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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, September 12, 1932, Image 1

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hekderson,
GATEWAY to
CENTRAL
CAROLINA.
.NINETEENTH YEAR
Crisis In Germany
As Reichstag Votes
Against Von Papen
Communist Motion of Non.
Confidence In Cabinet U
Patted by Vote of
513 to 32
SOCIALISTS IGNORE
DISSOLUTION EDICT
Chancellor's Decree Cornea
After Vote, and Reichatag
Head Holds Government
Has Already Been Over
thrown; Government May
Employ Force
.... 12 < AP» A Com
„ .• ni of non-confidence in
. , .-v.-.*' Chancellor Franz vor>
: wi- voted by the Keich-uag
vj 32. with 30 members ab-
Tn» «v 'ion was carried after the
, . r h.nt promulgated a decret
'he Reichstag, and Her
Wtih-lm Hoering. Nations
« -i'f.tser. had declined to en
- 'h-* oeciee pending action on
, •#, h »itt > before the house.
c aid with the non-confidence
w >* ,t demand that the emer
j •> ‘•i-r-’e by which President
. - H " iertbutg legalized the econo
- • ft 'iism of Chancellor vor
f pen *v- r scinded.
;>■•> is ,matte turn in events left
; ir. inieotai lans uncertain regard
r.' he e\Htt etatus of the Reichstag
t he C'infusion was increased by
jw,*»r Goerlng. who declared tha.
chancellor's decree *>f dfrsolu
t. r «"u!il t>e ignored, in view of
«(■- •*.•• ’hat the government had al
nceii overthrown.
TV Reichstag session was cram
jyi «-n surprises. The apparent!)
...ms- .- communist motion appear
fj ■ «vch the government nap
s.d.-.t when the dissolution de
l .■•«• imie it seemingly had little es
' 'tv members. The legislature
».'• trne 1 until tomorrow. anc
a.*i whi.e 'he council of elders wil
future proceedure.
Th-i- were rumors in the Reich
'..4. oc>t’. 'hat the government plans
• "--arv to use force.
Accused Couple
At Robbinsville
Deny All Guilt
R hhuisviiie. Sept. 12 <AP) John
•• I'iif-r. r')-defendant with Oliver L.
F»k»; m their trial here on charges cl
• ' ' degree murder in the siX-year
o.d i»irh of Eagle Rose, denied on the
tand h*-re today that he klll
‘d K< e o f that he knew who did
*’» id'ien swore That J. J. O'Malley
tf**i-’.v** who reviewed the invejtlga
' i. :• '< 'h' case, atterrtpted to 'dope"
:.~t. r. order to get a confession to
•' * * • ged part In the killing.
‘•ila'iej former Chicago inspector,
r - rv-*n ac ivp in unravelling a r.um
t - -f VWjtern North Carolina mur
mys'er.e* in the past two years.
- ! * i.' largely responsible for tin
<» Ting of the evidence on whic;i the
?'■> d jury indicted Gladden. Baker
I 'w»i others, who were freed when
3 n--mt was taken In their case*.
EXONERATEWAKE
YOUTH OF KILLING
Coroner 4 * Jury Probe* Fatal
Shooting Near Wake
Forest Saturday
r < f Sept 12. -<AP> -Coleman
r, H" lK vear-old resident of the
v ( Up Forest section of Wake county,
■ i, was exonerated of blame in
' • ‘-'■'ion with his fatal shooting of
1 Perry 20. who was one of three
men who attacked uke last
'•** irdav night.
'■ike evidence at an inquest hear-j
•■'•nducted by Coroner L. M. War-!
-hnwed. was attacked by Irvin
f '' Garland Ferry and Clement
u i her while he was in company
14 '!i Mis-es Daphne and Olivia Perry
' k;r to the youth who was kilted,
ine girls and their mother, who
' Tie upon the scene while Irvin
I’" was choking Duke after the
•*”“r had been cut with a knife and
"'-•wil to the ground, testified the
r ’:vi and Barber stopped the girls
Ouke with no apparant reason,
ittacked Duke when he asked
’"• ni to .stop using abusive language,
''■miner Waring said tbe three
attacked uke were under th*
itnce of whiskey- Neither Oar
* 1 Perry nor Barber could be lo*
'■ i for examination at the inquest.
