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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, January 07, 1932, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-01-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
Ljßgticlc Girl
Autfior of ’DAD’S GIRL! ’JORETTA* and ’LOVE PREFERRED* CENTRAL PWeSS&6OCIATIpN, INC.
toc*Dj;NiH rikar.
Marcia Moyer, it t the cosmetic* da
fMrtmttU of the largest store In
M-.tchdTeld, ices firm the fob he
amuse of her beably, kil through Mkr
• bUity IM interest, advances Ip
MV'T. fib* net go her tent her •atth the
support of flte children, but dreamt
of the day when she can lea re home,
to tee the world and find romance.
Ted b'tontOM, m young mechanic who
giant to ha*e his own basinets some
aoy. hot been id lore with Marcia all
her life, but the does not think of
led like that, though she is fond of
htk~ The president of m Sew York
cosmetics company, comes lo Mltchel
field and noiiccs Marcia's tales meth
od*. She is called lo the manager s
office where ike merit Mercy On Unit,
who asks her if the would like to
t-mvcl and demonstrate their product*
Oil over the country. It it her big
orpor!unity to escape from the town
Which no one know* exists crcegt the
few thousand prop'- who live there.
Mrs. Moyer reluctantly ''ousentt to
the change far Marcia, and Ted Is
grieicd to lose her, but Marcia makes
joy'ul preparation* for her departure.
Mari in dine* »t the hotel with OuMott
oe'ore he return* to \ew York. Many
parties ore gii'en in her honor. (Ms
her last evening at home, Ted takes
her out to Paradise Inn tor dinner
and pleads with her not to go away.
Me lakes her to her train the next
eiening, h owner, and Irares her
icith the memory of hi* first kiss in
fare well.
(VO* GO OS WITH TilK STOttY)
( HAITKK 10
IT WAS midnight when Mun l_ •
boarded the train. The oar was
lighted dimly, with prominent "Quiet’*
placards In the vestibule corridors.
Marcia was grateful to Ted for bay
ing located her berth before he left
her. It was all so new and strange,
this very first time on a Pullman
train. Long ago, when she was very
■mail, before the motor age. she had
ThlO memories of going with her
mother on the train to Springfield to
visit her grandmother. Hut it had
hot been a long ride and they had
traveled in a dusty day coach on a
local train that stopped at every sug
gestion of a station and sometimes
between, leisurely. There had been
On elderly man who held his watch
to her ear ond gave her peppermints,
and a Isdy who held Davey and cried
over him because he had red hair,
Mbe the little hoy she hnd Just lost.
Bince then. Marcia's comings and
goings had been by motor highway,
and those not fur distant.
The porter had thrust her bags into
the section liehind heavy green cur
tains marked with the number eleven.
Timidly. Marcia drew them apart and
sat down on the edge of the berth,
striving for composure. The etching
■train of two weeks resolved itself
into panic, now that everything was
over and done and she was started on
her way into the unknown. Her hands
trembled as she removed her bat and
slipped it into the paper bag which
the porter had left. She looked around
her, taking inventory of the con
veniences In this little cubicle that
was to be her room for the night: a>
hangar for her coat, one for her
Mom. a net hammock swung across
the windows to accommodate further
articles. She twisted around and ex
tracted her dressing case from l*e
i ween the suit case and hat bos. id)
*.f Which were piled onto the berth.
Bhe wondered, anxiously. if she should
try to dispose of the hags herself, or
a«ik the porter to do it: and deckled
on the laMer course, resolving 1 hat
if. sM here destined to become an
Lkhitaa' traveler, who would acquire
•'iMo/rotd from the beginning. Her
glance noted the bell between the
vitirnwr. j.r.d she cate it a »..-.iid
NO+ICK OF BALE OF REAJL
ESTATE
In I'nltrd Stmfw IMstriot Court
blsWct Os North Carolina
In the matter of S. R. Adams,
> V « Bankrupt.
