked at my dime.
"IIow many?' he asUed.
"Two," said I.
"Where's the other one?"
"Two," I repeated doggedly.
An idea struck him suddenly. If I
were fool enough to permit him to ring
s up two fares he need not bother about
lthe lady's deficiency his accounts
fwould come out square. But the lady
was not so obtuse.
"Thank you very much," 6he said.
"Kindly give me an address where I
can pay the debt."
"There is no debt. A nickel espe
cially thus invested is not worthy of
consideration."
"It is not the nickel; it is the prin
ciple." "There are principles and principles.
It is a principle that a gentleman who
acts so as to require a lady to commu
nicate with him should send to her In
stead of permitting her to seud to him.
It is your right to insist on payment
of the loan, but it is my part as a
was. After I " had discovered thls
hunted for a mutual acquaintance. I
found one who chilled nie by inform
ing me that the object of my admira
tion enme of the best of stock intel
lectually and otherwise, and I was not
given much encouragement to hope
thnt I could aspire even to an ac
quaintance. However, I wns accorded
nn Introduction and received gracious
ly. Eventually I gained more than
this the lady herself, who is now my
wife. I have often asked her how it
was thnt I won her. and she gives me
the Invariable reply:
"By your unblushing assurance."
"But there was nothing indelicate
about It. was there?"
"Nothing. It was the dellcocy of a
Mepbistopheles."
THE SUN AS AN ARTIST.
Discovery Upon Which Turn All the
Wonders of Photography.
There is a wide variety in the pace
at which the sun can give a color or
change it. A winter app'le may be a
COLUMBUS DAY.
An Old Poem Reproduced to Fit the
Occasion
A render suggests that the following
poem, descriptive . of tho founding of
America and tuken from an old booklet,
lie printed, in view of the celebration of
Columbus day in Vermont:
Columbus was a sailor brave,
The first that crossed th' Atlantic wave.
In fourteen hundred and ninety-two,
He came far o'er the ocean blue,
Whore ne'er a shin hud sailed before,
And found wild and savage shore,
Where naked men in forests prowled,
And bears and panthers roamed and
liowled.
The others came to see the wonder,
To gather sold and sock for plunder;
And many a cruel deed was done.
Far .South, beneath the tropic sun.
And, at a blow, proud Mexico
Was humbled in the dust;
Pizza rro, too, in rich l'eru,
With bloody heart, and cruel art,
A mighty empire crushed.
Ah! many a red man's blood was spilt
And many a deed was done of guilt,
Of torture, murder, crimes untold
GOMPERS
DRAGGED IN
ski
TROUBLE ON
Named by a Dynamite Case
Witness
PRESENT AT CONVENTION
The Objoction Male by Counsel for the
Defense Judge to Rule Out Tes
timony Unless Relevance
Is Shown.
monfh in i-wwlilne lt ruddiness. A
peach may take only one week to flush 1 To gpt the Por P"" Indi'8 K1J-
into its mantle of maturity but theAt ,pl)ptIl w,len vpar ,m(, d awg
most nimble work of the solar ray in Some j,:,1(flisll ra;ne to Virginia;
its deeoratJon of fruit and flower is not I 'Twas sixteen hundred seven; be sure
to be compared with what it accom
plishes In other departments. When its
power wns brought to bear npon some
familiar chemical it was found that
its action was reduced from days to
seconds.
I'pon this discovery turn nil the won
ders of photography. At first silver
nitrate or lunar caustic, as it was
commonly called was tised in the cam
era. From time to time other sub
stances of greater and greater sensi
tiveness to light have been produced, j
You let this in your minds endure;
For 'twas the first bold colony
Planted in North America;
The first that laid the deep foundation
On which has since been built a nation.
Well, here they raised a far-famed town
On James river, called Jamestown.
They struggled hard 'gainst many sor
rows, Sickness and want and Indian arrows;
But bold and strong at length they grew,
And were a brave and manly crew.
gentleman to send for the nickel."
