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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, June 11, 1932, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-06-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
MASTER OF GRANGE!
: SPEAKS IN COUNTY
W. Kerr Sccrtt, of Haw
River, To Be at Aycock
* Wednesday Evening
W J&xrr Scott, of Graham, master
of 'he State Grange, is announced
to addraaa a meeting of all Grange
organizations In Vance county at
Ayoocfc high school Wednesday night
at S 30 a'otock. All members of the
Orange in the county are invited and
urged to attend.
This is the first visit of the master
of the State Grange to this county
since the Grange work was gotten un
der way here, and it is hoped that all
who caa do so will hear Mr. Scott.
WARNING ISSUED OF
FOUR BOGUS CHECKS
Dfetra oa I'nlon 't rust Company of
Cleveland. Ohio, and Have Ap
pearance of Being Genuine
Chief of Police J. H. Langston to- j
day issued a warning against four I
bogus checks he has been notified are
being handled about the country. They
are drawn on the I'nlon Trust Com
pany of Cleveland. Ohio, and each
is for (3-1.40. and is signed by J. C. i
Baudien. paymaster, with the amounts
filled in with a check protector. They
have been passed on grocers in the
Middle West, and the person cashing
the checks is described as being 55
to 60 years old. about six feet high
and weighing about 200, with gray
hair, clean shaven and wearing dark
work clot he« and hat.
The checks are amid to be written
on bankers' safety paper, imprinted
"Western Union Telegraph Company.”
Any one coming in contact with the
checks is asked to notify police and I
hanks. Chief Langston said.
START REVIVAL AT
MIDDLEBURG CHURCH
Rev. EL R. Nelson, of this city,
pastor of the Middleburg Baptist
church, announced today he would
start a revival at that church totmor
row evening with a union service of
the Baptists and Methodists of the
community. Rev. P. D. W’oodall, pas
tor of the Middleburg Methodist
Episcopal church will preach the seh
mon Rev. Mr. Nelson said that va
rious pastors of the Henderson chur
ches would preach during the week
next week and the public is invited
to attend.
In old France these who had been
bankrupts were obliged ever after to
wear a green cap.
feALK OF REAL ESTATE UNDER
DEED OF TRUST.
liefault having seen made in the!
indebtedness secured under a deed j
of trust executed bv A. J. Green to i
the undersigned Trustee, dated May
3J IS3O. and recorded in Book 162,
page 168 in Vance County. I will on
TUESDAY, JULY sth, 1932
at twelve oclock noon, at the Court
House door in Henderson, sell for
cash to the highest bidder the real
estate conveyed In sai l deeo of trust
eru c‘<vrj ied as to' 1 i v :
That lot on Rowland streea in the |
City of Henderson convoyed to Au- j
gust us Gre-n by De vi recorded In ,
nnve 358. filed for recent i
June 14. 1885. described as follows: |
at a stone situated where the!
