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The Caucasian. (Clinton, N.C.) 188?-1913, September 19, 1912, Image 3

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7hnriy, September 19, 1912.
area
LIVE
SHOCK
PURE-BRED CATTLE ARE BEST
rc Be Successful Little Details Mus
Net B Overlooked Keep Up
Records of Animals.
X we!l-elected bred of pure-bred
ct.,'e is a source of much pleasure as
aeii as profit, but to be successful de
tail" must not be overlooked. Many
tree2es and beginners are too cars
jej. Ther keep no accurate records
cf birtbs, neglect their cattle, fall to
keep up the records, do not take prof
r care of their cattle in winter, and
j?e of tea caught with & lot of surplus
gad unmerchantable bulls on hand and
so buyers. Let me add that tae-only
vtj to dispose of surplus stock Is br
judicious advertising In some good
firm and stock paper, says a writer
la an exchange.
Keep your herd la nice, healthy coa
lition, so you will not be ashamed ta
ihow jour stock to prospective bujsm.
Make a yearly exhibit at a few leading
state and county fairs and present
your stock In the most attractive form
at home, as well as at the fairs. In de
scribing your sale stock to prospective
A Pure-Bred Hereeford.
buyers by mall or otherwlne, never
overestimate the merits of an animal.
Make Rood every statement, and make
every buyer a friend. It Is cheaper
to retain your old customers than to
hunt new ones.
There Is no better way to restore or
lceep up the fertility of your soil than
by keeping a herd of beef cattle, sav
leg and applying the manure. A lib
eral supply of both grain and rough
!ed should be grown and consumed
if the cattle. They should be kept
veil-bedded In the barns and all straw
stacks converted Into manure and re
turned to the soil. A well-bred animal
will not consume as much food as a
scrub, and will always sell at a profit,
even If sent to (he butcher. The best
Individuals will bring a fair profit to
the owner when sold for breeding pur
poses. SAVE GRAIN IN FEEDING HOGS
Two Troughs Conveniently Arranged
That When Corn Is Devoured
More Will Follow.
Make two troughs six or seven
inches wide and two and one-half feet
long. Fit these troughs together so
they will cross In the middle, writes J.
E. Spencer of Mount Pleasant, Term.,
la the Missouri Valley Farmer. Make
a chute five feet high, large at the top
and six inches square at the bottom.
Self-Feeder.
to fit into the cross of the troughs,
leaving it three inches from the bot
tom of trough. Shell your corn and
Pour Into the chute. As the hogs eat
the corn In the trough more will fall
down. The hogs' feed Is clean, and
&o com is wasted.
Raising Early Lambs.
Th sole object In raising early
lambs la to produce a fine animal of
8od size and flesh and get him to
market at the earliest posible mo
ment To do that requires good feed
good care and good management
. m tfle time he Is bern until lie U
nt to market.
Watch Unshod Colta.
unshod colts need inspection of thw
w occasionally, as they are likely te
w more on one side than the other,
r to develop too much toe. A' very
2l ra8Pln 1U keep feet liT'
CW, Qnt,e Work for Mare.
ll Wrk for the mar with' foal
WOrl her' bUt 8he 8h0Uld
forked for a week, before foaling.
HOLD ON TO GOOD BREEDERS
Pigs From Large-Copied, Old Sows
Number More and Often Double
In SU When Farrowed.
(fly J. W. INGHAM.)
Bows should be retained for a bcev
br of years untU their places can b
filled with their equals.
It is wll known that the prcgt&y
from mature parents are superior to
those descended from young progeni
tors not fully developed. Iioars and
sows for breeding should be kept In a
good -thrifty condition but not fat
The writer has always b-a !roi
b!"d to kf-ep his breeding os from
becoming too fat and consequently
farrowing a small number of scrawny
Pigs.
I once took a large sow to fatten
for one-half the pork. I did not know
ahe was with pig and fed her all the
corn meal and wheat middlings she
would eat.
Imagine my astonishment and vexa
tion when she bad three little dwarfed
pigs not only smaller than pigs usual
ly are wb-n first farrowed, but ema
ciated. Sows for breeding should not be al
lowed to run with the fattening bogs
fed oa corn but kept in a pasture by
themselves and given a plentiful sup
ply of slop made of equal parts of
wheat shorts, com zaeal and wheat
bran.
Most young aowi will breed when
three months old IT allowed to run
with a boar, but eight or twelve
months Is as young as Is Judicious to
breed them.
