OCR Interpretation


Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, October 29, 1934, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1934-10-29/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE FOUR

PAGE FOUR
HENDERSON OAILY DISPATCH
Established August 12, 1911.
Published I.very Afternoon Ex<«pt
Sunday by
HENDERSON Dlbi’AXCli CO., INC.
at 109 Young Street
HENRY A. DENNIS, Pres, and Editor.
AI. L. FINCH, Suc-Treaa and Huh Mgr.
IELEPHOXES
Editorial Office 500
Society Editor 610
Business Office 610
The Henderson Daily Dispatch ia a
member of the Associated Press,
Southern Newspaper Publishers Asso
ciation and the North Carolina Press
Association.
'Hie A. ociatod Press is exclusively
entitlc'd to uae for republication all
news dispatches cii.diterj to it or not
otherwise credited m this paper, and
also the local news published herein.
All rightsof publication of special
disputelum lu-iein are aiso reserved.
SI IJS( KII'TIOS KATES
Payable si rielly in Advance
One Yeni $5.00
filx Months 2.50
Three Months 1-50 i
One Week (by Cat net Only) ... .15 i
Per Copy
NOTH I. TO SUBSCRIBERS
Look at the printed label on yodr
paper. ’ih<- date* thereon shows when
the Hub.-.eription expire.-,. Forward your
money in ample time for renewal.
Notice date on label carefully and if
not correct, please notify us at once.
Subscribers desiring the address on
their paper changed, plea.se state in
their communication both the OLD
and NEW address.
National Advertising Representative*
BRYANT, GKII I ITII ANI»
Bit I N'SON, INC.
0 Ea t 4 1 1 1 Sir., i. Now York
230 N. Michigan Av,\. Chicago
201 Dovenshire street IV.. ton
General Motor llldtj., Delink
Walton Building, Altnnta
Entered at the pad. office in Hender
pon, N. ih second da . mail matter
w-«i
mtt mi tart. • Uftt mi* st >iV—fate llteM
A GREAT SCHOOL MASTER: O
God. thou hast taught, me from my
youth: and hitherto have 1 declared
wondrous work Psalm 71:17.
TODAY
TOD AYS A N NIV ERS A KIES
1656 Edmund Halley, English as
tronomer, born. Died Jan. 14, 1742.
1740 James Boswell, celebrated
[English biographer of Dr. Johnson,
born. Died June 19, 1795.
1775 Jean H. Faribault, pioneer of
the mid-west, fur trader and lead
merchant, influential in maintaining
peace with the Indians for many
years, born in Canada. Died at St.
[Paul. Aug. 20, 1860.
1781 (150 years ago) Robert Hoe,
•firth of the noted American family of
printing press manufacturers, a far
mer’s son who landed at New York
penniless, horn in England. Died
Jan. 4, 1833.
1795 John Keats, famous English
poet, horn. Lied Feb. 23, 1821.
1815 Daniel I>. Emmett, who form
ed ttie first American ministrel com
pany, the “Virginia Minstrels,” author
of "Dixie,” J.XSU. first sung in New
York and two years later the war
song of the Confederacy, horn in Ohio.
Died there, June 28, 1901.
1839 Justus 11. Rathbone. the
Washington government clerk largely
instrumental in founding the Knights
of I'vthias. born at Deerfield, N. Y.
Died in 18.H9,
TODAY IN HISTORY
1618 Executed Sir Walter Raleigh
Englished colonizer, statesman and
writer.
LSI I First steam warship, the Rob
ert Fulton, launched In New York
City.
1821 The U. S. sloop of war Hornet
dispatched .»> West Indies In effor.
to stop piracy so general there, eu|r
tured piratical ship, (tie Moscow.
1911 Belgians forced Germans hack
by Inundating the country.
1923 Turkish Republic inaugurat
ed.
TODAY*# HI ItTII l» \YS
Dr. Lewis It. Alderman of (lie U. S.
Office of Education, born at Dayton.
Oreg., 62 years ago
'Amos \V \V Woodcock, president
of St John's College, Annapolis, Md.,
onetime Prohibition bead, horn at
Salisbury, Vbl , 51 years ago
1' S. Senator Alvsh B. Adams of j
Colorado, born at P< I Norte, <N*l , 69
years ago.
