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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, April 02, 1932, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-04-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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PAGE FOUR
HENOERSON DAILY DISPATCH
A*|Wl IS. I*l4.
Pnftililil Srt»y iIMMN MlW><
CS« INO.
at IS V*mc Mtwt
XOBNRY A, DKNNtP. IV** and Editor
M. L. KlN<*H. -Soc-Trrx. aad Baa Mar.
TKLSPMOMSt
Editorial Office t*a
Soiltiy Editor *lO
Saiiacu uffli-r Itt
Til* Hi'DilfriK'n l*«*il> »* a
IDMabfr «*f the A»tvi*tisl N>* *•
paper Knlerpriar .Vaan'iallim, (South
ern New >|>«|irr I'uMmhi-ra AMtVlatlon
and the North enrolls* I'ren Aaavla
ttoa.
The A>ms latnl !>. ><. la exetualv ely
entitled to u>r (or reputdicaticn all
■ eras dispatches . tedllod to It I's not
otherwise . redded in this |*aper. anil
■ lin the local news puhllshett herein
All ri(hts of puhlh'ation of special
dlapatohrs herein .r<- also reserxed.
si bm iiiptiii> rsit iN
PaiaMe lltlril) tn Advance.
One Year HOO
Hit Months 2.50
Three Months ... I .No
Par t'opx OS
NOTtt K TO w| NMt niItKRM.
Uel at the printer label «>n your
paper. The dale thereon shi>w s w hen
the subscription expires. Forward
jour money in ample time for re
newal. Notice date on label carefully
•nd If not i.'rint please notify us at
on.e Vulvst nl>ers desiring the address
on their ivapor t haniiol. please state in
thnar cpminumiealion both the OLD
•nd NKW address
Natlnaal Umtlalnc Nepreseatatltea
I'BIIVT. UMII9 A KOH.V
250 Park Avenue, New Tork City: 3i
>:a«t VVa. ker Drive Chicago. Walton
Huililiuk. Atlanta. Security Building,
St l.ouis
Entered at the post office in Hender
son. N. C.. as sc. end class mall matter
Ah—wf»ma»ha.n*«Bd»—aipdv InfcWhdß
• RIGHTEOUSNESS BRINGS RE
JOICING Whn the righteous are in
authority, the people rejoice: but
when the wicked beareth rule, the
people moiirn Proverbs 29:2.
RIGHT REASONING - Let us rea
son together, saith the Lord: though
your sins be as scarlet, they shall be
as white as snow.—lsa. 1 18
IjJAMES •aSWELL] 1
By Central Press
New York. April 2 Marginal!! of
a Madhattanke:
Another jury summons... Well. I
wriggled out of the one last sum-
mer, so this time
I suppose I murt
take the rap ...
Maybe there'll be
hoi copy in the
proceedings, too.
.. And who am
I to sniff at 34
daily?... Inci
dentally, I never
beard of an unemployed guy being
haaded a summons: he needs the
money, and luck doesn't run so mun
ificent ly in this rteel-mitted town...
That little 12->ear-oM in the row
dieit and moot abandoned of the
Square cabarets made me un
comfortable the ether night; watching
with wide, uneasy eyes, the gyrations
of a ecorehy rumba she seems asham
ed of her parents, who had brought
her in...
Undoubtedly the most un-nerving
moment in any night club floor shows
the colored boy with the wooden limb
upon the arena of Connie's Inn, in
Harlem .He is realty one of the great
♦ap-dancers. and wriile his misfortune
lends a macabre note to the loudest
and liveliest of the late-spot exhibi
tions. onlookers almost forget the sig
nificance of that pounding peg. so
thrilling is his technique.. .1 noted the
intense io*err>: of Bill Robinson, at
a ringside table, in Bates' tapping...
