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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, May 01, 1935, Image 1

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HENDERSON
HATEWAY TO
CENTRAL
CAROLINA
TWENTY-SECOND yeah
CONFERENCE REVENUE BILL PASSES SENATE
* * ' * & & & & *****%s>!ss%> * & 9 + G : Q'
Senate Group Rejects The Administration NRA Program
2-YEW EXTENSION
PI AN DISREGARDED;
TIME FIXED APRIL 1
Three Changes Are Made In
Present Set-Up As Ap
proved by the Finance
Committee
TO MM IT CODE TO
INTERSTATE TRADE
Prohibition Against Price-
F i«mg Also Included; Pres
ent (*iven Rrief Period in
Wbn b t o Review Present
( To Make Them
Conform
Washington, May 1. —(API —• The
cr Finance Committee today dis
regH'ded the administration’s recom
inundation tor a two-year extension or
ypA and voted to continue the pres
ort i»vv with three changes until
AprH I of next year.
Aanother step in tlie long contro.
ifirsi over the blue eagle adminis
tration. ’be committee voted 15 to 3
*o report out a resolution extending
•hr present law with a prohibition a
galnst price fixing and a limitation
of codes to interstate business.
A third provision would give Presi
dent Roosevelt a brief period to re
view present codes in order to make
them conform with the two changes
in tti° laiw.
The action was taken without for
mal record vote in a two-hour execu
tive .session, marked by virtual un
animity of opinion.
Chairman Harrison, announcing the
action, refused to say whether it was
atisfactory to President Roosevelt.
The executive recommended
to Congress n two-year extension of
NR A, hut. in a. conference with con
gressional leaders yesterday, was re
ported in lmve agreed to sign a re
olijtion merely extending the recov.
e rv law until next spring, if Congress
preferred that method.’
McSwain Is
Rebuked By
Roosevelt
Washington. May J (AP) —Chair-
man Mr.Swsln. Democrat, South Caro
lina today assumed “‘full blame” for
publication of secret testimony of in
ternational import given the House
Military Committee by two high army
officials.
The gray haired former soldier re
-1 limed to his office late this morning
from New York, opened a tetter of
retnik» from President Roosevelt for
allowing the testimony to become pub
lit. and mnd ii aloud to reporters.
Then lie added:
J assume the full blame. The 10-
KJnnt.iriued on Pave RVuir)
MacDonald
Says Story
Is Official
I ells Commons His
Article Lambasting
Cermany (Jives
Co\eminent’s View
London, May I.—(AP)—Prime Min-
Ramsay MacDonald declared in
House of Commons today that an
~hrl e he wrote last week lambasting
" i many reflected the views of the
’lit ish government.
1 lie article was printed in the of.
“ 1 news letter of the Labor party,
"'' especially denounced Germany
m it- re-armament in the air. Mac
iald said lie considered that the
i"Mieation was in the public’s inter
iacDonald’s statement came short
'rUu iSir Bolton Eyres-Monfel, first
rj f l he admiralty, had told the
' that Germany would have its
i (Continued on Page Foul)
Hrnftersmt Batin Bianatch
only DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THIS SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIrSnIA. *
LEASED WIRE SERVICE OF
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
500 Go On Strike
v4s Goldsboro Mill
Gives Up The NRA
It’s a Dime Shame
Hi I
* ilL r > \o Air-***** 0
W : .^|M
■w \ jl
fgsSSsireM' \
yV’
Karl Crowley, solicitor of Postofße*
Department is taking steps to end
‘'send-a-dime'* chain letter scheme
which has almost paralyzed Denver
postoffice with mail and is rapidly
spreading each day. The chain calls
for the recipient of a letter to write
a letter to each of five persons
whose names appear at. top of it,'
sending each a dime. Then he
rrosses out top name and adds his
own. If chain is unbroken he is sup
posed to receive 15.1200 dimes. Au
thorities declare it’s a “racket.”
fCentral Press)
F. D. 11. Gives
“Go” Signal
On Spending
Rural Re-Settlement
L)i\ ision Is the First
Ol Many To Get On
Us Way
Washington. May 1 (AP) —The "go”
•signal in his $4,000,000,000 employment
/drive was given i v President Roose
velt today with Ihe establishment by
executive order of she rural re-settle
inent division intended to move fami
lies to places where they can earn a
living.