'U. S. Senator I,ester J Dickinson
of lowa, horn at Derby, lowa. 61 years
«ge>.
TODAY S HOROSCOPE
Here we have an emotional tem
perament. There will probably be
great attention to small details, which
is one of the saving qualities of this
degree. Added io this, the heart ap
pears to he centered in the task, and
with this combination a good posi
tion will probably be achieved through
patient and perhaps laborious toil.
ANSWERS TO
TEN QUESTIONS
See Rock Patye
1. On<* in which candidates for elec
tive offices are nominated.
2. Protestant Episcopal.
3. “It is finished!"
4. King Louis XIV of France
V Portugal.
6. 90* North.
7. Celebrated French damutie com
pose r.
Australia.
!>. The high mammals including man
monkeys., and lemurs
JO. Daniel Defoe.
| JMZJggg- . —”
THE WORLD WAR 20 YEARS AGO TODAY
Told in Pictures by CLARK KINNAIRD
Cnpyrinht 1934, Central Pre<i Aiv>ciation .
O
A German, Gea l.imon von Sander* (»rro»), cotuHuulr J tka
Turkish Army.
*n Yfnrn Ag* Tvd'tu: There hud oeer, no wf wav, but •
Turkish fleet and a Russian squadron fought a battie io th* Klack
jiftei whit:. h- v' nous Ottoman fleet bembarvled two Russian ytties.
'1 iic slruggia w* L rmans agai st Belgians aod British «
Uiancirrs reached a crisis,
o-* "Tadoj ut Dct/’
1 Today is the Day I ~
»r CLAM BHHAnU) J4W J J
osmoum,c«iaina.Aa K im,N [gAF lj ** * 7
Monday, October 29; 3o2nd day of
the year. Heshvan 19, 5695 in Jewish
calendar. 57 days tiil Christmas.
Morning stars: Venus it ill Nov. 18*,
Mars and Jupiter. Evening stars:
Mercury it ill Nov. 2>, Saturn, Moon:
last quarter tomorrow- Zodiac sign:
Scorpio.
TIIE WORLD WAR DAY-BY-DAY
Oct. 29, 1911 For once, the expect
ed happened in the war. Turkey was
sucked into the war whirlpool. This
it; the official Turkish version of how
ii came to pass:
“While on Oct. 27 a small pari of
the Turkish fleet was maneuvering on
the Black Sea, the Russian fleet,
which at first confined its activities to
following and hindering every one of
our movements, finally, on the 29th,
unexpectedly began hositilities by at
sued the Turkish fleet, with the help
tacking the Ottoman fleet.
During the naval battle which en
of the Almighty, sank the mine layer
Pruth, inflicted severe damage on
one of the Russian tor pedo boats, and
captured a collier. A torpedo from
the Turkish torpedo boat Gairet-i-Mil
let sank the Russian destroyer Kou
banietz, and another from the Turk
ish torpedo boat Mouavenet-i-Millet
Inflicted serious damage on a Rus
sian coast guard ship. Three officers
and 72 sailors rescued by our men
and belonging to the crews of th«- dam
CROSS WORD PUZZLE
' Z ~ 3 ~A- 5 G 7
~ /^// 9 j^To
TT iz j/p/iTz
H^ZLZZIIFIfLZZ
is / /y// LC * Zl ;/pj 22
23 2-1 2£
ZZZI~LZZZ1 _
30 3\ . 33 77//
“111 1” z
11 _ll_
ACROSS
I—A parcel of land
S—Fully developed
B—Form of verb “to be”
*—Very small
il—-Debutante (abbr. slang)
18—A dross of state
14— Arabian (abbr.)
15 — A wanderer
17—A medieval legend
20—To Act with fury
22—Meshed fabric
28 —Thither
25 —To avoid
87 — A narrow inlot
88— To cut apart
.4Q—A girl's name
—A veranda
H —Denoting nearness (prep )
8S —A lath
•87 —A hovel
s9—Vegetable condiments
40—Rhode Island (abbr,)
again
43 —Beer
DOWN
I—A young boy
B—Augury
*—Optical effects
4—Positive terminal of an els*
trie source
HENDERSON, (N. C.) DAILY DISPATCH, MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1934
aged ar.d sunken vessels of the Rus
sian fleet have been made prisoners.
