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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, September 20, 1932, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1932-09-20/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
FAIR RATE GROUP J
' TACTICS HURTING
ITS OWN EFFORTS
(Qoottnued rroen m« one.)
ever, that auch an appraieal could
Aot be made unless authorized by the
Jieat General Assembly, which also
would have to be appropriate about
(100.000 for this purpose, and that
from one to two years would be re
quired to complete the task.
The Corporation Commission is not
opposed to making an appraisal or
to having one made. It asked the 1931
General Assembly for an appropria
tion with which to make an appraisal
of utility company properties, but the
assembly declined to grant it. It did
enlarge its powers, however, by giv
ing it authority to demand from the
utility companies exhaustive and de
tailed figures concerning their pro
perties, operations and earnings. It
was maintained that with these fig
ures before it. the commission could
decide as to the fairness of rates al
most as well as if it made an ap
praisal of utility properties. The mem
bers of the commission more or less
agree that eventually the commission
should have an appraisal made as the
basis for fixing final rate schedules.
But it maintains that for the time
being some rate adjustments are pos
sible without this appraisal and these
should be made now.
If the Fair Utilities Rate Associa
tion had adopted u different attitude
and had given its assistance to the
Corporation Commission in its pre
sent efforts to reduce rates instead
of criticizing and opposing it. many
agree that the association would al
ready have assumed real significance
in the State But because of its ap
parent opposition to the present ef
forts to secure lower rates and its
Insistence that no rate changes be
made until after an appraisal can be
made many are doubting its sincerity!
The fact that C. A. Mees Its presi
dent. is an engineer who has in the i
past specialized in making appraisals,
for cities seeking lower rates is also
regarded as being detrimental to the
association. Even the Raleigh News
and Observer, for years an arch
enemy of the power companies and
ardent advocate of lower rates, has
reprimanded the rate association for
Its present tactics.
25,000,000 Destitute by
End of Winter Predicted)
(Continued irom Page One.)
sue of the magazine "Fortune." pre
dicting an army of 25 000,000 destitute '
before winter is over and declaring !
that preparation to care for them arc !
totally inadequate, deals with it as'
an emergency to be met within thej
next three months oi less.
The Washington consensus is that !
"Fortune" does not exaggerate great- j
ly. if any. '
President William Green of the Am- •
ican Federation of already has I
estimated that the winter's total of'
unemployed will teach 13.000.000. A. F. j
of L. spokesmen agree that an al-1
lance of v 12.u00.000 of dependents up- !
on this number is moderate.
Red Cross investigators at first ex-i
pressed the opinion that the 25.000.000'
figure was high but. upon considera- j
lion, inclined to accept it as reason-'
able, assuming President Green's cal- 1
culation to be accurate.
The Rev. Dr. John A. Ryan, direc- j
tor of the social action department of i
the National Catholic Welfare confer- i
ence. takes the most conservative view '
of any of the capital's recognized au- j
thorities on the subject.
"Most workers who lost their jobs
early in the depression must now be j
completely penniless, but by no means j
all of today's unemployed have been j
Idle for so long, a period.” he points I
out. "and the more recent victims of |
the crisis probably have some savings j
left. Besides, unmarried folk have'
been considerably haider hit than the’
married, which cuts down the mar- 1
ried which cuts down the roll of de
pendents.
' I would not place thy likely total 1
of the beginning of the winter's ut- ‘
tertv destitute much above 15.000 000. j
■possibly rising to 20.000.000 later."
Surprisingly, perhaps, workers for
W-- .
BIG SISTER In Proper Style ; 'y, By LES FORGRAVE
,_r LpO«s ]|'V~MOVJ THE. PROQIEM 6|TtWS 6«5v! TMey POT A-UU TMC CLAWS IUA T WE HAnIEKJ'T GOT A KETTLE
Li<E WED jfiA WERE., f HOW ARE WE G J I SAW HOV/ ©US KETTLE OF T WATER, BuT BUT THIS DvSHPAW DO )
tVERy CLAM >MTUE Wjj \TW THUM I TO GET
r-wer. there ooght wi more' ope to .so* s ] back at -That cause that nught sflultw' mjr starteo ( \3uddv' ■^s/f C4 '
[P ,® E °*J- CASi LOOK? /TP JE*‘ Lowe, ’MOO6UTP MAKE THE . -3 j? Jj
TWO \KiTAAT L.OT. y GOVXH \t ? . * l^epp eD \/ ILU A<se - COME OPEW • c
ANDY GOMP CAN AA _ bkHt? | l
ABSOLUTELY that he riuATjrvK'Vx ~ ** 1 I 1
HE FEELS Jlt * IS AEWC4K<
FOR. THE GOOD OF HiS WKM KM WM FOR A \’ 1 ! fffl ,1 !