Eastern edge of Rowland Street Jn- \ ]
tersect of Noah Gatling’s line, and j j
run thence. S. 68 1-2 degree® E. 20® | i
feet to a stone: thence S. 21 1-2 de- ! s
grees VV. 52 1-4 feet to a stone; thence j ■,
N 68 1-2 degrees W. 209 feet to stone ' |
on Rowland; thence along Rowland c
street N. 21 1-2 degrees E. 52 1-4 feet j t
to the place of beginning. i ,
This June 3rd. 1932. c
Jasper b. hicks. ; t
Trustee, j i
iTo o . , , Approved by All By LES FORGRAVE
BOAT AT L^T,HAYE K U>o?JK‘S«eI' 'TUoJgHT OpX W ' AV , e ) W&'LL MAKE. IT X VE‘s^R. j TDo TMAT '\
WHAT (-5 IT-? SAV I * ‘ \jPjf J O6TTe « J \ / BIG POR ) A Flw£ KiAME! / |
TMAT'S A— ISW'T ITA N. , -JVJ'S. . V-ITS. / ' \ J [ ARE. U EVERY3CDV TO 7 t 9 y
D/aV * Sj^Xw—^ / o|o, I R ®‘? COKAGOO* f ki*soa \ f tTIuP- V R6AO - l R'OES TM& ,—^yr-
Z£~JJ~Z ( LE 1T yjfetei ) vou'tTe p~ sr
'
' r//£ G(/AfP5-H f WAr TTexT? ~
I W£§! »°° S, A««aJ& r^TE^oH*- —n
FROM NOW 04' SAY ? 1 M FRC.IMG EVES INI EVERY CORKIER «*
Town it ND Zanorr F » cove. tom SO btARCY- f yLfjts back of every door ymere corks
yr-.twv»m E - Ijliigk _
v^ort j m ***&*£& sss w _ ( BiGA/AIST _BS r\
TNOUGHY DEAD -- ; ' NHER |e6N AtL E ) I [ --- * * SS % V
AS %Oj*i? BACK J FROAA / L jB
; -'r“ 3sAt\\ |||«9 '^ftjn
“ ' " —1 1 >- ■. : .u. To BE CONTINUED.
' PROHIBITION REAL
ISSUE IN RUN OFF
(Ooatlnued rrom Page One.)
mary. la order to get the nam I nation.
Morrison Expectations.
However, the Morrison foroes are
counting on getting a good aized por
l tion of the votes cast for Bowie. Grist
and Simmons, even If the Reynolds
j forces are claiming the bulb of these
: votes, la the first place, the Morrison
I backers maintain that the announce
ments already made by Bowie and
Grist that they would support Rey
nolds and try to throw their support
to him. is already reacting unfavor
ably among those who voted for
Bowie and Grist. For many of those
who voted for Bowie and Grist are
resenting the apparent presumption on
the purt of these two candidates that
they can wrap up these same votes
an ddeliver them to Reynolds in the
I scond primary. The Morrison mana
gers frankly believe that they have
Just as much chance to get at least
half of the Bowie-Grist-Slmmons vote
its the Reynolds forces have.
Wre “Dry" Votes.
| It is also pointed out by the Mor
rison supporters that virtually all of
I the 68.792 votes cast for Bowie, Grist
j and Simmons were dry votes, since
. if they had been cast by those op
j posing prohibition, they would have
: been cast for Reynolds. It is agred
I that they were anti-Morrison votes,
but that the opposition of these 68.000
voters to Morrison was based on some
thing else than because he is dry and
in favor of prohibition. Now that pro-
I hibition has become the one big issue
in the campaign, together wth the
fact that the wet forces not only In
; North Carolina but over the entire
country seem to be determined to kick
Morrison out of the Senate and put
Reynolds in, lesser differences will be
forgotten, Morrison's friends believe.
They also believe that those who vot
ed for Bowie. Grist and Sftnmons will
refuse to permit themselves to be used
to nominate a wet Senator and that
just as many of these will vote for
Morrison. If not many more, since if
| they had been wet and had wanted a
! wet candidate, they would have voted
| for Rynoldß In the first place.
, It is fhrther pointed out that there
1 were almost 25.000 more Democrats
: who voted for governor in the pri
, mary June 4 than voted for Senator,
since 379.470 votes were cast for gov
ernor and only 355.187 for the can
didates for the senatorial nomination.
These 25.000 were evidently not all
interested in Reynolds, nor in Mor
rison either. But they also cannot be
counted an wet votes. So the Morrison
forces believe that with prohibition
a sa clear-cut issue, many of these
25.000 who did not vote will vote and
for Morrison rather than Reynolds. If
a vote of 355,000 is cast in the second
primary. Morrison will need to get
only 43.000 more than he got last week
to defeat Reynolds and winr the nomi
nation. If only 300.000 votes are cast,
he will need to get only 16.000 more
than the 135.000 he received to get the
nomination.
