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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, February 28, 1935, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1935-02-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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STRONG BEER BILL
IS BELIEVED DEM
Efforts To Revive It Not Ex
pected To Succeed In
Lower House
Dully Di*|tnf<>li l{i|rcii«.
In the Sir Waller Hotel.
Kaloigh. Fob. 28- While an effort i:
.'■xpeoted today or tomorrow to brinf
tin' beer bill, decisively beaten in tin
House yesterday by a vole of 61 to 46
back for consideration agnin today oj
tomorrow, the prevailing; opinior
.mong house members is that this
particular bill is completely and en
tirely dead, and that there is now nc
chance for its passage by the house.
The hill would have permitted an al
cnholie content in beer up to 5 pet
cent.
This Dili was the committee substi
tute for the beer hills introduced by
Representative* one, of Guilford. and
painter, of Cabarrus. The Palmei
hill would have limited the alcoholic
content of beer in North Carolina tc
4.5 per cent., while the Cone bill would
have permitted the sale of any beei
irt North Carolina that is permitted
under Federal laws in other states
with no definite alcoholic content
The committee substitute was a com
promise between the two bills.
Representative Palmer believes
there is yet a chance for the passage
~f his bill, legalizing the sale of beer
in the State of not more than 4.5 per
cent alcohol. and has said he w T ill
make an effort to get his original bill
nassed if the effort fails to recon
sider the vote by which the committee
hill was defeated yesterday.
- The committee bill might have pass
ed yesterday but for two tactical
blunders on the part of Representa
tive Cone, who attempted to steer it
through the House, quite a number of
House members agree. One mistake
that Cone made was when he said the
MU was largely drawn by the beer
distributors and brewers, who wanted
it passed. This statement admittedly
Clean Out
Kidney Poisons
Vub Oat Hoar IS Mile* of Kidney Tube*
If kidneys don’t pass 3 pints a day
and get rid of more than 3 pounds of
waste matter, the 15 miles of kidney
tubes and filters may become clogged
with poisonous waste and the danger
of acid poisoning is greatly increased.
Bladder passages are difficult, which
often smart and bum like scalding
water and cause discomfort.
This acid condition, brought about
by poor kidney functions is a danger
signal and may be the beginning of
nagging backache, leg pains, loss of
P*P and energy, getting up nights,
swollen feet and ankles, rheumatic
pains and dizziness.
Most people watch their bowels
which contain only 27 feet of intes
tines but neglect the kidneys which
contain 13 miles of tiny tubes and
niters. If these tubes or filters be
come clogged with poisons, it may
knock you out and lay you up for
many months. Don’t run any risk.
Make sure your kidneys empty 3
pints a day.
Ask your druggist for DOAN’S
PILLS, an old prescription, which,
fias been used successfully by mil
lions of kidney sutTerers for over 40
years. <£> 1934, Foster-Milbum Co.
Paying Off 16 th Series
FRIDAY ; MARCH 1
$10,445.00 I" Cash
/sh !■* F* £\f\ In Cancelled Notes and
S9 9 uSS«UU Deeds of TrUßt
Is ready for delivery to the sharehonders in our 16th series just
matured. If you were a shareholder in this series bring in your
certificate and get your check or cancelled papers.
D Every series since organization has been matured on I
time, earnings being in excess of 6 per cent tax free.
Our 29th Series Now Open
Payments to Begin April 6
Let us have your application for shares in this new series now.
Staid, a savings account with any amount from 25c per week up.
Henderson Building & Loan Assn.
Irvine B. Watkins, Pres. Al B. Wester, Sec.-Treas.
I turned quite a number against the
bill who otherwise might have voted
for it. The other was his insistence
i in shutting of additional debate on the
Ibill by calling for the previous ques
tions when a number of House mem
bers wanted to speak on it. This
smacked too much of “gag rule” and
antagonized a good many members.
If the friends of the bill succeed in
- getting the vote by which it was de
feated reconsidered today or tomor
row and back before the House, and
if they will give its opponents all the
time they want to oppose it, it may
pass. But the outlook is regarded as
• very unfavorable.
r I Congress Knows
NRA Big Failure
t (Continued from rage One.l
ington. Were their positions to he ex
( tinguished, 'hack home most of them
would go. And they would work a
gainst re-election of the lawmakers
who voted to retire iherp.
j WHY SET-I PS REMAIN
j That explains why it is so nearly
j impossible to put an end to any gov
| eminent setup, once established.
1 It is true even of small outfits, with
I numerically insignificant staffs.
( How much more une.xceptionallv is
it true of an organization so vast as
NRA!
j Its rules may he altered, Indeed,
i That is the problem Congress is study
| ing now. As to a reduction in the
. number of its workers? It -would be
j safer to bet on an increase.
