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The Caucasian. (Clinton, N.C.) 188?-1913, November 02, 1911, Image 8

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1
II Ul
EES'
TOE HOOKS OF THE BTDLXL
God s?ak In Geneil. and mid:
Iet there b llht, and darkness fled;
In 2-sodas, at H!b command,
AS Israel fled from Egrpt's land;
Their lava, and what their tribe be
fell, rlticu& and Numbers tell;
kd't holy will again we tee
Contained la Deuteronomy.
Then follow Joshua, Judges, Ruth,
Two books of Sanuiel from his
youth;
And two of Kings, the record plain
Of many a good and evil reign;
Two books of Chronicles tell o'er
Each monarch's history heard be
fore Their noble deeds of valor done.
Their many battles fought and won.
Historic words our hearts Inspire
Trom Ezra and from Nehemlah;
And Esther shows the ways of God,
Whlle Job receives the chastening
rod;
The Psalms lifted up the soul with
praise,
And Proverbs teach In homely
phraso;
'Ecclesfaates next comes on.
And then the Song of Solomon.
Isaiah now, with vision clear,
"Beholds a promised Saviour near,
While Jeremiah lifts on high,
For Israel's race, his humble cry;
And Lamentations paints his grief
That Zion weeps nor finds relief;
Ezeklel, Daniel, each record
The wondrous dealing of the Lord,
Hosea, Joel, Amos, too,
And Obadiah, prophets true.
O'er Israel's faithless nation yearn.
And warn from evil to return;
Then Jonah, MIcah, Nahum show
God's tender love and threatened
woe;
Habakkuk prays In words sublime.
That ring through all succeeding
time;
Next Zephanlah, Haggal,
Then Zechariah, Malachl,
And we have passed in close review
STrom ancient Scripture to the new.
And now a Saviour's birth behold,
In Matthew's Gospel sweetly told;
Hark, Luke and John, His works dis
close, 'His Bufferings, death, and how He
rose.
In Acts the Holy Ghost descends,
,And Christ His Kingdom wide ex
tends; In Romans, lo! the apostle Paul
Commends the gift of God to all;
Corinthians and Galatians show
The grace that every soul may know.
Ephesians and Phillppians tell
The seal his life portrayed so well;
olosslans, Thessalonlans, speak
Of hope and comfort to the weak;
jn Timothy, Paul's charge w find,
In Titus, friendship warm and kind;
aPhllemon shows how love constrains,
Whlle Hebrews all the types ex
plains; "With James and Peter, John and
Jude,
And Revelation, we conclude
The books that in God's Word di
vine CLike stars of endless glory shine.
By Fanny J. Crosby.
substance U likewise dangerous, be
cause these things Ignite spontane
ously when placed where there la not
a free circulation of air. They
should be gotten lid of Immediately
after they have served their purpose.
bard to believe If every ote wba net
bin os the street war to say, "Good
morning, Mr. Taag?e-Toag:i? t
am sure that Dick would try harder
to be manly If bis teacher call4 his
same oa the roll. "Richard AprU
Eyes. And there would be no more
books for mamma to pick from the
floor for Frank If he were punished
with each a name as "Ererytalng-Out-o
Mis-Place." Selected.
TRUE AXD JTST.
rota come to bring Hat kalf? I
No replied Tom. -I featt $
to tell y&a thai l&e tittle ftlad fcf
beea broken for a long fcile. and If
yea wcnld like to back oat of the
trade, I'll come by here Monday
morning oa ny way back to school,!
and bring yon? velocipede back-" I
"And so that is what brought yon I
oct at this time o night? As If I
didn't know about that broken blade!
Why. I was la the crowd that day at
that tennis match wbea little Anna
Ferry borrowed yoor knife to eat a
"To be true and Just In all ray
dealings" There now, mamma. i?c o man nsv mum cnougn
har rot it exactlr tijrbt at last! That tfe b! bUde, Don't yon re-
is what I left oat when I said It last
Sunday. I skipped from 'hurting no
body by word or deed. to 'bearing
no malice or hatred In my heart,'
3IicelUneoos Dangers .Kerosene
Af nfl th a rimllnn can. the
swinging gas bracket, wood work f d the teacher said I did n t know
near a furnace pipe, or a stove pipe 'the lesson so well as Dick Stevens
or chimney, or near a stove, wood: J" W; J It a good trade ,me and
work near or touching a steam pipe. Wck made toy-my knife for
improperly installed, or insulated ' hla old velocipede? 1 had two knives
electric wiring, are all dangers to be and he had two velocipedes; to neith
looked into and removed. These er of us lost anything
.,Ki. Ki .rMt-H in retail. Me and Dick made a trade"
TMrr,,i -. unr. i repeated Mrs. Collins.
MANY DUCKS IN CHINA.
