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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, January 21, 1932, Image 1

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HENDERSON,
gateway to
'CENTRAL
CAROLINA.
nineteenth year
Slight Decrease Seen
In Fatal Auto Crashes
In State During 1931
Total of 762 Persona Lost
Lives an 2 5,075 Injured
In North Carolina
Last Year
IS FIFTEEN FEWER ,
THAN previous year
Month of December Shows
Larger Number of Persons
Killed In Auto Accidents
November Is Second
D»l>r OUpniffc llaira*.
In Hr M, tt »H« Until.
R r j r. ni!tKi'.nv<i.L
Ralfiph. .lan. 21 A total of 762 per
,ons were killed and 5.075 injured in
XS9* automobile arrident.l in North
Carolina during 1931. Recording to the
final figure* released today by L. S.
H»ttu. chief of the automobile license
division of the State Department of
Revenue This la 15 fewer killed than
In 1990. however, when 777 were kill
ed in automobile accidents.
The largest number of fatal acci
dent* occurred in December when #9
were killed and 176 injured In 363 ac
cident* m which IHI drivers were in
volved the accident record shows. In
November 74 were killed and 463 In
jured. which was the largest record
that far in 1931.
-Whil* it is encouraging to note
(hat there were not quite so many
death* from automobile accidents in
UJI a* in 1930. there is no getting
•way from the fact that there are far
tao many accidents and that some
thing must be done to reauce this
ttrriffic toll of life and property.'" said
Mr. Harris “If 762 persons had been
killed during the year in a single ac
cident or even a series of accidents on
the railroads or in any other means
of transportation, the people in the
State would be up in arms about it.
But people seem to be Indifferent to
automobile accidents, despite the fast
that a little more care and a little
more regard for the law would eli
minate almost all of them. Reck lean
ness. speed and rare learns eee cm—e 90
per cent of the automobile ace id ante.**
"If all the contageous diseases in
the State killed as many people in
a year as automobiles killed during
1931. the epeople of the State would
be demanding the spending of hun
dreds of thousands of dollars for dis
ease control, call in the Rockefeller
Foundation and maybe the Red
Cross." said Dr. James M. Parrott of
the State Board of Health. "But when
782 persons are killed and 5,075 in
jured in a year from automobiles, they
(Continued on Page TLree.)
FORMER LOUISBURG
COLLEGE HEAD DIES
Rev. C. C. Alexander Pastes
Following Illness At
Home In Clinton
Clinton. Jan. 21. < API- The Rev. O.
C Alexander, pastor ot the Clinton
Methodist church here, and former
president of Louishurg College, died al
his home here today of double pneu
monia He had been ill for ten days.
He was 35 years old.
Mr Alexander retired two years ago
*•* president of Lnulsburg College
where he took i p his duties after
holding the professorship of religious
eduration at Birmingham Southern
College
Hi* widow and three children sur
vi"f Funeral arrangements had not
he*n completed today.
Highway Patrol’s Work
Causes Careful Driving
Onilr Dt*Mtr> Bares*.
4a the Ntr Weller HntcL
"* J. C. MASK KM t il.I •
Raleigh, j an . 21.—That the State
Rtghway Patrol is bearing down
•larder on motorists and compelling a
“•ore strict observance of the high
way laws is attested by the fact that
J** drivers were arrested by the pa
_rPT ' n December, while a total of
• W drivers were stopped and wara
.. by Patrolmen. Captain Charles D.
armer. commander of the patrol.
Printed out today in commenting on
* Member report of the patrol’s
activities..
eJL t,>Ul of * lg > 237 *n cash was also
as a r «*uK of the patrol’s
»he report shown. Os this
113.650 went Into the school
fin-T 0f ,h ® vnrtous counties from
! ** * nrt forfeitures collected follow
the conviction of drivers, while
into the Btste highway
hr.. rrom lh * “*• °f nsw automobile
th*”?* 8 t 0 thoa * found either evading
c *sses CPn3e Uw or wtlh improper U-
Htfttiteraun Dailtt Utstratrfr
'yrfWjafeWge
Last Man’ Is 111
~ lll ,
Charles Lockv. ood, the last man of
the Last Man's club, has been suf
fering from a leg blood clot which
U expected to keep him in bed
several months. Lockwood, who
ia 89, now lives in Chamberlain,
S. D. He is the only survivor of
the Civil Wur Veterans' club,
formed b;’ a IliwncEota crmoony
iH BACKING IN
SOUTH IS GROWING
Two More Virginians And
One Tar Heel Favor Him
For President
Richmond. Va.. Jan. 31.—Two Vir
ginians and a North Carolinan have
added their voices to the General As
iembly’3 hurrahs for Harry Flood
Byrd for president.