COUNTRY THAT HE RUNS wffl |Ml| M °^U E TAK DOLLAR- _ { 'f ■ \Hi llr !I K
H IBffl E iT
S s3? =3r " HE RUNS nr WILL BE OW n»|' aB ■ ■ ■ j AiTbY
Y|§ PR£VU>EMT- • 1!TO> 4Hp *
*l| -i| FASMIONSB MOR*e »MC»E . Akfl tIT « , AE Mffwflfi'
FOR HIS EABLRN\ OF SUCCESS- YK AM If WrL Ml F *_-/
JEfrftZTW - 'F\ ?***•• . M)oi»wrry.
' ' WSfelwk
the Red Crow, which has been quite
freely accused of lukewarmth in Join
ing in relief activities acquiesce very'
readily in complaints of national neg
lect to prepare for the coming win
ter—though mindful to warn ques
tioners against quoting them in their
criticisms
"The federal relief rund of $300.-
000.000 for the season will work out,"
said & member of the organization's
staff "at sl2 per person, supposing
that 23.000.000 need aid.
“Obviously such a sum even if dou
bled or trebled locally, will not feed
any man. woman or child through the
winter.
"And what about shelter and cloth
ing."
The worker chanced to be a vet
eran of pre-war days, when the Red
Cross administered famine relief in
the Orient.
"Could a Chinese family," I asked,
"have survived on what it is proposed
to allot here, to last to springtime?"
"Yes a Chinese family could.” con
ceded the functionary, "but u Chinese
family is accustomed to living if it
can be called living exclusively on a
rice diet, and not much pf it. 1 would
n't like to try to make it do In this
this country, unless I were willing to
start a revolution."
As for a permanent solution of un
employment. however. "Not even the
ROOSEVELT CHATS WITH A FARMER
Bat*
Gov. Franklin D. Kooscveit, tour
ing the west, chats for a few mo
ments with a dirt farmer at Den-
SOVIET RUSSIA TO REMOVE STALIN?
1 ran I Hf 1 3
FStalin
Joseph Stalin, left, dictator of the
Soviets, is to be ousted from lead
ership in the near future, accord
ing to reports from Moscow. Fol
HENDERSON, (N.C,) DAILY DISPATCH TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 20 ISW
surface of 'the problem." says Presi
dent Green of the A F. of L., "has
been scratched.
"Shortening work hours is the first
step toward it.”
734 ARRESTS MADE
BY HIGHWAY POLICE
(Continued from Page One.)
trol through revenue for licenses,
fines, forfeitures and recovery of
stolen cars. Os this amount, more than
$11,400 went to the school funds of
the various counties ( in if J rues and
forfeitures, more than $6,000 went in
to the State highway fund for auto
mobile licenses, with more than $6,-
000 worth of stolen cars receovered.
Os the 734 arrests. 98 were for hav
ing improper licenses, 34 for having
no licenses. 84 for driving while drunk
40 persona for being drunk on the
highways. 41 for reckless driving, 54
for speeding, 45 for having improper
lights and 9 minors for operating
cars under age. Patrolmen investigat
ed 111 accidents in which 32 persons
were killed and 115 injured.
Among the 7.530 drivers giver. warn
>gs. 1,714 were far parking on the
highway. 434 for h .gging thf* road,
'O2 for "hearse driving." or going too
s’, w and 594 for so'T.ng.
I ver. The farmer told the Demo
! eratic presidential candidate that
ho once was a Republican.
'f
p pP'
Voroshiloff x
lowing widespread changes in the
policy of the Soviet government,
he is expected to be succeeded bp
War Commissioner Voroshilofl.
THE OLD' HOME TOWN Registered V. 8. Patent Office By STANLEY
/now, BOYS, I DONT MIND YOUr")
(IHPr DID/4T A TAt-KIN* POLITICS- BUT „
) < =5 T TO 1 YOU VE SOT TO KEEP TOUR )
V TAfctFP OH / !■', > TARIFF ARGUMENTS ABOUT)
WHEN THE PITCHED BATTLE OVER.
TARIFF ON SARDINES REACHED THE V===?
POINT NMHEISEF THE BoYS BE=<SAN "THROWN ..