MORE SCHOOLS OF
STATE ARE MERGED
i - -
(Continued from Page one.)
in view of the increase capital outlay
expense it might put on the counties
for the purchase of new trucks to
take care of the additional transpor
tation. Martin pointed out. So in most
cases the consolidations made were
limited to those that could be made
without imposing any additional ex
pense for transportation. A lack of
adequate classroom space in several
central scbooLs also made a number
possible consolidations impractical
this year.
The consolidations which the board
has been making Is constantly reduc
ing the nubmer of one-teacher schools
in the State, however, and giving more
and more children better educational
advantages. Martin pointed out. At
the present time there are only 559
one-teacher schools left in the State,
this number being 429 lass than there
were three years ago. Most of these
one-teacher schools are now located In
the isolated mountain sections in
western North Carolina where c<Vn
HENDERSON, (N. C.J DAILY DISPATCH, SATURDAY, JUNE LI 1932 yp
eolidation and transportation facili
ties are costly and difficult.
The status of the high schools In
the State was Improved by the board’s
action, since 52 three-teacher high
schools have now been Increased to
four-teaoher high schools, while a
number of six-teacher elementary
schools have been increased to seven
teacher schools.
FOUNTAIN DENIES
PLAN FOR RUN OFF
ON WET PLATFORM
(Continues rrom rage One.)
t. believe that it wouid i>t a waste
of time en*nry to cnii * 1 *>
ond primary in view of the lead which
Ehringhaus has and the size of the
vote obtained by A. J. Maxwell, since
most observers agree that Fountain
could not expect to get any appreci
able portion of Maxwell's vote. In fact,
most of the political thought here
agrees that in a second primary
Ehringhaus would defeat Fountain
from 75.000 to 100,000 votes, since
Ehringhaus would not only get vir
tually the entire vote cast for him
last Saturday but the bulk of the
Majcwell vote and from 10 to 25 per
cent of the Fountain vote —and band
wagon vote.
However, there Is an alement in the
Fountain following that is still urg
ing him to call for a second primary,
while it is also apparent that the
Reynolds-for-Senator forces are doing
all they can to encourage this ele
ment. For the Reynolds forces believe
that if there should be a second pri
mary for the gubernatorial nomina
tion. they would have a much better
chance to defeat Cameron Morrison
for the senatorial nomination. There
are indications that some offers of
support from the Reynolds forces are
being dangled as a bait before the
Fountain followers, especially should
Fountain come out against prohibition
and run on a “wet” platform. But
■ there are very few who believe Foun
tain would be tempted by this bait
or by the hope that he could be slosh
ed into the gubernatorial nomination
by the backwash from the Reynolds
“wet” Senatorial campaign. Fountain
undoubtedy has some real political
horse-sense.
Risk for Reynolds.
Nor is it believed that Reynolds
would run the risk of endangering his
campaign or himself in the seoond
primary by offering any aid and suc
cor to an already defeated candidate.
For both Reynolds and his supporters
realize that in spite of his lead over
Morrison, that Morrison is still an
adversary that Is not to be snickered
at .especially now that his fighting
blood is up, and that he is going to
have all he can do to defeat Morrison
in the second primary. Those close to
Reynolds frankly admit that while
they would like to see Fountain call
for a second primary, that they do
not want to see Fountain try to ride
into the nomination on a wet plank
tied to Reynolds' coat tail.
None of the thoughtful people in
political circles here give the rumor
any credence and agree with Foun
tain that ii Is "just bull” originating
from those obscure minds in which
rumors driginate. These also
agree that a second gubernatorial pri
mary is still unlikely.
More than one-fifth of Denmark's
total population is centered in its cap
ital.
