OCR Interpretation


Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, April 06, 1932, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-04-06/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

HENDERSON,
GATEWAY TO
CENTRAL
CAROLINA.
NINETEENTH YEAR
Contact Had
High Taxes Levied
By House Bill Are
Attacked By Mills
Taxes on Corporations And
Securities Transfers and
Estates Held
Objectionable
DISCOURAGES FLOW
MONEY TO INDUSTRY
Will Be Further Slowing
Down at Time When Busi
ness Men Are Heiitant and
Industry Stagnant; Econ.
omy Program To Be Made
By Democrats
Washington. April 6. lAPI Ad
minUtrstior. objections to the high I
taxes on corporations, securities trans
lets and estates written into the new 1
it venue bill by the House were put j
before the Snate Finance Committee
today by Seceretary Mill#.
The secretary said the rates and
some of the administrative changes i
in the new bill would tend to "dis
courage the enormal flow of capital
into industry and commerce at a time 1
when business men are hesitant and
industry stagnant.
His testimony opened the series of |
hearings which will precede action by
the committee on the bill framed by
the House.
liKMOCRATS CONSIDERING
FLAN TO OFFER HOOVER i
Washington. April 4 (AP)—Demo-I
cihtic leaders are seriously consider-'
in* a counter economy offer to Presi- j
dent Hoover proposing to give him !
blanket authority to administer a flat I
t« »r percent cut in departmental I
appiopnations for next year.
It appeared likely the proposal
would be advanced by Senator Har
rison. of Mississippi, ranking Demo
crat on the finance committee, who
had lhe floor nt the outset of the
session to discuss the economy row
between the President and congres
sional Democrats over finding the
needed J2Oo.noo.fYtn saving in next
years expenditures. This saving, with
the billion dollars of the House re
venue measure, is counted on to bal
ance the 1033 budget.
Kruger Falsified
Krt igerToll Books
Before Suiciding
Stockholm April fi -(APi Falsiflca
fioii of the books of the Kruger and
1"ll Company, made under the direc
tion of Ivar Kruger. Swedish match
king, who committed suicide in Parts
recently, have been discovered by ac
countants checking the firm's ac
counts. according to an auditor's re-!
Port just issued.
The report said entries were made
in the books which eliminated sub
stantial balance* owing to the par
ent company by Kruger and subsidiary
companies, while liabilities to other
subsidiaries also were eliminated.
Elimination of
Limit on Medicine
Liquor Is Sought!
Washington. April 8.--IAP' Pro- i
po-ed amendments to the Volstead act
eliminating the ten-day limit on fre
quency of medicine prescriptions for
a single patient were endorsed today
by Dr. Thomas M. Doran, commis
sioner of industrial alcohol.
He told a House committee that
during hla experience as prohibition
enforcement officer the present limi
'•ittons as to the time a doctor may
prescribe liquor for a subject has been
the subject of greatest criticism from
•he medical profession.
affirm sentence
BREVARD BANKER
Raleigh. April 6.—(AP)—The State
S'i*rcme Court split three to two this
afternoon In affirming prison sen
tences imposed on T. H. Shipman and
four other persons convicted in Trans-
Ivanta county of conspiracy to violate
the State banking laws, but the court
reversed a verdict against three other
•ben tried In the same case.
ARM IS AMPUTATED
AFTER AUTO CRASH
Rocky Mount. April 6. ( AP) —H. R.
Kl *er. prominent Thomasvilie attor
ney who was severely injured In an
automobile accident near here last
' <ght. was said to be resting as com
fortably as possible totay. An arm
wad amputated.
- , t > nt.iNue.rtow/rx, «■*
Imtiteraott Daily Dispatch
77" f ,„ , I ° NLY DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THIS SECTION Os NORTH CAROLINA AND VIISINIA.
’2^TH I S^SSeS? l s l «5HP
Accused by Student#
itSiL ' M
Walter Smith
College students, complaining to
Washington senators of the treat
ment accorded them on their at
tempted visit to the coal mining
regions of Kentucky and Tennes
see, declared that Waltei Smith,
above, attorney for Bell county,
Kentucky, denied them admittance
to the state. Bmith, they said, ae- 1
cused them of Communistic ten
dencies, demanding peace bomb
of SI,OOO per student, *vhicb the
students were unable to produce.
smmaT
SAFEGUARDTOU.S.
Stimson Says It Offer* Every
Reason To Adhere To
World Court
Washington, April 6.—(APl—Secre
tary
ance before the Senate Foreign Rela
tions Committee today, elaborated his
views that the Root protocol for Am
erican adherence to the World Court
would fully protect this country's
rights.
The secretary testified in executive
session, and neither he nor Chairman
Borah would reveal what took place.
