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French Broad hustler. [volume] (Hendersonville, N.C.) 1916-1919, August 17, 1916, Image 4

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PAGE FOUB
A' AlhUil ' w .
And Western Carolina Democrat.
Twenty-Third Year of Publication Third Ave. West.
Published Every Thursday by The Mutual Printing Company.
Gordon F. Gartington E(Utor andManagier.
W. Marvin Iteese -.- -Associate Editor.
r
Entered at the Postoffice at Henderson ville as Second Class Mail Matter.. ;
All subscriptions payable in advance, and discontinued promptly upon expiration.
One year in advance.. " 22
Six months in advance ,
Three months in advance ---
'All advance notices of sales, entertainments, shows where admission is
to be Charged or money to be raised, will be charged at the regular adver
tising rate of five cents, per line. A line averages six words. Other ad
vertising rates given upon request.' Address all communications and make
all checks pr money orders payable to Mutual Printing Company, Henderson
.'yille, N. C. t
Hendersonville, Thursday, August 17, 19 16
EXTEND THE SEASON.
" If every manf woman and child in
Hendersonville will lend an effort in
promoting the extension of the season
here there is no doubt in our mind but
that hundreds of peope will be induced
to remain here several weeks longer
than they first intended.
The summer season ordinarily has
been entirely too short. We have tried
hard to begin the season sooner. In
this we rave gained a little, but the
most important point now is to ex
tend the season. Make September
October and
November the best
months in the history of Henderson
ville. A prominent Florida man said the
other day that Hendersonville should
be the leading stopping over place for
the rich winter tourists who go to
Florida after Christmas. There is no use
arguing that we are not prepared to
handle this travel. We have fine ho
tels, steam heated. We have enter
tainment, climate and everything es
sential for their pleasure.
Hendersonville people need to waka
up. Get on the job and work now
now while the people are among us to
wards making this the greatest wia
ter resort in "Western North Carolina.
NEED OF DEMONSTRATOR.
Had Henderson ccuntj a farm dem
onstrator after the July floods there
is v. icubt. but that the farmers would
have saved thousands of dollars.
The Hustler has. maintained all the
"time that the county cannot well do
without a county farm demonstrator.
It was nothing less than a'calamity
when the county" commissioners failed
to see the wisdom in supporting a
government agent here, and now that
such a misfortune hag been sustained
by the farmers of the county, especial
ly those cultivating valley lands there
could never be a greater need for ao
expert on farming in the county.
In Rutherford, Polk and ether wide
awake counties the farm demonstra
tors are busy, working overtime dis
tributing seeds and rendering invalua
ble advice to the floorl stricken farm
ers. In Rutherford county alone the
demonstrator distributed S.OOO pounds
of beans, turnips, buckwheat and mil
lett seeds.
The commissioners could save the
county thousands upon thousands of
dollars, if they wanted to. Write them
a letter see them in person or attend
the next meeting and demand a farm
demonstrator.
HIGH COST OF PAPER.
Last but not least is the tremen
ous rise in the cost of paper. Newspa
pers all over the country are making
desperate efforts in an economical
saving of waste paper. The big mills
claim that there is a shortage of raw
materials, on account of the heavy de
mands since the war.
Whether or not this is the true state
of affairs wo do not know; but one
thing is certain and that is that plain
newspaper which we use to buy. at two
dollars and forty cents per one hun
dred pounds is now selling or five
dollars and fifty cents per one hun
dred pounds. There are two things
almost absolutely necessary for the
average weekly newspaper to do in or
der to miss bankruptcy. They must
increase their rates for advertising
and subscriptions.
Another important items which is be
ing indulged in by many papers is
curtailing .the subscription list, only
keeping the lives ones on. This item
does not help the Hustler because for
the past few years not a subscriber
received his paper after his time ran
out. We have a strictly paid in ad
vance circulation and it matters no!
who the subscriber might be, if his
dollar is not forthcoming at the expi-
,ttl,un 01 nis time his name is
ped" off.
'chop-
Main Food of Asiatics.
Fish,
nee and
PrtnciDal.arHM J..
vegetables are
the
ket basket tne Asiatlc mar-
THE SOUTHERN BAILROAD.
No corporation suffered during the
recent flood as did the Southern Rail
way company and particularly did they
suffer in Henderson county. Hundreds
of men have been working night and
day to open up the railroad to the
south where thousands of people were
waiting to travel in the mountains.
