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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, May 28, 1932, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-05-28/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
FBICANHWK
0N TICKET TWICE
*
Seeking Long *nd Sharfc
Terms for United St cute*
Senate In Primary
BY J. C. B VHK.KAVII.I.
Raleigh. May 28.—Pour of the five
candidates for the Democratic nom
ination for Senator are seeking the
nomination for both the short and
long term, so that those who vote for
any of the candidate* other than Ar
thur Simmons, the Burlington chicken
fancier, who seems to be running en
tirely on the strength of his name,
will have to vote for their candidate
twice—that is, mark their ballots
twice.
The names of the candidates for
both the short and long Senate terms
will appear on the ballot twice, it was
pointed out today by R. C. Maxwell
chairman of the State Board of Elec
tions. The names of the candidates
for the short term— from the Novem
ber election until March 4. 1933 will
appear first, following immediately
after the names of the candidates for
the nomination for Governor. The
names of these candidates are Cam
eron. Morrison. Robert R. Reynolds, j
Frank D. Grist and Tam C. Bowie. |
The placing of an "X" mark aftei !
the name of any one of these will
mean a vote for only the short term.
Immediately under this group of!
candidates fur the short Senate term, j
will appear the names of these same
candidate*, with the addition of the ■
name oi Arthur Surununs. So in or-'
der to vote for his or her choice for j
both terms, the voters will have to i
place an “X'’ mark after the name of
the desired candidate in both groups 1
It wail be possible. so course, to vote
for on* candidate for the short term
and one for the long term, if that is
desired. But in moat cases It is ex
pected that moMt4 voters will vote for i
the same candidate for both terms
unleaa t hey fail to understand that
they must vote for one candidate in
both group*. If a majority of voters (
should vote only for a candidate in
the first or short term group, and not
indicate a choice in the second group j
the candidate getting the most votes
in the second group would get the
nomination, of course. Friends of all
the candidates are already seeing to
it thal thuir supporters place an “X" I
after their candidates' name in ehch
group, however.
i
Wile Preservers
Scald tomatoes, then dip them In j
cold water. The skin may then be
ueated off easily.
SENSAI IO NAL!
shot will go down in
history of motion pictures os v *Jf J J^
on unmotched ochievement. M
HOWARD HUGHES Thrilling Air SjMctocle' j
hells //
angels/?
the first multi-million dollar
totking picture g
•* JEAN HARLOW ,(\
“Thm platinum blond* discovery JuK
UN ITON-MMiS HALL /' I
MONDAY 4|^%^
TUESDAY
United Ajrfiets Picmre
Wednesday Thursday—Friday
Robert Montgomery Ruth Chatter ton
|VT —AND—
Paul Lukaa
“BUT THE FLESH -in-
IS WEAK” “TOMORROW
lOc/ "T" ad
/ Everybody | TOMORROW’’]
STEVENSON ™£sr„.
THE LINDBERGH KIDNAPING CASE TOLD IN SKETCHES - - By Frank R ees< . t
NCh 3—KIIMAPEKS' WARNING
iMwr 1
The contend of the ransom
note, written on yellow pa
per, left at the Lindbergh
estate were not made public
officially, but newspaper
nudi who saw it later quoted
it as saying:
Why I Have Faith
In America
BY ROGER W. BABSON
Copyright 1.432, Publishers Financial Bureau
Babson Mass.. May 28.—1 t is
well at times like these to count our
blessings and to discount our fears.
The reason so many people are
panicky about the present and so fear
ful of the future is that they are
confusing "real ' wealth with that sic
titious kind of wealth which is mea
sured in price quotations of securities
commodities, and credits. Actually
this depression has caused no loss of
real wealth. We still have 123,000,000
vigorous, healthy, educated people—
our greatest asset. We still have 522-
000,000 acres of good farm land, eapa
abie of producing annually 800.000,000
busht is of wheat, 2,000,00,000 bushels
of corn. 16,500,000 bales of cotton, and
other crops and vegetables sufficient
to feed the entire population and
leave a surplus for other nations.
We have nearly half a billion acres
of pasture lands, capable of feeding
livestock for an annual production of
*>,360,000.000 pounds of beef and 637,-
000.000 pounds of mutton. We have
forests and lumber mills capable of
producing 26,500,000 M board feet of
lumber a year. There is coal enough
in the United States to six thou
sand years; iron ore reserves of 7.-
000,000,000 tons; and steel mills with
in annual capacity of 53.000 000 tons.
