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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, November 18, 1935, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1935-11-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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IIKNDLKBON
GATEWAY TO
CKNTIiAL
o.uv;
twenty-second yeau
Sanctions Now In Effect
SUPREME COURT IS
TO HEAR TALMAOGE
APPEAL ON COTTON
Georgia Governor Is Allow
ed To File Suit Testing
Bankhead Cotton
Control Act
MAS BEEN FREQUENT
ROOSEVELT CRITIC
Will Get Hearing in High
est Tribunal Without
Wading Through Lower
Courts; Claim State of
Georgia Suffering on De
nial for Cotton Land Use
VVi hington. Nov. 18.—(AP)—Over
|i mil -t of tho government- the *»u
i' nir Court today agreed to let Gov
-1-1111)1 Ku.gone Talmadge of Georgia
'ii i nil attacking the constitution
lii. of 'he Bankhead cotton produc
tion control act.
T ilniadge has been a frequent critic
cl the administration.
Tiii. was the first request received
i • i - high tribunal from a State
i king to start original action in the
"kip fine Court against New Deal leg
i:'itmn. t’suully cases are started in
lower eourts and brought liere on ap-
Th* high court already had agreed
to review, a case brought by Dee
Meoie Texas planter, which affected
die Bankhead act.
But me attorneys contended it
fi.Mild tie decided without passing on
tV validity of the act itself.
talmadge contended the legislation
wi- 'ineonstitutional.” and was t en
hi i in- tlie State's farm land “sub
- 1.• i,ti;lllv worthless.” It operates two
inimn farms on which cotton is
grown.
(’n or gin's petition, which asks that
’lie iei be declared unconstitutional,
'till that Secretary Morgenthau and
"'in’ Federal officials he enjoined
from collecting the tax imposed on
'•oiiuii produced in excess of a mixed
qnot it has been oppOscl by Stanley
K"<'<l. the solicitor general.
II" h*-l replied on behalf of the gov
• iiiineiit that the action was cssen
'i illy against the United States, which
m;i\ not lie sued without its consent.
If a I -i) contended there was no basis
f t the higher court to take the case
E"fon the lower courts had acted.
Youth Dies
Not Naming
His Slayer
V licville, Nov. 18. —(AIM —Herbert
1 "M Owenby. 15-year-old school
’’ <n"'l today as he had promised—
■ 'h'Mit icvealing the name of the
' ir niade who hold the fatal rifle.
•’t;igg"i mg home Sunday, November
;i with 22-calibrc bullet near his
if young Owenby told his family
hel i l en shot while scuffling with
fie i 'I for possession of his rifle. He
(Continued on Page Three.)
Neutrality
\ iolalions
Under Fire
Names Called In U.
S. Grand .1 u r y
Probe of Shipments
for Gran Chaco War
% "W York. Nov. 18.—(API—A Fed
-1,1 giaml jury today began consid
-1; 11 11> n of evidence presented by a
assistant to the Unied States
'•"' .v general to determine wheth
:’"v American corporation violat
' ,J an-American neutrality agree
I' 1 " 1 ' 1 'kning the war between Para
' :,l, d Bolivia in the Gran Chaco,
iitin Conboy, » by Attor
' 'fiierai Homer S. Cummings to
" " Mgai" violations of the
i{ r < Da Pa*ro Two.)
lUettitersmt tlatlu Btapatrh
L,^ SBL> Wlß ® SHJITICB OF
the associated press.
HIGH WINDS CUT NIAGARA RIVER TO A BROOK
Niagara becomes a brook at the America nfails
Where formerly the Niagara river flowed between
the Three Sister islands and Goat island above the
Niagara falls, merely a brook divides the two in
90Million Chinamen Ready
To Desert National Regime
Okays Coal Control
.. »
'-yy: |
Elwood Hamilton
Constitutionality of Guffey Act,
providing for regulation of coal in- ,
dus try by taxation, was upheld by
Federal Judge Elwood Hamilton at
Louisville, but an appeal will be
carried to United States Supreme
Court by operators.
(Central Press)
Auto Tags
Cost Less
This Year
l>nil.v ■»iN|>;il"h nurmn,
In the Sir Waller Hotel.
IIY .1. <IIASKIIitYII.I.K
Raleigh, Nov. 18. —The new 1936 au
tomobile license plates will be cheap
er when they go on sale December 15
than in many years, since the 1935
General Assembly changed the base
rate for licensing passenger cars from
55 cents per 100 pound to 40 cents per
100 poundds, and the minimum price
from $12.50 to $8 for a set of plates.
A letter informing the car owners of
the State of this change in license
costs is enclosed with each application
card which will be mailed to every
registered car owner before Dec. 15.
(Continued on Page Four)
“OUR WEATHERMAN
FOR NORTH CAROLINA.
Fair tonight and Tuesday;
frost in favorable places tonigh
rising temperature in west and
central portions Tuesday.
ONLY DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THIS SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA.
Declaration of Independ
ence by North China To
Be Made Within
2 or 3 Days
JAPAN TO PROTECT
NEW PUPPET STATE
Tokyo Claims Dissatisfac
tion Exists Toward Nank
ing Government; Foreign
Powers Assured Their In
terests Will Not Be Jeop
ardized in Any Way What
ever
(By the Associated Press.)
From Tokyo and Shanghai came
simultaneous indications today that
90,000,000 people would soon find them
selves citizens of a new state virtually
independent of China.
The new state would consist of the
five provinces of China contiguous to
Manchukuo, the Manchurian empire
which Japan created in a military
campaign three years ago.
Japanese newspaper men in the
area reported to Tokyo that the dec
laration of independence would be
made by next Saturday.
