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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, August 24, 1932, Image 3

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jrronilannes
1,71928 Election
Told by Witness
v.rth WllWe-Uiaro. Aug. 34
4 ,M-UHtor.it* Republican votm
Watauga county precinct
" ih«' i‘ r -* election wore told by
pollhoidcm to scratch
l(kt nanir <•' «» ‘b** Demacntfa on
,h. ik W**» and ticket* were
•»' ,>Hn * for D«»-
1 ' n,( v | U tm titled In
court hero today.
grWeite. witn. v* for the govern
mrnt in thr trial of id Democratic
lr% ,ii official.-, and other* charg-
i mini. »*id he was a Re
iiuMkao jud*e »n that district and
rrtuvil f« sl*n the returns elec
tion nifi*i
Unit all. rations regarding «h«
l!Wt , election are contained In the
t. .»t indictment, and Judge John
| Have* expressed doubt that
hr would leave Privette's testl
l;lun> in thr records.
Wall Street Fearful Leat
Uncle Sam Lead Business
To Unfamiliar Destination
(Continued ftom Page One.)
j,. ti r s'a lenient this same
, •, . \pi essing the hope of
-j.% ~i.. ■ -an lepeatedly uttered in
A- :. : "c conference of business
r- .a.. ! by Piesident Hoover.
*. r :\ a.-lct.mes the spvrit of hclp-
r .r>s wUxh the response to this
..V«~ but the business depres
r n’.u.-*' after all give way to proa
-t r\ w.th much artificial ac
.-.xpjn n:. nt The country's banking
k - bus:ne-< brains have bee n and will
:t f £r-' it -i-rvice. but the individual
u . .vk •(> his own industry, thrift
j Mtmiu n < ense rather than sit
.md iwait a magic formula from
- r ..,-aJs i>f the big banks, railroads.
t,fcu- ut; cs. industrial organiza
; wsnnv-nt executives and poli
ar>
A- i mi'ter of fact, it is not indt
vdJ.».:-ri' hit the status quo Utat fi
-ir.c.J. :r.irrests desire. What they
-.ro ve hey say. is a slipping into
5» j.tiatier. And the worst of it is
i.,-eni;n2 to their point of view--that
- :id.r. groups can be blamed <and
rt’<rrom:»!ed». It is a conservative
| v v«tnnir! t eager for reelectior., that
c: na.ng the nation close to gov
Whats the \{.6(150?2 lor this
swing to s ter field
, We believe it’s
and QetterTkste
IP YOUR cigarette is mild Chesterfield Cigarettes milder
that is, not strong, not and taste better and to give
bitter, but smokes cool and them a pleasing aroma. ;
smooth-then you’ll like it First, the right kmd of ripe, cJ Jk
and don’t worry about how Bwee t leaf tobacco-Domestic
many you smoke. an d Turkish. Then these pT
If your cigarette tastes tobaccos are blended and llrilffer
right; if it tastes better—that cross-blended to make sure
is, not oversweet; and if it that Chesterfields are milder -^w r
has a pleasing aroma then an d better-tasting. That’s P
you
.Everything known to Chesterfields a trial. They ( I , ' c ?S9HHF
" Science is used to make are certain to please you.
# “Musk that satisfies. ” Every night bmt
' Columbia Coast-to-Coast
e i»2 t libmtt a stno*<so**ax> Co. a—
. 1 ij.i » ( >;
' \ h
. - ■- ’.. *• t* . '*. <•
ernment control of everything
1 Qfwwmat "niiljiPj
ssa,"-^
not put down a bonus army d ldit not
the railroad debt. to the
z , :r/ ,n * ni ' ■—» ~**s%
‘ Yes.” says Wall afreet. “But ti «.
government probably will nut *
millions Into farmers' co-operatives H
Put down a farmers' ?°
another undertaking U win fort 11-
ernment money, obtained by taxation
U. compete with private moneyTtli
Sve wiil
-«™ir no s,'r* „r ,ea; ‘ h " e
ZTiT" th " r
wn', N ;^ gav V nrnent nor
Will recognize fundamental laas of
anomic. Nor wil l,hey recognii
evolurion. or change. Conferences of
government and business are derided
because they do not approach funda
mentals.
"They try to effect a return to an
ago that is past.