TRADE BOYCOTT IS
SOUGHT BY CAPPER
Washington, April 6. (AP)—A
resolution proposing a trade boy
ctot aeainst violators of the Kel
logg peace iwct was offered today
hy Senator Capper, Republican.
Kansas.
The resolation also would have
the Senate declare against recog
nition of any new state created as
the result of a breach of the Kel
logg pact.
Golden Jubilee Program
Had By Episcopal Women
Hislory of Auxiliary of North Carolina Diocese Review
ed at Convention in Holy Innocents Church;
Bishops Cheshire and Penick Heard
The fiftieth annual meeting of the
Woman's Auxiliary of the Episcopal
Diocese of North Carolina got under
way at 9:30 o'clock this morning in
its second session, following the open
ing last night at Holy Innocents Epis
copal church here. Miss Rena Clark,
of Tarboro, the Auxiliary presdenU
presided.
Following the opening prayers by
Rt. Rev. Edwin A. Fenick, of Char
lotte, Mrs. W. D. Burwell, president of
the Julian Ingle branch of Holy In
nocents church, extended a greeting
to the visitors to Henderson and to
the church. The response was by Miss
Emma Hall, of Charlotte. Miss Clark
presented a brief history of the Wo
man’s Auxiliary in America, saying
the North Carolina branch eras oof
HENDERSON, N. C., WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 6,1932
With Lindbergh
Norfolk, Va. April 6 (AP)
John Hughes Curtis, nego.
tiator in the Lindbergh case,
announced today that he
had made contact with the
kidnaper* and was inform,
ed that the child, was well.
CLASHESIONTINUE
IN EFFORT TO PICK
JURY IN HONOLULU
«
Guilt or Innocence of Native
Who Attacked Ameri- f
cans And Was Slain
Is Issue
JUDGE SAYS IT WILL
BE DECIDED LATER
Opposing Counsel Fight
Over Whether Jury Shall
Be Allowed To Consider
Fact Slain Man Was
Awaiting Second Trial At
Time Os Killing
Honolulu, April 6. (API Court
room clashes made the guilt or inno
cence of Joseph H. Kahah&w&i in an
assault upon Mrs. Thomas H. Massie
the burning question as selection of
jurors proceeded today for the mur- j
der trial of Mrs. Granville Fortescue j
and three navy men.
Opposing counsel disputed yester
day for the second time over whether
the jury snouid be permitted to con
sider the fact the young Hawaiian was
awaiting a new hearing after a mis
trial. when he was kidnaped and siain
last January S.
Mrs. Fortescue. her son-in-law.
Lieutenant Thomas H. Massie. U. S.
N.. and the two naval enlisted men
listened Impassively as Barry F. Ul
rich. assistant prosecutor, demanded
of a prospective juror:
"Will you find the defendants guilty
whether you believe they had the right
to do what then did or not?"
Instantly the elderly Clarence Dar
row, of Chicago, leader of the defense,
was on his feet.
"That isn’t the law," he said.
Before Ulrich could retort, Presiding
Judge Charles S. Davis, said the ques
tion would be settled later.
LINDBERGH BABY
NEGOTIATORS BACK
But John Curtis, of Norfolk,
Refuses To Make Desi.
nite Statement
Norfolk. Va., April 6. —(AP)— John
Hughes Curtis, one of three Norfolk
negotiators for the return of the kid
naped Lindbergh baby, who had been
absent from his home here since Sat
urday. returned here this afternoon.
He immediately announced he would
not be Interviewed until later regard
ing the progress of the negotiations.
Mr. Curtis said he would have no
statement to make until after he had
conferred with the other two Nor
folk intermediaries. He did not say
when he would confer with them.
of 23 organized in 1883. Miss Kate
Cheshire, of Tarboro, gave an his
torical sketch, saying that the North
Oarolina branch was organized in
Tarboro in 1882. The six original
branches were at Asheville, Charlotte,
Eden ton, Fayetteville, Hillsboro and
Lenlor.
Following Miss Wilkes as secretary
came Miss Mary Horner of Oxford.
Miss Kate Cheshire was Appointed
first president in 1904. Miss Cheshire
asked that Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn,
of Raleigh, be appointed president,
with herself as secretary. After one
year. Miss Cheshire served as both
president and secretary until 1913,
when Miss Cheshire became president
(Continued on Page Bix.£
APANIxy HOPE FOK SLEEPING ROY
HE y*
M Ik
Hope has been abandoned for
nine-year-old Joseph Huggins of
Memohis. Tenn.. who has been in
Wisconsin Democratic As
Roosevelt Sweeps State
2 Chinese Cities
Shaken By Quake
Shanghai. April 6.—(A!*)— An
earthquake which lasted several
seconds shook the cities of Hankow
and Nanking this evening. There
were no report# Immediately avail
able of the number of casualties,
ar of the extent of damage.