The pigs from large-bodled, old sows
will be more In number and frequently
double the size of pigs from yount?
sows when farrowed, and this with the
same feed and care and will frequent
ly weigh 50 per cent more at a year
old.
Not only this, but it stunts or
dwarfs the growth of such young
things permanently and they never at
tain good size.
GOOD FEED-RACK FOR SHEE?
Grain Trough Placed Beneath Saves
Chaff and Leaves, Most Nourishing
Part of Feed.
(By J. W. GOODWIN.)
The rack Is made with a pole for
the bottom rail and a piece of 2x6
inch scantling for the top rail. The
crossbars are pieces riven from an
old piece of timber.
These crossbars are four feet long
and about one and one-half inches In
mem
Feed Rack fer Sheep.
diameter, shaved smooth with a draw-lng-knlfe.
The holes In the top and bottom
rails are made with an inch-auger.
The crossbars are trimmed to fit the
boles and then wedged to hold them
The bottom rail is held in place
against the side of the barn by two
stripe of heavy sheet-iron which has
been bent to fit around the pole.
The top rail Is secured by a piece of
half-inch rope which passes over a
pulley located in a hole in the wall
above the rack, a weight being at
tached to the outside end of rope,
serving to always keep the rack
against the wall.
When the hay is put in, the rack is
drawn down, and when filled is pushed
back against the wall, holding the hay
in place closely and kept in place by
the weight
The grain trough placed beneath
and In front of the rack serves as a
receptacle for the chaff and leaves of
the hay the best and most nourish
ing part of the feed which would
otherwise be pulled under foot and
lost as food.
Good cattle require good care and
feed.
Pigs should be grown on pasture aa
nearly as possible.
Never raise a colt from a naturally
vicious-tempered mare.
A couple of sheep In the front yard
are as good as a lawn mower.
Hog cholera in Kansas ia under con
trol, at least for the present.
Cough affecting young pigs very
often is due to dusty bedding.
Never sare a sow for a breeder unr
less she has a large number of teats.
It is absolutely necessary that the
stallion should hare plenty of ezer-
Pasture and exercise develop a
strong frame that responds quickly to
feeding.
The boar should be an outstanding
Individual, possessing all the mark
ings characteristic of the breed.
Borne owners of land in the far
west claim they can raise 14 sheep to
the acre on alfalfa and beet pulp.
The stable that has plenty of pure
air and well flooded with sunshine
is most comfortable and healthful,
A pure bred ram of the coarse wool
breed crossed with Merino ewei pro
duces a good lamb for early fat
tening. . . V :;
Some farmers do not realize the im
portance of providing plenty of fait
for all the different animals kept on
the farm. , , . . . .... '-.- -.
ar T" I
LIVE: QJM
WHY PURE BREEDS ARE BEST
Well Kept Fleck f Tncreu;-fcra
win w orw o fH3 na HSMf
Than the Mongrels. j
CBy ill IS. IL r. GIUNTRDJ
The pra to ralsee chickens,
turkeys, ducks or acy other fot nat
ural'y frU a trrwuer prtdt axd
terett la thoroughbred ttock a&d.
th ;refore. kIt the fiock tetter rare
than would be lives to coaxre!i. No
matter what k.nd of birds yon hive,
however, th time rale of good car
fcTpHes. With the riicht klcd of rare
and Interest your Cock will yield
abundant satisfaction and goo3 iro2t
and toth of the are felt to a xrater
degree by the owner of the thorough
bred fowls.
Houses, yards and feed cost about
the same for either mongrels or full
bloods and a well kept flock of thor
oughbreds always attract attention
and admiration from neighbors, who
are olt?n willing to pay a much bet
ter price for egga for hatching pur
poses from such stock than ordinary
eggs will bring.
Many buyers, every ae&aoe. get ei
otllent results in the least expensive
way by purchasing eggs from which
to hatch pure bred stock. The breed
best suited to your surroundings snd
the purpose you wish them to serve
should be selected. The best meat
producer is not, as a rule, a good egg
producer and so on, but with careful
study of some of the breeds a buyer
ought to be able to kiow how to se
lect just what will meet his needs.
PLYMOUTH ROCKS ARE FIRST
More Marketable Than White-Feathered
Chickens, Says Prof. Lip
pi ncott of Karfa.
The
most, marketable
breed of
chickens ift the Barred Plymouth
Rock. This decision, handed down a
few days ago by V. A. LIppincott,
professor of poultry husbandry at the
Kansas Agricultural college, answers
a question which long has been dis-
Prize Winners.
turbing the minds of poultry-raising
persons. It will be a hard blow to
the popular theory that white-feathered
chickens are more in demand
on the markets than any other breed.
