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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, November 11, 1932, Image 1

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ARMISTICE DAY
I HENHEKSON,
I GATEWAY to
I CENTRAL
CAROLINA.
NINETEENTH YEAR
ARLINGTON CEREMONY HEADS AMERICAN ARMISTICE
*************** TT
W ar Debt Problem Reopened As Fpreign Nations Fail To Pay JJ. S.
11l EKING
JIN INTERNATIONAL
DEBT DISCUSSION
Greece Fail* To Pay And
Hungary Has Advised
Payment In December
Cannot Be Made
BRITISH NOTE SENT
PRESIDENT HOOVER
Secretary Stimson Says No
French Debt Note Has
Been Received, But Paris
Hears Negotiations Have
Been Begun With United
States On Subject
n. Nov. 11.—(API A
• ' m Great Britain, presumbaly
■ ; ,»t international debt As
tlrei'ce's) failure to pay and
.1 ■ « no*ice she cannot meet her
.* m-taiitnent. today renewed
•_> »ir cieb» oroblem.
• :c..»rv Utimson told newspaper
s'- t \- thtt the British debt note
-* • cr, submitted to President
•hat It wotjld not be made
■ ‘ r v, days ab least.
•v Stimson said he has not
»■: . note concerning debt from
government.
:rcti-r.t with a report from Eng
' < note had been sent the
>• I'e.-. Sir Ronald Lflihdsey,
ambassador. conferred’
--miv with Secretary Stfririioh.
k ' rr h fee lined comment.
if-eiwards Secretary Mills ah*'
•' the action ot Greece ana
K ;;mv. • ‘if
' - -t.-l *he Treasury failed to re
• payment of $2:17.000 of
• t i and $217,920 of interest that
- i .*> yesterday. And. he added that
'■‘ ,v ! '»il notie<) the government
s '" not have the necessary fore
■ exchange with which to make the
Py• ii>-r• .* due the United States on
‘IS. This amounts to $12,282
‘lt rip t | and $28,444 of interest.
I R \N( F. IS NEGOTIATING.
s\V REPORTS IN PARIS
Nov. li (AP>—ln a semi
luarter it was said today that
probably" France has sound
• ‘ *n« American government.con
-2 wxi debt negotiations, par
< \ with a view to suspending a
interest payment due De
•• -r 15.
•leji. it was said, is justified by
’hat at the Lausanne confer
rrar.ee agreed to the American
< - and somewhat in conse
’ "f the Hoover moratorium ac
i • * m appreciable reduction o*
'•:• nations claims against Ger
h rman gridders
INJURED IN WRECK
. ' > v S C.. Nov 11 <AP>
, !• nnvir. University freshmen
id i\'i r s were injured, one ser.
’••'•'• hc;r bus collided with a
. n n m ie. from here today as
. WH =* to Columbia for
. w. h "hi- University of South
> fr’.^h.
General Assembly Might
Legalize Beer And Wine
IHanat.-h ftwrea*.
p.. V J s . f "'SKKIIVILI,
x, T. • f,v - 11 H °w soon beer
; ~Th < '»r.lina? Will it be poe
, . ", l ’ ,l k ,h '“ ff *>t on a brass rail
1 < -ouple of schooners. B1U”
*hV m, I,V1 ,V 10,1 f,namin K fluid acroan
■nr- , , V v by ST>me tim - *n Jan
•hr ,t, -• ::'“ ar >- 1933 - °r will beer
a . ‘"u h ( ' arolin ' ’ns have to wait
Th* * h ’ lp I,>n * er?
are , “nlhuaiastlc o <*r-want»ri
C» r ,»jV. Piloting that „ e IMS
- tl »* Turlington Act
. ■ bone-dry protuh*-
*. c .h- * p€rm,t the sale of
r > North Cant*
JmtiterHmt
rCLL UUUD WTMJi njtYICB
or THB ABBOCIITIO ntMr
Hia/@
-■—ssssesss haag** ■ 4*.^—
Wfffimk ARMISTICE SIGNED, E$D OF THEWAR!]