It was evident that her mind was and the sinuous glint of lightning.
not used to considering-such trivial Chicago Record Herald,
matters. I could understand ber solv-j '
lng a mathematical problem, writing a ! Laugh and Live Long,
book, criticising a work of art, but not, it has been aptly said that there Is
'Twas eight years after this T mean
I i ..!.. 1 J - TiAirru iiuiiwit-ti nurrii-1
every one or niem rwrwatv Some iutcl from n0iand gPttled pat
the solar beam a wider play and more on
astonishing power. An island which they called Manhattan,
Today, with the exposure of a photo- i And straight they" set themselves to
graphic plate, not only are the beating i work
of an Insect's wings caught in the cam- And built the city of Xew York.
i, !. ti.o rath r n nnnnnnbnll. Now let the laughing wags and jokers
h-'cto' flight nf oinloded rock.ly thst thti J)!,t,1 are stupid smokers,
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 12. Whether
Samuel fiompers, president of the
American Federation of Labor, was pres
ent at a certain labor union meeting held
in St. Louis, Mo., in November, 11)10,
was asked by government attorneys in
the "dynamite conspiracy" trial to-day.
Frank Schilling, clerk of a hotel in St.
Louis, testified that the International
Association of Bridge and Structural
Iron Workers was holding its annual
onvention in St. Louis at the time. He
named Frank M. Kyan, Chicago; Michael
J. loung, Boston; F. J. McXultv. New-
rk, X. J.; M. B. Madrcn, Chicago, and
Olaf A. Tveitmoe, San Francisco, as
registered at the hotel.
J he convention was held the month
fter the Los Angeles Times disaster,
nd it was at this time, the government
charges, that Tveitmoe told Kvan. pres
ident of tho Iron Workers, that the
"Pacific coast expected a Christmas
present," in the shape of more explo
sions. Tveitmore also was described as
"the big puyrnaster" who financed the
dynamiters. At tliu St. Louis meeting
lie is charged with promoting the
Llewellyn Iron Works explosion.
"Was Mr. Couipcr registered at the
hotel at this time " asked Attorney .1.
W. Xoel.
"He wasn't registered, but he was
around the hotel a good deal," answered
the witness.
" United States Senator John W. Kern,
for the defence, objected. "Mr. Gomp
crs is not a defendant. He lias nothing
to do with the case."
"Nothing, other than it will be shown
he had something to do with the de
fence of the conspirators in the state of
California, replied Mr. Noel. Judge A.
B. Anderson ruled that lie at present
saw no relevancy in the mention of Mr.
(temper's name and if none appeared in
future testimony, lie would so instruct
the jury. Objection also was made to
the mention of MeXulty and Madden,
who are not defendant.
HANDS
1
And Feet. Some on Body. Formed
Dry Scabs. When He Scratched
Water Would Come Out. Cuticura
Soap and Ointment Stopped the
ncning ana uirea rum.
173 Pari. St., Eut Boston, Mas. "I
bavo a little boy eight years old who bad
ores on bis hands, arms, lugs, feet, and soma
on his body. They formed dry
scabs. I bad blm treated and
It lucked worse; It was spread
ing. In the night bo scratched
so much that In the morning he
was all blood and bis bed also
was a mess with blood and
scabs. When ho scratched tho
sores, matter and water would
come out from them. I bought
a box of , and that did
not do any good, and I was dis
couraged. My aunt said tome,
Why don't you try Cuticura
Ointment and Soap?' ehe said
It would stop that itch and give it a chance
to heal. The next day I got a box of Cuti
cura Ointment and a cake of Cuticura Soap.
"I gave blm a good bath with ths Cuti
cura Soap and put tha Cuticura Ointment
on blm all over where the sores were. lis
slept that night all night. I only bad to
use two boxes of Cuticura Ointment and two
cakes of Cuticura Soap and ho was ail cured
and has never bad sores since." (Signed)
Mrs. John J. Glrtior, Jan. 20, 1912.
Cuticura Soap and Cuticura Ointment are
sold throughout the world. Liberal sample of
each mailed free, with 32-p. Skin Hook. Ad
dress post-card "Cuticura, Dept.T, Boston."
Tender-faced men should use Cuticura
Soap Shaving Stick, 25c, Sample, froo.
LA IiOH NOTES OF
WIDE INTEREST
session was that there was a strong
group who declared their support of the
administration "so long as they ap
proved of the government's measures."
