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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, June 27, 1932, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-06-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
Dramatic Moments of Democratic
Conventions I Have Attended
/or HALF A CENTURY By UREY WOODSON, Noted Political Figure
IV —Parker’* Gold Telegram
The next Democratic national con
vention was held in Kansac City In
1900. In a great auditorium that had
Ju*t been rebuilt in ninety days, after
a fire bad destroyed the earlier one.
Jbmes A Reed, the mayor of Kansas
City, later U. S. Senator, delivered an
address of welcome Charles S.
Thomas of Colorado, was elected tem
porary chairman James D. Rich
ardson of Tennessee, was permanent
chairman.
Thte convention was a mere ratifi
cation meeting Bryan ww renomi
rated by acclamation, and Adlai E.
Stevenson of Illinois was again nom
inated for vice president.
The Kansas City Democratic na
tional convention nier in St, Louis.
John Sharp Williams of Mississippi,
was temporary chairman. Champ
Clark. of Mississippi. permanent
chairman It resulted in the nomina
tion of Allg*. H I'htker of New
York, for President at .VIS in the*
morning, of July 9.
The deciding bailor came after Mr.
Bryan had made a final plea in a vi.n
attempt to accomplish the nomination
Os Senator Francis M Cockrell, cf
Missouri. The ballot resulted Paiker
658. William Randolph He-trst, 200;
Cockrell 42: Richard Olney of Massa
chusetts. 33 and Edward C. Wall, of
Wisconsin 27.
Parker's “Gold" Telegram
At a later session the following
eight there was a very ten«e situation
caused by Parker's celebrated gold
telegram which he sent to his cam
paign manager William F. Sheehan,
of New York declaring that as the
gold standard had now been adopted
by the United States h. could not con
sider making the campaign on any
other platform. Th» convention had
not adopted a silver platform. I»
was silent on the money question
was for a time an attempt to
suppress this telegram but the news
leaked out
Bryan hearing of it. arose .from a
Sick bed and went to th f > convention
hall and spoke wi'h great earne.-rtness
in cntici.sm of Parker's telegram, sav
ing he should have sent :t before and
not after the nomination.
Harmonious -p* eches were made by
John Sharp Williams, of Mississippi.
Edward W. Carmack of Tennessee,
knd Chairman Champ Clark and
ethers, and Mr Bryan was finally
induced to withdraw a resolution he
had offered
Ex-Senator Henry O Davis, of
West Virginia, notwithstanding he was
80 years old was nominated fer vice
president at 1:15 o'clock Sunday morn
ing July 10.
The Democratic campaign that year
was a listless affair, The delegates
went home from St. Louis discour
aged on account of the Parker tele
gram and there was no recovei-y be
fore the election.
The national commit'ee was never
In sorer straits for money than
throughout th.s campaign, which Was
eventually financed by Thomas F.
Ryan and August Belmont, who each
gaVe SSOO 000 to the committee, aided
by Anthony Bradv of New York and
Albany, who gave $250,000.
Why Ryan Did It
At a subsequent senatorial investiga
tion of campaign funds of both potties
in Washington Mr. Ryan, on the w;t
ness stand was asked how much he
gave to the Parker campaign. He
replied he thought about $500,000.
Some senator asked Mr. Ryan. "Did
you know Mr. Parker never had any
chancy of winning’’"
"Certainly I did." said Mr. Ryan.
I never favored his nomination. I
thought It was a mistake from the out-
fIKrSNTKR > Half a Loaf— By LES FORGRAVE
S W A R£L \ EF - IHAOI eOT-90t WOT A VjOOO OtD V W AT ENDS 00(2 t R( P OOwM TV**.
*j S
\ E OR MOROtReo, tF THAT tyyEAMS TMEV DIOSH ~ .O, ANO tUAT VJoOID KAVC
11 AMoXjSti?- XXf' 9,5 PIWDiT. 15k)iE ITCOE-SAWD Y SEEM «UCW (JRANtO.PUMi AF4VHOVJ ■
3 bI Sqm L a aTOMfe X 1M QIAOTMAT CSftOAVJO
A ]/ j _ I ■ Cupynuhl. l"9jj C.ntrwl Pr«t. '^^*~* riJ^
T I TO -IHWk- THAT AFTER. \| ry | WOULb HAV6 ST*U<»E.LI£I> _ j a l "^S
o ALL OP THESE TEARS WE HAS ( ALOWfc, with HIM - I WAS HOT \ WAHTECS &OLO -
V TTRt~ T COME BACK TO ME- ASHAMEO OF BEIN& BOOK- I LOVE.O HIM THEN - OJAJJr T™JJ= ~-V =- / TOW''*
— NOT ONE WGRO- NoY ONE ALTHOUGH HE WAS CRUEL YO MS- / * fcfeYuWNSuL I W**-L- Y€LL Hl^
> ' UN6 4INC.E Hi LSFT ME BUT I CAN NSVtft FOfcNlVfi Ml*\ J ~'~?ZZ' 6vE^YTW4A*6-
- , tx'l' That night without \ PoU leaving me.- i '*** only y ’ _r"-\ I WtLL Ye. LA him all
l-saptbt 1-s.rissT'"" “ V iwwrt.’ss'- ‘zs&M, - -v»» —•«■"•-
i ~
I<> tiio< i.uic convention of »it Houston. Te*
set and could at no time s* e any
hope for him."