, “The Ottoman imperial fleet, glory
* he given to the Almighty, escaped in
jury, and the battle is progressing
favorably for us. Information receiv
ed from our fleet, now in the Black
! Sea. is as follows:
"From accounts As Russian sailors
j taken prisoners, and from the pres
: once of a mine layer among the Rus
| sian fleet intended closing the en
trance to the Bosphorus with mines,
and ds(.roying entirely the Imperial
Ottoman fleet, after having split it
in two. Our fleet, believing that it
had to face an unexpected attack,
and supposing that the Russians had
begun hostilities without a formal de
claration of war, pursued the scatter
ed Russian fleet, bombarded the port
of Sebastopol, destroyed in the city
of Novorossisk 50 petroleum deposits,
14 military transports, some grana
ries, and the wireless telegraph sta
tion.
“In addition to the above our fleet
has sunk in Odessa a Russian cruis
er, and damaged severely another.
Five other steamers full of cargoes iy
ing in the same port were seriously
damaged.
“In Odessa and Sebastopol the Rus
sians from the shore opened fire
against our fleet.
The German eagle, after long and
! patient setting, finally had hatched
d—lndians of the Shoshoneau
tribe
7—Rupee (abbr )
10 —Packed tn a crate
12—Tho north wind
14— Matured
18— To scar
15- -An aider of anarchy
19— A course of running watei
21 —Addicts
24 —A sword handle
20— Verse (abbr.)
29 —Tlu> added period of duo*
nology
Sl—Vipers
S3—To throw with \ loleitc*
Stf—A falsehood m
36—Fasten 9
89—A point of the compass
Answer to previous puss'e
hli lp|plolclft.lPstrlg.ls
P As &
P T* E. AslWiTr.
5. *2
2i E .EH N
i^ctustolP
v % T /v K. e K1 gjjß. g
out an egg i n Constantinople.
HISTORY rr-TO-n.ATE
Octoher 29, 1618- Sir Walter Ra
leigh died with “serenity and dignity”
upon the block in the Tower of Lon
don. for a crime he did not commit.
He was 66.
Once the favorite of the Virgin
Queen Elizabeth and so rich his
shoe* were encrusted with jewels, he
was ruined by his enemies and im
prisoned for debt. After he had writ
ten a history of the world, he won re-
I lease bv promising King James I to
! find a gold mine on the South Ame
| riean const. He was adjoined, upon
pain of death, not to encroach on the
! Spaniards.
When his expedition reached Ameri
ca. Raleigh was ill of fever and hail
to remain at Trinidad. \ trusted lieu
tenant whom lie had sent ahead had a
brush 'v"h Spaniards and could not
. in the ensuing fighi
lulled. No mine.
\ Cl mpt> handed Raleigh
esouaely back to England and
the inevitable death sentence.
Octobet 29, H)“3 i *ti the 911) mini
vevsnis of he i first host Hit ins io the
world war (be Ottoman Empire lie
! came the I‘mkish Republic with
humbly horn Miistupha Knititl, aged
tk as tlhazi lie was small like Na
poleoti \\issolu(e. like Ah'Xlindei lie
whipped itu> Vllleil aimjles at the Dai
dandles, formed a uattooalist army
after the armistice which wiped out
the sultanate mad< Ivemal dhdalui
tong t»eiv>l e Muaat'lllll liniiim- tin
nunlerii .symbol or die term
iVtobe . » 1929 Hi. i 10,030 shares
were sold in u»e Siiieti Exchange, 7,-
056300 m the i'uih m point a minute
declines. VUUuma in paper profits
disappeared m ii»e twinkling of an
eye. the rustic of •» newspaper. “The
biggest evap game m die world” broke
up. it was die e-od of tin era.
It is known ao die Wall Street
Crash
NOTAIII.K NATIVITIES
John Keats. !■ i ,'96, jn*et. He died
at 26. after having written his own
i epitaph: "Here lies one whose name
was writ in water .. George Halley,
b. 1685, discoverer of 1 Talley’s comet
...James Boswell, b. 1744), author of
j the most famous biography He was
122 when he met Samuel Johnson, a
great man in his day. Johnson is re
membered now only becatfse Boswell
wrote a hook about him ... Marie,
dowager queen of Rournnnia, 1». 1875
... Anna Case Maekay, b. 1893, opera
singer ... Jack Pearlman, known as
Pearl, b. 1895, radio dialectician. He
is not German, hut Polish in origin
... Douhlas Montgomery, b. 1907,
citiomator.