W. O. Saunders, editor of the Eliza
beth City Independent, is the North
Carolinian, who believes that “we in
North Carolina recognized Harry
Byrd’s presidential possibilities long
before you Virginians did."
As for Representative S. Otis Bland
of the first district, "a Byrd boom is
entirely agreeable to me."
The same goes for Allan D. Jones,
of Newport News, counsel for the
Virginia commission of fisheries, who
said Byrd seemed to be regarded as
the leader among the “dark horse"
candidates.
Meanwhile former Governor Byrd
has kept silent regarding his presi
dential aspirations. When the Virginia
assembly endorsed him as a presiden
tial candidate, Mr. Byrd expressed his
thanks, urged party harmony, and
gave no indication whether he will
enter the field.
POLING WILL SPEAK
IN RALEIGH SOON
Raleigh. Jan. 21.—Dr. Daniel A.
Poling, nationally and internationally
famed speaker will be in Raleigh on
.Friday. February 12 for two addresses,
it was announced tody. One will be
for luncheon and the other will be
for a great public mass meeting in
the evening. Dr. Poling is chairman
of the group of six speakers who will
compose the flying squadron which is
reaching the principal cities of the
48 statfts with facts regarding pro
hibition.
Patrolmen investigated and reported
on 153 accidents, in which 28 persons
were killed and 119 Injured. Twenty
two stolen cars, with an estimated
value of $7,849, were recovered by the
patrol.
Os the 7.768 drivers who were stop
ped and given warnings by patrol
men, 105 were for passing other cars
on curves, 406 for “hogging*’ the road
and 1,572 for parking On the highway.
Among those actually arrested, 68
w«(re for reckless driving, 96 for driv
ing while drunk, 42 for passing cars
on hills and 19 persons were arrested
not for drunken driving, but for being
drunk on the highways. Courtesies,
such as assistance in changing tires,
getting gasoline for cars out of gas
and other courtesies of this nature,
were shown to 1,827 drivers.
In all, 12,508 cars and trucks were
stopped by patrolman during Decem
ber and 18,086 different violation not
ed and reported. Captain Farmer
pointed out. Patrolmen travelled a
total of 119477 miles over the high
ways of the State during December.
-ONLY.DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THIS SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA
HENDERSON, N. C., THURSDAY AFTERNOON, JANUARY 21, 1932
JAP PARLIAMENT IS
ordered dissolved
FORNEW ELECTIONS
*\ - -
Imperial Decree Promulgat.
After New Govern
ment Outlines Pro
posed Plans
OPPOSITION GIVEN NO
TIME FOR QUESTIONS
Three Ministers of Govern
ment Outline Policies Just
Beforqf Parliament •Is Or
dered To Close
Tokyo, Jan. 21.(AP1- The Japanese
parliament was dissolved by imperial
decree this afternoon to make way
for general elections.
The order was promulgated imme
diately after Premier Inuk&i, Foreign
Minister Yoehizawa, and Finance Min
ister Takahashi comnleted an outline
of the new government's program to
both houses and no opportunity was
given the opposition members to ask
question.
In the outline of policies the three
ministers touched upon the Man
churian question, reiterating that
Japan has no territorial ambitions in
the territory. They also criticized the
late Wakatsuki cabinet for removing
the gold embargo and said industry
has witnessed a revival since the em
bargo was replaced by themselves.
VEHICLEUSEDFOR
KIDNAPPING FOUND
Denver Offers Reward For
Information Regarding
Bower Abductors
Denver, Colo., Jan. 21.—(AP)—Find
ing of the motor car used by k!9-
(tapirs of Benjamin J. Bower. 62, held
for $90,000 ransom, gave police their
first major clue today as relatives of
the bakery corporation manager ex
pressed fear that he had been slain.
An offer of SSOO for information
leading to the arrest and conviction
of the kidnapers was made by Den
ver officials after the car was found
abandoned on the outskirts of the
city. Fingerprints were taken from it.