''Then why should you giv 0 such :»
munificent fund to his campaign?" the
senator inquired.
Ryan replied: “Well, the committee
netded the mony and could find no
other way of raising it. While I had
no connection with the party organi
zation. I didn't want to see the con
mittee go home leaving debts behind
it. I made this contribution for the
honor of the Democratic party."
Mr. Belmont had endorsed the
committee's notes to the amount of
$450,000 and was of course very glad
to have thfcs assistance from Mr.
Ryan and Mr. Brady.
Denver Convention
The convention in 1908 met in Den
ver. where it was a foregone conclu
sion that Bryan would be nominated
again and the delegates went to Den
ver to have a good time and they had
it. The convention assembled on the
Fourth of July. Theodore A. Bell,
of California. was the temporary
chairman. H. D Clayton, of 1 Alabama
permanent chairman.
One feature of the Denver enter
tainment was snowballing the dele
gates as they went into the conven
tion hat! The Denver people had run
several flat cars loaded with snow
down the mountains and switched
these cars to a siding near the con
vention hall entrance. Two hundred
or more boys stood on these flat fars
and snowballed the multitude that
went into the grpat hall.
A pleasant incident of the Denver
convention was the coming of Mr.
and Mrs. Medill McCormick, of Chi-
HENDERSON, (N. C.J DAILY DISPATCH, : MONDAY, JUNE 27, 1932
I oago. accompanied by Mr. and
| Nick Ixingwortli. all Republicans but
| to be our guests for the convention.
Living in Denver at That time wfcs
Ruih Bryan, now Mrs. Ruth Bryan!
Owen, the Congresswoman daughter
!of our Peerless leader. We flved up
two adjoining boxes in the conven
tion hall, one f° r Ruth Bryan and the
other for Alice Roosevelt Longworth.
her husband and the McCormicks,
sealing them side by side. The
> ckiughter of the then President Roose
velt and the daughter of the great
Democratic leader, about to be nomi
nated for president for the third time.
wer e introdued. visited each other's
' boxes, and became good frinds.
Alice listened intently and with
complete composure to the Democrats
who weer panning her father to a
fare-you-well. while Ruth, all smiles,
listened to the eneumiums of her
father. Many years afterwards, Mrs,
McCormick, of this party, and Ruth
Bryan Owen served in congress to
gether.
On the ticket was Bryan named at
Dmver was John W Kern, of Indiana
afterwards a senator from that state.
Ollie M. James, of Kentucky, vigor
ously declined to be considered for
vice president though he was Bryan's
first choice. Ollie had a safe seat
in the house of representatives from
a Kentucky district that gives 12.000
to 25.000 majority.
The wind is a force of the heavens;
to some extent it is one of its secrets,
for although much has been learned,
the whole truth is not yet laid bare.
THE OLD HOME TOWN *.»-ty STANLEY
f WELL TMATS THE THIR© l f'i'OU “TAKE THAT BA<5 OF feICE
S THAT
C WITHOUT A THING THROWN ) \vA/HEfeE VoU FOUND IT- You \
AS PRACTICALLY ALL TME OL_D SHOES AND
SLIPPERS JN TOWN ARE IN DAULY USE - rs 9g£ =r
TODAYS BRIDAL PAIR <SoT AWAY SAFELY
© 1932 U« W Stanley Central Frets
DID YOU KNOW? By R. ). SCOTT
W*****qm< A comparison of <he. force of Gravity
dm! om Three dtferen-t worlds -
BK i kaJDY CtKrftß - -Twn NORMAL JUMP of AM ArrHXE-ft
OMEAJ2-TH— RIQHf- SAME AMOUN<OF
A / effort would carrv him 6Times as Hiq*t
m ON the moon - left- his JUMP on JUPITER.
Wf ; WOULD BE LESS THAN £
HALF OF THAT oM
Jfi-tUe FAprrfi wk)
~ I £—*
The First matTonAu 9 I
REPUBLICAN CONVEkUiOH //mL I 1
WAS HELD Irt « 11 ~
PHILADELPHIA IN 1854), , | | /
AMD NOMINAT%P |" "1 I » /
OOHH C. FREMONf I I •*—' k- JF
FOR PREwIDEMT" > I 1 ** r
Copyright. IM2. by Csattsi Frew iwrtitlin. laa. .