Thf r-oroner’s jury decided Ehike's
■- of Perry was a “Juattfiable
b 'ttucide.' _ ‘i
Satin Bramrftft
*o*** pjJBSP*
Col. Robing Missing
tj
:
U
tears were expressed for the
safety of Colonel Raymond Rob
ins, noted social economist, since
he left New York City for an ajv
pointment with President Hoover
at the White House in Washing
ton which he failed to keep. Mrs.
Robins, visiting at Southwest
Harbor, Me., said her husband had
received numerous threat* of
death from bootleggers in Florida,
their present home, unless he
ceased hia prohibition efforts. Col
onel Robins at on a time was a
orominent Bull Moose leader.
TENERAL SALES TAX
JF TWO PERCENT IS
LOW PLANNED HERE
Mississippi Plan Reported
Contemplated By Advo.
cates in 1933 Gen.
eral Assembly
WOULD WRECK MANY
STATE MERCHANTS
Warning Sounded By Wil.
lard Dowell, Secretary Os
Merchants Group, Who
Point* to Its Drastic Provi.
sions; Would Impose Levy
On Incomes, Too
Dnllr DUpnlrh nureou.
In ike s*r Walter Hotel.
AY J C hitSKKKVH-l.
Raleiga. Sept. 12. The Mississippi
general sales tax law. now in effect
there, which imposes a general tax of
two per cent on gross incomes from
almost all sources is slated to be in
roduced into the North Carolina
iGeneral Assembly when it convenes
in January, according to reports here,
Whether it will be introduced first m
he House or Senate has not been
earned, although opinion is that it
will probably be introduced first in
the Senate, since it Is agreed that
there will probably be more sentiment
in favor of this general sales taJt
‘here than in the House. But there is
little doubt that a bill modeled close
ly after the Mississippi law will be
introduced in one house or the other.
The reports have become so persis
ent that the Mississippi law is to be
:ome the model for the general sales
ax law to be Introduced in the 1933
General Assembly, that Willard
Dowell .editor of The Virginia-Caro
lina Retailer, official publication of
»he North Carolina Merchants Asso
ciation, has prepared an article deal
ing with the Mississippi law which
will appear in the next issue of the
(Continued on Pago Four*
Ousting Os Bonus Army
A Political Blunder Os
Increasing Proportions
By CHARLES P STEWART
Washington, Sept. 12 — IU President
Hoover should be hasten, and if it
were possible for him to? determine
just whet defeated him, an! it it were
cleer that Ihe depression was what
did it. at (east he could console hlm
eetf wi«) Os tfcpught **• vil "
NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THB SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA.
ONLY DAILY
HENDERSON, N. C., MONDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER 12, 1932
Legion Convention Is Opened
At Portland; Daniels Speaker
Portland. Oregon. Sept. 12. (AP>
- The American Legion s 14th annual
convention was opened here today
amid Ihe blaring of bands.
Called to ordered by nine-year-old
Henry L. Stevens. 111, eon of the na
tional commander, dressed in a dim
inutive Legionnaire uniform, the
great organization of ex-soldiers set
tled down to what is expected to be
the most momentous annual gather
ing since its founding.
DANIELS URGES LEGION
TO ELEVATE POLITICS
Portland. Ore.. Sept. 12.—( AP)--
Ftgtatlng men in the World War
NIL ME HAD YET
OF FLYING FAMILY
Motorboat Party And Plane
Hunt For Hutchinson*
In Far North
SENT DISTRESS CALL
George K. Hutchinson. His Wife. Two
. Daughters and Four Others In
Party Flykig From New
York to Inndan
Copenhagen, Sept. 12 —(AP> - A
motorboat party from the Pan-Am
erican East Greenland expedition
and a naval plane from a Danish
scientific expedition joined today in
the search for the "Flying Hutchin
sons" along the soutntast Greenland
coast, radio dispatches said.
The British trawler Lord Talbot
had failed today to find any trace of
George R Hutchinson, his wife, two
daughters and four other members
of his party, when it raced to the
poirot where they flashed distress
signals early yesterday.
The Hutchinsons had left Jullane
hab, bound for Angmagsallk, on an
other stage of their projected flight
from New York to London.