"I am afraid
member, when yon were fasting
about her breaking the little one how
old Mr. Sparks made yon madder by
telling you about Sir Isaac Newton
saying mildly to the little dog wbo
upset the lamp, and burned up hU
valuable papers, G Diamond, Dia
mond, thou little knowest the mis
chief thou hast done
"Yes; I don't like to nave folks
brought up to me as good examples,
not even Sir Isaac Newton. I had
forgotten you were there, but I am
-, li .V . - .
you couldn't parse me' In that sen- s,au- tt" luo Mmf crae lo ie" -TOU-tence.
And I hope your principles ! 1Ik,e tob troe aad ait ln u mT
"Yes and to-morrow I suppose
you will say My Duty Towards My
are better than your syntax. Dick's
Those traveling in foreign lands velocipede seemed to be in perfectly
are apt to note with interest many ' good condition when you brought It
pecularities of the people of different home. Was your knife in the same j Neighbor'
nations, and of course are apt to no- shape when you gave It to him?"
tice the different kinds of fowls and " haven't given it to him yet. I
didn't have it with me when I met
him in the park, and he gave me his
animals found in different countries, j
There are more ducks in China than
In all the rest of the world. Th,elr
voices are a familiar sound in every
town and country spot of the sea
coast and in the Interior of the vast
without leaving out a
velocipede. I am to take it to him
When I go to school on Monday. My,
but I am sleepy!"
And Tom gave a terrific yawn, and
empire. Even in the large cities lighted his bed-room candle." But
ducks abound. They dodge between half an hour later, as his mother was
the coolies' legs. They flit, squawk- passing his door, he called to her and
Ing, out of the way of the horses, said:
Their indignant quack will not un-' Mamma T can.t go to sleep be-
1 j j a v, m l
aeiuuui uruwu iue ruar o. uruau cum- aue i(. j Q wam jn heJ. Would
merce. Children herd ducks on every
road, on every pond, on every farm,
on every lake, on every river. There
Is no back yard without Its duck
quarters. All over the land there
are great duck-hatching establish
ments, many of them of a capacity
huge enough to produce fifty thou
sand young ducks every year. Duck
among the Chinese is a staple deli
cacy. It is salted and smoked like
ham or beef. It is served as a deli
cacy prepared in many ways, and a
lumber of travelers declare that only
you mind my taking a short walk
out of doors to cool off? I can climb
down the ladder that the painters
have left leaning against my window
sill, so there won't be any need to
unlock the front door."
"Very well," returned Mrs. Col
lins, "but don't go near Mr. Terry's
back gate. I am always afraid that
that growling dog of his is going to
break his chain."
"I am not going that way," return
ed Tom. "I am going through the
word.
And so Tom did Clara Marshall
in Young Churchman.
the Chinese know how to cook and Pine grove at the back of the house,
serve a nice fat duck. In royal I'll be home again in half an hour,
houses and among the very wealthy if the ghosts don't catch me."
the duck Is served in a particular "The ghosts don't want you," said
style in honor of any distinguished Mrs. Collins. "Your conscience is
guest, and those fortunate enough to the only ghost that will trouble you
have eaten It say that jt is far beyond if you have done anything wrong."
anything they get elsewhere In the "It may be that he knows about
way of prepared fowl. Many ducks it," thought Tom as he started off
are exported from China, and it
promises to be a growing industry.
The climate, as well as the care of
in a run through the shadows of the
tall pines; ."but if he doesn't, it will
be only true and just to tell him
the fowls, is said to produce the most about it."
excellent flesh. The Watchman. I Dick Stevens, whose bed-room was
j on the ground-floor of a wing of his
father's house, was startled that
night as he was preparing for bed by
"" . the noise of a handful of gravel
In the November Womaii s Home thrown against the top mh of hijJ
Cpmpanlon a contributor advises wo- WindOWe
men on xaiK. ir.ve rules are lata
FIVE RULES FOR WOMEN TALKERS.
IFIRE DANGER.
2Xu"bbHh. Have you a pile of rub-
bisti is the cellar or in some outbuild
ing? Rubbish is responsible for many
firec There is no excuse for such
fires. Rnbbish piles are unsightly and
should be removed on that account.
Bui the readiness with which this
"may be ignited makes them exceed
ingly dangerous. A carelessly-thrown
jmsfcch or one accidentally stepped on,
S3, lighted cigar or cigarette, or oily
waste 'or rags within the pile, and
ia thousand other things may set it
bn fire. Let all rubbish be gotten
crid of.
f
j
The "Criminal" Match. Nearly
tall of us are careless with matches.
Ill vre were always careful we should
mever use anything other than the
tsafety match. All others have been
nightly characterized as "criminal."
jA tplendid resolution for us all to
radi)t would be this: Never to buy,
sand .except In dire necessity to use,
iany other than the "safety match."