This was the first executive order
issued under the job-making program
and many others must follow before
the entire machine can get in motion.
While not explaining the delay in
officially creating the new government
unit, the President did announce at
his press conference that he has ask
ed Morris Llewellyn Cooke, of Phila
delphia, to establish the rural electri
fication division.
iOn Capitol Hill, administration
leaders still sought a, means of break
fContinued on Page Four)
School Group Wins Round
In Its Fight For Control
Mean* Superintendent Erwin Would Likely Become
School Dictator for State; Would Virtually Hire
and Fire Secretary of State School Commission
In the Sir %Va!ter Hotel,
Dally Dispatch Bnreao,
BY J. C. DASKERVILL,
Raleigh, May i—The portion of the
school forces represented by a large
number of the city and county super
intendents have won the victory to
wards which they have been striving
ever since the legislature began by
getting the joint education commit
tees to approve a section giving com
plete control of the State School Com
mission into the hands of the State
superintendent of public instruction.
If the House and Senate now pass the
school machinery act as finally ap
proved by the committee and now in
4he House, it is agreed that the school
HENDERSON, N. 0. WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 1, 1935
Notices Posted In Atlas
Plywood Company Plants
Announces Much
Longer Hours
WAGES ARE SLASHED
FIVE CENTS AN HOUR
Strike Is Spontaneous When
No'n-LJnion Employees
Read Notices; Manage
ment Says Order From Bos
ton Home Office, Which
Says It Is Local Matter
Goldsboro, May I (AiF)—Approxi
mately 500 employees of the Atlas
Plywood Company went on strike here
today following receipt of orders from
the home office at Boston abandoning
the NRA code, cutting wages and in
creasing hours.
The strike came spontaneously when
employees, who a»e understood not io
be unionized, were forced by a posted
notice at opening time today sunoime
i-ng a cut in wages from 23 to 13
cents per hour, and an increase in the
weekly hours of work from 40 to 56.
Informed that Boston officials main
tained any wage and hours provisions
were purely matters local to Golds
boro and had not been ordered by
the general office. F,. T. Sanborn,
plant manager, said only.
"The new wages and hours were ord
ered from headquarters.”
The first walk-out came at tlie com
pany’s Empire plant, where approxi
mately 390 persons arc employed.
A scattering of workers who insist
ed on returning to their jobs in the
plant was repulsed by a barrage of
brick and liostily summoned police
cordons were required to restore ord
er No one was injured.
Strikers from Hie main plant then
went to the Utility plant nearby,
where they were joined by about half
of the 150 employees there and began
picketing, which was promptly broken
(Continued on Page Four)
did ooiinni nikin
11111 iHil liliil I Ull
Passes With Senate Rejec
tion, 40-6, of Amend
ment to Money Bill
Dally niipnlck Boreas,
In the Sir Walter Hotel,
Raleigh, May I.—The rapidly-dim
inishing hope of securing $22.000,000
annually for the public schools is de
finitely dead. The hope died as the
Senate rejected by the overwhelming
vote of 40-6 an amendment to increase
the appropriation to that amount.
Advocates of the $22,000,000 allot
ment beat a hasty retreat in the face
of a reduced revenue bill after Sen
ate Finance Chairman Harris New
< (Inn tinned nn Pup. Emirl
forces, as represented by the State
Department of Public Instruction and
the North Carolina Education Asso
ciation, will have won what they have
been trying to get for years, namely,
control of the school commission and
control of the spending of the $20,000,-
000 a year of school funds.
The new school machinery act, as
re-written by the education commit
tee, also does not contain the section
which would have helped the teach
ers more than anything in the act,
according to most teachers, the same
forces that sought to get control of
the school commission having suc
(Continued on Pago
Three Are Killed
As Bus Overturns
Muskogee, OkJa., May} I.—(AP)
Three persons were killed, five cri
tically injured and 25 less serious
ly hurt early today in the overturn
ing of a truck loaded with Mexican
beet field workers en route from
.Sa|p Antonio, Texas, to Mount
Pleasant, Midi.
IyandgrahwiT
WILL FIGHT IT OUT
FOR GOVERNORSHIP
Neither Has Announced but
It Is Certain That Both
Will Make Race
Next Year
LEGISLATORS THINK
GRAHAM HAS EDGE
Battle Will Be Between Li
beral and Conservative
Kings of Party in State,
With Old Guard Behind
Hoey aind Younger Demo
crats Supporting Graham.