Ihe conversation most frequently heard
in the lobby was that "Congress now
was going to conduct the affairs of the
country; that congress would give in
structions to the president rather than
receive them."
Adversity has resulted in an altera
tion of the personnel of Pascual Orozeo's
immediate following. The rough riding
of the guerilla warlare made necessary
I
During (lie recent past, especially
since the developments in the dyiiaunt
ing cases ocrined, the widespread and
vicious attacks made upon the trade
union movement would lead one to think
that tlie Only snlvation of society would
be the destruction of trade unions, rout
and branch. Possibly many of the fa
natics, who arc so ioud in their denunci
ation, really believe what they are say
Inir, and it is to these that we address
the following questions!
is it wrong to advocate anil secure a
fair WHge and reasonable work day tor
men with families dependent upon them?
Is it wrong to advocate proper factory
safeguards against the loss of lifo and
limb of the workers! Is it wrong to
demand that women who are forced to
compete in the industrial fields be sur
rounded by the best moral and improved
sanitary conditions; that when they are
unorganized and unable to protect them
selves to insist that tho state exercise
its sovereign power to the end that jus
tice may bo done!
Is it wrong to insist that each child
bo given an education that will fit him
or her for the battle of life and thus
give each nn equal opportunity with
every other child! To deny to divi-
ilend-chasing exploiters the right to work
children of tender years in order that
more and still more profits may be piled
up to the detriment of the child and so
ciety!
Js it wrong to dpmand better bousing
conditions and the destruction of disease-breeding
hovels and tenements or
that our railroads be conducted so that
the life and limb of the workers and
traveling public will be better con
served !
Is it wrong to advocate one day's rest
in seven for all workers or that the law
be administered equally for the rich and
the poor, and to insist that laws be made
by constituted authorities, instead of by
judges!
These are a few of the reforms which
are being advocated by the trade union
movement and before passing final judg
ment upon us, we would be pleased to
have some of our critics answer the
above questions.
Dr. Hartman Writes:
Columbus, Ohio, July I."). In reply t
many letters about my recent articlrt
on catarrh and constipation, I wish M
make the following statement:
Constipation is becoming more preva
lent every day. Nearly one-half of tha
human family are troubled with it mora
or less. This tn.'t presents a serious
complication in the treatment of clironil
disease.
Thirty years ago, when I was prescrib
ing Peruna every day, only a small frac
tion of tho people needed a laxative. But
1 have found by experience that mors
and more a laxative must be used.
Peruna originally contained no laxa
tive element. I used to prescribe the
laxative M.'.iiaiin to be used in case a
laxative was needed. This necessitated
the patient buying two bottles of medi
cine instead of one.
As constipation became more general.
I finally concluded to add a laxative ele
ment to Peruna. the new J'eruna H
made with a laxative ingredient, flu
old Peruna (Kn-tar-no) is without a
laxative. On that account some prefer
the old Peruna, sonve prefer the new
Peruna.
The new Peruna is for people who
have some catarrhal ailment and yet
need a laxative. Sold at all drug stores.
Tho old Peruna (Ka-tar-no) is for
those people who have some catarrhal
ailment but need no laxative. .
Those wishing to procure the old Pe
runa should address The Ka-tar-no Co.,
Columbus, Ohio, for further particu
lars. Advt.
$700,000 DEBT DUE
TO TIGHT SKIRTS
They founded famous New York City;
The largest city in the V est,
For trade and commerce quite the blest!
Then came along, in five years more,
The Puritans, or Pilgrims o'er;
Be sure the time and month remember-
catching the true inwardness of my J not the remotest corner of the Inlet of
nrittimont fiha mi?lnrt nroi" If fnr A t. .t.... utnA.l rAuanl. tt tha litininn
-p. -... j............. iuc uijuiuit? mt. tt-n-..-, v.. .,......." ,, , . , t-v v - -
few moments, then said: body thnt doe. not fee. some wavelet "'r oXThe litTnd'
lou are inclined to sophistry. In- from tIle convulsion occasioned by of weirv v.anterers first did Iam.
stead of permitting me to get rid of g00(1 bearty laughter. The life prind- And j.pgrty thanks to Heaven they
an obligation you would impose upon pie 0f the central man is shaken to Its gavc,
me another." i innermost depths, sending new fides of For kind protection o'er the wave.