Pursuant to an order made In the
entitled matter, I will sell, by
jpubUc auction, to the highest bidder,
e>r cash, at the court house
tndefson, N. C. at 12 o'clock, noon,
on Tuesday, the 2nd day of February,
1932, the following described property:
That certain tract of land in Saasa*
ft-as* Fork township. Granville cottre*.
ty. adjoining lands of S. R. Adams olh
north. Mrs. Marion Taylor, C. G. Roy
ster and S. V. Morton on the cast, W.
H. Gregory on the south, and E. B.
Tunstfll on the west, containing 706
acres 4 and known a*'the S. R. Adams
Colenfun farm.
Also three fourths of an acre in
Townhvjlle. Vance county known as
the Asa Williams tract, described as
follows: Begin In road, opposite S. R
Adams corner, run thence S 35 3-4
K. 300 chains to post, thence N. 6T
K 2.04 chains to post thence 25
2-t W. 360 chain.% to stake, thenct-
S «.'» W 204 chains to beginning, aee
deed in book 98 page 374, Vance
County.
*the above property will be Bold
fVec from encumbrance.
I will al;*o sell at the same time the
following real t-state. subject to life
estate of S. R. Adams:
Uhdfvided one half interest In Klm
baJl and Adam?, 50x150, Townsville
Undivided one half interest in Har
grove «nd Adams. 50x150, Townsville.
Obe.vacant lot, No. 8, Townsville.
One .vacant lot. No. 9 Townsville.
SC acres Willed to Olivia Collier for
life. near Starkes Mill.
Also the following personal property
One saw mill (Stave mill), near
Soudan
1© shares stock, northwestern Tele
phone Co.
30 shares stock, Vance Fair Asso
ciation.
All book accounts, notes and chose*
In ectkrn.
This sale Is made subject to confir
mation by the Court ten days after
sale, without notice. Successful Ud
der must deposit of his bid oo
day of sale, and pay balance in cash
upon delivery of deed.
This SOth day of December 1931.
T. S. KITTRELL. Trustee of
8. R. ADAMS, Bankrupt
x
, He long train whistled an J retrtJ on into tbe night.
poke, half fearing that It would briny
more dire results than the Inquiring
porter. But It proved to be ail right.
He came, shambling, and stowed her
luggage beneath the berth.
The dressing room was deserted
Marcia's composure mounted as sbe
cleansed her face with cold cream
and changed to the black satin pa
jamas with the wide gold sash and
the little gold-lined bolero Jacket.
Then she swayed down the narrow
aisle through the ear to her berth.
There was no Indication that there
were other passenger* behind those
swaying curtains except that a man’s
pair of bright tan shoes protruded
from beneath one, and a black pair
from another. The train Wa*
strangely silent as it roared on
through the night, shrieking like a
mad monster.
Marcia crept in between the smooth,
rightly tucked sheets, snapped off the
tight at her bead and raised the win
dow shade. The same silver creßcwt
of moon, which bad hovered over Ted
and her last night, greeted her with
a friendly wink, where it hung just
above the hortfcon. Was it only last
night that she .had been wttb Ted at
Paradise lhjn?)rtf course, ridiculous,
it was'less than hour ago that Ted
had kissed hef N standing right here
in,«tris jvery aisle beside her. She
frOt up per Ang<y* to touch her lips,
tentatively, and found herself won
dering why be had not attempted to
kiss her before—last night, even. She
turned on her side impatiently.
There wa* no time now to dream
about Ted.
Here she was, rushing through the
wight, on her way to t’hicago, from
J where she Would begin her work
'under the district manager's super-
Ivisfota. Memories of Ted were ob
literated instantly. The first misgiv
| mgs assailed her. What would these
I :>eeple be like. /horn she must
jpleaw? Hui-Doee 1 1 at. after all, she
! ’ouidn't tbt e-v-V i lii red of her?
THE GUMPS —THAT liTTLEWORD , “THANKS’-
OLD M*c OuVr CA.KTT I A- ia?} :j!j M N.