Cotton Drops $2
Per Bale In Big
Selling Movement
New York, Sept. 12 (AP) -Cotton
dropped about $2 a bale today to new
low levels for the gurremt reaction.
Tbe market was forced down by hedge
selling and liquidation from Wall
Street commission houses and other
sources.
Octctoer eontrac's sold at 7.70 cent*
a pound, off 31-35 a bale; December
at 7.74 cents a pound, off $2.05, and
March 3.05, off $1.95.
Traders reported that numerous
"stop kjee" orders were uncovered, ac
celerating tbe decline. Trade buying
was reported on a scale down.
tuaily inevitable.
Fe*hap» there is ropm for discussion
as to whether or not this administra
tion has dealt with the hard times to
the best interest of all the people, but
ft oatrhardly he disputed that A period
at deflation was unescapabie. due to
(Continued on Page Fourj^
of Catastrophic Boat Rfoc
■lljyH '■< x^v ' ■ j
I . ■
Here ia the scene of the disastrous explosion in Neva
York s East River, a-here the steamer "Observation,
was virtually blown to matchwood. The number ofl
known dead is expected to reach 40. besides nearly d
hundred injured. The craft, once used as a sight
mg steamer was ferrying a party of workmen tef
Riker a island, where they were employed on con *.i uc
tion work on the new penitentiary Rings show all
that remained of the craft after the
view of (he "Observation” made some time ago The
dock in ffcc foreground is where the craft had left mu
before the tragedy.
“asked no favois" and "they ask none
now." Josephus Daniels, of Raleigh. '
N. C., war-time secretaty of Ihe navy,
i told the National Convention of the
i American Legion here today,
j “More than that," he added. "th?y'
I wish all administrative policies, which j
have, been justly criticized, repealed
. find discontinued to the end that this
generous nation's policy to the vet
erans will not be tained by either ex- i
travagance or favoritism."
The solution of national economic
| problems rests alike upon Legion
naires and all other citizens, aniels de-!
j cl&rcd. asserting extravagance in ap- i
1 propinations “is not confined to veter-1
Democrats Open
Raleigh Offices ;
Raleigh, Sept. 12.—< AP)—Demo- ,
era tic State headquarter* were [
opene dhere today in the Sir Wal- (
ter hotel, as J. Wallace W’inbome.
of Marlon, State chairman, tald |
Mr. Wlnbome was busily engaged J
in Incidental details In connection
with the formal launching of the I
fall campaign, but took time out I
to announce that Franklin D. ,
Koose . elt's speech Wednesday I
morning will be broadcast over I
the radio. The Democratic presi
dential nominee will be speaking
at Tope . .
COUNTIES FAIL FO
GIVE RELIEF DATA
State 4 * Appeal For Federal
Fund* Held Up t Dr. Mor.
rison Announces
Daily Dispatch Harenn.
la the Sir Walter Hotel.
BY J. C. BA3KKRVIM,
Raleigh. Sept. 12.—While some of
the information from counties, cities
and towns is coming in almost daily
concerning the extent of their relief
bdtigities from (January I to Sep- 1
tember I of this year, not enough of
this information has been received so
far to give anything like a complete
picture, according to Dr. Fred W.
Morrison, State director of relief. Un
til ail this information has been re
ceived and tabulated by months, and
until the estimates from the various
subdivisions of the relief needed from
now until January 1, also by months,
has been received and studied, it will
not be possible to determine how
much the State will need to borrow
from the Reconstruction Finance Cor
poration for relief work. Dr. Mor
rison said.
"The'most difficult part of our work
yight now is getting anything like an
accurate report on what has been ex
pended for relief work in the various
counties, cities and towns month by
month since January 1.” Dr. Morrison
said. "In fact, many of these subdi
visions have kept no record of month
by-month expenditures for relief, since
appropriations have been made in
lump sums or funds have been raised
in lump sums.
?An additional problem is getting
figures on expenditures for relief
made by individual churches in all the
communities, by church agencies,
(Continued on Page Pour.)
weather
FOB NORTH CAROLINA.
. Fair tonight and Tuesday; slight
ly warmer tonight hi north mm*
mrtrff-p* west portions , _
an legi.iation.
"It has been rampant in almost
every line, in ways without justifica
tion." he declared. "The knife shoulc
ne applied wherever waste exists."