To those who really, know anything
about construction work it was re
markable the way the washouts were
repaired by the working crews. It is
stated by a man of authority that the
repair work is being made even more
substantial than before the flood. Tho
road up the mountain is being put
into excellent condition.
The heavy traffic both in passengers
and freight is working the railroad to
its fullest capacity. It is not a rare
sight to ee double headers pass Hen
dersonville now when they use to stop
at Saluda on this division.
OOJ JOB PRINTING PLANT.
Did it ever occur to you that every
job of printing ;-ou give us, no matter
how small it might be, is a big lift to
wards helping your home town news
paper and ultimately helping the city
in which you: live?
There are0 we know, many improve
ments to be made in the Hustler. We
have been growing steadily for many
years. Our job printing department Is
one of the prime factors in the growth
of the Hustler. The larger the reve
nue of the job department, naturally.
the niore efforts and money we can
place on the Hustler. Do not con
strue this as begging for your work.
We simply want to impress upon our
readers that the Hustler is more, or
less dependent upon its various depart
ments and by patronizing one depart
ment you help the other department.
HAWKINS SALE MONDAY.
Splendid Property n Jluin ' Street to
be '"'old at Public Auction at
Eieien OTelock.
A public auction sale of real proper
ty of much importance is that of the
Hawkin's property on Main street
which will be disposed of Monday,
August 21, at 11 a. m. The sale will
take place on the grounds and excel
lent music wil be furnished for rue oc
casion by the Hendersonville band.
This is a splendid piece of property
and is one of the old landmarks or
Hendersonville. The tent show on the
grounds will not interfere with the
sale as the side curtains will be lifted
us so as to command a good view of
the lot. It will be a good investment
for some one and rumor has it that
promotoffe of a big hotel have an eye
on the property.
NEWS OP THE WEEK
FR03I HORSE SHOE.
(Special to The Hustler.)
Horse Shoe.. Aug.: 15. Mrs." Z. T.
Pinner of Pomdnia, S.' C.,' is spending
some time here.
Rev. T. J. Jimison will return from
Virginia this week, where he has been
conducting a meeting. He and Mrs.
Jimison will occupy the cottage being
erected by A. L. and L. E. Davenport.
Mr. Roy Johnson of Pomonia, S. C,
is visiting his mother, Mrs. Corrie
Johnson.
Mrs. J. K. Burke, of Spartanburg
was here Monday.
A wooden bridge is being built over
the river here. Mr. S. E. Case has the
contract.
ai lu 11 r nui en is ai amnn a r wnrir
. 1
. pr
The Boy of It '
A hov wantprf Q Antr o' .-u
uncle said: "Well. Eddie. sunnns T
J vv u, CI .Llll bllC 1 lJl J
6ivc juu iwu uuncyea aoiiars tor a.
dog. Would you spend thjt whole sum
on one dog, or would you buy a pretty
good dog ard put the rest of the
money in the savings bank?" "Well,
uncle," replied Eddie, "if you leave
it to me, I would buy two hundred one
dollar dogs." '
Affection a Heavenly Gift.
How sacred, how beautiful, . is the
feeling of affection in pure and guile
less bosoms! The proud may sneer
at it. the fashionable may call it fa
ble, the selfish and dissinated may
affect to despise it; but the holy pas
sion is surely of heaven., and is mad a
evil by the corruptions of thosA wtinm ,
11 was sent to bless and preserve
j Mordaunt.
, - w
& & & & & & &
M A COLUMN-OF-TICKLEKS. , &
yVMJVIU: , S
"Who's the smartest boy in your
class,. Bobby?" asked his uncle.
Td like to tell you,," answered uod
by, modestly, "only father says I must
not boast.'' ,
w 9
"Mike,
I am going to make you a
: present of this pig." 1 '
j "Ah, sure, an tis just like you, 8or!"
Wife with newspaper) "It says
here that men grow bald because of
xne i inwnae acwviiy vi
nusoana
tense activity of their chins.
i?
"Say, Alabama is a dry state, isn't!
it?"
"Sure."
"But when I was there I saw several
regroes who were intoxicated." '
WeH, of course, they can't Btop
the sale of that awful cotton gin en
tirely." t?
A Hero. Maybe.
Tommy. Pa. what's a biped?
Father. An animal with two legs.
For instance, a man is a biped.