BERLIN SEIZED BY 1 EVOLUTIONISTS;
V&m 1 NEW CHANCELLOR I EGS FOR ORDER;\ ■A J E|
wBBSM,.2I£uMM^ EIi A J° Holland) */l
Fourteen year s ago a war-sick nation
yelled itself hoarse with sheer joy
when such headlines as those above
screamed across every newspaper in
RESPONSIBILITY IS
ON THE DEMOCRATS
TO: DELIVER GOODS
I '
If They Don't, There Won't
Be Left In 1936
To; Apologize, Wash
ington Thinks
CAN BE NO MORE
MUDDLING THROUGH
Easier To Explain Hoover's
Defeat Than Roosevelt's
Election; Depression Lies
At Bottom of Whole Diffi
culty; Prohibition Is De
clining Issue
By CHARLES F. STEWART
Washington. Nov. 11.—A few wild
whoops of Democratic triumph no
doubt are pardonable.
Soon after this first burst of en
thusiasm! however, the country cer
tainly will expect the party of Jef
fersonianism to begin showing an ex
ceedingly sober sense of the enormous
Tesopnsibility it faces.
Whether or not Democratic leadship
has reason to congratulate itself in the
present juncture is a question no one
can answer intelligently until two,
i ■
(Continued on Page Seven)
llna by mldOanuary. This is. of course
tend on the assumption that the
December session of Congress wil re
peal or modify the Velsteed Act to
permit the legal sale of Hght wines
and bser throughout the United States
On the- face of things, especially since
the overwhelming victory of the Dem
ocrats on Tuesday, *
serves* believe that the
slon of Congress, in spite of the many
in it, will at least mpeal
or modify the Volstead eet to permit
the i«gai sals of wines and beer. It
is not thought that the wete <**
ter eoouglletesogth In this Deesasb*
£ XOontteued <* P*f
ONLY DAILY NEWSPAPER 1
Welcome Headlines That Signalized Pead| 14 Years Ago
tho. country- The big guns on the
western front had finally been silenced •
At left, below, is ( the railway c4r In
which the Armistice wqs signed. At
Thousand Estimated Dedd
From Caribbean Hurricdne
Storm Heads Out To Sea Leaving Trail of Wreckage
and Destruction on Land and Sea; Only One Vessel,
An American, Reported Wrecked Thus Far
.■ (By the Associated Press..
Theten-dhy old Caribbean hurricane
headed over the Atlantic today, leav
ing in its wake an estimated 1,000
or more dead in central Cuba and a
trial of wreckage and destruction on
lahd and sea.
First reports from Cuba said most
of the province of Camaguey was de
vastated and part of Santa Clara and
Oriente province were damaged hy the
disturbance, which cut a wide swath
through the island Wednesday.
Nearly all the dead were reported
from the Caribbean coast village of
Santa Cruz del Sur. in Camaguey pro
vince. The hurricane blew up a tidal
wave that virtually destroyed the
town, trapping its residents during
the night.
The latest ship reported in danger
is the United States Navy tug Scioto,
disabled by the storm 280 miles north
Roosevelt
<
Put To Bed
With Gold
Albany, N. Y.. Nov! 11.—<AP>—
President-elect Roosevelt today was
gpnfined to his bed with a slight cold.
cancelled his week-end trip to
Hyde Park to rest at the executive
mansion. A report from the mansion
said he did not have a fever. Mrs.
Roosevelt, who arrived toady from
New York, advised him to rest in bed
over the week-end.
Mr. Roosevelt said yesterday-that he
had contracted a cold last Tuesday
on Us motor trip from Hyde Park to
New York City, but her added he be
lieved be had tossed it off.
- He rode In an open car that day
and during most of the trip was Uflne
while he waved his hat to the
crowds in the villages along the way.
|fr. /Roosevelt, who conducted a
Buffet arduous campaign, said the day
after his election, “I paver fait bat
ter." but added be was tired end ex
pected to “catch up" with his sleep
during the following week. ,
.-JUtPERSON, N. C., FRIDAY AFTERNOON/NOVEMBER 11, 1932
mMn Stspatrh
PUBLISHED
P 4 THIS | SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA.
lower right,- ftwttfa’‘sle c&r' as MaF
«hal Fetch received the German
behind the French
of Nassau. Rihnmas.
The Sclotb serit out SOSf signals just
before midnight last night, and early
today the Navy Department at Wash
ington ordered the submarine Dolphin
and four vessels in destroyer division
No. 2 to the rescue. They were 40 miles
away.
The storm thus far has wrecked
only one vessel, the American schoon
er Abundance off Jamaica. Its crew
was rescued. Several vessels were
damaged, later proceeding on their
way or waiting assistance.