The common parlor match, which
can he ignited on the side or the end
with ..equal ease, is a constant source
of danger. We have all seen them
fly for many 'feet when struck, and
many of is have seen them start
fires. The "bird's-eye" or "double- j
tipped" mateh is an improvement, !
but for safety use the "safety."
Matches should never be left with
in reach of children, and if you still
dhink it necessary to stick to the par
2or match, let them be kept in a
netaj stone receptacle and out of
urea'' ybf the little folk.
down:
( 1 ) Don't tell long stories, or even
short ones, unless you have an espe
cial gift for it
(2) Remember that talking about
yourself is an indulgence, and, as
such, should be strictly limited.
(3) If another woman tells you of
some sensation or experience of her
own, don't Immediately cap it with'
one of yours. "Swapping tastes" is
of the lowest order of conversation.
I have been in circles where the talk
consisted In each woman's taking
her turn In telling how she thought
or felt about some commonplace sub
ject, such as the digestibility of, shell
fish, or liability to colds.
(4) Never lose consciousness of
the proportion of the talk you are
usurping, and, if you are taking
more than your share, be sure that
the quality matches the quantity.
(5) Discriminate always between
talk for your own pleasure and talk
for your friends. People constantly
tell the stupidest anecdotes because
these have become charged with
some extraneous charm impossible ;
to transmit. Perhaps the occasion !
when it took place was important be
cause some particular person was
there, and every detail of it has tak-
en on a radiance visible only to the'
narrator.
"Well, who is It?"
he leaned out of the
asked he as
window and
looked down Into the darkness.
"It's me," replied a voice from the
yard.
"Oh, it's Tom Collins, is it? Have
SOMETHING ABOUT A WEDDING.
Philip came into the primary
school-room one morning, and in
formed the teacher that the flag was
up.
"Is It?" she said doubtfully.
"It certainly is, and it isn't the
Fourth of July, or Washington's
birthday, or Lincoln's; and I couldn't
think why the flag should be up. Why
is it?"
The teacher thought a minute or
more, but could not remember any
anniversary worthy of notice by a
flag-raising on that special day.
"I don't know, I am sure," she
said at last. "Go and find out, and
then come and tell me."
Phillip hurried away. In a few
minutes he was back, with a bright
and satisfied face. "It's to celebrate
somebody's wedding," he reported. -
"Wedding?" repeated the mysti
fied teacher. ".There isn't any wed
ding on the whole list of our histori
cal celebrations."
"That's what it says on the card,
anyhow," insisted Philip. "It's some
thing about a wedding."
The teacher pondered a few mo
ments, then she decided that she
would look for herself. What she
saw on the card was as follows:
"This day is the anniversary of the
engagement of the Monitor and the
Merrimac." The Lutheran.
HE GAVE HIS BEST.
A gentleman was walking up the
street carrying in his hand a bunch
of beautiful white water lilies which
he had gathered as he returned from
a pleasant sail on the bay.
"What lovely lilies!" exclaimed an
acquaintance, as she inhaled their
fragrance, and looked longingly at
the bouquet in his hand.
"Yes, they are rather nice," he re-
88 frrinAMJ
1. ronteinsnoAlcohoMl . P O 1
i - i I lJh-"itip M
t,r . I fcHtW tmr Ut. I tQ Q-J M
wn4wBa ----f k T fM-BL.
tie""
aVoid
dangerous
meaicmes
Jusi ...
N read the
labels
CONUNDRUMS.
When
woods?
is it "easy to read in the
When Dame Autumn turns
the leaves.
Which is the largest room in the
world? The room for improvement.
Why. are the Western prairies flat?
Because the sun sets on them every
evening.
Why are the laws like the ocean?
T.n .n.. . ik. . J n VI X ' J
dcmusc tut) musk uuuuie is caused
by the breakers. Journal and Messenger.
INDLAN NAMES.
The Indians have a queer way of
naming their braves. An Indian who
was not a fearless rider would be
called "The-Old-Man - Af raid-of-Hls-Horses."
One who had very' keen
eyes might be known as "Eagle Eye."
j Another, whose blanket hung too
low, would be very likely to catch the
name or "Training Blanket."
I won-
-Oily Waste and Rags If you have der how this plan would do for nam-
Tfceen house-cleaning and have had ing children. I wonder if little Sue
occasion to have the floors oiled, you , WOuld not be more tidy in her per
ashould be certain that any cloths-or. (Son if Bhe knew she had to be called
waste? usedin the process Oiave not "The-Girl-With - Dirty - Nails.". And
'2een thrown into a closet or in any what do you suppose Harry would
j2nclosed. placed Any "other greasy think about telling some things so
-" - i ... . , ' . .... . . .:.
"Read the Labels. The pure food and drug law
was designed for the protection of all, but it only
protects those who read labels.