YOU’RE WRONG IF YOIJ
BELIEVE
That no man born in a foreign coun
try can become President of the
United States.
Conrad A. Heinrich, McKeesport,
Pa., doubts this statement. Here’s
the proof:
The Constitution provides tha tto be
eligible to the Presidency, the candi
date shall have been born a citizen.
A child born of U. S. parents in a
is therefore eligible. Actually, the
foreign country is a U. S. citizen, and
Bth president, Martin Van Buren, was
the first who was born a U. S. citi
zen.
Also you’re wrong if you believe:
That if a criminal is electrocuted
and revives, he cannot afterwards be
executed.
That a “month’s notice" must be
given on the last day of the preceding
month. (By English common law, a
month’s notice is deemed to he a lunar
month of any 28 consecutive days.)
Write a “wrong.” Contributions will
be published and acknowledged. Ad
dress Clark Kinnaird, care this news
paper. If you doubt his statements,
send stamped, self-addressed envelope
for proof.
‘JUDGE PRIEST’
GREAT ROLE,
SAVSPLAYERS
Irvin; Cobb Delights Rogers
by Giving Him Another
‘<Old Clothes” Part i
The most successful pictures Will
Rogers has made arc those in which
he has worn old clothes. On many
occasions these have been the identi
cal pveralls and jumper he wears on
his ranch.
Rogers says so himself, polntit. 7 to
“David Harum,” “State Fair,” “Light
nin',” “Mr. Skiteh,” “Handy Andy”
and now “Jtidge Priest.”
“I feel more comfortable in old
togs,” declares the comedian, “and
feeling at ease, I can give a better
performance.”
“What about ‘They Had to See
Paris,’ one of your greatest pictures?”
ask an interviewer. “In that produc
tion, as I recall it, you wore evening
clothes and several tailor-made out
fits.”
“Well,” drawled Rogers, “that’s the
one that proves the exception. Some
said I suffered from' microphone
fright, but it wasn’t so. I was afraid
the people would laugh at me instead
of at the character.
So far as his pictures are concern
ed, Will admits that he regards most
highly his newest, “Judge Priest,”
now showing at the Stevenson theatre
today and tomorrow.
“Now there’s a picture with a
world of humanity in it,” says the
sage of Claremore, Oklahoma. “Irv
Cobb wrote flesh and blood into the
‘Priest’ stories —and they’ve been
given a mighty fine treatment by the
studio.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our many friends
who were so kind and sympathetic
during the illness and death of my
husband and our father.
MRS. T. L. FULLER & CHILDREN.
The Triple-Threat Man
Stop Him by rabscribing to your Community Fund
Huge Benefits of Cotton
Control lij State Evident
(.Continued from Pago One.)
of 420 pounds to the acre the grow
ers would have to plant 2,437,000 acres
to produce the crop. With the 260-
pound yield of an ordinary year, ap
proximately 3,000,000 acres would have
to be cultivated to produce the neea
ed bales.
The biggest crop ever produced in
North Carolina was in 1926 when 1,-
208,000 bale were produced on 1.802,-
000 acres.
Charles A. Sheffield director of the
state cotton program, also pointed
out that conditions worse than those
of 1932 would probably prevail if
southern cotton growers were allowed
to plant all they could without any
restrictions whatever.
Missolini Starts Plans
For Militarizing Italy
(Continued from Page One.)
in tine blackshirt newspapers, found
no mention today.
Enthusiastic cheers greeted the pre
mier when he appeared at the Benc
zian College, headquarters of the
new inspectorate. A large crowd com
posed of men and boys gathered out
side.
The inauguratiem consisted chiefly
of an address in which Mussolini out
lined the reasons that had prompted
him so drastically to militarize Italy.
(government Case Against
Insull Is Suddenly Rested
(Continued from Page One.)
immediately began to read to Fede
ral Judge James H. Wilkinson a mo
-1 tion for a directed verdict of not
I guilty for his client.