Doubtless 'you have stetod by that be
lief all your life, and you may take
exception to the ruling of the court.
But white feathers don't count for
all, the poultry professor says. And
he has made, In packing centers, an
investigation upon which to base his
assertions. At to their marketable
merit, Prof. Lipplncott ranks the
various breeds like this: Barred
Plymouth Rocks, White Wyandottes,
White Plymouth Rocks, Black Lang
shans, Leghorns, Brahmas, Cochins,
Scrubs.
Tellow shanks and yellow skin are
demanded above everything else, the
decision says. Further, the shanks
must be clean and free from feathers.
The body must be plump and of medi
um size four to seven pounds, for
roasting birds. The breeds that most
nearly meet these requirements are
the Plymouth Rocks, Wyandottes, and
Rhode Island Reds. The reason such
breeds as Buff Wyandottes and Rhode
Island Reds do not appear in 'the list
just given is because they have not
been bred in sufficient numbers to
make an impression on the market.
Packers axe not acquainted with
them.
Look to the comfort of the fowls.
Never feed whole corn except a
evening.
Direct sunlight is a great natural
disinfectant.
Don't neglect your chicks and fowls
in hot weather.
Hot, close weather brings lots of lice
to the dlirty pen.
It is a well-known fact that all hens
are not good layers.
. The hot, sultry weather is trying to
both fowls and men.
Don't crowd sleeping quarters. Keep
fronts of houses pen.
Hens and pullets do not thrive on
the same kind of feed.
Heat prostration is common in
yards where there is no shade.
Keep things clean. Use lice powder,
lice paint and disinfectants freely.
As soon s the hatching season is
oyer all sale birds should be marketed.
" Feed little, if any,' corn or other
heating foods while the temperature is
high.
It takes a good pocltryman to keep
up his enthusiasm when the weather
is - hot. ; W : ; 4 :r, ''4'
Success with poultry all depends on
whether we hav eg producers or
drones. ,.v --
l-RBBBflBTte
CULTURE OF THE ASPARAGUS
ECttt Rt-tf fr Kin.; ,
Cretn t to Dt Oay Wit
sr Ct to gatfcer Ut tte ir;a grtw
cstil jL Ko ih we4 4-w"6 tf
a;;lyis. a thick cukh of ctr t&
cafe. rotli leave cr gr.. If ibm
little ty t 4ul early fa the
&erth,5 ith dry a'rUckl llae.
rarli gtrn Klattca sr.ay he ttt4 ta
tad cf U3 We hate :as foti
tke Urae !tl U pal ca as mcm as
th slui aprar. Vm freh sir
slacked Hn: asd dmt every c.crrltg
until aU th worxs are kill!. As
paragus grown from seed tsun be
kept clean of grasa asd ei. std
the soli drilow and rich. U diiutr4
urine from the slab lea. or bose aho
I bate. on handful to every id laches
cf row. says a writer In an exchange.
The bet remedy for asparagus rust
Is to cut the tops off clew to the
ground and burn. Then ow a thick
coat of air-ala.rked lime over the
rows and give clean culture. All
rust stalks should be gathered up and
burnt. If any are left the tporea elll
be b?own by the wind on to the new
growth. To grow stout plaits from
seed, thin out the plants to stand
four inches apart !a the row.
KILL OFF INJURIOUS WEEDS
If Noxious Plants Are te Be Destroyed
Work Must Oe Dene In THer
oogh Manner.
(By R. Q. WEATIIER8T0NB.)
The presence of weeds oe many
farms demands that mere rigorous
measures be taken for their destruc
tion. It is plain that so long as so
few pastures, meadows and cultivated
crops are used in rotation with grain
the fanners will find it very difficult
to keep the weeds In check.
Summer fallowing mar destror
labor during the entire season, when
no crop ia obtained from It.
Mustard, wild oats, pigeon grass.
and French weed are among the worst
The French Weed.
weeds with which farmers have to
contend.
It is to be regretted that so far as
the writer knows, no simple or prac
tical method has been found that will
surely and completely eradicate
French weed. Some farmers have re
ported methods that have proved suc
cessful with them, but other farmers
have tried the same methods and
failed.