FOUNTAIN [EAOING
GOVERNOR MIN
OPINION OF MANY
Rank and File Think Rocky
Mount Man Has Inside
1 rack at the Pres
ent Moment
ALL MYTH, OTHERS
SAY IN APPRAISAL
McLendon Says His Organi.
zation Has Been Unable to
Find Vaunted Fountain
Strength; He Has Reached
'His Peak, Friends of Op
ponents Say
DaUjr Btirf.iH,
In the Sir Wfillrr llolrl.
BY J t*. IIA SK Kit V 11,!,.
Raleigh, April 6.—ln spite of the
claims of both A. J. Maxwell and J
C. B. Ehrtnghaus and their followers
that they are gaining steadily In their
campaigns for the Democratic nom
ination for governor, the prevailing
opinion of the average voter in the
street is that Richard Tillman Foun
tain ts the candidate both Ehringhaus
and Maxwell are going to have to over
take within the remaining 58 days of
the campaign If either of them is go
ing to win the nomination. A majority
of the average voters continue to
(Continued on Page Six)
North Carolina
Ninth In List of
Job Placements
Raleigh. April 6. fAPi—With a
total of 15,840 placements reported in
the American Legion employment
campaign, North Carolina has ad
vanced from the tenth to ninth place
in the list of States.
NATIONAL TOTAL NEARING
HALF WAY MARK OF GOAL
New York, April B—(AP)—Officials
of the United Action for Employment
Campaign announced that jobs have
been found for 432,460 persons. The
goal Is one million.
They said that yesterday’s reports
brought the total; to this figure by
adding 9,882 new jobs. •
LEATHER
FOR NORTH CAROLINA.
Partly cloudy, slightly colder in
northeast portion tonight; Thurs
day
a deep sleep since la.-t Octobef.
He has been tuffering from en
crnhr'Tf’fc.
New York Governor Wins
by Landslide Over Dele
gates Favorable To
A1 Smith
ALSO WIN CONTEST
IN NEW YORK STATE
Hoover Ticket Walks Away
In New York Republican
Primary, But LaFollette
Progressives Win Over
President In Wisconsin
Primary Returns
(By the Associated Press.)
An exleedingly heavy Democratic
vote in Wisconsin, normal Republican
stronghold, Wlbs a conspicuous de
velopment of presidential primary vot
Ing yesterday in western states and
in New York.
The forces of Franklin D. Roose
velt won by a landslide in Wisconsin
over ,an uninstructed ticket favor
able to Alfred E. Smith. They also
carried against a fifth place the one
contest in New York State—in the
Buffalo district. All other delegates
were chosen without opposition, the
up-State men generally favoring the
governor, the Tammany block uncom
mitted.
The Hoover ticket walked away in
the New York Republican primary,
marked by only two district contests.
However, conservative G. O. P. forces
in Wisconsin apparently were beaten
again by the Progressives under the
LaFollettes. The LaFollette delegates
favor Senator George W. Norris, of
Nebraska, for president, while the un
pledged conservatives have given
"tack approval” to the Hoover admin
istration.
HOOVERS ARE GIVEN
BASEBALL TICKETS
Washington. April 6. -(AP>—Presi
dent and Mrs. Hoover, both baseball
fans, today received from the Ameri
can League Baseball Association two
scrolls of engraved passes to admit
them to any grounds in the League.
Tar River Baptists Meet
Here In Called Session
Spiritual Life of Church Discussed, With Addresses By
Outstanding Leaders of Denomination: J. Edward
Allen, of Warrenton, Moderator, Presides
With the subjeoi, "The Exaltation
of ChrMt in the Ohui-ohas" as the gen
eral theme, an extraordinary session
of the Tar River Baptist Assn ration
was held in the First Baptist church
here today. There were two sessions,
morning and afternoon, wMh lunch
eon served to the visitors at noon by
members of the church, In the base
ment dining room.
Approximately 160 delegates were hi
attendance from 40 of the 45 churches
wtthtn the bounds of tbs association.
J. Edward Alldu, of Warrenhon, mod
erator of the association, presided. R
wa» said at be the fin* extraordinary
session of the association in a cen
tury.
A praise and prayer sendee at 10
PUBLISHED EVERT AFTERNOON
EXCEPT SUNDAY.
Kidnapers
Guardsmen Called
As Flames Spread
In S. C. State Pen
On Secret Trip
h ?aJ
■r * ■ I
n < i
Major Chariot Schoeffei
Much secrecy has veiled the trip
of Major Charles Schoeffei, New
Jersey police officer, to London
in connection with the Lindbergh
baby kidnaping. Immediately
after disembarking from the liner,
on which he posed as a salesman.