Declaring that legislation for bene
fit of veterans is under fire, the war
time navy secretary said "the answei
to criticism is an examination b>
your proper officials, who should take
Ihe lead to demand an end to all ex
penditures by which ’-eterans secure
bc:h pensions for disability »no salary
for service rendered, and every dol
lar for veterans that may be touched
(Continued on Page Pour)
BOLIVIAN INFANTRY
REPORTED BEATEN
14th Regiment Declared An.
nihilated; Brazilian
Federal* Failing
Asuncion, Paraguay. Sept. 12. -
(AP) Paraguayan forces, fighting a
three-day battle with Bolivians at
Fort Bouqueron in the Chaco region,
"completely annihilated" the 14th
Bolivian infantry regiment, and were
meeting witii further successes as
the fifth battle continued, the govern
ment announced today.
BOLIVIA SAYS SOLDIERS
RESISTING “VIGOROUSLY"
La Paz. Bolivia. Sept. 12. (AP)
Bolivian army headquarters. an
nounced last night that the battle in
the Choco region was still raging at
6 p m.. and that the Bolivian troops
were "resisting vigorously."
BRAZILIAN FEDERAL ATTACK
FUTILE, REBELS ANNOUNCE
Sao Paulo, Brazil. Sept. 12.—(API
No important progress has been
made in two months of fighting by
Brazilian Federal troops against the
Sao Paulo rebels, and the Federal at
tack on the Minas Gerades frotrt
seems fruitless, rebel headquarters
announced today.
TOTAL DEAD NOW 42
IN FERRY EXPLOSION
New York, Sept. 12.—(AP)—A
body taken from the East river
today brought the total of known
dead In the explosion of the labor
ferry “Observation" to 42. Twen
ty-one persons are still missing.
Manufactured Products
Valued At $864,310,530
Small Number of Plants Furnish Large Portion of Total;
18 Factories Had Output Worth More Than $5,000,.
000 Each; 3,800 Plant* Are Reported
Raleigh, Sept. t2.(AP>—During the.
last census year 179 manufacturing,
plants in North Carolina produced
goods valued at $864,310,53K), or almost
two-thirds of the total output of the
3.800 Tar Heel plants reporting, the
Department of Con«ervat.on and De
velopment announced today.
Based on federal census figures, an*
analysis 6y the State • department'
shows that a small number bf as tat-'
li&hments furnish a very large por
tion of the total' output, and a rela
tively small number of medium-sired
factories furbish employment to the
PUBLISHED EVERT AFTERNOON
EXCEPT SUNDAY
8 PICKETS ARRESTED
AFTER A CLASH WITH
HIGH POINT POLICE
Will Hf» Back?
Taw— .
-
Hert is former Mayor Walker as
he sailed from New York for
Europe on the S. S. Conte Grande.
Now all Gotham is asking if the
popular Jimmy really intends to
run for re-election. Walker stated
hi« anrpns{ sailing was due to
“dfif r.**»li rt
FARM PICKETS IN
THE WEST RESUME
HIGHWAY BLOCKADE
Leaders Meanwhile Discuss
Plans For Extending
Movement In Many
Other States
GOVERNORS 4 REPORT
CLOSELY EXAMINED
Make Direct And Specific
Recommendations to Pre*.
ident And Congress For
Agricultural Relief;, Strik
ers’ Views To Be Made
Known
Sioux City. lowa. Sept. 12. <AP> -
Pickets in the “farm war" for higher
produce prices resumed their at
tempt to blockade the highways in
this section today, while iheir lead
ers duetts*®*! plans Ao extend the
movement.
They fixed September 18 as a date
for information of a market asso
ciation designed to further their pur
pose. and said they hoped to operate
in lowa, Minnesota Wisconsin. North
Dakota. South Dakota. Illinois, Kan
sas. Montana. Wyoming. Nebraska,
Indiana and Oklahoma.
Meanwhile, other strike leaders
were scanning a conference report
of four mid-western governors and
representatives of five others direct
ed specifically to the President and
Congress, and recommending plans
for agricultural relief.
A statement outlining the attitude
of the strikers toward the recommen
dations was expected later from
Milo Reno, president of the Farm
ers Holiday Association.
greatest, number of workers.