Tommy. Well, what's Uncle James?
He's only got one leg. BostonJTrans
cript. H
A Small Point.
Parriatpr'a Wifp Kf VOUr O.liimt Was I
rnto,i rr m.irr. On what
Bart-isterv-Insanity. We proved
o Vlo fnfKr,- r-nnt erOTI- tXICt TOttr9
that, his father once spent two years,
in an asylum.
Barrister's Wife But he didn't dick
he?
Barrister Yes. He was doctor
there, but ye had not time to bring
that out Tit-Bits.
h n
Ouek.
ni TVioctmaitor " mmnlainpd the t
tiresome after-dinner .speaker, "there.
is so much conversation going on thai
I can't hear a word I'm saying."
"Oh, well," said a voice at the end j
of the tables "you are not missing
much." Cincinnati Enquirer.
5 5 ?
Father's Tip.
"Wish to marry mv daughter, do
" . . . .
OU
9 Tnlro rtfr 5f1viee don t. '
"But why, sir?"
'1 have noticed evidence of insanity
in her lately."
"Good heavens! What evidence?"
"She says she wants to marry you."
Boston Transcript.
S
Had His Preferences.
Hospitable Farmer fcv. stranger,
sit right down X6 the table. You are
welcome to your dinner, but you'll
have to eat what the rest of us do.
Stranger. Thanks., but I er if IV a
all the same to you I'll eat what the
rest of vou don't. Philadelphia Press.
THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK.
There is no month in the whole year., . As to the time of seeding, many peo
i which natuie wears a more beautiful j pie differ. As for myself, I always
j jipearance than in tlic month of An- prefer to sow the seed the latter paTt of
gust. Sprin- ba3 many beauties, and, August or the first of September and
Ytv.v is a fresh and blooming month, at least not later than the middle of
but the charms of this time of "ea1' are September for fall turnips. The seed
enhanced by their contract with the may bo covered by "brushing in" (a
viTiiPr season. August has no such method which i3 familiar to most read-
advantage, it comes when we
tr.cmV.ov nnthinz but clear skies, green
e .
! minds as completely as tney nave uis-
appeared from the earth; and yet wnat
o ipnsnt timp it is! urcnavas aim
corn fields Hue with a hum of labor;
trees bend beneath the thick clusters of
rich fruit, which bow their branches
to the ground; and the corn, piled in
graceful sheaves, or waving in every
light breath that sweeps above it, as if
it wooed the sickle, tinges the land
scape with a golden hue. A mellow
softness appears to nang ovu me
whole earth. Charles Dickens,
"Pickwick Papers."
in
A RAG RU(i RACE.
A novel entertainment was given in j
Flat Rork for the benefit of the Hen-,
dersonville hospital also fqr the fun
nf it.
fieM and sveet-smening noweia , used snouia oe excefumgiy ut,uij aa opuiiauuui!;; auu oioioui mci nuui
whon'the recollection of snow, and ice, i seed covered deeply wil not have vital- singer, J. W. Elder,, R. O. Cannon, F.
mi, u .iuk has faded from our-itv enough to push to the surface of ! E. Kerr and W. J. Warlick of the local
A number of ladies, in groups or at Alta Pass,
three, raced against each other to win j Weather bureau officials in Wash
prizes, one for the prettiest, one for ington confirmed the Alta Pass rain
the biggest, and one for most original fall as the record. The greatest rain
rag rug that could be crocheted in two fall in any 24 hours previous to the
and a half hours. Ginghams and cot- July storm was that at Alexandria, La.,
tons of various weaves and every ,gay in June, 1880 when 21.6 inches fell.
color, including the gayest of all, white
and black were distributed in myste
rious bundles. In each group two peo
ple cut and sewed together the endless
strips;, while one champion of the hook
crocheted for all she was worth.
Amon? the ladies were various men
who cut strips so recklessly that it
was a wronder no fingers were snant
off. There was a thrilling momerj:
wnen time was cauea.
. -a 1 V . 1
and the rugs
were spread together on the floor, and
. the eager ring 0 contestants swarmed
around them. Some were were round,
some long, some hexagonal, and some
werp sombre, somp brieht somfi ripli-
TiiTn nnstD cnarfoa enrn o rrvrrrr c
' cato nastpl shadps sottip rr!Tfniic I
j futurist frenzies.
