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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, July 05, 1935, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR
WENPEBSON DAILY DISPATCH
Established August 12, 1914,
Published Every Afternoon Except
Sunday by
BENDERSON DISPATCH CO„ INC.
at 198 Young Street
HENRY A. DENNIS, Pres, and Editor.
VC. L. FINCH, Sec-Treas and Bus Mgr.
TELEPHONES
Editorial Office MO
Society Editor 610
Business Office ~
The Henderson Daily Dispatch is a
member of the Associated Press,
Southern Newspaper Publishers Asso
ciation and the North Carolina Press
Association. «
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to use for republication all
news dispatches credited to it or not
otherwise credited in this paper, and
also the local news published herein
All rightsof publication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Payable Strictly In Advance
One Year $5.00
Bix Months .. .• 2 - 60
Three Months •• •
One Week (by Carrier Only) ... «15
Per Copy
NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS
Look at the printed label on your
paper. The date thereon shows when
the subscription expires. Forward your
money in ample time for renewal.
Notice date on label carefully and if
not correct, please notify us at once.
Subscribers desiring the address on
their paper changed, please state in
their communication both the OLD
and NEW address.
National Advertising Representatives
BRYANT, GRIFFITH AND
BRUNSON, INC.
9 East 41st Street, New York
280 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago
201 Dovenshire Street, Boston
General Motors Bldg., Detroit
Walton Building, Altanta
Entered at the post office in Hender
son, N. C„ as second class mail matter.
ROAD TO TRUE RICHES: Seek ye
first the kingdom of God, and his
righteousness; and all these things
shall be added unto you. —Matthew
6:33.
TODAY jt
TODAY’S ANNIVERSARIES
1755 —Sarah Kemble Siddons, fam
ous English actress, born. Died June
8, 1831.
1801 —David G. Farragut famous
Union naval commander of the Civil
War, perhaps the greatest admiral in
our history, born near Knoxville Tenn.
Died at Portsmouth, N. H., Aug. 14,
1870.
1810—Phineas T. Barnum greatest
of all showmen and most skilful ad
vertiser in history, born at Bethel
Conn. Died at Bridgeport Conn., Apr.
7. 1891.
1810— Henry C. Murphy, a noted
Brooklyn, N. Y. lawyer, statesman
diplomat and scholar born in Brook
lyn. Died Dec 1, 1882.
1846-—Joseph B. Foraker. Ohio gov
ernor and U. S. Senator, born in
Highland Co., O. Died in Cincinnati.
May 10, 1917.
1851—William Brewster, noted Cam
bridge, Mass, ornithologist of his day,
born at Wakefield, Mass. Died July 11 |
1919.
TODAY IN HISTORY
1807 —Buenos Aires Argentina, tak
en by British forces.
1811— Venezuela first of the South
American countries to declare inde
pendence from Spain.
1814 —Canadians lose 500 of its army
of 1200 in battle with 4000 Americans
at Chippewa. Canada.
1830—Alberia taken by French and
ruled ever since.
1865 —Rev. William Booth founded
the Christian Mission (later renamed
the Salvation Army) in London.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS
Col. Alva J Brasted. Chief of the
U. S. Army chaplains, born at Find
ley’s Lake, N. Y.. 59 years ago.
Dr. Andrew E. Douglass astrono
mer-director of the University of Ari
zona’s Observatory, born at Windsor.
Vt., 68 years ago.
Dwight F. Davis of Fla, and Wash
ington, D C.. ex-Governor of the
Philippines born in St. Louis, 56
years ago
Dr. Eugene L. Opie of New York,
famed pathologist, born at Staunton,
Va., 62 years ago.
Jan Kebelik, famed violinist, born
in Bohemia 55 years ago.
Frederick Lewis Allen of New York,
writer, born in Boston 45 years ago.
TODAY’S HOROSCOPE
Today produces a person of great
capacity for knowledge and w<th a
keen and retentive mind. There is
great versatility, sometimes too much
since it may induce desire for change
drawing the abilities into too varied
channels. Avoid the general tend
ency to indolence and self-indulgence
and cultivate strength of mind and
purpose.