STRUGGLE FOR ADVANTAGE
- i The struggle for advantage is ter
- i rifie.
The labor-versus-capital issue Is a
three-cornered affair. The independ
i ently unionized workers want to do
minate. The captains of industry de
sire to dominate, under acontrolled
form of unionism. And there is an
element which desires the government
to dominate, between the two.
Big business and little business are
at odds.
Consumer-dom clamors for what it
considers its rights.
Questions of monopoly, price-regul
ation, working hours, wages, child la
bor. collective bargaining, limitations
on the employment of women, pro-
I cessing, transportation and a multi
-1 plicity of other disputed points are
j involved in the general controversy.
While Congress tinkem with the
! law. two NRA investigations are pro
i pressing—an investigation by the
j Senate Finance Committee, under j
' Senator Pat Harrison's chairmanship; j
| an investigation, under the chairman- j
I ship of Senator William H. King, by j
1 a sub-committee of the senatorial i
| judiciary committee,
i Meantime some 20,000 suits are j
! hanging fire on account of violations i
of codes—a worse jam than ever oc- ■
curred in connection with prohibition I
j violations.
i Roosevelt’s Worries
* Are Pyramiding
(Continued from Pago One.)
|on work relief and social security. j
Fresh from practical victory in the
j gold clause cases, the government j
j once again loked to the Supreme
Court for rulings upholding New Deal
powers. Administration authorities
looked with confidence to the out
come.
During t.ho President's short -trip to
Harvard University and his Hyde
Park home, little has v.een accomp
lished on the work-relief bill beyond
HENDERSON, (N. C.) DAILY DISPATCH, THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 28 1933
, informal discussions between those
for and against the prevailing wage
i requirement. Organized labor has re
i affirmed its stand for prevailing
wages over Mr. Roosevelt’s opposition,
and compromise talk was in the air.
The social security bill, which the
! administration wanted enacted by
February 15, still was in congressional
committee. Sto completely was the ori
ginal measure re-written by the House
Ways and Means Committee that
doubt has arisen whether all the
changes would he agreeable to the
President.
“Better cooperation” between Fed
eral, State and local governments in
! fixation ando ther fields was urged
i by President Roosevelt in a message
|to the interstate assembly of the
I American Legislators Association.
; MY NEW YORK
1 By JAMES AS WELL
New York, Feb. 28.—It’s a curious
comment on something or other in
metropolitan life that the only theater
which has succeeded in wangling a li
quor license for a lobby bar is the
Metropolitan Opera.
It is probably the best-behaved dis
pensary in town, at that. Perhaps
ladies freighted with several hundred
thousand dollars’ worth of Tiffany
rocks are more than ordinarily chary
of that additional champagne cock
tail; and gentleman stop this side of
tipsiness for fear of smashing their
top hats.
The attendants beyond the rail are,
from a single once-over, a mixed and
representative, lot. They did not wear
uniforms the night I was there and
they mixed drinks with the smiling
cannaraderie of host 3at a private
party. There were several gentlemen
in business suits and a young woman
in evening dress.
I am told that since the bar was
installed applause is more frequent
and even some critics have heard new
echoes inth e arias of great merit and
never auditioned hitehrto.
*******
NAME NOTE
If you spell Lime backwards you
get Emil. The elastic gentleman who
folds and unfolds as the Golliwog of
the show at the hugely glamorous
French Casino here is named EmiT
Lime. It is his real name and he says
his parents did not choose Emil be
cause it was Lime backwards; the
choice was pure accident. He did not
discover the engaging fact until he
was 12 vears old.
BREWSTER’S MILLIONS
“Brewster’s Millions” is coming to
the talking screen, but I wager there
will be some poetic license used by
the producers on the old fable’s mod
ern version. If I remember correct
ly, Mr. Brewster was left $10,000,000
by a peevish relative with the proviso
that he spend $1,000,000 inherited from
another source in one year.
Back around the turn of the cen
tury the yarn had a mad and charm
ing validity. But today Brewster would
have no such problem on his hands
as he had then. On the $1,000,000
there would be levies, if it were
classed as income, of some $650,000;
if it were inherited, the taxes, law
yer’s fee and other expenses, my conn
sel says, would reduce the increment
to a good deal less than half.
Today Brewster would only need to
wink once at the tax gathers, federal,
state and local, and his trick would
be turned. Then he would only have
to worry about keeping a fraction of
the ten million.
EFIRD’S THREE BIG
A Flood of Big Dollar Values From All Departments
for This Event. Bargains That Will Make/the
Most Thrifty Minded Wonder How It's Done.
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FAST COLOR PRINTS 36-INCH WINDOW SHADES
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PAGE THREE

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