We are producing annually 18,000,000,
HENDERSON, (R. C.,) BiMLY BgaSYCR SATURDAY. MAY 28, 193 Y
“Dear Sir, Have $50,000
ready, $26,000 in S2O bills,
$15,000 in $lO bills and
SIO,OG4j in $5 bills. Have
them in two packages. Four
days we will Ln£ar < m you to
redeem the money..
000 gallons of gasoline, and 900,000,-
000 barrels of crude oil. A vast system
of pub utitties furnishes household
ers an 1 industries with 96 000,000,000
kw. hcu'.s of electricity and 12'V«m,
000,000 i,i.-lie ,eet of gri annually
These things and a host of other valu
able assets are all here. They are tan
gible wealth which, when put to nor
mal use, can offer employment, food,
shelter, clothing, and some luxuries
for all.
Abuse of Credit to Rlamc.
If America were poor in natural
resources, backward in industrial de
velopment, devastated by war or pes
tilence, then the pessimists might have
cause for despair of the future. It is
not. Our national wealth exceeds
$32,000,000,000; our manufacturing in
dustry does a business of over $70,-
000,000.000 a year; our retail business
exceeds $5,000,000,000 a year. Our peo
ple have $27,000,000,000 deposited in
savings banks, and more than SIOO,-
000,000,000 in life insurance. The $5,-
000,000,000 currency in circulation is
backed by a wider margin of gold re
serve than that of any country on
earth. We have developed mass pro
duction to a point unrivaled in any
land. “Why then," I asked, "should
7,000,000 people be out of employment
and many more on part time? Why
should our incomes and purchasing
power be so greatly reduced; why
are many factories shut down; why
are corporations, railroads; cities,
and towns unable to borrow money?"
The trouble is not with our physical
resources or our scientific develop
ment. The main trouble arose from
the abuse, Instead of the proper use,
of credit. Through speculation in se
; curities, through mortgaging our fu
ture incomes, through waste and ex
! travagance, through reckless foreign
; loans, through piling up debts far be
yond our near-term capacity to pay,
we brought about an unhealthy ex
pansion of credit from 1926 to 1929.
, Tbe drastic liquidation of the past two
years has been correcting this situa
| tioa; and in spite of the 80 per cent
decline in security prices, the 35 per
i cent decline in commodity prices, the
curtailment of incomes, tne passing
of dividends, in actuality no real
wealth has been destroyed. We have
; been liquidating those credit excesses
! for the past two and a half years.
This process of liquidation was drastic
and violent, thus throwing the whole
machinery q { production, prices, and
purchasing powgr out of gear.
A Return To Conunon-Seiiae.
Credit is the basis of all business.
i Confidence, in turn, is the basis of all
| credit; and character is the basis of
; ail confidence. Hence, the keystone to
the whole economic structure is the
character of our people, from the
highest officials and business leaders
to the humblest of wage workers.
Character is the nation's greatest as
set, far surpassing all of the vast phy
siclal and material resources which
I have enumerated. This depression
was the reaction from the flagrant
abuse of credit which in turn destroy
ed confidence, smashed prices, cur
tailed purchasing power, reduced pro
duction, and created unemployment.
) \ &ocS>
WioKEV 1 J TTU- f"W YoP's
» rtf BdOKffM 6*(5
\ (T HC CAfi
—S' \IS L\C* C-Aft ujeACM

"We warn you for making
anything public, or for noti
fying the police. The child
is in gut care." InYestiga
tors pointed out that "gut"
is the German word for
good.
May Be Second Lady
k
A Dossitw vt ,'t -l .ady of the land,"
Mrs. Albert Barkley, is shown at the
garden card party of the Women’s
National Democratic Club, held in
Washington, D. C. Mrs. Barkley is
the wife of the Senator from Ken
tucky who will deliver the keynote
speech at the Democratic Conven
tion. He is a likely possibility for
the Vice-Presidential nomination.
However, during the depression the
majority of people have again come
to a common-sense view of the real
fundamentals of living, and are again
developing the elements of character
which will bring back confidence and
credit. Great as the distress and suf
fering is, there apparently was no
other way by which all ot us could
relearn the lesson that real prosperity
must be based on hard work, thrift,
honesty, and the other old-fasbioned
virtues which were temporarily dis
carded in the speculative hey-day of
1928 and 1929.