Trade Is Baals of Existence
Whether our governments be con
servative or radical, whether th;y be
based on monarchy, dictatorship, dem
ocracy or communism, they exist only
through the medium of trade
“Men have suffered for want of
wo!k and food these past few years,
not because of overproduction, but be
cause o lack of trade. And the
reason w e hove no trade is not be
j c ,us * > people do net need what we can
, Produce, but because trade is re
strained by unnatural barriers.
"If a world conference of nations
were held tomorrow and every nation
would agree to remove its trade bar
riers. trade would flourish as grass
i after a shower.
"Until man understands that wealth
* la based on trade, on barter and ex
change and not-on the piling up of
\-old which, when plentiful buys less
; and less, we shail suffer."
Can’t Revert to 1958
But what of change? we ark.
"Change is another thing we do not
, understand," these economists say.
I "We can’t return to IW. If huge
plants were built and cueix companies
overcapitalized some years ago, It
isn't essential Lhat we ge' those plants
going again In the meantime. Rus
sia or some other nation has developed
a simpler, more modem method of pro
duction. It would be w.ser to scrap
I our obsolete plants. A small new
plant may put men back to work
TN. C.,T DAILY MMTOB* WEDNESDAY AUGUST 241932
Ocean Soloist Sees Gay Gotham
'YnEjVV
Os course every visitor to N'ew York simply inu„l .-ce v t ;.o nigh*
cluba for which Gay Gotham is famed at home and abroad. So here is
Captain James A. Mollison (left), British trans-Atlantic soloist, in one
of the joy spots on the “Great White Way” on the night he arrived from
St. John. Mollison was the guest of George M. Mand (right), of Mayor
Walktr’s reception committee. He plans to fly back to Europe after he
has rested and overhauled his plane.
quicker with more modern methods.
"One mentions Rusj.u because it
has proceeded without tradition, as we
did in the past century. IT we permit
ourselves to be enveloped by tradition,
we shall be the country to be pitied,
not Russia. The country that starts
from the bottom up has an advantage ”
And thute government, financiers
and economists offer their contending
views, while the evolution of industry
and finance continuee at a pace that
seems to bewilder leaders In govern
ment and finance.
MAY ABOLISH CASH
DISCOUNT ON GAS
(Continued from Page Oae.)
that are registered limited only to the
most necessary uae, justify this in
crease In the gasoline price, accord
ing to those who have studied the
matter. In fact, the opinion expressed
here in most circles ta that the two
per cent cash discount plan was de
cided upon by the big gasoline com
panies merely as another means In an
attempt to “freeze out” the smaller
independent dealers, despite the claim
of these companies that they decided
upon this cash discount In order to
discourage charge accounts.
The practice of granting a two cents
a gallon discount for cash has reacted
against the independent filling sta
tion operators but has not cost the
operators or stations owned by the
large companies anything, according
to those who know. For the large com
panies have granted their operators
the same margin of profit they had
before— in most cases four cents a
gallon -while the profit of most of the
Independent operators has been re
duced two cents a gallon and in many
cases cut on only two cents. Thus,
under this arrangement, the indepen
dent operators have been able to make
a profit of only two cents a gallon,
while the sttaions operated by the
large gasoline and oil companies have
been earning a profit o( four cents a
gallon, and six cents a gallon from
thode who bought gas on cUadge ao
coufcts.
hidependedt operator*, who
are good trader* and who have been
•hie to build up large following*, were
formerly able to buy gasoline In car
load lota at lower prices than others
and were thus able to earn aa much
aa six cents a gahon profit, so that
they were able to sell to their regular
customers at two oenU lesa than the
posted prices at the big company sta
tions and still make four cents a gal
lon profit. But they were not able to
do this when the larger companies
also decided to cut their prices two
cents a gallon for cash. Those Inde
pendent operators that had been get
ting only a four cents profit in the
first place were even harder hit, of
course.
Just why the larger gasoline com
panies have apparently decided to stop
giving this two cents discount after
September 1 la not known. It may be
that they have secured an agreement
with the independent dealers or that
thy may fear that the recent Inves
tigation made gasoline and oil
companies by AMomey General Den
nis G. Brummitt may be extended to
include this two cents discount. Suits
have already been brought against ail
the larger companies by Attorney
General Brummitt as result of the al
legedly discriminating contracts which
they have compelled their filling sta
tion operators to sign. These suits are
expected to be tried either in Septem
ber or October.