TRIALATPHOENIX
DRAWS BIG CROWDS
Winnie Ruth Judd Goes On
Trial For Trunk .
Slaying
Phoenix, Ariz., Jan. 21. (AP) —Win-
nie Ruth Judd leaped from her chair
during her murder trial today to de
nounce Dr. Joseph Catton ,of San
Francisco, prosecution alienist.
1 Spectators stormed the stairway of
the courthouse in an effort to reach
Judge Howard Speakman's courtroom
to hear the first day of testimony In
the murder trial.
One woman jammed in the packed
corridor outside the courtroom faint
ed twice before deputy sheriffs could
force their way to her side. She was
removed to an anteroom and revived-
BIGJOIESSFDND
BILL IS FAVORED
Senate Committee Reports
Bill of Costigan And
Lafollette Favorably
Washington, Jan. 21.—(AP) —An ap
propriation of $375,000,000 for direct
federal relief for the unemployed was
recommended to the Senate today by
one of its commlttes, despite Presi
dent Hoover’s opposition.
The Manufactures committee vote
6 to 2 to report the Costigan-Lafol
tette bill authorizing $125,000,000 for
the present winter and $250,000,000 for
the next fiscal year.
The committee’s action places
squarely before the Senate the pro
posal for direct appropriations from
the treasury to aid the Jobless.
WORK OF FISHERIES
PROVES ECONOMICAL
Raleigh, Jan. 21.—The approximate
ly' three and one half million game
fish distributed from the mate hat*
i chertes during the calendar year of
1931 were produced at a cost of only
■ about one cent each, according to a
• report yesterday by J. S. Hargett, as
i sistant director of the Department of
■ Conservation and Development in
■ charge of inland fisheries.
Britain's Bigger and Better Submarine
i ' itH
j * ijgH H 9HH
’j, jfr r jk -f THk '
„ ill
Said to be the world’s largest submarine, cm*
undersea craft, bearing the colorful name of “H. M.
S. Sturgeon,* is shown at Tilbury Docks, London,
soon after her launching. The sleek and sturdy
vessel, which has oassed Its tests to the complete
GRANGE SUPPORTS
MCLEAN FOR PUCE
Urges North Carolinians
For Reconstruction Fi
nance Body Board
Washington, Jan. 21.—TAP i The
National Grange today threw Its sup
port to Angus Wilton £lcLeen of j
North Carolina, for a director of the
Reconstruction Finance Corporation.
The Grange's support for the for
mer North Carolina governor was
brought to the president by L. J.
Tabor, master of the National Grange
and Albert S. Goss, of Seattle, Wash.,
chairman of the executive committed
of the Grange. "
Tabor said McLean was mentioned
after they had expressed "the urgent
need of placing on the Reconstruc
tion Corporation someone # who under
stands the rural problems and can
make Its provisions do what we think
they can do."
FOREIGN TRAfIE IN
COTTON INCRUSES
Monetary Return* For Pro
duct Smaller Than Year
Before, However
Washington, Jan. 21.(AP)—Foreign
trade in United States cotton during
the last five months of 1931 showed
an increase in export volume over
the same period of 1930. but the
monetary return was less due to the
prevailing low prices.
The Commerce Department report
ed today that shipments during the
period amounted to 4,035,000 bales as
compared with 3,947,000 bales during
the 1930 season. The dollar returns
for 1931 amounted to $163,463,000 as
compared with $280,711,000 during the
earlier month.
repaßsmeet
MAY BE HELD LATER
British Fail To Give Up
Hopes That Lausanne
Meet Will Take Place
London, England. Jan. 21.—(AP) —
Postponement of the Lausanne re
parations conference, announced here
yesterday, does not mean that the
conference will not be held later, it
wax said in official circles today.
The government is continuing its
preliminary work and hopes that the
conference will ultimately be held and
be a success it was stated.
SON OF GANDHI IS
GIVEN LONG TERM
Bardoli, India, Jan. 21.—(AP)—
Bamdas Gandhi, third son of the
Mahatma, was sentenced to
eighteen months in prison at hard
labor today for participation In the
In the Nationalist campaign. He
was attested last Ti—iSey.
WEATHER
FOB NORTH CAROLINA.