»■ ■ -
Wife Preservers
A dad scratch qp furniture caa
be made almost invisible by rub
bing it with the broken side of a
nut meat. Ihe oil la tbs nut acta
as staifi and nolistv
G. O. P. Conclave Fraught
With Importance For Nation
Battle Over Platform Plank May Be Far-Reach
ing in Government and Business
r ~r~ —n
J|i
Th. irrsprea.ibU qusst.on of prohibition may c» UK the greatest
uproar, but economic issues will be more far-reaching
(This is the third offfiev e dis
patches from Chicago on the in
ventions and their problems.)
By LESLIE EICHEI.
Chicago, June 1* —That the Repub- j
lican convention may not be the un
THE OLD HOME TOWN lUfUtered TJ 8. Patent Ode* By STANLEY
?%■ J. _f==- I 1 '
V ( *7 • ~,A
CMETWOR7MYS new S7RAVJ MAT
BLEW OFE TODAY AND DISAPPEARED
AROUND THE OF
DAIRY* BARN * / S
- © I**t Lee W. Stanley Central Preea
impoi'tant, simple affair one may now
imagine seems likely.
Indeed, it may determine the course
of the nation for generations to come.
The irrepressible question of pro
hibition may cause the greatest up
roar. but economic issues will be
more far-reaching.
Fear ism may put .in its appear
ance. N<* a few Republicans believe
in one-snail rule, or rule by autocracy.
The chief executive of a nation invar
iaMy does.
Qeagreae a Target
There has bean a tendency among
financial Interests to class congress as
a nuisance, to blame congress for the
continued decline In security and com
modity prices, to blame congress for
faili-r? to balance the budget, and for
t ... w u. i-nreqt. > , 1
- ~..0v 1„ uc aad Progressive Lsad
.... i.iat congress merely is try
, to straighten out a mess which
..nancial interest and the administra
tion got us into; that If the president
had called congreaa before the crisis
had become acute, and pain of the
curative operation would not have
been so severe. Besides they “warn"
that liberty rests with them.
Thus the Republicans* are put on
the defensive end may advance the
moat significant proposaple—proposals
that opponents may term Faacistic
Persons who will be delegates from
rural and indusrtial districts say that
neither the of sn aulocracy nor
a hurried passing of financial pallia
tives will answer the num
ber of questions being hurled at the
parties.
“What good have the emergency
measures done us?” a man in lowa
ot Nebraska growls.
. And someone else snorts, in the in
dustrial regions of Michigan and
Ohio: “If we can’t have international
trade, well starve. Tariff barriers
everyywhere! and we started it!”
Turn About
One of the curious phenomena of
the depression has been the almost
free-trade conversion of the formerly
high tariff industrial regions, and the
cry of the former low tariff regions
for protection against constantly de
creasing commodity prices.
, Both RepubbLicans and Democrats
enter their conventions with th® real
ization that they have no plan. Each
1 topes for a “turn"—and then luck.
But cry financial i nt#r 77
- laiding to soc. all,a tlon b
t vattv® Republican party , Co, *->
• 4ha nwrion Into the P *W«t K
• de| Mandlngs which k of «n
--«*mn*misiic a f* w v COnd * nn «l
to be done
ventions w.kl not an ‘ **»• co lr
, wm indicate a trend. 1 but «*>■
a
- New Era Greets pu M
r Writer laWo^
DUKE SUMMER TERM
’ OP£ N TUESDAY
■ *‘on will start Tuesday momin Sfc *‘
t classroom work for the fill? Whe/1
, June 14-Juiy 22, gets under
» K * cond will begin July £ Tb *
. close August 31, and both w,U £
• on the university's new he * 4
Affiliated schools of the U r?
will be conducted at l L a i c „ JV * r, d*y
. durtn « the summer The regular*
mer school at the lake win „
currently with the first tern, u
ham and the Lake Junaiuak*
1 of religion's summer term win
; from July 25 to September 7 **
Dispatch
WANT ADS
Get Results
FIRE SALE OF SHOES AND
clothing Everything mite, g0 *
gardleas of costs. Shoe repaint
neatly done. Boston Shoe Store
Next door to Henderson Candy Km.