Opening statements by Thompson
and other defense attorneys were ex
pected to follow the presentatoin of
motions for a directed verdict.
Robinson Is Liberat
ed In Kidnap Case
(Continued irmn Page One.)
Campbell, in Nashville today, order
ed that Robinson, Sr., he, released.
The Justice Department said the
application for removal probably
would e made to Judge* Harry B. An
derson. of the western Tennessee dis
trict.
Supreme Court To
Uphold ‘New Deal’
(Continued from Page One.)
dent Roosevelt and his associates.
* * *
WHISPERS
Whispering campaigns again are
playing an important part in Ameri
can life.
A New York paper recently expos
ed a company that sold its services to
corporations to break up unions or to
destroy competitors by means of
whispering campaigns.
Politics always has known such
cammiigns.
Unfortunately, they have some ef
fect. People have difficulty getting
at the truth when sources are poi-
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to express our thanks and
appreciation for the prompt and effi
cient action of the Henderson Fire De
partment in response to the fire at
our home Sunday afternoon mid to
those who aided in the fight in any
way.
MR. and MRS. G. W. KNOTT.
soned. ; STIIWIM
COMPLAINTS * T r gTHMI
Complaints continue to come from
California that large corporations
have intimated employes should vote
against Upton Sinclair for governor.
Oighly paid employes of a movie
company also said they were invited
to contribute to an anti-Sinclair fund
on the basis of a single day’s earnings
NOTICE OF SALE.
By virtue of power conferred in a
judgment of the Superior Court of
Vance County in an action entitled
Mrs. Maude Grissom and husband, W.
H. Grissom vs. Mrs. Mamie Wilson
and husband W. E. Wilson, Mrs. Mag
gie Evans and husband T. J. Evans*.
P. £. Renn and wife, Halite Renn, and
G. H. Renn and wife, Owen Renn. I
will sell by public auction to the
highest bidder for cash, at the Court
House door in Henderson, N. C. at 12
o'clock noon, on Friday November 30,
1934, the following described property:
LOT 1. Beginning at st stake on
Montgomery street, Renn’s corner,
thence along Renn’s line 1&0 feet to
So) J. Stallings old corner; thence
along Stallings old line 26 feet to a.
stake; thence ISO feet to Montgomery
street; and thence along Montgomery
street to the beginning.
LOT 2. Beginning at a stake on
Montgomer') Street. T. J. Evans cor
ner. and run thence along his line 180
feet to Sol J. Stalling’s old line cor
ner; thence with Stalling's old line
13 feet to Mrs. Renn’s corner; thence
parallel with first mentioned line 180
feet to Montgomery Street; thenct,
along Montgomery Street 13 feel to
the beginning.
LOT 3. Beginning at an iron pin,,
Mrs. D./ L- Parker’s corner on the
north side of Montgomery street and
run thence along Montgomery Street
in a Northwesterly direction as per
plat N 35 1-4 W 73 feet, more or less
to a stake, corner Lewis and Row
land line; thence by Lewis and Row
land 180 1-2 feet more or less to an
iron stake, corner Lewis and Row
land; thence S 35 3-4 E 79 1-2 feet
more or less to Mrs. D. L. Parker’s
corner, a. stake; thence by Parker’s
line 180 1-2 feet more or less to Mont
gomery Street, the beginning.
This 29th day of October, 1934.
HENRY T. POWELL,
Commissioner.
1 %DISCOUNT 1 %
Will Be Allowed on 1934
CITY TAXES
If payment is made or or before
Thursday, November 1
Pay now while you have the money and
save this discount.
S. B. BURWELL
City Clerk and Tax Collector
I nerves or upsetting Blomach. I
■ Banishes nerve strain. Urinßs welcome I
E relaxation. Correctly blended formula. ■
Call On Us For
Prompt Service
New Numbers Arriving Daily
R. E. Satterwhite Co.
Wholesale—Phone 170
SAVE MONEY
By Insuring Witli
W. C. CATES
Agent for
STRONG MUTUALS
We Sell
Hackney
WAGONS
And carry a complete stock
of everything for the farm.
The Cooper
Company

xml | txt