A newspaperman just returned from
Russia tells me that the bane of Sta
lin's existence is those high peasant
boots he mu:t wear, for the looks of
the thins, to formal gatherings.. .The
czar of the Soviets has longed all his
life for a pair of ahiny patent leather
dogs the —kind the officers used to
wear...
t'LOS£ll SHOPS
A social register playboy advanc
ed a theoiy one evening recently that
took this reporter somewhat aback
He contends that prohibition Ms, in ef
fect, being enforced in Manhattan!
Here's how he supports his aston
ishing thesis:
"All the de luxe speakeasies are very
ctreful these nights about admitting
people A stranger hasn’t a chance.
The old line about being ‘a friend of
Joe Zilch' doesn t soften the doorman's
stare any more. You must be known
"WtbaA's the result? A private club,
nothing else. When a speakeasy de
pends upon a regular trade of repeats
and habitues its no more than a closed
gathering. You can't call K a wide
open town when you have to know
the ropes to carry on.
“A joint which admits onyl mem
bers' and rigidly excludes strange faces
la scarcely an out-and-out commercial
affair. It's an exclusive ckub.”
Well .•! If it makes him happier to
fftihik n 0...
FI CM-CPS PUT-DOWN 8—
Schum&nn-Helnk never lets
a* American flag out of her possession,
beMerit* that to do ao would bring
certain miafortun*. Winaky, the bur
lesque impresario of the town, got all
the newspaper beys into his office the
other day to suggest applying the tech
nique of the atrip shows to grand opera
... “Get a runway and make the prims
doona walk down K, and the hox office
would fee mobbed/.. .Hia glory mad*
the aheet* at a walk...
Taxi drivers of the Village are una
nimous in admitting that El Chtcos is
a "clean joint "-meaning that K is
oat of Mm few places they know which
won’t aland for any chine*ng in the
matter of atomy fares brought to the
<tnor. which will not atknit a man un
accompanied by a woman and which
M generally, as this reported is glad to
reoogniae. a notably healthy dine-and
dance emporium, as such business go.
TTie Broadway personalities who are
seen at every opening, large or small,
and who*# names are always announc
ed from the floor by master* of cere
monies an>: Jack Owterman. who
manages to get into the spotlight and
sing a song, the same song, incidental
ly. on each occasion; Abe Lyman,
who usually is funny enough to juaL
lfy his center-of-lhinge craving; Lou
Ho Its. and half a dosen other regulars
whoor names you wouldn't know and
whose name* I forget 10 minutes after
rech session...
It’s a curious thing that there are
n»ver more than three or four very,
very successful ni»M clubs in Man
hattnn at the same time... There arc
nmny complaints now about slack
trade but In my memory the favored
after-the-theatre cut-up places have
slw-ays been counted . The name* of
them change and the public drifts
back and forth, spelling success or
failure, often for reasons no one can
detect.
TODAY
TODAYS ANNIVERSARIES.
742 Charlemagne, celebrated King of
the Franks and Emperor of the
Romans, born. Died Jan. 28. 814.
1808 Hans Christian Andersen, Dan
ish writer of fairy and folk
tales, born. Died Aug. 4. 1875.
1840 Emile Zola, French novelist,
champion of the cause of Drey
fus. born. Died Sept. 29. 1902.
1841 —Daniel Draper, noted New York
City meteorologist, born there.
Died in 1932.
1886—Charles A. Weyerhaeuser among
among America's wealthiest
lumbermen, born in Coal Val
le*. 111. Died Feb. 15. 1930.
TODAY IN HISTORY.
1818 The American Farmer, pioneer
agricultural paper, established
in Baltimore.
1866--President Johnson proclaimed
the Civil War at an end.
1930—Third Census officially com
menced.
TODAY'S BIRTHDAYS.
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, presi
dent of Columbia University, eminent
citizen, bom at Elizabeth. N. J„ 70
years ago.
William B. Wilson, onetime Secre
tary of Labor, born in Scotland. 70
years ago.
Walter P. Chrysler, noted automo
bile manufacturer, born in Wamago.
Kans.. 57 years ago.
Maj. Gen. William R. Smith, U. S.