I Then again the men were useful.
lThey awarded the prizes,, and them
auctioned off the rugs to the eager
J bidders. All the proceeds of the auc
tion were given to the hospital; and
the narty was such a success that the
workers are ready to try it' over again.
The Modern Housekeeper.
She fills her tireless cooker
With seven kinds of grub;
Turns on the suds and puts her duds
Into the scrubless tub.
She starts the dustless sweeper v
On gear keyed down to low;
Powders her nose and gayly goes
Td see a picture show.
- Ohio Agr. College.
When the campaign against typhoid
in Catawba county ouened last Wed
nesday at Hickory,, 1,315 persons were
vaccinated with the anti-tvohoid
rum. According to reports this is the
J TH1S JfAasusw u JiAJuwA a.
But yesterday Kanuga lay, y
I All smiling inthe vale's embrace;
And gloom funeral haunts the place.
Enraptured, once the verdant hills
Close held her in, caressing arms;
jBut came the ruthless foe that kills,
! And, lo are gone her myriad charms.
I
-a-WAll Kjiniim ..Nvrmor ,
.-..-Thy : graceful curves the waves will
hold ' ' '
That fondly kissed thy sylvan shore,
And gently by the meadows rolled. -
Never again the summer moon
1 Will glimpse her splendor in thy faco
Wierd liillabiep in guttural bass: .
No more the hues of Pinnacle ; .
Will tinge the deeps within thy,
breast, .
Nor lovers' lips their secrets tell. .
In boats that drift on oars that rest.
j
No more the herpn's snowy flight
Will startle in thine opal flood " 1
The painted trout, or sorely fright -The
.wriggling denizens of the mud.
Gone are swimmers from thy shore,
And all the race of Naiads fair,
Whose witching forms shall cleave no
more
Thy waves, their amorous arms to
dare.
I The campers of the Hastoc tribe
I Lugubrious gaze thy borders o'er
powers of earth and heaven would
I DI"lDO
Thine erstwhile glory to restore.
But, ah! Kanuga, in the shrine
Of memory still thy charms abide;
In dreams I see thy bosom shine,
And float upon thy silvery tide.
Yet in some blesj tomorrow may "
lhy happy resurrection be,
' And all forgotten this sad day
Amid delights that wait for thee.
Hastoc W. G. Bt
PREPARE FOR TURNIPS NOW.
You should select a rich plat of
ground for your turnip patch and
weaK now not Demg airaia 01 getting
i 4 n n i - r . , r a. x
luu ui. iuutu oi me mriuu is wa-
tpr anrl if the irrnnnH io nnt wp11 hrnlr.
11 j y 1 L Will Ul' CLiJLKZ L UV1U IUUlk3lUl
your turnip crop will suffer accord
ingly. No matter how rich the land you
select, it will need a liberal applica
tion of manure. Place this manure on
the land before breaking and it will
give" the ftest results. - After your ma
n it Weill Vi n r. Virtlsl Aicf 11 rrt
nure has been turned under the land
v ill need frequent workings at least
1 after each rain until time to sow the
seed. I always prefer to work the land j
into goou conaiuon as soon as it uua
been broken, and then to give it a
liehf harrowinsr after each rain. This
v.nrrowinr r-onserves the. moisture and
eupplies the water that is needed by
the turnips.
re-.ers), or
they may be put in with a
In any case the implement
weeder. In any case
- 1 1, 1 l : - -r
tne grounu. i'. 1. n., m
slve Farmer.
ALT A PASS HOLDS RECORD.
Has
Heaviest Rainfall for 24 Hours
of Any Section of the United
states.
Rainfall of 22.22 inches at Alta P
in Mitchell county for 24, hours pre
ceding 2 p. m. July 16 is believed to
have established a hew record for the
united States according to Lee A. Den-
! son, of Raleigh, section director of tne
! weather bureau, who has
compietett
his report on the flood in this state last
i month. Mr. Denson said as far as he
knew Alexandria, La., had led the
country with 21.4 inches in a similar
period. MitchelV county in the w est-
tti . rf V. ctoto uroc. hnrrl nit nnr
MANY VISITORS ARE
REGISTERED AT FLETCHER.
(Special to The Hustler.)
Fletcher, Aug. 15. Visitors register
ed at Floral Home, are: Mrs. Poo
and daughter, Mrs. Bourger and daugh-
ter, of Jacksonville, Fla
wife, of Savannah,, Ga.