No Longer Need# Help
Key West, Fla.. Nov. 11 (AP)—The
naval tug Scioto, which last nigftt sent
out an SOS call today reported to the
Charleston S. C. naval base that »he
no longer was in need of assisstance,
according to a radio message inter
cepted at the naval radio station here.
Aged Farmer Near
City of Charlotte
Slain By Stepson
Huntersville, Nov. 11. — (AP) — Joe
White, 72, former Huntersville police
man and father of Moee White, Fed
eral prohibition agent, was shot to
death at his home here today by his
stepson, Marshall Wester, 28,
Wester surrendered to Mecklenburg
oounty police and said he shot in—
self-defense. He was taken to the
county jail at Charlotte on a warrant
charging murder.
Wester told rural officers White
had bean drinking for several days
and that the elder man was “mad”
with him because of a political dif
ference. He said they argued at a
friend’s home last night, and that
White had struck him.
Today Wester said White advanced
on him and a pistol. Wester said
be then fired.
WEATHER
FOR NORT HCABOUNA.
. Generally Mr and oelder te
nlgfcfc aaaoep* P»tefai date In «*-
trass agpt P«k« earty tonight;
heavy faet t» uW and light to
tenvy la eait poettan fafafc)*r**
***,***». fa am* am*
lines, the (memorable Incident that
brought the World war to a cloje on
Nov. 11, 1918—14 years ag<>.
Defense In
Casey Case
Concludes
Kinston. Nov. 11.— (AP).~The de
fense rested today* in the trial of Her
man Casey And the Stat« began its
rebuttal t testimony in an effort to
convict the 46-year-oid Lenior man of
murder of J. C. Causey, Suffolk, Va.,
lumberman.
Casey, who was testifying in bis
own behalf when court was recessed
yesterday, did not resume the stand
today, but a number of witnesses were
introduced in an effort to establish his
claim that he was several miles away
from the scene of the killing at the
time it is alleged to have taken place.
One witnesse testified he saw Casey
in Dover, several miles from the spot
where Causey’s body was burned in
his automobile, at noon on July 4,
1930. Other witnesses have testified
that the fire was discovered at 11:45
a. m. • •
fourarekilled
AS PLANE WRECKS
Little Hope Held For Fifth,
A Child, In Tennessee
Tragedy
Kempvillk Tenn., Nov: li.—
Four.persons were killed and another
injured so seriously little hope of re
covery was helg when their airplane
crashed in a woods near here about
midnight last night.
Two of the dead were identified as
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Hirt, of Fort
Lauderdale, Fla. A young woman, pre
sumably their daughter, and a boy
about five years old were the others
killed. The injured was a girl of about
four years. The children were believed
to be grandchildren of the Hlrts.
Dr. C. W. Robinson, who was with
the searching party that found the
demolished plfaie in the woods on the
edeg of a steep hillside, eaid four
of the occupants apparently ted teen
killed Instantly. The little gtrl wan
unconscious and it was feared el* suf
fered a cqnscussion of the brain.
Dr. Robinson said Mr. and Mrs.
Hirt were hbout 50 < r 55 yens* old,
and the younger woman in the early
XTs.
The plane landed at Sky Harbor,
near .Nashville, yasterday afternoon
from Chicago, inquiring about leath
er conditions between Sky Hkrbor and
Atlanta, Mr. Hirt, the pilot, said be
Mas ea route to Florida. ] ,
PUBUIHjBD *V*ET AJTTWUIOOM
■XCRPT SUNDAY.
Newly Completed
Tomb Os Unknown
Dedicated There
Offers Stevens as
Secr~* o *-’ r of War
Fayetteville, Nov. 11 (AP)—The
Fayetteville Observer today advo
cated thfe appointment of Henry L.
Stevi* a, of Warsaw, paat national
commander of the American Le_
glen as secretary of war.
The paper reviewed St« vene* hta-
Iwj' and advanced quallifcations of
the Legionnaire, strew *ig his re.
cent stand against the immediate
payment of the bonus.
The Observer said that a man
‘with the stamina to make himself
temporarily in popular by refusing
to approve what he considered an
unwise request of the rank and file
of the organization he headed had
qualifications among the best for
appoVitment to the position.
Winter
Strikes
Tonight
Atlanta. Ga., Nov. 11.—(AD—
The South buttoned up its over
coat today In preparation for the
coldest weather of the season.