A., who, today, reaches the statutory
age of retirement, born in Nashville.
Tenn.. 64 years agoo.
Sergei Rachmaninoff. celebrated
pianiat-composer. born in Russia, 59
years ago.
License Needed
To Fish Outside
One’s Own County
w
Dally Dlspali-h Bureau,
la the Mir Waller Hotel.
B\ J. f. BAMKKHVILL.
Raleigh. April 2.—Any one who
fishes outside the limits of his own
county must have a State fishing li
cense. fishermen of the State were
reminded today by J. S. Hargett, as
sistant director of the Department of
Conservation and Development.
The requirement, Mr. Hargett em
phasized. extends to commercial as
well as Inland waters, the only ex
ceptions being the ocean, sounds and
the wide mouths of the Cape Fear.
Neuse, Pamlico. Tar, and New rivers,
Wilmington. New Bern. Washington,
and Jacksonville marking the inland
limits of territory where no licenses
are required.
The State anglers art. Mr. Hargett
explained, exempted only the ocean
and sounds as waters in which no li
censes are required by resident;-, o*
any other ce’o.tie.s execj t those in
which the waters are located. The law.
however, -rave authority tr the Boaid
of Co-'. ivj:V i and Development, lo
specify nviii'inal waters in >vVtn li
cense 'cquirementH do not apply. I’n
der ruth. --ity. the boa i excepted
the mouths of rivers which have been
specified.
Although weather handicaps prob
ably resulted in one of the lightest
Easter Monday fishing days in years,
according lo the conservation officials
warm spring days are expected t:>
bring out fishermen in largo num
bers in the eastern and cential parts
of the State.
Opening of the trout season in the
mountain counties April 15 inaugura
tes formally the sport in that section.
The trout season will continue until
September 1. Small mouth bass fish
ing in that section will not open un
til June 10, continuing until Septem
ber 1 and closing at the same time
as trout fishing.
Seasons for large mouth bass and
other species except mountain trout,
close during spawning period on May
1 for one month and ten days or un
til June 10. being broken only In a
few counties where certain days dur
ing the general closed season have
been exceptd.
WKenheiliag do wn nupie syrup put into
a large kettle and do not cover when 4
form a aoh bad si cold water it will fir into
rtw.
HENDEKSON, (N. C.J DAILY DISPATCH- SATURDAY, APRIL 2, 1982 "
Government Economy Aid
To Business, Babson Says
Local Governments Leading the Way and State And
Federal Organizations M u »t Follow, Economist De
clares; Says Budgets Must Be Balanced
BY ROGER W. BABSON,
Copyright 1982, Publishers Fin
ancial Bureau.
Babson Park. Fla., April 2. The
current trend toward economy in Gov
ernment shows that we are at last
coming to our senses. This movement
merits the support of everybody who
wants to see a recovery In business.
England is working out of her de
preeslon by flashing expenses and
balancing her budget. The United
States must follow her example. Gov
ernment costs, federal, state, and lo
cal. in 1931 were thirten billion dol
lars—more than one-fifth of the en
tire national income. Business, under
going the most severe dpression in
seventy-five years, is crying out for
relief from this staggering burden.
People can no longer afford to give
one day's income out of every five to
run the government. There is, of
course, immediate need for more re
venue to balance the budget; but let
us not forget, while imposing these
new taxes, to insist upon the most
sweeping economies.
The trouble with government fin
ances in that they follow the crazy
principle of spending the money first
and tryin gto raise it afterwards. In
stead they should follow the business
principle of estimating the Income
first and then appropriating only as
the income will permit. There is a
definite limit to the income which the
government may exact without killing
the goose that lays the golden egg,
namely, business. Current financial re
ports show that this limit has already
been reached, and business, instead of
laying golden eggs for public officials
to gather, is laying just ordinary
goose eggs." It is time the public in
sisted on the same sound financial
principles in government that apply
to individuals and corporations.
Local Government!* Leading the Way.