ANSWERS TO
TEN QUESTIONS
See Hack Page
1. Georgian Bay.
2. Booth Tarkington.
3. On the coast of Morocco.
4. Oahu
5. Haym Salomon.
6. Northern Central Africa.
7 Fora.
8. Knoxville, Tenn.
9. The arrangement of election dis
tricts so as to give an unfair ad
vantage to the party in power.
10. Benevolent and Protective Order
of E!’:3. . ...... I
Today is the Day
. By CLARK KINNAtRD /j
Copyrlthl, 1984. for this Ncwipiptr
by Central Frew Association
Friday, July 5; Old Midsummer day;
186th day of the year. Venezuela’s in
dependence day. World’s oldest open
air parliament meets in Isle of Man.
Morning stars: Mercury, Saturn, Ura
nus. Evening stars: Venus Mars,
Jupiter Neptune.
TODAY’S YESTERDAYS
July 5, 1704 —John Broughton was
born in London, destined to become
the father of professional boxing. A
saloonkeeper who was handy with his
fists, he drew up the London Prize
Ring Rules which made fighting a
sport and remained its governing laws
for almost 150 years.
Broughton’s regulations differed
from those of today mainly in the fact
that a round ended whenever a fight
er fell or was knocked to the ground.
As long as he got up in less than 30
seconds, the fight went on.
July 5, 1810 —Phineas Taylor Bar
num was born in Bethel, Conn., des
tined to become the world’s greatest
showman. When he staged the first
baby show in New York, 80 years ago
this summer, reformers closed it for a
time as “a disgusting, immoral spec
tacle.”
One of the most important things
Barnum did is the least remembered.
He started the first illustrated paper
in the country in 1853. It failed. His
foreman, Frank Leslie went ahead
with the idea and made it a tremen
dous success. «
NOTABLE NATIVITIES
Barnet Barnato. b. 1842, English
peddler who went to Africa with a
pack on his back and came back the
successor of Rhodes as diamond king.
Millions did not make him happy, he
killed himself . . . Dwight Davis, b.
1880, former secretary of war and
donor of Davis Cup emblem of world
tennis supremacy . . . Edouard Har
riot, b. 1872, French statesman who
has several times been both premier
of France and mayor of his home
town simultaneously . . . Frederick
Lewis Allen, b. 1890, author—Only yes
terday etc.
THE WORLD WAR 20 YEARS
AGO TODAY
July 5. 1915 —The horse transport
Ajnglo-Californian met the U->39 in
blockaded British waters. The cap
tain and 20 men lost their lives; but
the heroism of surviving officers sav
ed the ship and her valuable cargo of
horses from the American midwest
for the German guns in France. For
tunately, we have an eye-witness story
of how the Anglo-Californian managed
to escape, told by the first officer, H.
O. Read..
“It was morning, about 8 o’clock,
when I noticed a small cloud of blue
smoke on the surface about a mile
away ... As the cloud gradually
lifted I caugh sight of the conning
tower and long, low hull of a subma
rine. which I knew at once must be a
German.
“Ordering the man at the wheel to
put the helm over, thus bringing the
submarine directly astern of us, I
informed the captain. He immediate
ly came to the bridge and proceeded
to try to outrace the submarine. We
were unarmed, flight was our only
chance. . . . The captain ordered
the wireless operator to send out the
‘SOS’ call. This was promptly ans
wered . . . Meanwhile the submarine
was slowly but surely gaining on us.
“At a quarter of nine she first open
ed fire, this presumably being a warn
ing shot. The captain took no heed
of the summons; he merely smiled and
gave orders to the engineer to keep
her going as fast as they could . . .
The submarine continued to fire shell
after shell at us. At first they tried
to bring down the wireless apparatus,
so as to prevent us from getting in
communication with the patrol ves
sels but this we had already done.
“No sign of panic were shown until
a shell, bursting amidships, killed
three of the horsemen. Then a rush
\O/enjj Stamp telh aStcnu
PECULIAR S!Rt5 'S
SO CALLED B V ' THE N!ACTIVES
OF MEW ZEALAND BECAUSE OF
rrs CALL NOTE “ Kl-1 -Wit, * .TO
HUNT !T REQUIRES INFINITE
PATIENCE, IT BE IMG ALMOST
EXT!MCT...rr * FLIGHTLESS..*
•TS NOSTRILS APE AT THE «NO
CP ITS BEAK,VET POSSESS
A KEEN! SENSE OF SMELL...
rr SNIFFS WHEN FEEDING,A
LOUD SOUND AUDIBLE AT A.
iag. GREAT «
DISTANCE/.
teALMj*
Ar/W> '
HENDERSON. '(lt CJ HSILY DISPATCH, FRIDAY, JULY 5, l9sSr
JULY
*UH MON TUt WIP THU HU SAT
I 3 I1/ —L 6
9 19 1
i« it r-o to
23
30 31 n
was made for the lifeboats and men
began scrambling into and overload
ing them. The captain ordered me
to shoot anyone who did not come
out and wait for orders.