Another factor in the decision of the
gasoline companies to abandon the
two cents a gallon discount may have
been the fact that the State of North
Carolina was getting the benefit of
this discount in addition to its regular
discount. Thus the State, with its fill
ing station discount of 3.26 cents a
gallon, was getting a discount of 5.26
cents, thus getting gas selling for 21
cents for 14.74 cents a gallon at fill
ing stations, which included seven
cents of State and Federal tax. In
tank car lots, the State discount, gives
it an 8.26 cents discount.
If the jarger gasoline companies
boost the retail price of gasoline up
two cents to the present charge price
on September 1, the independent deal
ers will not be hit so hard, unless the
companies also increase the wholesale
or tank car lot prices to them. Some
of the Independent dealers are ex
pecting this move. But if the large
companies should abolish the two
cents cash discount, but leave prices
just as they are, the independent deal
ers would continue to suffer unless
they could get lower tank car prices.
It may be that the big companies
have decided not to continue their ef
forts to make ft Harder for the ind&
pendent dealers pending the trial of
the present suits eUried by the at
torney general. B*t the independent
dealers nrq that tie let-up
1* only temporary at best end that
eventually a new hlan will be evolved
to subject the independent* to anothei
•queering process, according to these
dealers.
Power Authority Ctetaft
St. Lawreace Pact Won't
Serve PiAHc lritonfests
(Continued from rage One.)
New York is to bear tne construction
expense, not only at its hydro-electric
plants, but of the two danne likewise
On this basis .the Empire cotmnon
weaith’s Investment will reach $150,-
000,000. The New York State Power
Authority had estimated ft at $h0,000.-
00C.
“The Albany regime,” relate* Direc
tor King, “was planning to retail 3-
cenb electHcrty as compered with
about a 7-cent average, charged by
private edmpanies.
“It was realized, indeed, that ff this
current were turned over at the
switchboard to private concerns to
distribute, they doubtless would find
means of maintaining the higher rate.
Therefore It was foreseen that state
owned transmission lines probably
would be necessary. The legislature
was asked to authorize them, ts lead
ers inquired what contracts could be
secured, to justify the expenditures.
“To discuss contracts, it was essen
tial for Chairman Frank P. Walsh of
the State Power Autnority to have
some idea of the amount New York
would be required to contribute to the
St. Lawrence project, but queries on
this subject elicited only the Infor
mation from Washington that inter
national treaties were for the federal
government, not the individual states,
to handle.”
“Nevertheless,” Bald King, “the 3-
cent rate was deemed well wtthin rea
son. even assuming, the moet liberal
cost allowances as the state’s share
in payment for the waterway.
“Workers in the cause of cheaper
power for the American people looked
forward to it with satisfaction, not
only as a boon to tens of thousands
of New Yorkers, but as a revelation
to the entire country that the price
of powfr can be more than halved
and still be supplied profitably to con
sumers.
“Now we discover that, under the
terms of the treaty. New York’s in
vestment is made, artificially, so heavy
that the state will be unable to com
pete profitably with private power in
terests.”
WM -- *
• ilg aMjvl
fnitriw arid Xw>m
Office I* L mm riuUdtag
Office VkoM 19S Hmm I%om M
A 10 DAY
VACATION
TO
CUBA
Avfuat 26th-27th
From To
Norlina Havana
Henderson And Return
Oxford $28.00
Louisburg . ,
Wake Forest '** Jackson villa
wage roreat And Port
Tickets Sold for all Trains August
2eth and Train Itl From Hen
derson August 57th
S to powers—Baggage Checked
Far Information See Agent
H. E. PLEASANTS, DPA
5«5 Odd Fellows Bldg., Raleigh, N. C.
teahnairi
FORECLOSURE SALE.