My organization recently compiled
a list of all the states, cities, towns,
and counties which have made salary
cuts during the past three months. As
shown in the following table, state and
local governments have already made
a good start in salary reductions, even
though the movement must go further
than it has thus far. _
Public Salary Cub*.
Jan. Feb. Mar. Three
Months'
Total
States 11 2 4
Cities and Towns 37 33 21 91
Counties 14 6 3 23
Total 52 40 26 118
The reason the states and local gov
ernments are leading the way toward
cutting operating costs and curbing
appropriations is that they were the
first to feel the effects of Impaired
credit. Difficulty in accomplishing fi
nancing in New York, Chicago. Phil
adelphia. and other centers has
awakened the public in time to avoid
a disastrous collapse of state and
city credit.
In the meantime efforts to make si
milar ecenomies in the federal gov
ernment have been blocked by po
litical groups. A cwrefully jplanned
program of salary reduction through
out all brances of the government
from Congress down would not only
mean worthwhile cutting of public
costs, but more important still, would
set an example would have a good
psychological effect on th whole coun
try. Business can be speeded up only
as every group makes the necessary
sacrifice. With 6,000.000 totally unm
ployed, several million more on part
time, and nearly all private workers
having taken substantial pay reduc
tions, there is no reason to exempt
the vast army of public employees
from the sacrifices which all other
groups are making.
Must Balance* The Budget.
While new taxes are necessary and
will be imposed to create some sort
of balance for the national budget in
the emergency, the real cure for our
financial troubles lies in controlling
the outgo. The multidude of Bureaus.
Commissions, and other appendages
which have fastened themselves onto
the federal payroll In such profusion
during the past twenty years should
be thoroughly overhauled and those
not absolutely essential should be Jei
minated. Unquestionably the trend of
our political system since the war has
been toward ever-increasing and cost
ing and costly bureaucracy.
This trend largely accounts for the
increase of 475 per cent in Federal
government costs Bince 1913. No other
Kejurnin*; Student
t
|l Mmm
Parts, London and Berlin may ho
the goal of many an American's
ambition, but, somehow, the re
turning wanderer Is always glad
to get back home. Virginia Dawes,
daughter of former Ambassador
Charles G. Dawes, is no exception.
She is shown on her arrival at New
York altar a six months’ study trip
to Paris,
nation in the world has shown such
an increase. England is nearest with
296 per cent; Holland third, with 279
per cent; Germany fourth, with 273
per cent; Switzerland fifth, with 282
per cent. In the United Stats even In
our most prosperous times the public
expenditures were growing much
more rapidly than our national in
come. Now with the average family
income reduced about 35 per cent
since 1929, we are paying 20 per cent
more than in 1929 to run our Govern
ment!
As I have said, the vigorous cut
ting of expenditures in England has
brought back a balanced budget:
enabled the repayment, ahead of their
due date, of credits advanced to her;
brought a sharp rise in sterling ex
change; and a better spirit of confi
dence and courage to British business.
Aggressive action on our part along
the same lines of Government econo
my will do more than anything else
to reestablish business confidence in
the United States.
To do this, all groups must un
selfishly make sacrifices for the com
mon good. Each congressman seems
to think that his main duty is to get
something out of the Federal Trea
sury for his own section. Every com
munity should let its congressmen
know that local and sectional interests
are subordinate to the big task of
balancing the national budget. I be
lieve that this change in attitude is
coming, because people now see that
as individuals and communities they
suffer only as the whole country suf
fers. and prosper only as the whole
country prospers.
General business as measured by
the Babsonehart is now 35 per cent
below the normal X-Y Line, compared
with 34 per cent a month ago, even
with the adjustments for usual sea
season improvements.
A. J. MAXWELL OPENS
, HIS HEADQUARTERS
Daily Diiiwtrl Bnreua.
la the Mir Walter Hotel.
BY J. t. RANKERVILL.