"Not at all. It is I who am incurring je fln(j strength to the surface, tbua j The scene was wild, for hill and dale
these obligations." I materially tending to insure good i re clothed in winter's snowy veil,
"How s.V" She brought those two nMlth to the persons who indulge !-And a" the shore the eye could mark
. , , , , ,, Was covered thick with forests ctarK,
therein. The blood moves more rapidly j WH)lin whoM oomv shn(Ip(( afn
nnd conveys a different impression to.M-aa npllrd tnp lnrU, whoAp of war
all the organs of the body ns It visits rtut bold and strong these pilgrims were;
them on that particular mystic journey ; They feared not Indian, wolf, or bear
wonderful eyes of hers to bear on me.
... "First by permitting a stranger to
spend (temporarily) in your behalf n
coiu only one-twentieth in value of
what he would offer a waiter as a tip
you are conferring on biin a very
great honor, besides a pleasure. In the
second place, if you permit him to
send for the amount of the loan, thus
waiving your right to send It to hira
yourself, you honor hira still more, and
be has the exquisite pleasure of bavins
saved you trouble."
A faint smile dawned upon her lips.
"I have certainly derived pleasure
from your Ingenuity." she said, after
brief thought, "which Is another obli
gation under which you have placed i jflcp
me. tiut your argument inns to pieces
like 'the wonderful one boss shay' that
broke down nil at once. I admit thnt
your motives are unimpeachable, but
notwithstanding the brlllinncy of your
logic there remains the bare fact that
Kyou have conferred n favor on n stran
per and refuse to permit that arranger
to discharge the obligation."
"Ah, but I have not declined to ac
cept a favor at the hands of the stran
ger.'" She smiled again, this time more
amused than before.
"So much Ingenuity, so mnch gal
lantry." ahe said, "so delicately ex
pressed must needs gain yonr point for
yon."
Inserting her gloved thumb and fin
when the man Is laughing from that
conveyed at other times. For this rea
son every good, hearty laugh in which
a person Indulges tends to lengthen his
life, conveying ns it does new and dis
tlnct stimulus to the vital forces.
What Wellington Was Doing.
When Sir John Steell, the sculptor,
had the Irou Duke sitting for a statue
he tried to induce him to look warlike.
All his efforts were in valu, however,
for Wellington seemed, judging by his
. i , . a . ,
race, never to nave nearu oi v aienoo
j or Talavera. At last Sir John lost his
patience. "As I am going to make this
statue of your grace." he exclaimed,
"can you not tell me what you were
doing liefore. say. the battle of Sala
manca? Were you not galloping about
the field, cheering on your men to
deeds of valor by words and action?"
"Rahl" said the duke In evident
ncorn. "If yon really want to model
me as I was on the morning of Sala
manca, then do me crawling along a
ditch on my stomnch with a telescope
In my hand"'
Though far from home, a feeble band,
I'nfriended, in a desert land,
Where wild beasts sought at night their
pray,
And ruthless Indians lurked by day,
By sickness pressed, by want -beset,
Kach ill they braved, each danger met.
Long, long they strove,, and much en
dured;
To sufferings were long inured;
But naught their courage could subdue:
'Mill want and war their sinews grew,
Their towns increase, their numbers dou
ble. And soon they triumph o'er their trouble.
The Jackson-Mack Manufacturing Co.
Was Forced to the Wall by
fashion. '
Xew York, Oct. 12. The Jackson
Mack Manufacturing Co., one of the larg
est makers of silk petticoats in New
York, went into bankruptcy yesterday.
The failure of the firm is the culmina
tion of a widespread complaint among
petticoat .manufacturers that close-fitting
dresses now worn by women have
so reduced the demand for petticoats
as to make them a glut on the market.
The liabilities arc estimated at $700,.
1 100; the assets at$000,OOU
"RULE BY THE SWORD"
IS THE ALTERNATIVE
If Mexican People Fail 'to 'Support the
Present Administration, According
to Pres. Madero.
per Into her portemonnale she drew ont ; Scriptures?" asked the deacon in great
a card and hesitated. I handed her I wrath.