By virtue of the power contained in
a Deed of Trust executed by J. Hal
stead Kelly and wife. Rose Kelly, to
Thos. M. Pittman, Trustee, recorded
in the office of the Register of Deeds
of Vance County in Book 145, Page
88, default having been made in tha
payment of the debt therein secured,
on request of the holder of the same,
1 shall sell for cash, by public auc
tion, at the Court House door in Hen
derson, N. C., to the highest bidder,
on tha 19th day of September. 1983,
at twelve o'clock noon, the following
described property:
Begin at a point on the South side
of Young Avenue in the intersection
of said Avenue and Rail Road Street
in the City of Henderson, and run
thence in a Westerly diiection along
aald Avenue One Hundred and Fifty
< ; 150» feet to Adcocks' corner; thence
at right angles to said Avenue in a
Southerly direction along the line of
Adcock and Young One Hundred and
Sixty (180> feet to an iron pin; thence
on a direct line In an Easterly direc
tion and parallel with said Young
Avenue One Hundred and Fifty (180)
feet to said Railroad Street; thence
along said Railroad Street in a North
erly direction One Hundred and Sixty
(160) feet to the point of beginning
the lot together with the two story
dwelling thereon, being the old home
place of the late Ella V. Kelly.
This the 17th day of August, 1932.
ELIZABETH B. PITTMAN,
Executrix of the estate of Thos. 1L
Pittman, Trustee.
Pittman, Bridgers and Hicks,
Attorneys.
FORECLOSURE SALE
By virtue of authority contained in
that certain deed of trust executed
by J. W. Gill and wife Edith M.
Gill, recoided in Book 151, at page 302
in the office of the Register of Deeds
of Vance County, default having been
made in the payment of the debt
therein secured, at the request of the
holdec of the notes, I shall sell by
public auction to the highest bidder
for cssh at the court house door in
Henderson, N. C., at twelve o'clock
noon on Monday, the 12th day of
September. 1032. the following de
scribed property:
Begin at an iron stake 50 feet from
the center of the S. A. L. Ry. right
of way and 866 feet from W. S.
Parker corner and run thence S. 60
1-2 E. 200 feet to a stake at the in
tersection of Watters Street, thence
along said Walters Street N. 29 1-2
E. 100 feet to a stake on corner of
Lowery Street, thence N. 60 1-2 W.
200 feet to a slake 50 feet from center
of right of way of S. A. L. Ry.. thence
parallel with said RR. S. 29 1-2 W.
100 fee* to the place at beginning. See
deed book 69. page 433. also deed J.
N. Gill and wife to J. W. Gill. On
this lot Is located Ihree houses.
This the 10th dsy of August, 1932.
A. A. BUNN, Trustee.
FORECLOSURE SALE
By virtue of tihe power contained in
a Deed of Trust executed by Howard
Thorne and wife, Bessie Thome, to
Thomas M. Pittman, Trustee, record
ed in the office of the Register of
Deeds of Vance County in Book 145.
Page 212, default having been made
in paymertt of the debt therein se
cured, on request of Hie holder of
the same, I shall sell for cash, by pub
lic auction, at the Court House dior
in Henderson, N. C., to the highest
bidder, on the 19<h day of September
1932, at twelve o'clock noon, the fol
lowing described property:
Lot No. 1: Begin at a stake on East
comer made by junction of Eaton
Streets and Andrews Avenue and run
thence North 64 degrees E. 200 feet
to a stake on Eaton Street; thence
South 26 minifies E. 100 feet to a
stake; thence S. 64 minutes West par
allel with Eaton Street to a stake on
Andrews Avenue, thence along And
rews Avenue N. 26 minutes W. 100
feet to the place of beginning. See
Lot 41 of Petar Plat of Young Fair
Ground property in Book 10, Page
510; also Deed Book 91, Page 47 for
further boundaries, etc.
Lot No. 2: Beginning at ‘the east
corner of Florence Allen's land on
Eaton Street, running along Easton
Street N. 64 degrees E. one hundred
fee* to an iron stake; thence S. 26
degree E two hundrd feet to an iron
stake; thence S. 64 degrees W. to
Mrs. Florence Allen's comer 100 feet
thence along Florence Allen’s Une N.
26 degrees E. to the beginning 200
fee*, containing 20.000 square feet.
Recorded Vance County Registry
Book. 56. Page 187.
This 17th day of August, 1982.
ELIZABETH B. PITTMAN,
Executrix of the nit at n of
THOMAS M. PITTMAN,
FlUuSu, Bridget* and Hicks, Ajttg*.
PAGE THREE

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