Mr. Frize and
Mrs. Parham
and daughter., of Gainesville. Fla.; Mrs.
Barnett, Mr. Loeyea and Miss Loeyea,
of 'Manning, S. C; Mrs. Anderson and
daughter, of Conway, S. C. ; Mrs. Riley,
two sons, and Mr. Manning of Charlesr
ton. S. C.
J. L. Carland's home registers the
names of Miss Flora Putvoye, of New
Orleans; Miss Rogers, of New Orleans.
At Dr. L. L. Johnson's we find the
fol1ow.ins: guestsf Mrs. E. B. Cwell.
of Savannah,, Ga.; Mrs. E. Cars well and
Mrs. Etheridge, of Waycross. Ga.; Mrs.
Jefford and son, of Charleston. S. C;
Mrs. F. B. Moran, Alice and Mary Mo
ran. 'Mrs. Charles Moran, and Miss
Ceute Rice, of Charleston, S' -C.
SLIDE MOVES BIG HOCK
I .
, Granite BonJder. Weighing 250.000
Founds, Carried L0 Yards by
Force of Slide.
A hie: slide oil Ilikh Peak mountain
near Blantyre, during the recent flrviV
learned a huo granite boulder, weigh
ing many ions'a distance of 50 yar-'s
from its resting place. The rock
measures;14 feet wide, feet long aud
6 feet high, and "contains mhir.
feet. It is estimatprf that tha tu.
of th rorlr
is fully 250,000 pounds.
v. -v i uv, rir 1 1,
MSURMCE SERVICE S
Is - first of all: to make our clients' SURE or R"Rf!TTPiii ... .
, ,
them contracts correctly drawn,
Dies sufiicieritly strong to carry out the contracts promptly.
-This first step is tohe ibl lowed by pointing out to these clients
possible improvements that can be' made, thereby reducing e
hazard, reducing the cosi off the contract. If a loss occurs it is
our part to assist our clients in every possible way in the adjust
ment of the loss, and. by so doing, assist : the company in, makina
prompt and r satisfactory settlements. ' - 5
: - Lastly but not least in importance, to :educate the public in the
' dangers of fires from the more common causes, and by so doing
; teach people to do their share individually to prevent firea, thus
- helping to save our burning dollars.
We earnestly endeavor, at all. times to give you this service and
, we are backed by the STRONGEST COMPANIES IN THE WORLD1
Ewbank. Ewbahfc & Company
Real Estate V Renting 1 Insurance
POIHT LOOKOUT NEWS -
i '
Now. a Convenient Outlet for Those
Who Used to. Come by Bat Cave.
(Special to The Hustler.)
Point Lookout, Aug.
Broad River washed the
1-5. Since-
y .
roads away
in those sections through which it
flnwa mA whit furnished a conven-
lent outlet for numeroua. individuals,
' . . . - i
this nlace has become the most con
venient outlet or numbers of those
who used to come through Bat Cave.
Weare sorry to learn that Elim
Martin and Hobert Moore ' have the,
fever and are very ill. We' all wish
them speedy recovery.
Rev. Mr. Morris preached an inter
esting sermon at Mt. Home church
Sunday and there were also services
held at S. P. Williams Sunday night by
ail Episcopal minister. A number at
tended both services.
Oval Lamb of Hendersonville aud
Mr. 'McGee of Canton, N. C, were in
this section Saturday.
Frand GillandV who a few months
ago purchased some land near Sugar
Loaf, is now making a log yard and is
preparing to .Jmild a dwelling on his
new farm.
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Jones of this
place has moved back to Chimney
Rock Mountain to live with their par
ens, Mr. and Hampton Jones.
FIVE THOUSAND DOLLAR
FJRE AT INDIAN, S. C.
. , I" . ' . ance of the principal streets of Bur-
Fire, supposed to have been caused : lingtcn bv paving. that ig guanfeed to
by a defective flue, at Inman, S. C, ' ast 3 yg3s
early Sunday morning, destroyed pro- ;
pertyv with a valuation estimated at j The North Carolina annuai Deaf and
$5,000. With the help of -five members jDumb convention convened last Wed
of the Spartanburg Fire department, nesday morning at Wrightsvilje Beach
! volunteer hre ngnters preventea a se-
rious conflagration. The flames start-
ed in a pressing club, in a building
owned by E P. Clark, of Campobello.