Dully Di«|tnt«k Bareas.
In the Sir Walter Hotel,
J. I'. nASKERVILL.
Raleigh. May I.—The contest for
tlie Democratic nomination for gov
ernor ni 1936 is uof going to be chief
ly between Lieutenant Governor A. H.
(Sandy) Graham and Clyde R. Hoey,
according to most of the opinion ex
pressed here since Congressman Rob
ert L. Dough ton announced late Mon
day that he would not 'be a candidate.
While neither Graham nor Hoey have
yet formerly announced their candi
dacies. there is no doubt In the mind
of any here but that both, of them
will run. Already an announced can
didate is John A. Mcßae. 6f Char
lotte. It is also expected that. Colonel
T. Leßoy Kirkpatrick, also of Char
loft e, will likewise become a candidate
But the opinion here is that the cam
paign between Graham and Hoey will
almost completely overshadow the
other candidates.
While it is conceded in political cir
(Continued on Page Six)
FULLYSAFEGUARDED
1
Re-Allocation of Funds *
Would Be Limited Now \
to. Only 15 Percent 1
Unily Dlupntck Barest,
Is the Sir Walter Hotel, (
By C. A. PAUL
Raleigh, May I.—As the Senate ap- i
proved the biennial appropriations <
bill in almost the same form as pass- i
ed by the lower house it adopted an
amendment which will safeguard the j
funds allotted to county roads.
Launching an attack on a clause in
the highway appropriation which I
have permitted the director of the
budget to transfer funds allotted for I
maintenance of State highways, main
(Continued on Page Six.)
Yount Would ,
Be Secretary
School Board
Dally Dispatch Barcas,
In the Sir Walter Hotel.
Raleigh, April I—County Superin- ,
tendent M. E. Yount, of Alamance '
county, who is also chairman of the
legislative committee of the North
Carolina Education Association, will
be the assistant executive secretary
of the State School Commission if
the House and Senate pass the new
school machinery act in its present
form, making State Superintendent
of Public Instruction Clyde A. Erwin
executive secretary of the commission
as well as its vice chairman, it was
learned here today.
Since it is agreed that Superintend
s Continue!! on Pago Tferoa)
15056
As President Addressed Nation
m 'gy mBBBBSSm «h
It
Placing upon congress responsibil
ity for further social, business
and banking reform, President
Roosevelt is pictured at the mic
rophone in his Sunday night fire
May Day Brings Rioting
And Death As Holiday Is
Observed World Over
Greatest Soviet Military Demonstration In History Is
Marked by Loud lalk of War; Hitler Says Germany
Desires Only Peace; New York Is Vigilant
~ .. (By the Associated Press.)
The greatest military demonstra
tion in the history of Sbviet Russia,
at Moscow; holiday features through
out Germany, a bombing In Vienna,
rioting in France and widespread po
lice precautions against possible dis
turbance in the Uinted States sig
nified May Day celebrations through
out tlie world today.
In Moscow spokesmen delievered
sombre warnings, of impending war,
while nearly 700 military planes dron
ed over Red Square, and the massive
red army passed in review.
Klementy Vordshiloff, Soviet com.
missar for defense told Russian kork
U. S. MEDIATOR TO
AUTO STRIKE ZONE
McGrady Goes to Detroit To
Seek Settlement of
Difficulties
Detroit, Mich., May I.—-(AP) The
Federal government sent its ace
mediator, Edward F. McGrady, into
the trouble zone of the giant auto
mobile industry today to cope with
strikes and threats of strikes which
have already affected more than 1,-
300 employees of General Motors Cor
poration subsidiaries.
Arriving in Detroit late last night
by plane, on orders from Secretary
Perkins, McGrady set up temporary
headquarters, denied himself to inter
viewers and protested that his mis
sion was secret.
WEATHER
FOR NORTH CAROLINA,
Fair tonight, Thursday cloudy,
probably followed by showers in
west portion; not much change in
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTHRNOOM
EXCEPT SUNDAY.
President Roosevelt
side address to the nation. The
president’s appeal came during a
session in which congress has
threatened to delay reform meas
ures urged by the administration.
ers that war "hangs like a heavy
colud over humanity,’’ and he assur
ed his comrades and told the world
that “if war is imposed upon us, the
enemy will get acquainted with our
red army.’’