“Just at this moment a signal to us
to ‘abandon ship’ was observed flying
from the submarine, and the firing
suddenly ceased. This the captain
had no intention of doing. He de
cided to ge t as many of the crew from
the ship as possible. The remainder
of us were to stand by him and keep
the ship going to the very last.”
The Arab fireman came on deck and
made a rush for the boats. They
were driven off but would not return
to the stokehold, though the captain
offered SIOO to any man who would
do so. The chief and second engineers
with the donkeyman, responded to the
captain’s request and rushed down to
the stokehold and engineroom to work
like demons.
“One filled lifeboat had gotten
away and others were being filled
when a message from the patrol steam
er, saying the Anglo-Californian was
in sight.
They told us to keep going, and hold
the submarine at bay as long as pos
sible. As soon as it was apparent
that we were not going to give in the
submarine commenced firing again,
and with deadly effect, for the boat
was only 100 yards behind us.”
The patrol steamer gradually came
into sight and began firing at the
submarine. The U-boat crowded on
extra speed and drew up alongside the
steamer,t hus sheltering it from shots
of the patrol ship, and meanwhile
pouring shell into the Anglo-Califor
nian . A shell blew the captain to
pieces. With a Maxim mounted on
top of its quick-firing gun the U-boat
crew was raking the steamer’s deck,
upon which dead, dying and wounded
men lay in bloody profusion.
“Nothing more could now be done.
We were momentarily expecting a tor
pedo to strike the vessel, and stood
ready to jump clear when she went
under. But the torpedo did not ar
rive. Instead, we saw the crew of the
submarine hurrying to get their gun
below and preparing to submerge
The reason was the sudAtn appear
anceof of two destroyers, racing to
ward us at full speed. The subma
rine rapidly disappeared.”
Holes in the ship were plugged with
bales of hay, and she was given a list
to raise damaged plates out of water
when she was conveyed into Queens
town The courageous captain was
dead, but his ship was in port.
What Do You
Know About
North Carolina?
By FRED H. MAY
1. What North Carolinian declined
the appointment of Secretary n f the
Navy?
2. When did Salem stores first
adopt a cash system? t
3. When was Central Carolina’s
greatest snowstorm?
4. Who were Captain Philip Ama
das and Captain Arthur Barlow?
5. How did schools conduct their
examinations one hundred years ago?.
6. When did Daniel Boone make
his first trip into the Kentucky ter
ritory?
ANSWERS
1. Abraham Rencher, of Pittsboro,
declined the portfolio of Secretary of
the Navy under President Buchanan
but accepted the appointment by him
as Governor of New Mexico Territory
and served from 1857 to 1861 He was
elected to Congress in 1829 and served
five terms and from 1843 t 0 1847 he
was Minister to Portugal. Born neat
Raleigh August 12, 1798, graduated at
the University and established him
self in law at Pittsboro. After retir
ing from public life he returned to
Pittsboro, died at Chapel HiFf July 6,
1883 and was buried at Pittsboro.
2. According to a report of Fred,
erick William Marshall, Wachovia
business manager under date of De
cember 10, 1773, “It has been decided
to give n 0 more credit (except in a
few cases just among ourselves,) and
to sell from the store only for cash or
barter, therefore the price on goods
has been reduced.”
3. January 16th to 18th, 1857. An
article published) in The Times
(Greensboro) the issue following the
storm, says the snpw was banked six
feet deep in the streets and railroad
cuts filled level. Three engines were
necessary to push through the snow,
making “about 100 yards per day. the
snow being to the top of their stacks.”
“It took from Sunday to Thursday
for a train to get from Jamestown to
Greensboro, a distance of ten miles.”