Raleigh. Apr!; z. —Campaign head
quarters for Allen J. Maxwell, who Is
one of the three candidates seeking
the Democratic nomination for gov
ernor, have been opdpd on the fourth
floor of the Capital tttub building here
on the corner of Martin and Salis
bury streets. The rooms occupied by
the headquarters are 401, 402 and
414.
Robert Ruark. Raleigh attorney
who was recently named State cam
paign manager by Mr. Maxwell. Is
In active charge of the headquarters,
with a corps of assistants.
CROSS WORD PUZZLE
ACROSA
I Divided
7 renaming to a
state
II Barren
14 Act of coming to a
place
15 Noting motion
towards
17 To cover
18 Language of
Siamese
19 Pronoun
?0 Liquor
22 Wife of a czar
14 Watering place
15 Paragraph
17 Hanks •,
28 Portal
29 Sophistical
11 Specter, phantom
13 Powerful rock-bor
ing tools
14 Pollen-bearing
organs
85 Jumbled type
16 Note of scale
57 Uin or noo.se
12 Written mandate
17 Owner of plantation
18 Dwells at
19 Resounded
ill Daub
SI Learning
SI Conclusion
S 4 Follower of Pliny
46 Mass. Inst, of Tech
(abbr.)
S7 Indefinite article
>8 Control
*9 Country of Asia
• t Bone (l-atin>
12 Landed estate at
tached to manor
14 Platform, dais
1G Tags ngam
17 Petition lo the Lorn
irTpi
z H r7 B rl ~~ IBP
To T 3 LJff ——
73
■■ ■■ 5i ™
_——
RI IP RMRR RRR
—■ —- -—Bpi —
Z--ZW-----WZ —
97 -— Mp~ r
■ “
■H IXMirl Uff
A 81000 OUT $
. . i vxx/ of this Mn<Ml
„|L
' - ———— s'
! /v&
p
UNIVERSITY PRESS ISSUES
BOOK THAT WON PRIZE
Chapel Hill, April 2—The University
Press has just brought out a volume
by Profs. F. B. Simkins and R. H.
Woody on ‘‘South Carolina During Re
construction . ” Thp book won the
John H. Dunning prize for the bent
essay in American history writing In
1931. Simkins formerly taught here
and is now at Virginia State Teachers
College: Woody is a professor at
Duke University.
The new release is a “study of so
cial, economic and political forces of
one of the most interesting phases of
Southern history, the reconstruction
period in Sk>utt|i Carolina.’*
The thoughtful eye sees farthest.
Duwn
1 Larger
2 That man
I Luminous bridge
between two poles
4 Uproar
5 Nitrogenous sub
stance resembling
albumin
8 Delays
7 Burlesques
8 A passing
9 Air, melody or tune
10 Nervous twitching
It Avenue (abbr.)
12 Persona! .satire
13 Rigid
15 Fixes In mind
through study
21 Simple; sheer
23 Noting repeti
tion (prefix)
24 Alone
26 Charting
28 Establish in a
residence (var.)
Answer to Previous Puzzle
Inf h*l y hWH 6 !
t h|Bt rv
* J r T sslfr t sMIm h
frTpjpK esp
aTc]s|mN OITjE V, E. ss
F> Ay S g,j
e W ElßtelibA A Wplshr R A pi
U| A S O KtMs ERE
li_omipLOL!S§|
ET-O I LEjuBAN
ty|e|NiTjs|&BE|RlNo|g^rß
lu 6pjt ui statu
32 Lad:es of position
37 Unfurl
38 Schemer
39 Highland (So. Afr.)
40 Gosling (Prov.
Eng.)
41 Weasel-like animal;
42 Lauded
41 To life up again
44 Region of lowland;
south of Dead seo
45 Intervals of time
48 Irritating African
fly
51 Printer’s unit
54 German East
African copper coin
65 Common diminutive
for Nathan
58 Bteep in water to
separate fibers
60 Married woman
(abbr.)