From all partis of Germany, con
spicuously from the newly-acquired
Saarland Germans went to Berlin to
celebrate the “day of national labor.”
Chancellor Adolf Hitler toTd more
than 1,000.000 workers assembled at
Tempelhofer air field that Germany
desires only peace with other nations.
Propaganda Minister Paul Joseph
(Coniinuedi on Page Thnwi
rs™
Outstanding Political Cam-?
paign Argument Next
Year Already Clear
By CHARLES P. STEWART
Central Press Staff Writer
Washington, May I.—Next year’s
outstanding political campaign issue
already is as clear as any good gues
ser could desire.
On Capitol Hill there is little dis
agreement as to the verdict.
Disregarding the possibility of war,
which naturally would upsei all pres
ent calculations, the contest essential
ly will be between the producer and
the consumer.
HALF ON PRODUCER’S SIDE
Os course everyone is a consumer.
However, large numbers of folk
(perhaps half of the voting population
or perhaps more than that) conceive
their interest to be on the producer’s
side of the argument.
Unless he is the kind of fanner who
on TZzezJ)
8 1 PAGES
TODAY
FIVE CENTS COPY
FOOD EXEMPTIONS
FROM SALES LEW
TAKENFROM BILL
Amendment Seeking To Re*
store Provision Is Badly
Beaten by Vote
of Senators
LIQUOR BILL FACES
ITS TEST TOMORROW
Will Be Sought as Revenue
Producer; 23 Senators
Have Signed Pledge to Op
pose It; Salary Measures
For State Officials Are
Debated
Raleigh, May l.—(AP)—The Sen
ate this afternoon pased the revenue
bill conference report on second read
ing.
The vote was 28 to 15, not counting
pairs.
Senators Coburn, of Martin; Swar
ingan, of Cabarrus, and Burrus, of
Guilford, spoke /.gainst adoption of
the compromise on the tax measure,
which strikes out all exemptions of
food from the sales tax.
Coburn sought to recess the Senate
but was voted down
As Senator Allsbrook, of Halifax, ex
plained his vote, he censored senators
without calling names for their stand
on the revenue bill. He was asked by
Bagley, of Currituck, if he was ex
plaining his vote or lecturing the Sen
ate, and Allsbrook replied that he was
doing both.
Senator Hill, of Durham, champion
of the exemptions, said a bill would
be introduced next week to supple
ment the revenue bill and provideHfor
food exemptions. It was understood
Ihe exemptions would be made if the:
Revenue from another source, such aa
liquor, might be found.
A liquor bill is pending In the
ate for consideration tomorrow, biR ’
(Cnntinnnd nn ThranT; rhf’
c+n j
Neg ro Jury'
Problem 3$
A ry& .
Greensboro
1 Greensboro. May 1 (AP)—The case
of Dr. C. C. Stewart, Negro physi
cian. and Oilie Parrish, a white man,
charged with second degree murder
for the death of a white woman from
the effects of an alleged illegal opera
tion, leached an abrupt impasse ih
Guilford Superior Court today, and
was continued for the term when
counsel for Stewart moved to quash
the indictment on the grounds that
Negroes were excluded from the grand
and petit jury list.
Two mot-ms were lodged embrac
ing both the grand and petit jury bo
dies, based on the recent decision of
the United States Supreme Court in
ihe celebrated Scottsboro case, gain
ing a new trial to the defendant Nor
ris on the ground that Negroes were
excluded from the Alabama jury list.
Agreeing that the State should b®
given time in which to study the mat
ters at issue, the court ordered the
rtoses continued
$35 Bounty
For Cotton
Is Proposed
Per Bale Subsidy On
Exports Offered
Washington Fo t
Processing Tax
Grenville. S. C., May 1 (AP) —Seek-
ing alleviation of the cotton process
ing tax, southern textile interests will
propose to the government tomorrow
that it establish a bounty of $35 per
bale to be paid manufacturers on ex
ported cotton goods, it was announced
here today.
(Samuel C. Lamport, New Yo t'x ex
porter and author of the plan, .aid
here today that the proposal hac not
met with A. warm receptiox. o. Sio
recent August meeting oi me L-- : n
can Manufacturers Ass,. • L SKJiI, jid
that it would probably form me iocai
point in discussions it, ~ •..
zi F*.'

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