Thus three strong colonies, we see,
Are planted in America:
Xew F.ngland in the northern part;
Xew York within the very heart;
While southward, o'er the hills away,
Is seated fair Virginia.
The first rude dingers thus o'ereome,
Others did eek this land for home,
And came like birds in numbers o'er,
Till, far along the eastern shore.
That bounds the blue Atlantic tide,
Village with village proudly vied;
While Swedes and Fins did settle downs
In Delaware, and build a town.
To Maryland, 1-ord Baltimore
A colony of papist ent.
In sixteen hundred thirty-four,
Who there did make a settlement;
atorv that I was an iinbeliever in the ' And William Pcnn, the grave peace
maker.
Came o'er, with many an honest Quaker,
Silenced.
"What did you mean by starting the
ind
pencil. She wrote ber address on j "Well, deekin." said the man who
had originated the report, "ymi know
yon told me that all you said abont
that ho I Imught was as true as pm
pill. An" you know how true it was."
"Er-ah," said the deacon.
the card and banded both card
pencil to me.
"Thank you very much." I said.
I realised that -the time for me to
make my exit had come. nnd. turning J
to look: ont through the window, press-
4 the button, and when tbi car stop- Didn't Go In.
ped. raising my hat deferentially to "I you pad candy store on
the lady. I left the oar. j yonr way home this evening
So far. so pood. I thought over onr ! "IIow In the world did
brief dialogue and conkl not think of! that?"
anything I bad said that would look "Borau
like forcing an acquaintance. And ! with you."
yet. tbongb t had not Intended to
foroe an acquaintance. I bid Intended
to leave do tfne unturned to bring
n ahwjt. I had oefeN-d In karn
Inp th lady's name and addr. bnt
To Pennsylvania: 'twas done
In sixteen Hundred eighty-one.
fist tht Original and Gsnulni
fsGRUGO
I2:r "ny c'Ddr Pi! ALT ED MI LK
j Tht Fcod-drink f:r A!! Jgis.
' For Infants, Invalids, and Crowing children.
you know
Spiteful.
Mexico City. Mcx., Oct. 12. The Mex
ican people must be prepared to be gov
erned bv a dictator "who will rule bv
the sword" if they fail to support the
present administration, according to
President Madero.
The statement was made in a speed
at a banquet at which the guests were
congressmen and politicians in private
life. The hannuetters retired with oniv
an indistinct idea of just what it was
the president had meant and since then
the public generally has done much
guessing as to his real meaning.
When Madero was spreading the doc
trine of equality and democracy, there
were few who would have believed there
was the making of a despotic dictator in
him. Since then, however, by his invo
cation of the law of suspension of con
stitutional guarantees, he has displayed
some of the signs of a ucceful "Iron
Man." Many have suggested that Presi
dent Madero was warning them that he
himself would be the one to "rule bv
the sword."
"Long ago," said the president, "when
I first began my work. I decided that
the will of the people was the will of
Cod. This will must le respected, end
I consider it my duty to see that :t i"-.
The present government has fultillel its
promises, and if the government freely
elected by the people cannot sustain it
self it w'ill be proof that the Mexican
people are incapable of democracy. It
would then be necessary to call a dic
tator who will govern by the sword."
The president also bitterly assailed
the pres. an institution for whose tin
trammeled liberty he fnght. "The por
tion of the press which has survived,"
said the president, "is in its msjority a
n lie of the recime. It tries to alarm
and to deceive the people, but it tried
to do so for thirty vesra and Mill the
cnple revolted, and they will refuse to
Ix-lieve it now.