4. They were selected by Sir Walter
Raleigh in 1584 to head his first ex
pedition to the New World. They sail
ed April 27, 1584 in two small ships
from England. They touched the coast
at Ocracock and landed at Roanoke
Island. After 1 spending six weeks mak
ing explorations they sailed for home
sometime during August.
5. The general custom was to hold
tw 0 examinations each year. These
examinations were oral and the pub
lic was invited. Usually the questions
were asked by members of the trus
tees.
6 Boone with John Findlay, of
Pennsylvania, Joseph Holden, James
Mooney, William Cooley, and his own
brother-in-law, John Stewart, set out
from the Salisbury section on May
1, 1769 to explore the Kentucky lands,
lands for Judge Richard Henderson’s
land company.
1853—Cecil J. Rhodes the sickly
English youth shipped off to South
Africa who became an empire build
er, statesman and financier, bfcrn.
Died March 26, 1902.
MY NEW YORK
By JAMES ASWELL
New York, July 5. —Interview with
a “Ghost”:
Q. It’s true, I think, that you are
a professional “ghost,” that you run
advertisements in the personals eol
lumns offering to write stories, arti
cles and poems under the signature
of anyone who will pay for the ser
vice. '
A. Yes,' that is true. I would not.
want you to reveal my name, of
course, for various reasons. But it
is fascinating business and, in good
seasons, there is money in it.
Q. But why don’t you write under
oyur own name for the magazines?
There would be more money in that,
wouldn’t there?
A. Not necessarily, I used to be a
professional writer, using my own
name and several none de plume, But
my best yearly earnings then were
SB,OOO. Now I make up to $15,000.
Q. Are there many of your pro
fession in New York?
A- Only a very few reliable, first
rate ghost-writers excepting of
course newspapermen who are oc
casionally dragooned for the business.
But they are different. I take clients,
who have always wanted to write
but never tried and let them realize
their ambitions.
NO BITTERNESS
Q. But isn’t it true that a man
would have a rather bitter taste in
his mouth upon realization that the
successful book for which he is rs,
ceiving all the praise was written by
somebody else,
A. Not at all. Nearly all of my
customers come to believe —really be
lieve, I "mean—that they have actual
ly written what appears under their
names. If it sells —or has any sort of
success, If it flops, on the other hand
they disown it promptly and blame it
all on me.
RARELY SUGGEST CHANGES
Q. Do your clients ever insist on
collaborating and tell you to change
and rewrite, according to instruc
tions?
A. Very rarely. They feel, as I said,
that it’s their own work as soon as
the bv-line is attached and they
wouldn’t dream of pulling their own
brainchild to pieces.
Q. Do you ever do any writing of
your own?
A. No. I quit that years ago. When
I sign my name to anything it gives
me the creeps, I always feel like an
impostor—as If the thing had really
been writtXen by a ghost-writer.
Wife Preservers
Tar may be removed from cloth
with turpentine. Rub well into
''•nth and the tar will disappear
WANT ADS
Gel Results
LOCK JOINT GALVANIZED ROOF
ing, nails hid, can’t leak, $4.50 in 30
square lots, smaller lots a little
higher. Get my low prices on that
bill of lumber, etc. John B. Wat
kins, Jr- 5.1tl
LOCAL CONCERN WANTS YOUNG
man about 18 years old with high
school education or equivalent to
learn a good trade and business.
Small pay to begin, but offers won
derful opportunity for a, hustler
to go forward. Write giving full
particulars about yourself to
“Young Man” care Dispatch. 2-4 ti
HENDERSON BUSINESS SCHOOL
offers: Bookkeeping, Accounting,
Gregg Shorthand, Touch Typing,
Filling, Business English and Cor
respondence, Spelling, Penmanship,
Rapid! Calculation, Commercial
Law. Operating Mineograph, Elec
tric Bookkeeping Machine, Edi.
phone, etc. New fall term begins
September 9.
WE SPECIALIZE IN WELDING
things others can’t. Hester Motors,
Chestnut street. 3-4 ti
W ANTED—A PERMANENT JOB
by young man, nineteen years old.
Willing to accept any honest em
ployment. (High school graduate
and completed one year college
course. Address “Wfork” Henderson
Daily Dispatch! 5-3 ti
FOUND: TWO PAIRS CHILDREN
slippers at Rock Mill. Owner can
get same by calling and describing.