Some few things have been learned
by experiments, however. If this weed
Is to be destroyed, the work must be
done thoroughly. The weed produces
seeds so profusely that If one plant Is
allowed to go to seed a large area of
surrounding land will soon be in
fested. If there is one direction in farming
in which thoroughness is required, it
is In trying to destroy this weed. A
slipshod way will not do, and an ounce
of prevention Is worth a thousand
pounds of cure. Farmers whose farms
are free from the French weed should
guard against its incoming with the
utmost vigilance and care.
GA1EN oA
Notcs
Cut the rye heads out of the wheat.
Keep the cucumbers picked off each
day.
An Inverted clover soil is ideal for
beans.
If your onions are running to tops,
breakdown the tops.
Kerosene emulsion Is good or bad
-for squash bugs.
Keep the tomato vines off the
ground, on supports of some kind.
The first essential in fighting weeds
in any crop is to keep ahead of them.
I There is permanent satisfaction in
the use of concrete equipment on the
farm.
A common rotation for large bean
growing sections is clover, beans,
wheat.
The small hand-cultivator Is handy
and saves much hoe work in every
garden. - - -
Experiments have proved - that
beans yield better on old land than
on new.
Hay will be valuable again this
year. Let none go to waste; mow ev
ery corner.
Be sure that rain-water barrels and
cisterns are closely screened to keep
out the mother mosquitoes. "
The longer you stick to the culti
vator between the corn rows the more
corn you will have in the crib by and
by.
For cabbage worms use insect pow
der mixed with flour in the propor
tion of 1 pound of powder to 13 cf
flour. Dust the plants well after caeb
rain.
Oar Si rt St tns$s-V.)
T SScfe fix-US. f t
Tl ;c of Nr?a CareUa. 7 JUtUf Znvt tm
t&iar t-pjar tki4 at cf Tali
pfr as.4 ta;iUfUM r aajisg at5t
Educational
Louisburg College
North Carolina
for Ytntng H'omen anj girl.
Thorough Work ia Iiooka. Syts
tvslhetic Training ia Manners a ad
Moral Positive K chylous Tea
ching and Training. Heaaa&t
location and Spacious Orouada.
Floe Health Record. Moderate
Charyet.
CM K?C1I 0 AV Iinixn 1CA1
EKDSsirrmn na, ttis.
SESD FOR CATALOG,
Utu him DATS AUK.
Smlde&t
L ALLO, Secretary.
Louissimc. n. c
TEZ KZm CAIOim CCLLTXE tf
ASRICULTUn A)I0 UECHANIC AITS
THE STATE'S IKDUSTMIAL COUXCE
Four-year courses in Aertculture; ia
Civil, Electrical, and Mechaniaal Ene
ineering; in Industrial Chemistry; in
Cotton Manufacturing and Dyeing.
Two-year courses in Mechanic Arts and
in Textile Art One-year and Two-year
course in Agriculture These courses
are both practical and scientific. Kk
aminations for admission are held bv
the County Superintendent at ail
For catalog address
THE REGISTRAR.
West Raleigh, N.C.
W A RR EN TON HIGH SCHOOL
WARRENTON, NORTH CAROLINA.
Course ol t d required for granting of certificate s1en hitet crln-U
uniu In the l tt o( accredited tchooU o! The Uiertjr. I tptfwmrtl
Faculty. All roardng pupil under theticBmediate ipmMNi ol lha
Principle. Separate dormitory (o girl. l oUl eipeftaee lor year, IIP .
For Catalogue address.
BlilE'S CREEK ACADEMY and BUSINESS COLLEGE
Prepares for College, University, or Business Special teachers in Charge of Elo
cution, Art, TeleCTaphy, Business. Exceilent Music Course, Piano, Band. Voice,
Strong Faculty of christian men and women. Good boarding arrangements,
with dormitory for girls.
506 Students hst year, representing C5 counties, 6 States, snd Cuba.
"One of the greatest schools In theState." Oov. R. B. Glenn.
"Your school Is doing a blessedwork." Hon. J. Y. Joyner.
"It is doing a high quality ofwork." President Alderman.
"In many respects the best Acad emy In North Carolina." Rev. B. W.
Spllman.
"One of our greatest schools." Judge Pritchard.
For catalogue and other information, address
J. A. CAMPBELL. PRINCIPAL, - - DIKE'S CREEU. N. C
The Agriculture and Mechanical CoIIeoe
for the Negro Race. Open all the year. For
males only. Strong Faculty. Three well
equipped departments Agriculture. Mechan
ical and Academic. Board, Lodging and
Tuition $7.$9 per month.