Forecasts promised freezing
temperatures almost to the gulif,
with IdlMng frosts predicted In
many sections. The day was raw
and chilly, but the worst is yet to
come.
Near freezing weather was re
ported today from Memphis and
Nashville, with lows of 84 during
the night.
The seaboard was promised ex
tremely cold weather, light to
heavy frost was indicated as far
south as north Florida.
Fair and colder weather was In
dicated for tomorrow.
DIES FOLLOWING
WIFE'S FUNERAL
Elizabeth City. Nov. 11.—(AP)—D.
W. Etheridge, of Manteo. who suffer
ed a stroke of paralysis Monday after
the funeral of his wife, Mrs. Minnie
Etheridge, had been held Sunday, died
today. Funeral arrangements have not
yet been completed.
Armistice Is Observed
Throughout This State
<By the Associated Press.)
North Carolinians today in every
part of the State paid tribute to Am
ericans who served In the World War,
honoring the living and memorializing
the dead. §
Special celebrations of various kinds
occupied the stage in almost every
community in the State. Hundreds of
schools hod special programs and in
some counties the final contests in
the annual State Legion oratorical
eontest for school ohlldren were held.
At Wake Forest this afternoon Car
son-Newman and Wake Forest clash
ed in football as a holiday feature
while at Raleigh the North Carolina
State freshmen played Louisburg Col
leg*. Several other football games by
colleges added to Interest in celebra
tions over the State and scores of high
school games were played.'*' *
Raleigh,- where ell State offices
closed for the day, a legal holiday by
State statute, a parade was held in
the morning and Bryce Beard of Salis
o PAGES
° TODAY
FlVtl CENTS CAES
Legion'* National Comman
der Takes Opportunity
To Urge Adequate
Preparedness
BONUS ARMY ECHO
IN HURLEY SPEECH
Washington Drum Corps
Threatens To Walk Out
on War Secretary Because
of His Part In Eviction of
Veterans; Tribute To
Woodrow Wilson
Washington, Nov. 11.—(AP) — In
ihe soft silence of Arlington Ceme
tery’s historic hills, the nation and
capital today renewed their homage
to the unknown soldier on the four
teenth Armistice anniversary.
Dedication of the newly-finished
tomb that replaced the plain marble
slab under which the unknown, sol
dier was laid to rest in 121, and a
memorial tribute to Woodrow Wilson
under the vaulted arch of the na
tional cathedral, were parts of thq
observance.
The day was looked on by Louis C.
Johnson, national commander of the
American Legion, I na speech prepared
for delivery at the tomb, as emphastz
the necessity for preparedness.
“Loyalty to our departed comrades
makes us stress this necessity for a
reasonable army and preparation.”
was Johnson’s expreMldn, continuing
later to add:
"The young manhoods Os America
that went forth a;xd*qgde and n half
ago to represent this country nn the
field of battle have erected a monu
ment to themselves that shall live as
long as the history of this nation is
pursued.*’
Appearance of Secretary Hurley on
(Continued on Page Ftve.)
Seventh Death In
Kentucky Election.,
Is Now Reported,
Pineville, Ky.. Nov. 11. —(AP)—
Kentucky’s death toll from election
day shootings rose to seven today with
the death of Paul Millerr.
Miller, an election of ft cer, was ond
*of four men who were shot and
wounded Tuesday In a, general gun
fight at a polling place, at Four Mila,
Belle county. Andrew Sillier died oC
wounds the next day.
4 In additio nto the several dead, sev
eral others were woxinded In Ken
tucky’s election day 'violence.
bury. new State 'Legion commander,
spoke.
At Greensboro* a parade participat
ed in by some tvr o score organizations
reviewed by Ad- Gen. J. Van B. Metis
and Col. l>on Fjcott of Graham, com
mander of the 120th Infantry, North
Carolina National Guard, was follow
ed by a menu rial service with Judge
Wilson Wartie-k as speaker. Burling
ton's Legion >j leathers took part In the
Greensboro celebration.
Goldsboro -decreed that every phase
of business and industry stop for five
minutes at ,11 o'clock, the period be
ing ushered in by ringing of firs and
church befit. Legion members station
ed at int's.-vals throughout the city
sounded “tespe/' President A. D. Wil
cox of Louisburg College was the
speaker at memorial exercises.
At Greertvilie Major L. P. McLendon
spoke.
Hickory was putting on in all-day,
_ sssamaA ic 2m \

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