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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, September 16, 1932, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-09-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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"HENDERSON,
GATEWAY to
CENTRAL
CAROLINA.
YEAR
SOO HOSIERY MILL
WORKERS' 60 BACK
IN WINSTON PLANT
Accept President Hanet* Os.
frr To Return, But Seve
ral Hundred Others
Remain Idle
thomasvilTe CHAIR
group is split up
Strike Situation There Ap.
peart More Muddled Than
Ever After President's
Statement Not A3I Could
Be Taken Back Because of
Business Situation
Winston-Salem. Sept. 12.—(AP)—
Approximately 900 striking workers
-he H«ne« hosiery mills here put
S 4'i* »h»ir dissatisfaction of a wage
lucti-'n and returned to work hap
p. i. today.
Y»«'erday James G. Hanes, prest
itr’ f *ne mill told the strikers they
>u 1 re*urn today if they choee. and
offering to open the mill he promised
h- pa.-t will be forgotten" and that
rh* mill would follow its "usual po-
I of endeavoring to meet reason
»y.t wage prices.”
The returning workers entered the
mi’, with expressions of satisfaction
•hat the strikes backbone bad been
6-oken
They left approximately 300 of the
company s workers still tdla.
These still were adamant in their
pretest against the wage reduction
ttut caused teh strike September 8
and led to a complete shut-down of
the mill September 12.
THOMASVILUS SITUATION
MORE MUDDLED THAN IVEB
TVaiasville. Sept. 16. (AP>
Tbrffi*iville'» strike situation, in
Ti.ri :.000 employees of the Thornes
* Chair Company have been idle
lot weeks, was more muddled the"
rer 'o«tay by a split in the rank* 6f
the strikers.
A meeting, called to effect a set
t>ment of the strike was disrupted
l-* night when the workers divided
•hem-elves into two groups u a is
rjlt of a statement by T. A. Finch,
president of the company, that any
t?reement leached with the strikers
would be verbal only, and the com
ply would not agree to take nil
* 'rkers back, becuase of market con
ditions.
New Indictment,
On Embezzlement,
Given on Drake
P.i’eigh. Sept. 16.—<IAJF*>—An addi
"nnal bill of indictment against W.
B Drake, former president of the
defunct Raleigh Banking and Trust
Company, was returned by a Wake
county grand Jury today. Drake is
under bail on two previous indict-
Rl *nt«. and his bond will not be in
creased The new indictment charges
embezzlement. Drake is also charged
w 'th making false reports of the con
dition of his bank before it closed two
y*ars ago. He will probably face trial
:ti October.
fire does damage
IN ELIZABETH CITY
0 M Williams Storey Fartty Wrecked
And Other EslihMehmcnW
Suffer From Blaee
E izabe’h City. Sept. 16. —CAP)
E: r “ of undetermined origin damaged
'he r, jn Williams store in the busl
district here today, destroying
a ST 000 stock of goods and damaging
’h» building 50 percent.
High winds fanned the flames, and
f'H a while firemen believed that
'>'h»r buildings may be set.
->»veral other buildings were dam
darecoOktyhit
BY SERIOUS GALE
Mtil Boat* Held In Harbor
And Tide Rises Two
Feet At Piers
Manteo, Sept. AS- —(AP) —A gale
bed Dare county today, preventing
niail boats from leaving the harbor,
* id causing an unusually high tide,
*hich threatened damage to water
fr >rit buildings here.
"The tide rose two feet above normal
d was still rising. Merchants with
’ near the harbor prepared to
r ’'' , v<“ their goods up on shelves in
'• *“ the water entered the building*.
The steamer Trenton, which op
' 'tea between Manteo and Elisabeth
was held In the harbor, hut the
ovil was sent out by autotnoMla,
Batin
WLL I.aieep ■
or T «ASocuSif D mSSS*
INTERESTING PERSONALITIES AT LEGION CONVENTION
m p *
. h Em
< a JHr
l* HHBBI i v<*y' .
C ,2- n mmiiwßßßT I at aOBSih ~*.
■pPPJJBi , yr* . s . ■
v rr » 4-; •• ■ ; : : I Ai . W iwß
Wherevei the North Dakota Forty
and Light hand played during the
American Legion convention at
Poitland, Ore., Miss Audry Hog
lum, 18-year-old North Dakota
co-ed, left, attracted wide atten
"ion in the role of drum-majoress.