A. B. Young 5-lti
6BOOKO POSTED, GENERAL LED
ger controls and cost accounting
systems installed. Comparative trial
balances, balance sheets, profit and
loss statements by J. A. Lewis, Box
476, Henderson, N. C. 4-3 ti
AGAIN OUR LEADERSHIP IS
proven. We have installed the
latest type Motor analyzer and are
the only Independent Garage in
Vance with this equipment. We can
test and prove to you the trouble
with your motor in less time than
it takes to guess. Don’t let some
one guess, patronize the leader.
O’Lary’s Garage, 24 hour wrecker
service. Phone 470-J. 5-lti
WE BUY, SELL AND TRADE
cattle. We also keep a few
extra mules. W- C. Hight’s
Store. 5 EOD-tf.
WANTED CAMP TRAILER. MUST
be cheap for cash. Telephone War
renton. N. C., 53. J. or write Box
233, Wairenton, N. C. 2-4 ti
An Old Roman Road
f ___ _
i NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL
, ESTATE.
, Under and by virtue of order of the
T Superior Court of Vance County made
in the Special Proceeding* entitled
- Citizens Bank and Trust Company,
Administrator, c. t. a. of Mrs. Mary
A. Buchan vs. Henry S. Buchan,
Laura Buchan, Mae Buchan Mor?'*
Henry T. Morris, George T. Buchan,
Jr., Ruth Buchan Gray, Franklin
Gray, Mary Ann Buchan, Mrs. N. M.
Henderson, P. H. Gill, Administrator
of Mrs. Willie M Gill, the same be
ing No. 3604 upon the Special Pro.
ceeding Docket of said Court, the un
dersigned Commissioner will on the
22nd day of July, 1935, at 12 o'clock,
noon, at the Court House Door in
Henderson, N. C., offer for sale to
the highest bidder for cash those cer
tain tracts of land, lying and being
in Vance County, North Carolina,
more particularly described as fol
lows:
Lots On Charles Street.
Those three housese and lots and
I one vacant lot situate on the North
east side of Charles Street at the
I point where it is intersected by Cher
ry Street, opposite the present base
ball park. Said 4 lots fronting about
l 210 feet on Charles St. and extending
back about 150 feet.
Nut Bush Farm.
Begin ar a DiacK gum H. H. Row
) land’s and W. D. Wortham’s corner
. on (Beaver’s) Spring Branch and run
l thence up said Branch as it meanders
- S 63 E 10 poles South 72 E 14 poles
1 S 50 E 34 poles to the new road;
- thence along the North Edge of said
r road S63E 29 poles to a cedar James
i Wortham’s corner; thence N 81 poles
> to the East fork of Nutbush Creek;
thence down said Creek as it mean
• ders to a s tone H. H. Rowland's line;
’ thence S 12 W 91 poles to the 'begin
-1 ning. Containing 63 acres.
> 2nd tract Begin at a pine H. H.
i Rowland’s corner of the Williamsboro
' road and run thence S 19 W 167
J poles to Great Branch; thence up said
’ Branch as it meanders to a stone
’ James Wortham’s corner on said
branch; thence East 100 poles to a
? dogwood A. iM. Baskett’s line; thence
North 40 poles to a ted oak, Baskett’s
and John W Barnes corner; thence
' N 60 W 50 1.2 poles to a red oak.
1 Basket’s corner; thence N 11 E 37
poles to a maple on Cox’s Spring
. Branch; thence up said branch as it
meanders East 38 poles to a white
oak, Barnes’ and Joseph Baskett’s
corner on the North side of said
branch; thence North 43 poles to the
Williamsboro road; thence along said
Road N 56 W 16 poles N 62 W 40
poles, N 53 W 20 poles, N 66 W 30
poles to the place of beginning. Con
taining 117 arres, more or less.
The above two tracts of land are
adjacent to each other. The descrip
tions given above were taken from
a deed of trust recorded in Book 71
at page 317, Vance County Registry.
Home Tract.
That tract of albout 66 seres front
ing on the Henderson-Epsom Road
or hardsurface Highway, about one
fourth of a mile from the corporate
limits of the City of Henderson, and
bounded on the North by the lands
of Miss Lelia Young ana others; on
the East by the Henderson-Epsom
Highway; on the Couth by the lands
of Highland Home Realty Company;
and on the West by the lands of Hai
riet Cotton Mills and others, being
known as the Buchan Home Place.