Major Schoeffei went into confer
ence with officials of Scotlanc
Yard.
raceltuble in
HAWAII IS FLARED
Investigator Says Serious
Disorders Possible As
Result of Trial
Washington, April 6. -(AP) Assis
tant Attorney General Richardson, in
his special report to the Senate said
the trial of the Fortescue murder case
In Hawaii will embroil “the people of
the territory of Hawaii in most un
pleasant circumstances,” but he ad
ded:
“I see no way out of the situation
but to go through with it."
The text of Richardson's report was
made public today.
The assistant ottorrtey general ex
pressed fear that the Hawaiian people
will “take sides" and. regardless of j
the verdict, "it will not be surprising
if a condition of racial antagonism]
and possibly demonstrations should |
result."
schooTbook board
MEETS IN RALEIGH
Raleigh. April 6. (APi Tb4> State
School Book Commission me.t here to
day with Dr. A. T. Allen, State su
perintendent of public instruction. The
commission was created by the 1931
General Assembly to inquire into
printing, prices, distribution and pur
chasing methods of ?kate school text
books.
a. m opened the meeting. and this
was followed by a devotional message
by Rev. D. P. Harris, of Loutsburg.
Recognition of delegations from the
various churches followed, and a brief
season of music was then interspersed.
The first set address was that by
Dr. Ira S. Knight, pastor of the First
Baptist church of Durham, whose
subject was r "A Closer wialk With
God." After this whs a discussion of
the life and work of the churches.
There 'was a'roll call and a verbal re
port trout- Ibe churches represented.
There were given hy the pastor or
some other perron. Ttve discussions
Included consideration of the spirit u
(Coattnued on Page Three.£ , t
6' PAGES
TODAY
FIVE CENTS COPY
Blaze Starts In Chair Fac
tory and Quickly Spready
to Half Dozen
Other Houses
DOCTOR IN CITY
CALLED TO SCENE
Prisoners Leap From Burn
ing Structures; Flames Not
In Main Cell Block at Last
Reports, No Disorder
Among Prisoners Was Re
ported
Columbia, S. C., April 6. (AP)—Fire
broke out in the chair, factory of the
South Carolina Statin penitentiary
shortly after 2 p. m. today, and quick
ly spread to half a dc-zen other prisup
buildings.
An hour after the oiaze was die- •
covered, Govefhor Jbra C. Blackwood
called out the National Guard lo aid
in fighting the fire* AII available coun
and city police alr o were sent to the
scene.
At that time the flamea had not
reached the main cell block and there
was little disorder among prisoners.
Shortly after 3 o'clock, a fourth city
alarm was sent in. The governor's sec
retary asked all doctors in the city to
go to the pe .iitenttiary when casual
ties were re|ioroted.
A piisonev named Clark jumped
from the third floor or the chair fac
ory to esca pe the blaze. It was not
known h«*v seriously he had been
hurt.
Another prisoner, named Diuwdy
vas overcome by smoke when hand
ling the hose.
Fewer Teachers v
Train Many More
Pupils In States
Raleigh, April 6.— (AP) Fewer
oachers were employed in the public
schools of North Carolina than in anv
school year since 1324-25 and at the
<ame time the average daily pupil at
‘endance showed a very marked in
crease over the preceding year.
Figures cotr.piled by the State De
partment of, Education and released
oday showed that 22,241 teachers
were allotted to instruct an average
iaily attendance of more than 710.000
pupils djiiing the six months term just
-nded. This is the identical number
>f teachers employed to teach 596,-
-H pupils in 1924-25.
mlaceMes is '
HELD AT SALISBURY
Son of Prominent Greens
boro Family Is Taken
With Two Others
Salisbury. lAprll 6.—(AP)—Wallace
Scales, 24. member of a prominent
Greensboro family, who turned liquor
runner and 'is alleged to have robbed
Mrs. A. H. Yjaiioway and three guests
in her h'tme in Winston-Salem of
jewels worth *20,000, was captured
here last night.
Officers James Crowder and John
Poole her rd three men arguing before
a church here. They started toward
the throve and the argument broke up
as the three participant# took to their
heels.
One of the three was run down and
captured. He said he wa# Al Fox. of
Washington, but told conflicting
atorir-s. and wa# held on suspicion.
whiU* the officers kept watch upon
an automobile, which apparently be
longed to the three men.
After an hour's wait, one of the
other two returned to the car and
w*as arrested- A search disclosed 120
quarts of whiskey In the car, and. the
two were booked on charge# of trans
porting liquor.
The second man arrested gavel his
name a# J. R. Davie, and exhihMted
what purported to be a press a*rd is
sued in that name, but officers Laid
a check disclosed that he was Scailqs.
The third of the trio was arrested
in Greensboro after officers 3un
heard he boarded a bus for that icity.
He was returned here early today, and
said he was John Neel, of Washing
ton
The Galloway home was robbdtf In
March. 1930. Mrs. Galloway was play
ing bridge in her library with three
friends when two masked men en
tered and held them up,

xml | txt