1 Her dress, girls, presented to her j
Maine Vote Inconclusive
But Does Indicate Trend;
Stewart Says In Analysis
By CHARLES P. STEWART
. Wasteugtoa Sept. 1A -Democratic
victory in Maine ia e portent G. O.
T*. political forecasters are are ex
*periencing difficulty in explaining
satisfactorily, from the Republican
standpoint, with next November's pros
pects in view. i
The Democrats naturally would
have pooh-hoohed the result, had the
commonwealth gone eaviiy for the
Republican state and congressional
STATE BUYS COAL j
SGENTS PER TON
Prices Range From That
Figure Up To 45 Cents,
All F. O. B. Mine
•Y J. C. BaSKERVII,L.
Dally Dispatch flnrrati,
la the Vr Walter Hotel.
Raleigh. Sept. 16. —The State of
North Carolina nas just purchased I
16.400 tons of coal, ranging in price
from 5 cents to 45 cents per ton. it
was announced today by A. S, Brower,
director of the Division of Purchase
and Contract. All of the coal pur
chased at these prices is slack coal
for use In State institutions that are
equipped with automatic stokers. This
amount of coal will fill all available
storage capacity at most of the in
stitutions and be sufficient to take
care of their fuel needs until Jan. 1
or even later. The freight on this coal
from the mines to Raleigh Is $3.06 a
ton. These prices are at the mine.
These prices are much lower than
any the State has yet been able to
get and are probably the lowest it
will be able -o get. Brower says.
These exceptionally low prices were
obtained at this time because most
mines are now overstocked with slack
coal and forced to move it at almost
(Continued on Page Four)
Dispatch Food Page
Removes The Worry
Os Family Meals
rxrfi week throughout the year,
on Friday evening, Henderson
houaewtvre have learned lo sii
down end rend at leisure the varied I
offering* of the most prominent
and program *tera of Hender- j
Spread out before her. eo that
comparisons may be easily made,
the housewife finds not oily the
widest selection of B»oda and eco
nsadrsl prions, but also delicious
and tempting means with otter per
tinent kifonneiion that every wo
maa finds Inti listing.
M.V. your food selection* from
Tho DISPATCH Market Basket
pngu ulniii quality, variety mid
ecanocy are presented by Heid*r
aon'e foremost foed merchant*. _
ONLY DAILY
’ newspaper published in this
HENDERSON, N. C., FRIDAY AFTERNOON, SEPTEMBER 16.1932
by a Parisian jeweler, is comprised
of 12,000 rhinestones.) At top,
former Secretary of War Jose
phus Daniels received a ilowcry
welcome upon hi 3 arrival at Port
land for the conventibn, Miss
Frances Kanzler, Queen of Rosa
lia, making the presentation. Be-
candidatea. With its swing in their
direction, the Democrats, of course,
are claiming the outcome ss an In
fallible Indicator of what is to come
six weeks hence.
Tho P;ne Tree vpters’ interests are
peculiarly their own. as a matter of
t actual fact. Their verdict always has
been deemed especially significant,
not because it is particularly repre
(Continued on Page Pour.)
j No Pauper Grave
For Other Woman
Sacramento, Cal., Sept. lA (AP)
—There will be no pauper's grave
for Miss Dorothy Mellette, Identi
fied as the other woman In the
life of Paul Bern, self-slain motion
picture executive, and husband of
Jeon Harlow, blonde film actress.
Coroner James R. Garlick today
said S3O had been found in the
purse of the woman, who leaped
from a Sacramento river steamer
two days after the body of Bern,
with two pistols nearby, was found
In the Hollywood home he deeded
to Mias Harlow at their marriage
two months before his death.
i
oMWoir
INJURED IN WRECK
Result Os Collision Os Auto,
mobile And Passenger
Train at Crossing
Kings Mountain, Sept. lA—
(AP)—John J. George, 60, Cherry
rllle real estate dealer and bond
salesman, was fatally injured, and
Ban com Sorrell, of Charlotte, was
seriously Injured whens north
bound Southern Railway passen
ger train crashed Into their auto
mobile near here today.