For Catalog or free Tuition, write
PRESIDENT DUDLEY, GREENSBORO, N. C
EAST CAROLINA
TEACHERS TRAINING SCHOOL
A State school to train teachers for the public schools
of North Carolina. Every energy is directed to this
one purpose. Tuition free to all who agree to teach.
Fall Term begins September 24, 1912.
For catalogue and other information address
ROBT. H. WRIGHT, Pres., Greenville, N. C
MEREDITH COLLEGE
On of tbe few col!re for womea a the South tbt eoafra as A.B, 4(r
representing- tour ?ers of tenuis eoleg-o work eeor4!as to Ih t4r4 of lb
collere beloaries to the JLoc1tioo &f Colleges of tb Souther Ststeo.
Diploma ore awarded taooo who complete the cooroe la tho &cbola of ITleoa.
tlon. Art. and Music
Library facilities exceUc&t.
Systematic training- la PbysioaJ Eduaalloa. Courts for teasis a4 taskst-bsil.
Board and furnished room fa Mala DuUdlng. boat, light. literary tuttloa. feo far
physician asd nurse, aad all minor fees S22t.lt; la East Build las a4 CoiUkfoa,
from f7 to 1ST less.
8tudenls not efferias th aeeeasary aits for eat rases may pre oar ta Msredlta
Academy, which Is rated ta tbm A-Cias of the accroditod achsols of tas tcato Ual
eratty.
Both th Caller and th Academy rs located la ta oeater of RaleLga. boat ta
Capitol aad leading- churches, so that
culture, ta addlUoa to their reg-viar worst.
fsUor taforamatlaaw addross
H. T. VAX. Presides t,
S72 TO U&O fy Board.
E
for the entire session of
niae montis
SesakMi opens Aog-ost tta.
rrmTi rraTMnn
ii ii i. .i n in. I ii.
For Elostrated Catalog, wirte to W. D. BUSN Latwaslalc.
FOUNDED 1838 CHARTED 1C59
TRINITY COLLEGE
ITS STRENGTH LIES IN
X LARGE, WEL1TRAINED FACULTY; EXCELLENT BUILDINGS AND
EQUIPMENT; FULL, WELL-ARRANGED COURSES; EARNEST. HIGH
MINDED STUDENTS; A LARGE AND LOYAL BODY OP ALUIlin "AND
FRIENDS; NOBLE IDEALS AND TRADITIONS; AN INSPIRING HISTORY
OF ACBIEVEIIENT AND SERVICE.
Ntxt Session btsbuSeptembmr It, 1912.
54 St. !U Mar Ptt m) a t
tetter f swr Nrt3a Ct
!.a? Tilt ,t4i ik2rll W asasja
' t"jt la c--.5.rf vsy a 44i sa.
Directory
THE NORTH CAROLINA
State Normal and
Industrial College
MIMi4 It m IV fM T
H CrU rr. CWw I
tvni-M u t fc u i if ttxe Is
tam sua. ra i'iv - W is.
tm fr tW-v t4 tor Mermtno .
4rmm
JOrCf I rtOT. rYrsUrs. &T4Sere V C
up sxxiArru. ia
tit trata yea. eurtag spate usae. fee
i Ooterasaeet poJUu m U 111 n
poaalble lee steal poetUoa at a tarf
r salary teaa torn art am gettlaa
Wot toll la tons ulc on ww Ue
owpa aad tuall U ' ir
Waahtagtos) C3e
H D HaaUy. 6npL. "1 C A. " Hub
tagtoa. D C. OOo ft v. te
sylvaala Avesee. N va
Dear Sir: Fleaee imict-
asatioa sa to hoe I rat hmyn
tloal hy spare tleu tfti5t
lea vis g suy ira . ..'. i
ausitfi4.
My same Is .
Street asd rto
Tewm asd State. ...
JOHN GRAHAM. lYinrtpal.
todeets aava naaay opsortaattSeo for
For Catsiocaoy mmTtmnj
- nAUZCHsfl c
Tuition and Room Rami sit
"A treat cbooi"-Helist C. Moore. Editor BtbUeal Racordsr.
"4- maenfficeiit schooL" Cbarity sad CaUdrea.
"IdeaUr locatad.w-ClerclaBd Star.
Boardiaa sTitem oaiqa," C W. Pays or. Pastor of Lawmdsia
aad Kew Bethal Bsprist rbvrthes
Tkc keat aad cawqxat Scaaet la tae ftaa."EL M. Koosca.Bsats.bar of
the Legislator, of ftorth Carolina.
For C&iakiswM omd EZuiratad EcZlm

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