•3 Mol
45 Sloth
The One Consistent Exception
To speak to the purpose, one must
speak witu a purpose.
NOTICE
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF VANCE
Default having been made in the
deed of truut executed by R. A. Harris
payment of that debt secured by that
and wife, Bessie Harris, dated the
15th day of January, 1931, recorded in
I book 155 at page 425 in the office of
the register of deeds for Vance county,
N. C., and ait the request of the hold
er thereof, the undersigned Trustee
will offer for sal; and sell to the high
est bidder for cash at the Courthouse
door in Henderson, N. C., on Monday,
April 11th 1932 at 12 o’clock midday,
the following described property:
All the righrt title and interest of
the said R. A. Harris and wife, Bessie
Harris of every kind, nature and de
scription in and to that lease dated
the 22nd day of April, 1930, duly filed
for registration in Vance County.
North Carolina, executed by Dorsey
Hart and wie, Ekrise Hart, which said
lease runs for a period of fllve years
with option of renewing the same for
five years, on some six or seven acres
of land in Vance county, North Caro
lina known as pant of the Dorsey
Hart farm, adjoining T. H. Hight and
| others, and upon which land R. A
| Harris has erected and does now ope
rate a planing mill or saw mill. To
gether also with all the machinery
appliances and equipment now locat
ed on said premises and used in the
operation and conduct of said busi
ness; said machinery eo relating in
part of an A-d Yates Planer, a Berlin
Saw and a Hardy-Tines Corliss Type
Steam Engine. It being the intention
of this instrument to convey all of the
machinery regardless of whether the
same is described herein or not, locat
ed on said premises. Together also
with all right, t.tle and interest which
the parties of the fin* part may have
in and to buildings, houses and other
property which may have been locate
upon the said premises or which may
hereafter be located upon said pre
mises during the life of the aforesaid
lease.
This the llbh day of March. 1932.
J. H. ZOLLIOOFFER. Trustee.
Low Bound Trip Fares to Almost Every Town in A tuerica
Over The
East Coast Stage Lines
The Short Line System
These tickets are good on all regular schedule buses.
Call the agent for information,
’Phone 18 Union Bu* Station,
Henderson, N. C. *
When planning a trip always nde the bus.
Bide De Luxe Motor Buses— The most safe and
courteous way to travel.
ADMINISTRATION NOTICE
Having qualified as administrator of
the estate of J. W. Young, deceased,
late of Vance County. N. C., this ii>
to noitfy all persons having claims
against the estate or the said deceas
ed to exhibit them to the undersigned
on or before the 14th., day of March.
1933, or tihts notice wiH be pleaded
in bar of their recovery. All persons
indebted to the estate will please
make immediate settlement.
E. O. YOUNG,
Administrator.
SEABOARD AIR
LINE RAILWAY
TRAINS LEAVE HENDERSON
AS FOLLOWS
No. NORTHBOUND
108—8:48 A. M. for Richmond.
Washington, New York, connect
ing at NoriJna with No. 18 ar
riving Fortamouth-Norfolk 12:05
P. M. with pari or-dining car ser
vice
4—2:52 P. M. for Richmond
Washington, New York.
10*—0:48 I*. M. for Richmond
Washington and New York.
8—3:28 A. M. for Portamonth-
NorfoUt Washington. New York.
No. SOUTHBOUND
191—(5:43 A. M. for Savannah,
Jacksonville, Miami. Tampa, St.
Petersburg.
3—3:12 P. M. for Raleigh. San
ford, Hamlet, Columbia. Savan
nah, Miami Tampa, St. Peters
burg.
107—7:55 P. M. for Raleigh. Ham
let, Savannah. Jacksonville,
Miami. Tampa. SI. Petersburg.
Atlanta. Birmingham.
8—1:25 A. M. for Atlanta, Birm
ingham, Memphis.
For information rail on H. E.
Pleasants, DPA., Raleigh. N. C ,
or M C ’ Capps, TA , Hendetwoa,
N. C.

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