Dispatch
WANT ADS
Get Results
CARS WASHED AND
SI.OO. Work guammeed
Puller's Service Sution 27,,
MIBB O. C. BLACKNALL. PUBllc
stenographer now located at
derson Book Co. Copy, ng , toull; .
graphing, mimeographing. Duh(l
Have your furniturFrepair;
ed. reupholsiered. to wear sad
look new. New upholstering
very low prices. J. W. P ar ? iu
alley back of Henderson Furniture
Co - 20 22 24 27
GROCERY STORES. FISeTdeTl
ping paper. Use old newspspe*s
ere and markets save on your wrtp.
Get a big tunoie at the Daily Dj
patch office lot 10c.
FIRE SALE OF SHOES AND
clothing Everything must go tt .
gardless of 00ate. Shoe repamce
neatly done- Boston Shoe Siort
Next door to Henderson Candy K.-.
chen. gj
USED CAR ~~~
1931 Pontiac Coach
1930 Chevrolet Coach
1929 Olasmoblle Coach
1928 Ford 1 1-2 Ton Truck
1928 Oakland Sedan
1929 Whippet Sedan
1927 Pontiac Sedan
MOTOR SALES CO
Phone 832
THE DAILY DISPATCH IS NOWON
sale at The Smoke Shop. Jefferson
Case, Henderson Candy Kitchen
Wortman's Pharmacy. Wigglm L»ruj
Store, Agency. You may s*c u «
a copy from any of these place,
st the regular price of sc. 29-ts
FORECLOSE RE SALE
By virtue of the power contained in
a deed of trust executed by Lena elim,
Hill and husband. Claude Hill <«-
corded in the office of ihe Rtgisu.<
of Deeds of Vance County, in bock
148. at page 153. default having beta
made in the payment of the dtf:
therein secured. o n tequest of the
holder at the same. I shall sell L:
cash by public auction a; the court
house door in Hender.=r>n. North
Carolina, to the highest bidder, on
Thursday. July 28th 1932. ai twelve
o’clock, neon the following deccnbia
real property:
“Begin at a »Une on Robinsnr
Street. Ed Turner comer, be.ni 4?
feet from the edge of Kittrell Stree:
and run thne along l;ne X
W. 190 feet from Kittrell Str®t:
j thence 8. 9 W. about 82 1-2 f*jt to .
[ pin. Kellv corner; thenre along Kei",
! line S 88 F about 170 fe»-i to KeiJy
! corner on Robinson Stieer thence
alone said Street North 4 Es*i 93 fee'
to place of beginning. Seed deed tj
Lena Mims from S. O. Kelly and wife
recorded in Register of dee** off.c*
of Vance County, in booe 134 pis
167, for mors accurate description
J. M PF.ACE Tmetee
This 27th day cf June. 1932
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF LAND
Undei* and by virtu*, of the power 0!
sale contained in that certain deed J
trust, made, executed and dehvettd on
the 7th day of January. 1932 to ti»
undersigned Trustee by Curtis Pace
and wife. Lucy T. Peace, which ss.d
I deed of trust U duly of record ic
j Book 181. page 107, of the Pubi.c
1 Registry of Vance County. def*u.:
having been made in the payment J
the bond secured thereby, and st the
request and direction of the ownei »n:
holder of said bond. I shall, on Friday
July 22. 1932. offer for sale to the high
est bidder by public auction for cseh
in front of the court house door in
Henderson. N, C.. at about the nour
of twelve o'clock, noon, the follows*
described lot or parcel of land siiuata
in Kittrell Township. Vance County
State of North Carolina, and describes
as follows:
Adjoining the lands of Mrs Annie
Powell. John Harvey, and the Peace
Estate, containing 89 acres more or
leas. Being the land bought of Mm
Margaret* Peace and being the land
Upon which Curtis Peace now lives
This June 18. 1932.
W. M. PENNIX, Trustee
Hancock and Tyler.
Attya . at law, Oxford. N C
SEABOARD k\f
UNE RAILWAY
TRAINS LEAVE IIENDF-RSO>
AS FOLLOWS
No. NORTHBOUND
108—8:48 A M. for Richmond
Washington' »« York, connect
ing at Notlina with No 18 * r '
riving I’ortaniouth-Norfolk
P. M. with jiarlur-dlnlng car **r
vice.
4 P M. for Richmond
and Portsmouth, Waalimi*® 11
New York.
192—6:48 11.I 1 . 51. for Richmond
Washington and New York
*—3:2B A. M for ParUiuoew
Norfolk Washington. New Y«>rk
No. SOITIIBOIND
191—A: 43 A M. for Savannah
Jacksonville. Miami, Tampa. :*
Petersburg.
8—8:45 P. M for Raleigh,
ford, Hamlet. Columbia. S«v«n
nah, Miami. Tampa, S«. Vetert
burg.
107—7:55 P. M for Raleigh.
lei. Savannah,Jsd**' 1 11' 1
Miami, lamps, Si Feiersb* 1 *
Atlanta, Binning ham.
5 A M for Attanta.
Ingham. Mmtfihla.
'For Information call on ® ®
PtalSSantß DIA , Raleigh. N
or M C ’ Capps, TA . Beodet**
N. C.

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