Fair and somewhat warmer to
night; Friday cloudy and warmer;
psssttily light showdhs k extreme
west portion; gentle to moderate
winds, mss Mi south.
■vHiisiactJon ot ;ne ttruisi) Adrn»r«ili>. embodies
many features heretofore regarded as impractical
for submarines. Besides her fore and aft torpedo
tubes, the undersea monster cames batteries of
disappearing guns and anti-aircraft artillery.
Says U. S. Lines
Operate Bars On
Trips Over Ocean
Washington, Jan. 21.—(AP)—
Chairman O'Connor, of the United
States Shipping Board, today told
a House committee under ques
tioning that American lines op
erate bars outside the 12-mile
limit.
O’Connor was testifying in the
investigation of the House Mer
chant Marine committee into the
shipping board’s sale of the United
States Line.
WAR POLICIES!
WILSON DEFENDED
Glass Attacks Statetnent
Made By Secretary of
Agriculture Hyde
Washington. Jan. 21.—(AP) — The |
cabinet members —Secretaries Mellon i
and Hyde, were represented In the |
Senate today as being in disagreement
over the legality of European loans
made by the Wilson administration
after the war.
Seneator Glass, Democrat. Virginia,
who was secretary of the treasury un
der Woodrow Wilson, charged that
statements by the Secretary of Agri
culture that the loans were “without
legal right” were false In “spirit and
In fact."
gandhTfoumers
DEFY AUTHORITIES
Political Gathering Is Held
Despite Interruptions
By Police
Bombay, India. Jan. 21.—(AP)—In
defiance of the law forbidding po
litical gatherings, several thousand
Nationalists assembled today on the
Maidan Green, raised the Congress
Party flag and shouted their boycott
slogan.
Again and again the police drove
them off but each time the mob
gathered as soon as the police retired.
A dozen of them were injured and
several arrests were made.
COTTOWNING
SHOWS INCREASES
Census Bureau Report Shows
Last Month Os 1931 Bet
ter Than in 1930
Washington. Jan. 21— (AP)— The
cotton spinning industry was report
ed today by the Census Bureau to
have been operated during December
at 79.3 percent es capacity oh a single
shift basis, compared with 86.8 per
cent in November and 764 percent in
December 1930.
spinning spindles in place Decem
ber 31 totalled 32.826,026 of which 24,
637,864 were active at some time dur
ing the month, with the average on
a single shift basis being 28,680,069.
THIRD SHOCK HITS LIMA}
ONE DEAD, TWO INJURED
Lima, Peru, Jan. 21-—lnhabitants
ot Lima, severely shaken Tuesday
night by an earthquake, felt a lighter
tremor last night, the btlrd in two
days. i
PUBLISH BD EVERY AKTKRNOOM
EXCEPT SUNDAY.
MORE CHINESE ARE
SLAIN IN BATTLES
Two 'More Encounters Re
ported In Official State
ment by Japanese
Tokyo, Jan. 21. (AP) Thirty
Chinese were killed, many were
wounded and one Japanese soldier
was wounded today in a clash between
Japanese troops and Chinese irre
gulars near Tahushan. Manchuria, a
war office statement said this Evening
In another encounter north of Chin
chow sixteen Chinese were killed and
nlnteen captured. There were no
Japanese casualties in that engage
ment
The war office casualty list covering
the Manchurian campaign from Sep
tember 18 placed the number of
Japanese killed at 300 and the num
ber of wounded at 600. In addition to
about 400 soldiers are still in hospitals
with frostbite.
EFFORTSTOSAVE
NEGROES STARTED
Alabama Supreme Court
Takes Up Appeals Os
Convicted Men
Montgomery. Ala., Jan. 21. (API
A bombardment of threatening let
ters and resolutions received by the
Alao&ma court wirntn the
last six weeks was revealed here to
day by Chief Justice John C. Ander
son as arguments opened in the ap
peals of eight Negroeß from death
sentences imposed on them at Scotts
boro, Ala., last spring for attacks on
two white girls.
The girls were travelling as hoboes
on a freight train and were attacked
between Stevenson and Paint Rock,
Ala.
“These letters and resolutions at
tempting to bulldoozc and browbeat
the court arc highly Improper," Chief
Justice Anderson said. "If the party
who circulated them were in the
jurisdiction of this court he would be
judged in contempt."