We are again building up in our
selves the characteristics which our
hfardy ,ancestors possessed and by
which they built up this great nation
Hence, instead of being discouraged
about the future I am encouraged for
two powerful reasons. First, the fun
damental physical assets of this coun
try farm lands, minerals, forests,
buildings, factories, machinery, power
lines, roads, railroads, and other re
sources- remain unimpaired. They are
still here in excellent condition ready
for use for economic reconstruction.
Second, hard times are building up
in us an appreciation of the common
sense attitude toward life. Realizing
that we can no longer get something
for nothing, everybody whll attack the
task of reconstruction >in the right
spirit. Hence, the depression has de
stroyed none of our physical assets
an din the end will be found to have
improved our spiritual assets.
General business as measured by the
Bansonchart is now 38 per cent be
low the normal X-Y Line, compared
with 38 percent a month ago. even
with adjustments for usual seasonal
movements.
STYLES OF DEBATE
CHANGING AT HILL
Chapel Hill, May 28.—Styles in de
bating have changed at the Univer
sity of North Carolina.
The old classical type of contest,
regarded hy* many as stiff and formal,
has given way to an informal style
modeled much after the Oxford sys
tem.
The hi gidea behind the new form
is to get at the truth ratber than win
decisions.
This spring, for instance. Carolina
delators participated in only a few
contests calling for decisions by
judges. Moat of debates called for
decisions by the audience, while in not
a few cases there were no-decision
contests.
It has become the custom to ad
vertise the debates here with posters
and newspaper announcements in
which wise-cracking, ballyhoo ' lan
guage is used in an effort to drum up
a good audience.
Whether this q*w style will con
tinue in v<*pie or whether after a
while, Carolina will revert to the old
form, with which for years thia in
stitution won the majority of its con
tests, remains to be seem
To recognise his limitations is said
to ha tfaf mark of a genius; the re
cognition of his gUU U his distino-
\
\ ~ < v : -‘--f-ia
— —— - Or- ■
H. Norman Schwar.txkoaf
I TRAVEL BARGAINS
I For Every Occasion
I DAILY BARGAINS
All SEASON SUMMER TOURIST FARES: From all Agency Station* on the Southern Railway to all
MOUNTAIN AND SEASHORE RESORTS, at a r eduction of 20 per cent Tickets on sale daily to Srp
umber 30th. Return limit October 31st, 1932.
■ SHORT LIMIT TOURIST FARES: From ail Agency Station* on. on* Southern Railway to PA-
B CIFIC COAST POINTS, GRAND CANYON, YELLOW STONE PARK STATIONS AND MID
■ WESTERN POINTS, at slightly more than the one way fare- Ticket* on sale daily to some points to
September 30tb, and to others until October 15« h; Return limit Thirty (30) days from date of sile.
TWO-DAY TICKETS: Between all stations on tfao Southern Railway for a radius of 150 miles, at
■ one and one third fare for the round trip; Tickets on sale deity the year round. Return limit mid
night following date erf sale.
B SIX-DAY TICKETS: Between all stations on the Southern Railway for a radius of 150 mHee, t:
B one and one half fare for the round trip; Tickets on sale daily the year round. Return limit five
(5) days in a<ttitlon to date of sale.
MULTIPLE TICKETS: 10, 20 and 30 trips at ver y low fare between any two points on the Southern V
B Railway System wihere the one way fare is $7.20 or less. Tickets on sale daily. Limit thirty (30) day*.
I WEEK-END BARGAINS
B WEEK-END TICKETS: From all Agency Stations on the Southern Railway to any point on the
B Southern Railway System or in the SoutiheecA, at one and one-fifth fare for the round trip. Tickets
B on sale Friday, Saturday and Sunday of each week, unity October 31st., 1932. Return burnt Midmght
Tuesday following date of sale.
B COACH EXCURSION FARES: From all Agency Stations on the Southern Railway to ah Stations in
the Southeast at one and one tenth fare fo>r the round trip. Tickets on sale for Friday Saturday and
B Sunday of each week, during June, July and August. Return limit ten (10) days from date of sale.