The law prevents false claims on the labels not
in the advertising. The law makes the label tell if
the medicine contains alcohol: Not so in the adver
tisement. x
Read the Label
The law specifies a list of such drugs as are considered dangerous
unless prescribed by a physician, such as opium morphine, cocaine,
acetanelid. canabis indica; chloral, arsenic, strychnine, etc., and
makes the LABEL tell if any of them are contained in the medicine.
The advertising does not have to. Therefore when buying medicine
Rcld tllC Lclbcl e next tme yu e inclined to buy a tonic or
t a remedy for any of the ills that come from
impure, impoverished or acid blood, ask your druggist to let you read the
label on a bottle of MILAM. This preparation has no rival. If you suspect
any other preparation of being in its class, Read the Label. Look for a guar
antee of benefit, Look for ALCOHOL and other dangerous and habit
forming ingredients. Any preparation can claim what we claim in their
advertising: NONE CAN on their labels.
READ THE LABELS!
KING'S GRADUATES
are above par in the" business world because of their thorough training and
superior qualifications. We do not tolerate lax methods, Incompetent
teachers or short, superficial courses of study. Success is our aim and
motto. If you want the best business and stenographic, training that ex
perience, money and brains can provide, write for our handsome cata
logue. " ;,'. -.- N
ftt4; ua roar $k tf you car fct
Oft."
"May 1? Ton ar to Ma4. tb
bxIS. at b npcb4 eat and tlt4
a Gdist4 Corr fro a ts
bascSu
How sod rat yoa art! I d W
lv yoa bat e.ca lb t3!!t
yon co a 14 find. Hr. take tbti
one." b aaid, as fe detac&t4 tb
largest and asl fiovt r frota lb tml
aad banded It to bar.
"Ton ar geatroaf. iaded, a!&
exclaimed. "Toa feste given lb
beat ose cf tbo lot-"
"Have I?- be aald. 131113. Wt II,
It's a pleasure to give aad tUU nor
of a pleasure wbea we gtv oar btit.
This Is worthy of ear thought. It
may cot always be easy to gita of
our best. Selfishness says: Kp
t b.i fa ...
U Ws ralmaS f t
- .
iw vnrmirm as 6titt .
st I4rsl of ra U il'9V
t ti u 1
oar esSctsf 0
rair; f r- .
Ibe tvUtmt lev f ..,
, . i , . ,
w.iNTrn, reflex r
mam asa. a4 ::. M f,n
bard wars- cltk: tar. y. ,
ear: caa fsmUa be? cf u
good rtstca for wust :
change; only tbo k.!tt .7. T
class answer tbU sitw n
Apply ta Lock Drr iu.rJ
C
w frjmrA A
RALEIGH, N. C,
ItNCORPO RATED)
OB
CHARLOTTE, X. C.
RE
MOWHI!
Hart-Ward Hardware Co.
Wc have Moved our store to new building 125 East
Martin Street We have 10,000$quarc feet of thov rcorai
with Electric Elevator, every floor on the ground floor.
Right in the heart of the business center of Raleigh.
We will he pleased to see all friends customers, and tKc
public generally.
Our stock is complete and our prices the lowest
HART-WARD HARDWARE CO
WholeaaJe and Ret&iL 125 E. Martin St., Raleigh, N. C
tllenz
Ease Shoe
For
Comfort & Long Service
1ATE can show you procf
v that eight out of tea
men wear their M ENZ
EASE twelve to twenty
four months.
Isn't saving the price of
one or two ordinary thou
every year good enough for
you?
Herbert Rosenthal
Tb Shoe Fitter
129 FayettevSb St, M:fr N. C
Kak5fijlo DfflarMe Wwl
Shipments made to any part of
the State at same price
as at, shop.
MOIUMEITS
COOPER BROS.. Proprs
RALEIGH. N. C
OKIMD COR CATALOQUE.
When writing to AdrertLten mestlon the Cactln-"
i J .
1 1 ---;ss -TT
THE CAUCASIAN
and
Uncle Remus Home Magazine
Both One Year for Only
$1.2S
Uncle Remus. Home Magazine was ftmnded br Joel
' Chandler Harris, the author of the "Uncle Remus" stories, tad
Is the best xnagailne of its class published In the United
State. Jack London. Prank L. Stanton, and other prominent
writers contribute to this Magazine. It is published in Atlanta
eTery month and the subscription ' price is $1.00 a jear. The
Caucasian Is the best weekly newspaper published in the Stat
Whr not hare both of these excellent pnbllcations In jour
nome? Subscriber, who are In arrears must pay up and renew
their subscription in order to take adrantage of this exce
tlonal offer. This I. the best bargain in reading matter we
Hare erer been able to offer to the reading" public. Send in
your subscription to-day. Don't delay-butdo It now.
Address. ,
THE CAUCASIAN.'
RALEIGH, A. a

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