State Uses Best Way To
Cut Salaries, Many Think
Dully Dispatch Bares a. |
la the Sir Walter Hold.
XT J. C. B4RK.ERVII/U
Raleigh, Jan. 21— Drastic as are |
the cuts being mtde in departmental i
expenses and in the salaries of many *
State employes and loud as are the
howls going up from many of these
employes, the cuts being made are
not as drastic and the howls not as
loud as if the general assembly had
been convened in special session to
do the budget pruning instead of the
Budget Bureau and Personnel Di
vision. according to several members
of the general assembly who have
been in Raleigh recently.
“It is true that some of the expense
cutting and salary slashing is going
to be pretty severe,” said a member
of the general aseembly from an east
ern county here today. “But I am
convinced that the trimming being
done now by the Budget Bureau and
Personnel Division is going to be con
servative compared to what world be
done should a special session of the
general assembly be called to re-make
appropriations and trim the State
budget to stay within the expected
8 PAGES
TODAY|
FIVE CENTS COPY
FINAL APPROVAL OF,
BIG 1 CREDIT GROUP
SCHEDULED FRIDAY
Whole Hearted Cooperation
Pushes Work of Recon.
struction Finance
CorVoration
BOTH HOUSES EXPECT
TO ACT BY TOMORROW
Record Set By House And
Senate Conference For
Speedy Action on Measure
Recommended by Hoover
Washington. Jan. 21.—(AP)—Whole
hearted cooperation for national eco
nomic recovery pushed the Recon
struction Finance Corporation today
to the verge of congressional enact
ment.
Carefully but speedily revised by
expert members of the Senate and
House, this greatest of peacetime em
ergency measures was returned to the
two chambers for final approval, a
consummation expected tomorrow.
Something approaching a record was
set by the conference committee in
adjusting within two days numerous
and important differences between
Senate and House on the two billion
dollar government credit agency.
ANOTHERATTACKIN
HAWAII REPORTED
I
Honolulu Aroused To Man
hunt After Assault On
Another Woman
Honolulu, Hawaii, Jan. 21.—<AP)—
Honolulu was aroused today to a fresh
manhunt by another attack upon A
woman.
Mrs Toka Okazaki, 2», mother of
two children, complained to police she
had been assaulted near John Rodgers
airport by a man she Identified
through a photograph as Daniel Ly
man. escaped Portuguese • Hawaiian
murderer.
The assault occurred as authorities
were preparing to place before the
grand jury evidence in the tynehlng
of Joscpn Kahahawai. Hawaiian, al
leged attacker of a navy officer’s wife,
Rnd as the. territorial legislature In
special session was seekinr a formula
for better law enforcement to over
come hoodlumlsm In Honolulu.
It was the third serious assault
case reported to authorities since last
September.
ASK RAILLABOR
TO ACCEPT CUTS
i
Carrier Presidents Offer
Statistics To Prove Earn
ing Power Smaller
Chicago. Jan. 21.—(AP)—The rail
way presidents came forward today
with the “important statistics” de
manded by union labor in support es
the plea for acceptance of a ten per
cent wage reduction.
The presidents asserted that gross
earnings on the railroads in 1931 were
33 percent less than in 1929.
Their statement presented a moss of
data on railway earnings and answer
ed the labor proposals at the joint
wage conference.
revenue. I also think this present cur
tailment of expenses by the various
departments is going to be conserva
tive compared to what the 1988 gen
eral assembly is going to do, unless
condition take a sudden change for
the better very soon."
Several other members of tbs gen
eral assembly have pointed out that
it was by a very narrow margin that
(the bills introduced by Representa
tives White of Robeson. Moye of
Greene and Davis of Warren counties,
in the 1931 general assembly, to re
duce salaries of SIOO a month 60 par
cent, salaries of S2OO a mouth 20 pgr
cent and all salaries of SBOO a molftti
or more SO per cent ware defeated qy
only a Very small margin. If Is'ano
recalled that virtually all of the mem
bers of the general assembly regard
ed as being members of the “MsrT efrn
Group*' in the house and senate ,'as
well, were in favor of State
salaries a gre»* oaai more than ’so
per cent, * r u that Representative
Holme* l rhtt county was one at fbe
(Continued on Page tight) *

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