Several other buildings were damaged
to nmp Pvtprt n.r.H ns tho fire was on
Main street, for a time the whole bus
iness section of Inman was threatened.
Little or no insurance was carried on
any of the property damaged.
The fire was discovered about 3:30
i Sunday morning and it began to
spread" rapidly. A call was sent to
t--v- n a MMiotnTif f 'Mint- unTiT-
fire department rushed to the relief in
an automobile. They carried some
chemical equipment and the fire was
gotten under control in about an hour
and a half. Water from neighboring
wells was used to fight the flames with.
Three or four buildings were totay
destroyed by the fire and several oth
ers were damaged tota more or less
degree. On account of the fact that
practically all the buildings situated
near the starting point of the fire were
frame buildings there was little to
check the advance of the fire except
the efforts of the fighters. Spartan-
but g Herald.
.
MEETING AT HOMES CHUBCH.
,
Rev. J. B. Beavers, who supplied
U not H on H Pronn vi 1 1 o XJn nficf nhnrnli
last summer, is conducting a revival
meeting in the Holmes church out at
West Hendersonville. Mr. Beavers
does not believe in the tongues move
ment and he asks the co-operation of
all christians.
The Baptists of the Tabernacle
church at Raleigh announce that they
have called Rev. Dr. G. L. Yates, pas
tor of the First Baptist church of Ty
ler, Texas, thus pvfening the count with
Texas which thew.4- n1 1 r-"--
the Reverend Charles E. Maddry and
yanked him t0 that state.
3 Sh
A Carload ' of
lie Caes
We
have just
of Tin
Cans, complete for canning
, purposes. Call at
what - you need.
them cheap.
Case
At the Depot
- v$ givinw
or written, and backed by corn
1
TAR HEEL NEWS
Goldsboro ig to have a new
box factory in the near future.
paper
The J, M. Odell Manufacturing Co
will rebuild its cotton mill at Bynum
destroyed by the recent flood.
Yadkin county commissioners may
let contract within 30 days to "replace
bridges destroyed by recent flood.
Caldwell county has voted $5ft,000
bonds to rebuild and" repair brijaeg
and roads. .
The commissioners of Surry county
are planning to replace bridges de
strowed by the recent flood.
Buncombe county commissioners
will rebuilt Gorman bridge near Crag
gy, steel or concrete.
November 7, 8, 9 and 10, has been
announced as the dates for holding tha
Mecklenburg county fair this year.
J. W. and A. E. Watts, of Taylors
ville are to established a knitting mill
at that place. They have Diirchaspfi
the machinery.
Three thousand and five hundred
persons' in Alamance county have ben
piven ;free of charge, immunity from
typhoid fever.
Much is being added to tne aupear-
; witn more tnan lou delegates and visi-
i tors in attendance,
,
! The Southern, Seaboard Air Line and
Norfolk Southern, Railroad companies
' have been indicted for fai:'..re to keeo
a gateman constantly on duty at the
crossing in Raleigh.
. James Cook, a prominent business
man of Greensboro was drowned in the
Guilford Battle Ground lake, last week,
when he went in to swim and caught
cramps. i
Buncombe county commissioners
bave let a contract to the Roanoke
Iron & Bridge Works of Roanoke. Va.,
fo rsalvaging and reconstructing the
iron bridges at the site of Gudger's
bridge at Azalia and Haw Creek.
W. W. Greer of Wilmington U or
ganizing a $100,000 meat packing com
pany which nroposes a daily csnacity
of JoO to 200 bogs and 30 cattle in
cluding provision for addinsr cold
storage units until a capacity of 1000
hpgs is reached.
The production of sugar beets i? an
other farming development that the
future holds for Catawba county. C.
M. Yoder has been exneriment'na: w-th
the beets this year and has proved that
thev will grow wel in the soil of that
county.
Rutherford county commissioner
have-, sold $75,;000 worth of county
bonds fo Stacv. and Braun of Toledo,
Ohio, for a premium of $1,000. The
proceeds of this bond sale will be used
immediately in reconstruction of ths
bridges Pnd highway destroyed by tho
July freshet.
Aubrey Kelly, aged 13, at the risk of
his life,- with the assistance of two
colored men, succeeded in saving the
life of his 11-year old brother who had
fell into thP ocean about 100 yards
from shore at Wrightsville Beach last
j Thursday.
received a carload
our store arid get
We are selling
& King
Phone 247

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