By agreement of the parties to said
Special Proceeding, and by order of
the Court, the Commissioner will not
sell any part of the Mrs. Mary A
Buchan homeplace if the other real
estate described above brings enough
to pay the debts of the estate and
the cost of administration.
This 22nd dav of June. 1935.
R. G. KITTRELL,
Commissioner.
BUY OLD NEWSPAPERS FOP
wrapping purposes and kindling
fires Big bundle for 10c. three foi
28c at Dispatch office. H-tt
EXECUTOR’S NOTICE.
Having qualified as Executor so the
Estate of Mrs. Effie Mobley Browne,
deceased late of Vance County, North
Carolina, this is to notify all persons
having claims against the estate of
said deceased to exhibit them to the
undersigned at Henderson, N. C. on
or before the 21st day of June 1936,
or this notice will be pleaded in bar
of their recovery. All persons indebt
ed to said estate will please make
immediate payment
C. E. GREENE.
Executor of the Estate of Mrs.
Effie Mobley Browne.
BE PREPARED
For the hot summer
weather with a
1935 NORGE
REFRIGERATOR
and one of our
Monarch Electric
Ranges
Foil can own yours for as lit
tle as SIO.OO down with two
years to pay the balance.
Loughliit-Goodwyn
Jewelers.
Seashore Week-End
Fares To
Portsmouth-Norfolk
From:
Neuse $3.20
Wake Forest .... * 3.00
Youngsville 2.90
Franklinton 2.75
Kittrell 2.75
Henderson 2.50
Tickets sold for all trains Friday and
Saturday also Sunday Morning trains
until September 29. 1935.
Limited returning following Monday
For information see Agent
Seaboard
air uni railway
New Through Daily Train
To
Portsmouth Norfolk The Seashore
—No Change of Cars—
GOING— RETURNING—
Lv. Henderson 6:58 AM Lv. Norfolk 8:15 PM
Ar. Portsmouth 10:25 AM Lv. Portsmouth 4:05 PM
Ar. Norfolk 10:40 AM Ar. Henderson 7:25 PM
AIR-CONDITIONED
Cool—Clean—Quiet
First_C!ass Coach, Parlor Car, Dining Car
Spend The Week-End pn Round Trip
At The Seashore tD^«Owlenderson-Portsmouth
Tickets good on all trains Friday and Saturdays, also Sunday morning
trains. Return limit Monday following date of sale.
Lowest coach rate in history—cent and a half per mile.
C. G. WARD. DPA.
505 I. O O. F. Temple, Raleigh, N C. Phone 4610
Ex. 1
SEABOARD
AIR LINE RAILWAY
The ONLY completely Air-conditioned trains in the South
I* SPECIAL THIS WEEK ■
l 50 lbs. table ccpn meal .. $1.23 I
I 6 ihs Blue Belle flour .... 25c I
I 4-X Confectioners’ Sugar
2 lbs 15c I
Blue Belle Flour 7s Delicious. I
Dickson & Company I
I Phone 659 Horner St. |
I All Forms of
INSURANCE ■
RENTALS REAL
ESTATE
Al. B. Wester
Phone 189-7
Reduced Fares for
Tobacco Curers to
Canada
Buffalo $13.00 $21.70
Delhi 15 75 26.25
St. Thomas 15‘.75 27.75
Simco 15.45 25.50
Tilsonburg 16.10 26.85
Detroit . ...’ 13.85 23.10
Atlantic Greyhound
SI auoqj uorjKjs sng uotufi
Attention! Tobacco
Curers
Special Round Trip Fares
FROM
Raleigh-Durham-Norlina and
Intermediate Stations
—TO—
Buffalo • $26.00
Detroit 28.70
St. Thomas 28.70
Toronto 30.10
Tilsonburg 28 70
Deilhi 28.70
London 28.70
Waterford 28 70
Tickets on Sale Daily July 15th to
.September 10th. Inclusive—Limited.
.. to Return as Late as October 31 ..
For Information See Agent or Write
C. G. WARD, D. P. A.
505 I. O O. F. Temple Raleigh, N. C.
Seaboarcl
AIR. ILNI RAILWAV
The Only Completely Air-Conditioned
Trains in The South.

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