Eighteen plants turned out products
worth more than $5,000,000 with
an aggregate value of 561 million
dollars, or 43 per cent of the total,
244 plants did business of $500,000 to
$1,000,000; 752 produced from SIOO,OOO
to $500,000' worth of stuff each; 944
from $20,000 to SIOO,OOO and 1578 from
$5,000 to $20,080 each.
The average Tar Heel plant did an
annvtal business at SIOO,OOO and em
ployed about 200 workers.' '' .
In 35 of the reporting e.rtablish
(Continued on rage Pour!)
6' PAGES
, TODAY
FIVE CENTS COPY
Four Women Taken Into
Custody As Officers Try
To Enter Truck Into
Mill Grounds
SEEK AGREEMENT IN
THOMASVILLE MEET
Governor 4 * Representative*
Meet With Chair Factory
Officials and Strikers;
Hanes Knitting Mills At
Winston-Salem Closed By
Walk-Out
H : ;.h Point Sept. 12. (A:*) High - ,
pickets, including four w.i'ii.-n, wt" »
arrested heie Icwiny ;*'• puli' *
brushed with 4((0 StchU .-Pk m«i
striker*, who attempt eil lr> prevent
the clearing of a drivev, i>■ i ) the
mill grounds.
The brush followed -< ■ -r by n'-
ficials of the mill that ponce clr:i r
a driveway leading into th.' plant
grounds.
Members of (he High Point polk e
department. .responding to the re
quest. attempted to make a wav
through approximately 4(H) picketing
strikers who recently walked from
'heir posts in protest against a wage
cut.
The strikers refused L> move in
compliance to police orders, and th;
officers threw a tear gas homh.
As the fumes spread the crowd
Sacked away slightly, while one wo
man ran to the bomb and picked i*
up. By that time, however, its force
liad been spent, and the picketers dis
regarded the orders to vacate the
.section about the gates.
Police then moved about the crowl
and arrested eight. They were charg
ed with obstructing a driveway, al
lowed bond and released.
HANKS HOSIERY MILLS AT
WINSTON CIAIKKn BY STRIKE
W»n«;on-'a:em, Sept. 12. GAP)—
Strikes of some employees in two de
partments of the Hanes Hosiery
Mills, which employ 1.300 persons left
all departments closed today.
Approximately 200 workers were
officially on si like when ihe decision
by the management to close the mills
was reached but there were reports
they would be joined by 400 others.
Although the first walk-out occur
red Thursday, the mills operated
through Saturday.
HOI'F. FOR AGREEMENT IN
TfiOMASYILLE /OONFI.. MCE
Thomasville. Sept. 12. <AP> Re
presentatives of Governor Ga-dnrr.
striking Thomasville Chair Co:. if iny
employees and their employers con
ferred here today In an effent to end
the month-old walk-out.
Governor Gardner, in R:ii> <gh. an
nounced that he would uni attend,
but would be represented by Capua
Waynick, editor of the High Point
Enterprise.
AH of the outside jnteri .*• nries
have expressed confidence 'ho' to
day’s conference will go f:v toward
procuring a settlement of th<- dispute.
The chair workers walked out four
weeks ago in protest again: t a wage
cut.
Death and Loss ‘
In Wake of Gale
Off Nova Scotia;
Halifax. N. »., Sept. 12.—(AP>—
The North Atlantic co&st line was
strenwn with wreckage today, after
math of a storm howling out of tb«
northeast, while two steamers wer*
wedged on rocks.
One of the victims of the gale,
which struck Nova Scotia Saturday,
the steamer Watford, rested on jag
ged rocks off Glate Bay. Two of her
crew are dead, but 37 others were
rescued and reached Sydney safely.
Sixty miles from St. Johns, tha
abandoned Swedish steamer, Peus
holm was breaking up on shoals of
Burnt Point. Parts of her cargo of
pulp wa* drifting a shore. AH mem
bers of tbe crew were saved.
M’LENBONTOHEAD
ELECTIONS BOARD
Durham Man To Succeed
Judge Biggs; To Start
Printing Ballots
Raleigh. Sept. 12.- (AP»—Nervous
printing presses are awaiting tbe se
lection of a new chairman for the
State Board of Elections before be
ginning their task of turning out
nearly a million State ballots for the
November elections.
Tbe signature of tbe ttiairman must
(Continued on Page Pour.) • t
a* 9 I

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