Ch * n ' 8-u
FOR SALE CHEAP- CANE
seed, millet, chufa, soy Vthy
Raise hay, have nj n youi
barn. Plant peas and can e togett.
1 €r ' ftneßt clߣ B of hay. Make uo a
load, I will deliver there on shor
notice. Write for prices dehverto
J. G. Layton. Lkllington. N. C. 10 k
\IF PARTY TA K Two SAM FLE
trays from my car containing about
forty shoes for left foot, will » Us
their address, I will have factory
send mates. A. J. Davis. jj.,,,
BELIEVE IT OR NOT-DAY BY
day In every way more and more
people are learning about the mer,ti
of our shop. Meet y OU r friend,
tiore. ADen's Barber Shop.
Thurs-Fri. ts.
FOR SALE-ONE ALL STEEL RE
frtgerator. In good condition
white enamel finirh. Akx S Wat
FOR RENT -MODERN ~Ap"aRtT
ments in the Stonewall. 215 Young
Avenue. Prices attractive First or
second floor. Steam heated Ei,c
G. Flannagan. Phone 535 or 215-J
USED CAR VALUES
1929 Okismobile Cuach.
1928 Oakland Sedan.
1927 Pontiac Sedan
1928 Whippet Sedan.
1928 Ford Truck.
1928 Ford Coach.
1927 Chrysler Coach.
MOTOR SALES CO.
Phone 832.
FORECLOSURE SALE
By virtue of power contained in that
certain Deed, of Triad, executed by
Gjuiys EsfceHe Terrell and J. T Ter
reh. her husband, recorded in the of
fice of the Register of Deeds of Vance
County in book 162, at psge 182. de
fault having bean made in the pay
ment of the debt therein secured at
the requst of t)he holder of the noi
I :4h&U sen by public auction to ti*
highest bidder for cash, at the Court
House door ht Henderson. N. C. at
twelve o’clock noon on Tuesday the
sth day of July ,1932, the following de
scribed real property:
“Beginning ai a stone the S. W
corner of lot No. 2 of the Thomas A
Stewart estate sub-division, thence
South 87-58 E. 2565 feet to the center
of the Henderson and Raleigh Road,
thence along the center line of the said
road N. 2-30 E. 308 and 5-10 feet
thence N. 88-21 W. 2559 feet to the
beginning, containing seventeen and
sixth fcenhhe acres and being a par'
of k»t No. 2 of the Thomas A. Stew
art estate. Surveyed by Bruce E
Lon caster Jaauary 15. 1630. See deed
booh 156, page 342 office of Register
off Deads, Vajsoe County, for further
description. ”
Thi* the 44b day of June, 1932.
T. P. GHOLBON. TrusM*
SEABOARD AIR
UNE RAILWAY
WAINS LEAVE HENDF.BSO.N
AS FOLLOWS
No. NORTHBOUND
10*—8:48 A. M. for Richmond
Washington ( New York, cimnei'i
lag at Norlina with No IS ar
riving Portsmoulh-Xorfulk I2:#i
P. M. with parlor-dining car wr
*ke,
1—2:52 p. M. for Richmond
and Portsmouth, Washing ton
New York.
!•*—•:** P. M. for Richmond
Washington and New York.
*—3:2B A. M. for Portsmouth
Norfolk Washington, New York I
No. SOUTHBOUND
*•1—4:43 A. M. for Savannah
Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, St
Petersburg.
*—3:45 P. M. for Raleigh, San
lo*i, Hamlet, Columbia, Savan
hah, Miami Tampa, St. Peters
burg.
tO I ?—7:sa P. M. for Raleigh. Ham
hli Savannah, Jacksonville,
Miami, Tampa, St Petersburg,
Atlanta, Birmingham.
5—1:25 A. M. for Atlanta, Blrm
litghau, Memphis.
P<w information call on H. E
I‘tsaiaiiln DP A., Raleigh. N. C .
or M C Capps, TA . Henderson
M. C.

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