The crash occurred at a crossing on
the outskirts of Kings Mountain.
George died of hi 3 injuries in an
ambulance en route to Gastonia.
Sorrell, who received painful lacera*
1 (ions about the head and other in
juries, was said by physicians to be
[ seriously but not critically hurt He
• was taken to a Gastonia hospital
I Later Sorrell, certified agent for g
* life insurance company at Charlotte,
said he was driving, and that he saw
the train too late to avoid the crash.
Sorrell said the crossing is blind on
the right side, and that he failed to
see the train until he was less than
20 feet from the track. Then, he said,
he (attempted to cross the track before
the train but failed.
He bad almost negotiated the cross
ing, he said, when the engine crashed
into the rear of his machine, crush
ing it into splinters., George was rid
ing in the seat with Sorrell on the
side next to the origins, and bdre the
full force .of the impact.
low, Hanford MacNider, left, for
mer ■ commander of ths Legion
who recently resigned as ministei
to Canada, enjoys a good laugh
with Mayor George L. Baker of
Portland. The sudden illness of
MacNider’s three children cut
short his convention visit.
GARDNER TO LAUD
GOV.ROOSEVELT IN
HIS OWN SPEECHES
- — &
Governor To Assume That
Policy Rasher Than Be.
rating and Lambast.
ing Mr. Hoover
BELIEVES IT WOULD
BE MORE EFFECTIVE
Roosevelt's Record Is Such
as To Thrill and Attract
Voters, Gardner Says, Cit.
ing New Yorker‘s Party
Activities During His Ca.
reer
Dolly Dhpitrk Dnrriia,
la Ike Sir Waller Hole!.
BT J C. BASKERVILI..
Raleigh, Sept. 16.—Instead of lam
basting President Hoover and the Re
publican party for their dilatory tac
tics ana general dilly dallying for
three years before finally waking up
to (conditions, as most Democratic
speakers have done so far. Governor
O. Max Gardner is going to approach
the campaign from a different angle
when he will help formally to open
the campaign at the High Point rally
Saturday, he indicated today. He will
hold up Franklin D. Roosevelt as the
positive, dynamic leader and battler
for the rights of the people and as
the logical man to be elected Presi
dent at this time to overcome the
effects of the negative leadership of
Mr. Hoover.
In his speech Satrday at the bar
becue and rally being sponsored by
the club of Young Democrats of Guil
ford county at the High Point muni
cipal lake. Governor Gardner expects
to present Roosevelt to the people of
North Carolina and to show that he is
the essence of the type of leadership
needed in the United States at this
time and that he reprsents the anti
thesis of the Hoover school of politics.
“Everything possible has been done
by thoee opposed to Mr. Roosevelt to
represent him as an opportunist, a
demagogue and as lacking in force
and determination,” Governor Gard
ner said today. "But these ark deli
berate misrepresentations, as all who
know Roosevelt know.
"Ever since he was 26 years old,
Mr. Roosevelt has been battling
crookedness and corruption in New
York and New York City, It was then
(Continued an Page Four.)
GARNER CONFERS IN
NATIONAL CAPITAL
Washington, 9ept. J6.JAP>— Speak
er John N. Garner arrived here today
to confer with Democratic leaden as
to speeches during the campaign and
is to leave for New York tonight or
tomorrow.
LEATHER
FOB NORTH CAROLINA. . J
Generally fair tonight and Sat- *
urday; generally cooler In west
portions SnWrSagr.
SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA.
DISTURBANCE SCENE
KIN MINING
WAR NEAR CUM
*-
Moves Up From Southern To
Northern Illinois Ap
proaching Metropol- .
itan District
POLICE GUARDS ON
DUTY IN COUNTIES
Melee Occurs When Insurg.
ent Miners Protest Against
.The Reduced Wage Scale
And Seek Tq Dissuade
Workers From Entering
The Strip Mine
Braidwood. 111., Sept. 16.—( AP)—
The scene or hostilities In the Illinois
mine war. has shifted today from
southern to northern Qllnois, with
new flare-ups occurring not far from
Chicago’s metropolitan district.
Guards of metropolitan State police
were on duty in Will and Grundy
counties to prevent a repeition of
violence following clashes yesterday
in which a few of the opposing forces
were injured. Previously all of the
violence had occurred in the south
ern Illinois coal fields.