IIow much reliance the executive can
plsi-e upon the support of congress this
fall and winter i not kim d. That
President Msdero became worried dur
ing the first day of the wision was evi
dent. It had appeared that the govern
ment party, or the lrngre.:ve, had the
control of the chanler when thst body
gathering at the capital, but not a
week hsd p!el when it he-ame ap
by the campaign of (ieneral Iluerta am
liy the clhciencv ot the American au
thoritieg in preventing the exportation
of arms and ammunition, did not appea
to a number of the more fastidious reb
els and they have disappeared from
Orozco s army
One of the first to go was fionzalo
Enrilc, a polished product of the old
regime who had charge of the treasury
of the rebels. Jose Cordoba, who Iiore
the title "general secretary of tho revo
lution," was one oj those captured by
Americans at Ojinaga when the father
of the rebel leader was taken in cus
tody
Others who for various reasons have
left the service of the rebel chief vo
untarily include Alfonso Castencda,
chief of staff, Miguel Quiroga, and Jose
Serret. These three left together and
established their temporary homes in
Canada. Casteneda and Serret had been
in the regular army, the latter at one
time paymaster general. Quidoga is
resident of .San Antonia, Texas, though
a citizen of Monterey, Mexico. Jose
Ponce and Jose Casares, both colonels in
the rebel 'Stahlishment, are reported to
have gone together to the I nited Mate.
Casares was paymaster general of the
rebel army. His home was at Las
Cnices, X. M. Ponce was a citizen of
Mexico, but the greater part of his life
was spent in the V'nited States.
Two others who are still out of the
fighting are Hicardo f)omez Robelo and
David de la Fuente, both residents of
the Mexican capital. Both have been
tried at Kl Paso on the charge of con
spiring to violate the neutrality laws
and exonerated. Due to the injury of
an arm by a bursting shell at the battle
of Villa Lopez, de Ta Fuente probably
never will return to the field.
All these men were of the type who
can wear evening clothes without ap
pearing "dressed up." There remain in
the field many of their type, but the
dominant element at present is the
plainer and perhaps sterner material,
though at no time did the departed cle
ment show signs of less courage as long
as they were in the revolution.
Apropos of the downfall of Ernest
Terah Hooter, the Knglish promoter,
Senator La toilette said the other day
in Washington: "TIhj English law
doesn t allow a man as much rope as
the American law. A very wealthy
American once said to an Englishman:
Oh, yes, you have a good trade here in
England, perhaps, but, as far as Xa
poleons of finance go, why, I have never
met a Xapoleon of finance in all my
visits to London.' Xo, probably not,'
the Englishman replied, 'you see. we
keep our Xapoleons of finance in jail.' "
"Tuberculosis is a social disease ia
the final analysis. It cannot be eradi
cated unless and until we have social
justice." Dr. Adolphus Knopf of Xew
York thus summed up the fight againsj
the white plague in a paper entitled,
"Some Xewer Problems in the Anti-Tuberculosis
Warfare in the United
States," before a recent session of thei
American lublic Health association. The
doctor dealt largely with the tuberculo
sis problem as associated with the child
labor question. He saiu that to separate
the two problems is impossible; that
the one is dependent to a large extent
on the other, and that until child labor
is rectified tiie warfare against tubercu
losis must go on under a gneat handi
cap. lima labor predisposes to tuner-
culosis. I his does not appiv exclusively
to child labor in the factory." In many
cases child labor is as bad in the home
as in the factory, and the danger from
tuberculosis is just as great. Bovine tu
berculosis is one of the most dangvrous
forms, particularly as regards the child.
Seventy peri cent, of the deaths among
children are from bovine tuberculosis,
which recent experiences have proven
conclusively is easily communicated from
butter and other dairy products. The
open-air schools are invaluable in fight
ing this disease, but the plan should be
applied to high schools and colleges as
wen as grammar scnoois.
call for the union label, we weaken some'
union and strengthen some opponent of
organized labor. Every purchase of non
union goods makes the fight that much
harder for some union, and places it in
a position where it is less able to help
others in time of strife. Our interests
are inseparable onr cause is a common
one, whether our craft has a label or
not, and ns soon as the great army of
union people grasp the truth of this, the
labor movement will occupy the position
to which :t is entitled.
We may resolve all we please, but It
is action and practice alone that count.
A solid line of union men demanding
the union label would soon make it pos
sible to purchase union-made goods ill
every retail establishment in the city.