THE SOLID FAULTS ,NC*\H BA*TER X
1 CALLED A HAL-T ©IBS! Lee W. BUnky Central Pm* 9-20-32.
DID YOU KNOW? - --By R. J, Scott~
KING lOUK TVT f
OF FRANCE.
-'TfwKER.INCi WITH luX M
'SST TVEI ftA
B 2»LIKtC AND I MASHARULUMBWE
revs ft jT 'Tribe m northern / .jw
Y —RHODESIA BELIEVE
\K id*? cars op BuTffe. , ntonTAnA •
WCRB PftOV'CED wiTVI EXTERIOR. HOOKS ON WHICH
C/C. 1 ERS I'j.'iG THE-lR WHEELS
NuHSkUu^
Parts oi= speech^
Dectveß PiEcf .
BRokea, En&|£ *
RocrPT WVAr . n •
BAKggv.cn-
DEAR. NOAH=
OCEAN ACTS UP v-ic
does -the sur ; BCA fc 7
CANOE t Ell
R B.NE-rn_eT &N; \
CAMDEN, N.T |
Wile Preserve.,
It is time to d.stjij ■ _
broom and buy am» ,*. .
worn out tools do not mala lor ♦:
ficiency
dispatch
WANT ADS
Get Results
.FOR SALE TWELVE
light bulbs at 25c
I Daily Dispatch Off: a
i FOR RENT-TEN Room jp, ..
, furnished. Dcstiable ,
; ted for Aic.jls hrat. Apj..> .
Singleton. So. Poster. \., , .
lU4.
DRESS MAKING AM < T.ol. ji
collar and cuff .-•-•. r Am
the -sewing ln.e See M: h
Walston. Singn M u u.t.-
Phone 5.
TOR RENT THREE NIUE ; ItM
heated rooms, close ;n. w.'.t. .
out meals. Phcm 125 S v. ;
Street. 2 ...
TOBACCO FARMERS USE
newspapers to store yon. <ui-.
bacco on. <kt then. :.t : .
Dispatch office for lo< j--r 1.,:.^
FOR RENT 3 GOOD ; ?. :<j
brick apsrim' n Tarn*: A
at sl6 00 per month A: j ■ V.
C Cates.
WANTED: MAN OR WOMAN
rig to introduce P**;:. .> ?.I v :-:r
$35.00 p'-r week an,. • •
Eureka Mfg. Co.. E ■ .. j.-
111.
FOR RENT -2 GOn!
houses cn. Pettigicw S: i" :
week. These h'ou'. •
and Ugh Ls. Apply V.
WANTED—I 2 0R 16 GINV.L i-A2i
double barn : w
be in good condition ir.*s I *-
right. Write Box i 3 li ne- -
FOR SALE- CAFE AND ULiM'r
etand consisting of ail re- - : > !A
ftures for business. E*i npu: re * -
than 6 months old. C s’ »1 *•
sacrifice for cash. Nome*.-.
ner. :
STENOGRAPHER DESIRES PER
manent or temporary jios:ti..n '•'■a
eral office work desired Accurate
fast and willing worker, <’>
years experience. Exctihr.! Xr
ferencee. Addreis, •'Sten..gi>i'k < ' r
Care Dispatch. f
SEABOARD AIR
LINE RAILWAY
TRAINS LEA\ f E IIENPERsON
AS FOUX)WS
No. NORTHBOUND
108—8:48 A. M. for Richmond,
Washington. New York, connect
log at Norlina with No. 18 ar
riving rortsmouth-Nnrfolk 12
P. M. with parior-dlning car
vto*. .
4—2:52 P. M. for Rkhmond
and Portsmouth, Waslilngtan
New York.
|#*_9:4B r. M for Richmond
Washington and New l»»rk.
•—8:28 A. M. for I'ortsniouth
Norfolk Washington. New York
No. SOUTHBOUND
181—6:43 A. M. for Savannah.
Jacksonville, Miami, Tampa, St
Petersburg*
8—3:45 P. M. for Raleigh, San
ford, Hamlet, Columbia. Savan
nab, MlamJ Tampa. Si. Petri*
burg.
107—7:06 P. M. for Raleigh. Ham
let. Savannah, Jacksonville
Miami, Tampa. St I’rU-n.hurg
Atlanta, Birmingham.
6—l:2s A. M. for Atlanta, Birm-
IngtUDY, Mimphla.
For Information call on H *•
Pleasants DFA., Raleigh, N C
or M C ’ Cappo, TA . Ucndervun
N. O.

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