The melee occurred when Insurgent
miners protested against the reduagg
wage 3cale accepted by the United
Mine Workers of America sought to
dissuade working miners from enter
ing the strip mine of the Northern
Illinois Coal Corporation near here.
The pickets, estimated to number
800, had marched into this district
yesterday from Peoria area, an
nouncing they would seek to close all
working coal mines.
JOHNSTON SHERIFF
CLAIMED BY DEATH
Smithfield, Sept. 16,-16.—CAP)
Sheriff Robbins H Richardson, of
Johnston cbnty, died at his home beie
early today as a result of a throat
affliction, with which he had suffer
ed from several months.
Funeral services will be held Sat
urday here. The widow and three
children survive
Attempts Suicide
After His Wife Is
Reported Missing
Quincy. Msm, Sept. 16^—■: (AP)—
' Charles E. Dubois, a Tuckahoe,
N. Y- jewe’er, died at the Quincy
hospital today a short Mine after
he' had shot himself In the bath
room at a rooming house, where
he had been living as “Ralph An
derson.”
Quincy. Mass.. Sept. 16.—(AP)
Charles D. Dubois, of Tuckahoe, N.
Y.. was in a county hospital today
after police said he had attempted
suicide..
The disappearance of his wife,
Edith Dubois, has been under inves
tigation for several days.
The Quincy hospital said Dubois had
a bullet wound in his head and bis
condition was “Very poor."
Dubois, after police had been In
formed by neighbors that he had told
conflicting stories of the whereabouts
of his wife who disappeared from
their summer home at Great Herring
Park, on August 10. was arrested and
Imprisoned on a charge of murder.
Later, however, a district court judge
declined to issue a murder complaint
against Dubois on account of. insuf
ficient knowledge that a murder had
been committed.
Police continued to search for the
woman’s body, and in the course of
their investigation interviewed a
young Middleboro woman who had
been seen in the company of Dubois.
Romance!
There are not many writer*
who have the gift of teHing .
a romance as does Margaret
Wlddemer. She is at her best
in her latest story, that of a
girl who withdrew from life in
She war day* to return in 1932 *
to find herself a long lost ideal
Pre-War Lady
A Great New Sekal
Begins Tomorrow
~ Henderson
Daily, Dispatch
V X
lwL>"w
D tspatrh
New Red Caesar?
Wjttm. 1 "
v.
bOHIm
■* ■ JBgMfe*^
BMB—terrr-.-rj |
Following the discovery of a plot
to assassinate Joseph Stalin. Soviet
Dictator, by government agents in
Moscow, there is a persistent rumor
in European circles that Stalin will
shortly be ousted from leadership
and that War Commissar Voroshi
loff (above) will take the reins It
b further reported that sweeping
sbaacaa in the Soviet policy will fol-
Isw Stalin's fall.
VON PAPEN
IN l>. S.JJNOER FIRE
Political Opponent In Ger
many Brings Old Skele
ton From Closet
RECALL ASKED HERE
Was Charged With Unbecoming Mill
tar) Activities In United States
Before America Enter
ed War In 1»17
Berlin, Sept. 16.-~( AP)—The record
of Chancellor Franz von Papen in the
United States during the World War,
when his recall was requested by the
American government for his activi
ties as a military attache of the Ger
man Embassy, was cast into the po
litical broil here today by Joseph
Goebbles. lieutenant of Adloph Hitler.
The recall of von Papen by Captain
Goebbles was requested by Secretary
Lansing In 1915 in connection with
what were called improper activities
in military and naval matters, and
also on the charge that they were
connected with certain persons under
suspicion.
Goebbles in a speech at a meeting
at the Sports Palias last night at
tacked the chancellor for these ac
tivities and also for his alleged recent
efforts to conclude a Franco-German
military alliance.
LEGION FOR REPEAL
PROHIBITION LAWS
Portland, Oregon, Sept. 16.
(AP)—lmmediate payment of the
bonus and prohibition repeal were
overwhelmingly demanded by the
American Legion In its 14th an
nual National Convention, which
had been cl need today.