A strong demand for the label will
make the organizations having labels
strong, and they :n turn will tlien be able
to help the organization without labels,
both morally anil financially, in the hour
of need. The label is the surest means
of driving out of the market the prod
uct of the penitentiary and the sweat
shop. It is a guarantee that the articla
purchased has been made under condi
tions which do :iot offer encouragement ,
to the spread of disease and the propa'
gation of lisease germs. It is a guaran
tee of those tilings which make life
worth while and a condemnation of and
a protest against the things which make
life dreary and undesirable.
Alex. Ironside,
Correspondent.
Who Will Claim Them?
Letters uncalled for at the Barre post
ofiice for tiie week ending October 10,
1912, were as follows:
Men. Mr. K. Allen, Isaac Baker (2),
A. Branch, O. Cenri, F. F. Cleveland,
T. Fabrijoi, C. Floraville, Geo. R. John
son, Hurbet MeRoy. O. Melinari, Charles
W. Smith, O. Spagnch, O. E. Tray.
Women. Miss Josephine Arnold, Mrs.
A. Branch, Miss M:bel Dewing, care J. O.
Patterson, Miss Mary fiomez, Mrs. Jo
seph Guev;n, Mrs. Guidulli, Mrs. Xina
Guild, Mrs. C. Gordon (3), Minnie E.
Johnson, Sarah J. Kelsey (2), Mrs. Mar-
cialle King, Mrs. M. Masnareth, Albintf
Ogna, Mrs. II. A. Scott.
Firms. Watson's Garage.
GILBERT'S MENTAL HABITS.
"Pinafore" Author Keen, but Nsvsr Fren
zied, Says Century Writer.
e
Sir William Gilbert contradicted every
tradition regarding genius, which he
seemed to rgard, like Michaelangelo, as
"eternal patience." His mind was as
disciplined as it was original, writes
Rowland Grey in the October Century,
reviewinir the career of "The Author aJ
Pinafore." His eves never rolled with ! j't threadbare and worn from too much
"fine fwnzv" but thev were keen to t use, but tiie tact remains that tiie de
discover nnv flaw in his work. He con- i niand
In order to impress upon his congre
gation the length of eternity, a colored
preacher used the following illustration:
If a sparrow, bredderen, should take a
drop of water from the Atlantic ocean
at Coney island and with this drop of
water in his beak should hop a hop a
day until it reached the Pacific ocean
in San Francisco, and when it got there
should let the drop fall into the Pacific
and when this was done should turn
around and hop a hop a day all the way
back to Coney island and get another
drop and do tha same thing over, and
keep on doing this very same thing until
it had carried the whole Atlantic ocean
over into the Pacific, it would then only
be early morning mi eternity.
, It may be thtt the average trade un
ionist gets tired of label organization,
becomes convinced that it is a dry sub-
Travel Sketches by Robert Hichena
and Jules Guerin.
Robert Hichens and Jules Guerin, who
have worked together before, have col
laborated in a series of travel papers
covering journeys through Dalmatia and
Greece, finishing in Constantinople. The
series will be one of the features of tiie
new volume of The Century, many of
Mr. Guerin's paintings being reproduced
in the colors of the originals.
How to Be Well.
Bv fS
sidered every detail as worthy of special
research.
He would buv the best and most ex
pensive Greek lexicon to insure the per
fect accuracy of the Greek wonls and
phrases introduced into a single song in
Hi Majesty, and he would copy a
whole play in his clear handwriting i '
for the label is not nearly so
I great as it should be. nnd we know no
other way of in-reasing it except by
constantly calling attention to it and
urging Upon the membership the neces
sity lor and the benefits to be derived
from a healthy demand.
We want to impress upon union men
that the label is the very life of union
when new editions called for alterations,! '" In making the rounds among mer
which his warmest devotees often de
plore. In the finsl issue of the "Bab
Ballads," h committed the truly Gil
bertian crime of tampering with his own
masterpiece.
"I'd like to the man who could p. . .-y- .JUuiJ- Pt " " Prober had been sPl,t
rsuade me to pn.mlse to Iotc. honor . . i.lJ !
to many fartK-n. giving no party the
Saved by His Wife.
She's a wise woman who knows just
what to do when her hubsnd's life ia in
dsnger, but Mrs. R, J. Flint. Braintree.