, T'VdOAAM M&LP CrLAMCINtr AT AUVStAV* A fotsNVl_E/AAN " Ui'.\ J r> * v
j MAYER- tiißt, - Mfc WA* MfcT U 6 TWQ TlAMS MAE
I feiAA i tATS LV - THtFE IS fc!/v\ Yo .> ; ] ( * •
die SISTER— It’* Worth a Try By LES FORGRAVE
tOOVJ, BuOOV ; -SOHE PtACS ") TtteralE’« MOT MUCK HOPE OP EVER THEM VOO'D KMOVUTV4E. TRAMP 0V i , t. Me wv ■>
in tV4»* to\wn There's a 1-ramP pinging him , but its <STo ee dad's coat, him monelt por vfJl/'ri see a man who i_oo*s
y/AUKIK)’ ‘ROUND WITH - OADig \ JC»e WHEN VOU'(l'€ OUT To_k."£F »T HSU- 3E.LL . UNLESS- , -v, LIKE A TRAMP StkXj, OUT
CQAT AWOTH HUNQfftEP .ki» V eV£ 1 A ~ ''N- <D,D=AR ! UNLESS \A& f ILL GE T .. I, \ AiOO ILL P.OK) OVERAVI'
dOLLARC ON Ml'S . AM' HeJ YOCO kUCVJ f £ \ C iW MOMEvJ OONIOtEL S TAVCE. A LOO< AT
<- |-]J DOGSN'T K.NONA) ( I IT AMY‘ / 'M TKE UIJIWG OP f AtJ’GETOOT | IT'TW HtS COAT. c~
~ —y I rl!i'”ri ? iT* it, <r*\ uokere 1 / coat * right wcw'f / kuooa luce 3
y /' —... a. i.
BENDERBOH DAILY DISPATCH. THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1932
Such questions Hashed through ncr
mind in a taunting procession until
she discovered that she wa* lying
rigid and cotd and wide-eyed, hurled
headlong Into space, it seemed to her.
Where wrre all her allies that had
served her faithfully in a greater
crisis than this? Where were her
confidence and courage, her pride and
hope? Had they fled like traitors,
or had she left them in Mitchelfleld
behind her?
Marcia smiled wunlv to heraetf in
the darkness. The long train whistled
and roared on. The wheel* seemed
to remind her suddenly as they
clicked over the rails In a violent
burst of speed, “To see the world, to
see the worldl” and a thrill of exulta
tion possessed her. She could not
sleep. The whirring wheels and her
whirling thoughts moved fn unison,
and her wide eyes starhd out Into the
blurred, moving world. With no
human sound around her, she felt
Hku a minute particle of matter being
propelled at terrific speed through
dlitnltable spare, with a roaring ac
companiment of sound.
Only when the train stopped at
long intervals did the human sounds
mound hir assert themselves. Then,
the deep breathing of g score of sleep
ers fitlea the narrow car with an
eerie rush of gonad. Interpolated by
rasping 4ru> hacking noises. Marcia
recoiled involuntarily at the too-inti
mate prdximity. There wa* some
thing a little repellent about it.
Well, wasn’t this What she wanted
—contact with the world and Itb peo
ple? She waa getting just that,
wasn’t she? She- Wondered how any
one could sleep. eomfortoMr aa she
was. From the darkened little nook,
she peered but, watching the activity
at the station where they were stop
ping; tiro or three isolated people
strolling on the pk.tfrrm, men haul
ing ice for the water coolers, the train
creW Inspecting snd oUtng, a switch
engine clanging end puffing to and
fro on the aexi tpack. IVr the bel).
lantern signals, and they were rtish
mg on their way again.
Her thoughts leaped ahead, over
the months that stretched before her.
ShV kifew that they held more of
work and anxiety than leimire and
pleasure. But beyond that—the years
that lay ahead, when she would have
progressed and made herself inde
pendent. Bhe would do that, she re
solved. Her confidence returned and
mounted. Her mind reviewed a famil
iar train of thought, cherished vi
sions. that were to become realities
for her: Rome, the Eternal City;
whopping fdr oriental treasures in the
narrow, twisted at recta of Tunis; the
cascades of Tivoli; dining at the
Savoy GrlM in London, where one
might sit near royalty, even; twiHght
on Lake Como— •
“Or to burst all links of habit.