WORLD WAR VET AT
CORNELIUS SUICIDE
Cornelius, Sept. 16. CAP)
Max on Westmoreland, 34-year-old
World War veteran, was found
shot to death In bis home here to
day.
IL A. Goforth, a rural officer
who Investigated, said a shotgun
was near the body, and that the
death apparently waa a suicide.
Westmorelands had been In 111 v
health recently.
Selection of Jury
In Extortion Case
Is Constant Flux
Wilmington, Sept. 18 (AP)—Selec
tion of a jury to try two former city
officials on chargee of, attempting to
extort 520,000. from Mr*. Joule Kenan
Wieev wealthy Wilmington socifcy lead
er began in superior court here today.
Selection of the jury waa in a con
stant state at flux, and toward mid
aftemoon no definite number had been
chosen to try Parker Q. Moore and
J. J. Furlong, Sr., the defendants..
Jurors were being elected in sections
with the State and defense accepting
or rejecting possible jurors in groups.
PUBLISHED ■VERY AFTBRMOOB
sxcbpt axmoAT.
Germany Will Not
Join In Next Arms
Parley On Sept. 21
O PAGES
° TODAY
FIVE CENTS COP'S
All Nations Must Be Subject
To Equal Rules of Disarm,
ament, U German
Conception
WILLING TO GO AS
FAR AS ANY OTHER
But All Other Nations Must
Reduce Their Armaments
In Proportion, Note Sent
Arthur Henderson, Chair
man of Coming Confer
ence, Sets Forth •
Berlin, Sept. 16 (AP)C
Germany has informed the
chairman of the disarma
ment conference that she
will not participate in the
next meeting on September
21, the government an
nounced this evening.
Constantin von Neurath, in his no‘e
uent yesterday to Arthur Hendereon.
chairman of the conference, reiterat
ed the German view htat all the na
tions must be subject to equal rules
of disarmament, and that no discrim
ination must be shown.
The text of that note, published
here tonight, disclosed that it was a
repetition of the views expressed on
several occasions by high government
officials, to the effect that Germany
is willing t.o disarm to any level on
condition that all other nations re
duce their armaments to the same
point.
Rotary Will Meet
At Wilmington on
May 30 Next Year
Wilmington, Sept. 16.—(AP)—
Dan Herring, president of the
Wilmington Rotary dub, today
said District Governor Charles
Phillips, of Greensboro, had in
formed him Wilmington been
selected for the 57th district con- ,
vention to be held May 36-31 next
year.
The district Is composed of 52
clubs east of and Including Win
ston-Salem.
JESSE LASKY WILL
QUIT THE MOVIES
Pubiix-Kaenger Official To Go Back To
Independent Product V>n Alter
Dtsagreenw».it •
Los Angeles. Sept. 16.—(AP) —Jes-
se Lasky, whose daring exploits with
Publix-Seanger in the theatre gave to
film fans probably more screams than
any other man. soon will turn bade
to his first love, independent produc
tion, after more than a decade an
one of the industries major producers
A leave of absence which began
last May from Paramount wan
brought to an end by a curt an
nouncement by Lasky In which h«
alleged a breach of contract had been
committed.
It marks a separation of two of thn
oldest heads In the industry. Lasky
and Adolph Zuckor, president ot
Paramount. ,
oxforolnheld I
FOR SERIOUS CASE
I. E. Harris and Mrs. Layton,
Latter of Raleigh, In.
dicteri In Wake
Raleigh, Sef-t. IS.—(AP)—I. E. Har
ris. a justice of the peace at Oxford,
and Mrs. Bophie E. Layton, of Ra
leigh, today were indicted by a Wake
grand jury’ on charges of manslaugh
ter growir.g out of the death last year
of Miss GiJia Roberts, of Oxford, after
an allegedly illegal operation.
Mrs. T/ayton has been under bond
of 51.50 Q since last fall in connection
with the case, but Harris pre
viously, been regarded as a State’s
witness.
*Coi\ner L. M. Waring, of Wake
county, investigated the case when be
learned Miss Roberts was carried
from a hotel here during a fire and
at a time a guest was found dead.
She died in an Oxford hospital about
a week later.
Vhe coroner said Miss Roberts un
derwent an tilegal operation in a hotel
room here July 15, 1881. _

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