NEW YORK, BOSTON, ATLANTIC CITY, BALT IMORE, WASHINGTON, and MONTREAL. Tick-
B fits wild be sold for Tuesday and Saturday of each week and to PHILADELPHIA, PITTSBURGH.
NIAGARA FALLS, CLEVELAND. CINCINNATI, DETROIT, INDIANAPOLIS, ST. LOUIS, CHIOA
B GO, LOUISVILLE and many other cities in the North and East. Tickets will be on sale Saturday
of each week June 4rth. to September 27th, 1932, at om and one half fare for the round trip. Return
limit thirty (30) days from date of sale.
I SUNDAY BARGAINS
ON SUNDAY ONLY: One cent per mile for actual distance traveled, two cents per mile for the
B round trip from all Agency Stations on the South enn Railway to any station* on the Scutlwrn Rail
way for a distance of 150 miles or leas. Tickets U rai.ed for return trip to departure from destin
ation prior to midnight of date of sole.
I OCCASIONAL BARGAINS
ASHEVILLE AND WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA POINTS: At lies than one way fare, from all
B Station* Goldsboro, Raleigh and Greensboro Line, JUNE 11TB., JULY 23R.D., and AUGUST 20TH.
B Return limit eight (8) day* in addition to date of aale.
TEXAS EXCURSION: From all Agency Stations o H the Southern Ra.iwny to all Stations in the Slate
B of Texas at one fare plus twenty-five (25c) for the round trip. Tickets will be sold for June 25th ,
B only. Return limit July 17th.
B ATLANTA, BIRMINGHAM AND CHATTANOOGA; At lees than the one wuy fare of the round
B trip. Tickets will be aoki for June 4th., July 2nd., August Oh, and September 3rd. Return limit: Al-
B iaata five (5) days and Birmingham and Giulia ncoga, Ax (6) days from date of sale.
NEW ORLEANS, AND OTHER GULF COAST POINTS: At lees than the one way fare for the round
B trip. Tickets will be sold for June 4,th, July 2nd, August 6th, and September 3rd. Return limit it-n
H U 0) days from date of sale.
B BRUNSWICK AND SAVANNAH, GA., FLORIDA POINTS AND HAVANA, CUBA At less than
B the one way fibre for the round trip. Tickets will be sold for June 4th, July 2nd, August 6th. and
September 3rd. Return limit ten HO) daye, except 16 days to Kay W«a* and 19 days to Havana
B Cuba from date us sale. ( y .
FOURTH OF JULY FARES: From all Agency Station* on the Southern Railway to all point* in th*
Southeast at one fare pDue SIOO for the round trip. Ticket* will be paid for July 1,2, 3 and 4th R*-
■ turn limit ten (10) daye in addition to date of sale.
LABOR DAY BARGAINS: Tickets will bo sold fr am all Agency Stations on the Southern Railway
■ t<> SteOoas in the Sookbeeat September 2nd. 3rd, 4lh. and firh. at one far# plus twentyrfive eexvts
B 125 c) for the round trip. Return tout ten (10) daye fexsn date of sale.
I CONVENTIONS
Reduced round trip farts are authorized for all important state and Nakional Convention#, with
date of aa)» of tickets and final return limit suited to the occasion
I PICNIC EXCURSIONS
B Extremely low round trip fares are made cm app Ilea turn lor Picnic parties using extra care on regu
■ lar trains or for 9peoigl Trains as the number juati ffas.
■ FOR aPB!CIFIC FAKSeB SCHEDULES AND PULLMAN RESERVATIONS, CONSULT YOUR LOCAL
TICKET AGENT Oft COMMUNICATE WITH AN Y SOUTHERN RAILWAY PASSENGER REP-
H RESENT ATTVE
j SOUTHERN RAILWAY
The note continued:
"Identification for letter*
aca signature*. Answer
three fold, (i-2-3-4). Two
ring* in blue ink, with cen
ter ring of red.
. JtM
"A blue ink line of the blue
circles on the outer edge of
the red. A hole on the
outer edge of each dark
circle, and otje in the center
of the red. publish
this letter "
Later on tracings Were
nUde of this anginal now
for intermediaries. I‘olu,
feared later, that »| u; ,
"depls" Were under w»v
outsiders nught ha\’ t
learned the symbols.
Next: Nggnftahoua Through
I n UuDwtitrit*.

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