Vt., is of that kind." She insisted on
my using 1H-. King's Xew Discovery,"
writes Mr. F.. for a dreadful cough
chants who handle labd goods, we are
constantly reminded that the demand is
not what it should be. Xow this diffi
culty must be remedied, and the sooner
the better. We know that a united pur
chasing power of the organized workers
is a weapon that no man fancies coming
in conflict wifh, nnd if we ever reach
that point where we all spend our mon
ey, not to strengthen our opponents, but
to build up a strong union-label trade,
then we can make substantial gains in
other directions.
There are mercHnts in this city who
handle union-made goods. Whenever w
Your stomach and bowels are tb: larg
est organs in your body.
And the easiest part of you to be abused.
You eat all kinds of different foods, you
don't chew enough, you bolt your food
too fast Then you neglect your bowels.
Consequence is you get a stomach full
of sour, half-digested food and the bowels
choked full of filthy watte matter, giving
poisons off into the blood and body. Is it
any wonder you feel badly?
In my practice I found so many people
whose sickness came from bad stomsch
and bowels that I had a prescription put
up and waiting for them.
This prescription became famous as a
health giver, so I put it up, naming it Dr.
True's Elixir, and you can buy it most
everywhere. Ail druggists and dealers in
medicine sell it for 35c, 50c and $1.00. I
know a lot of doctors and druggists who
use it in their own families, so you see
what they think of it! Just remember the
name, Dr. True's Elixir. It brings health
to men, women and children.
Tha Difference,
Two standby were talking over cur
rent event on the Eattern Tenue cor
ner, "Well, if its good weather vmill
rersuade me to promise to iotp. dohht . . , . , . j i
nd ol.y hire" id Miss VVelialonir. ' "'Wnnuwi1(niUu--. jv- , ore urn, men who r..l been ee a rn1 her xedneUT t, e
tiow could I proceed further without I "I don't Mome you. replil the pert ilTJJ , - - . -,'" , .... I L "'"-'
,. 1 " , . i kci- R.rorn' Hee.M I a -LI V 1 . demn!y announce! their own p-liti- snnther -hut not a msnv as when Ted-
IndehVacy or ven preemption? young bride -Oilmen Record Herald, j A tjank buck prepared ! ffltOTte. ,,, di(rt fmm (h thr :T ,,r vmm'hr- -X- ,aM the first wise
A lltt! thoutht showed me thst IJ J T&ke Zt Itlbst irate. Asi for KORLICk 5. i on! 1 1 er t and lined np with one ofjtnan. -perbp not. Folk alwar n
fceld the key to the altuatlon. I bad no j Tti la not a !nrle moment la l!f , m . Anj FSttllt Tmt "ny fctir. further to see a nenen tfcaa a food
- A
Ciaculty la JetixUst who. tfc ladr ' that w can afford t lo. Gu!bura. )
ftk'n of Deouty ia a Jsy Forevar.
when I tii o wesk m v friends ail
thought I had only a short time to live.' fail to patronize these stores, or fail to
and it completely cwrvd me. A quicK
cure for cough and cold, it's the raw!
afe and reliable medicine for many
throat and lung trouble grip bronchi
tis, croup, whooping cough, quinsv, ton
silitia, hemorrhage. A trial will con
vince you. SO rent and fl.flfl. Guar
anteed' by Red Cross Pharmacy. Advt.
D. T. Fstlla Oouraud'a Oriental
Crm or Maciol Baautiflar.
t1- a
Tft Pff1am
t rrfcMx 1. 4ft r air be
Mil rr-y ftnj
bsMvlf. sv4
a 4t.xi . ft
km tttOC lM IM
H m kirHie ir
taauo H to 4
I pi pPf f .tV-sK
i in Ir U A.
ks1v mt t-svat-
rWT
la. thm
I rt- r tf
TOOTH ACHE REMEDIES
"The kinds that cure."
1 0 cents per package.
CORN REMEDIES
that will cure corns, 10c,
15c and 25c.
-St, Jobnbury Republican.
'KMmi'l Crea.' at OW V he-ltl f -fct ! fl I nllfl? UTfc a ft ... . 1
FSl T. VJUl fr H t4 am In Tt 262 North Main Strt Earr.Veront

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