There to wander far away
Orb from island unto Island.
At the gateways of the day “
her rtilnd recalled those precipitate
lines es Tennyson.
Marcid did sleep, finally, for she
awoke to find the sun glaring in her
face from below the raised Window
shade. Her first reaction wa* of
fright. M'ftof was that terrible noise?
Gould tho house be on fire? Then
she waa fully awake, and remem
bered. In a panic, she turned her
wrist to look at her watch. Had she
overslept? It was only six o’clock.
Had her watch stopped? No. it
seemed to he all right.- She relaxed
a little and realized that she Was vert
tired. The train was not due in Chi
cago until eight o’clock. There waa
plenty of time, yet. She dosed her
eyes, and tried to compose her
thoughts.
When she went Into the dressing
room at seven o’clock, the tiny spark
was filled with women: women wash
ing. brushing tbei- teeth, creaming
their faces, combing their hair, dress
ing. Older women, girls, young wom
en. btarcla fled in panic. She couldn’t
face them. The contact waa too Inti
mate. She returned to her berth, hot
not without being stared at by a
series of men, whose sections Were
made up, and who sat in their seat I', 1 ',
fully dressed, even to their hats, as
if to hasten their arrival at th-.r
destination. They were gazing out
the windows with bored expressions
until a corner of their eyes saw Mar
cia approaching. Then, expressions
changed Instantly. Some turned to
follow her with their gaze. Marcia
wa* accustomed to being stared at bv
Mltcbellteld. Sbe ignored that. But
she flushed warmly with self-con
sciousness now.
In a cramped sitting posture, she
managed to dress and brush her hair,
using ths narrow panel of mirror be
tween the window's. Then she slipped
ent and sat in a corner of the sec
tion across the aisle, watching ner
vously outside. They were in the city
now, crashing between rows of tene
ments that lined the elevated tracks.
The squalor and confusion
Marcia. It was unbelievable that
human beings liyed in such places.
But they did, obviously. They
seemed to be everywhere. In door
ways, wlndaw* wobhly steps, and
in alleys Black,. white and Indiffer
ent varieties mixed. Again. Marcia
experienced a wayc of revulslaa. Sbe
had thought that her family was
poor! Os course, not in poverty like
a few families, who lived across the
river In Mltcbelfleld. But they Wer*
only a few shiftless ne’sr-do-wells
who were of no consequence, and
only attracted public attention and
sympathy »t Thanksgiving, Christ
mas and New Tear’s day, when they
readily accepted the generous holiday
baskets es food, toys and warm cloth
ing from philanthropic hands. But
Msn Were ea*ftiil Mocks of wretched
looking souls here!' *•
;. < <j .'.Hi
DID YOU KNOW? ■ - - By R. J. Scott
Noiieis kellam ~ wTm
A. 2‘2,'t MILE. NON-GTop SWIM /*2W2?* /yinn Wun/fi
4-fcOM CAIRO, ILL., To MEMPHIS, / / /Wt IW L—3X “f7*4
'TehN., BROKE AEI- KNOWN ( JO
SWIMMIKJC, ECO r-io S FOP- / -£> / Avlnl/ ! Tj&l
T*e Mississippi River. — J \ UflPMip
( -rIMF Qg HOuRC AMD -L5 MmUfEQ ’J
TO ATS “TWE FIRST} /YAS MAM- HE SAY iTs A ,
Z ,ME 0 ,VE SEEN // G*OOD S><S»N WHEN THEM V
W IN SETT.NG . ROUND
HO\N COME? J\ "TK4
/V y j LOUD, ITS A Si<S»N
: \\l /Tj 77r * ( Business has done turned
JA \ \ A ANOTHER one OF THEM /
S sßrf/V* r-J You HEAR SO /
THE PROPRIETOR, of -THE CENTRAIJ
HOTEL. NOTES A CHANGE FOR
THE better in the business
WORLD , S'

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