The five provinces are Hopeh. Shan
tung, Shanshi, Chahrar and Sui-yuan.
Japanese sources contend that the
indicated edvelopment is a result of
dissatisfication among the Chinese
with the national government at
Nanking, and is a popular manifesta
tion of the people’s will.
Chinese government officials, on the
other hand, claim that the alternative
movement is a result of Japanese ma
chinations aimed at increasing Jap
an’s sphere of influence in the Far
East.
A spokesman for the Japanese Em
bassy at Shanghai said that, for their
part, the continuance of present con
ditions, referring to a resurgence of
anti-Japanese activities, were regard
ed by the Japanese as grave.
He said that Japanese troops were
massing at Shan-Haikuan, the city on
the Great Wall- but that they did not
(Continued on Page Five.)
BAILEYISURGING
LOANS ON HOUSING
Says Tar Heels Not Getting
Share of Money and Pro
cess Is Simple
Daily Dispnt«*k Rnrciui,
In thr Sir Waller Hotel.
IIV J. C. DASKKRVILLB.
Raleigh. Nov. 18.—North Carolinias
have been very slow to avail them
selves of the opportunity offered by
the Federal Housing Administration
to assist them in building new homes
or in repairing their present homes,
with the result that to date only about
$1,500,000, has been loaned by this or
ganization to persons in the State.
Senator Josiah W. Bailey pointed out
here today. He believes that this fig
ure should be increased to at least
$25,000,000 and will be as soon as the
(Continued cu T'
HENDERSON, N. C. MONDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 18, 1935
this photo. The lack of water is due to the high
winds coming over the falls, driving the water back
toward Lake Erie. This sight lasted for only a dav.
Southern Railway
Limited Derailed
Reidsvitle. Nov. 18.—(AI*) —Five
ears of the Southern Railway's all
-I‘ullmun express, the Crescent
Limited, were derailed by a broken
rail near here early today. First
reports said no one was injured.
The cars were a part of the
limited’s first section en route
from New Orleans to New York.
Railroad officials said they were
derailed apparently by a split rail
caused hy a sudden drop in tem
perature. The air-conditioned sleep
ers comprising a part of the road’s
finest equipment careened to the
edge of the roadbed but hung witli-
I out overturning. , ,
. , ■, , T ,. „
U. S.-Canada
Treaty Might
ReContested
50 Percent Tariff
Slash May Be Car
ried to Courts By
Lumber Industry
Washington, Nov. 18.—(AP) —Court
actions to test the constitutionality of
the law under which the new Amer
ican Canadian trade treaty was nego
tiated was hinted today by represen
tatives of the lumber industry.
The 50 percent slash which the
treaty provides in duties on Canadian
lumber was described by officials of
the National Lumber Manufacturing
Association as “paralyzing two im-
on Page Two.)
RESETTLEMENTTO
BEGINTHREE JOBS
Huge Park Projects Be
tween Raleigh and Dur
ham Are Included
Daily Dispatch Btirean,
la the Sir Walter Hotel.
iiv J c. baskeuvillk.
Raleigh, Nov. 18.—Actual work will
be started on three large projects in
this State, totalling 96,000 acres- or
almost 150 square miles, by the Re
settlment Administration this week, it
was learned today from the office of
J. M. Gray, head of the land utiliza
tion division. Several hundred men
will probably be put to work before
the end of this week on the Crabtree
Creek Park project of 6,000 acres be
tween Raleigh and Durham, on the
Sandhills land reclamation project., in-
Coughlin Deserts
Roosevelt Ranks
Dtroit, Mich., Nov. 18 (AP)—Rev.
Father Charles E. Coughlin turn
ed his National Union for Social
Roosevelt administration today
Justice definitely away from the
with an assertion that the New
Deal practice and principles of his
organization “are unalterably op
posed.”
ROOSEVELT NEEDS
SOUTH TO WIN OUT
IN 1936 ELECTION
Section Is So Democratic,
Defections That Have
Occurred Won’t
Damage Him
CHANCE IS BETTER
WITH LONG PASSING
Had Louisiana Dictator Liv
ed, He Would Have Swung
Louisiana Away From
Roosevelt, and Possibly
Arkansas, Mississippi,
Georgia, Oklahoma
By CHARLES P. STEWART
Washington, Nov. 18. Every day it
becomes clearer how much next year’s
political prospects have been changed
by Senator Huey P. Long’s elimina
tion as a factor in the 1936 equation.
Virtually all impartial prognosti
cators now reckon that President
Roosevelt will have to be re-elected
by the country west of the Alleghe
nies and by the South. Most of them
agree that this may be by a tight
squeak, but most of them also agree
that the present White House tenant
will make it if the South slays solid.
And they generally think that it will,
but many doubts are expressed that
it would have done sq with the late
jkingfiish campaigning to the con,tiary.
j (Continued on Page Three.)
Encamps To
Starve Near
White House
Washington, Nov. 18 (AP) —A dis
charged navy sailor encamped him
self with bis wife and two children
In front of the White House today on
Pennsylvania Avenue, with the an
nounced intention of letting the
President see an average American
family starve to death.
He advised newspaper offices In
advance of his determination to stay
there until he starved to death or
got a job.
The man gave his name as Lewis
Vinson Farrell, of Philadelphia. Ho
complained that he could not get a \
job until his navy record was cnang
ed. and could not get a hearing on
his record.
He said there was a “slanderous
statement’ ’in his record.
“I could get a job all right,” he said,
“if they would fix up that statement.”
Farrell and the family were un
noticed by many passing people and
sat calmly by the fence along the
avenue.
Roosevelt Denies Appeal
From Knights Os Columbus
For Investigating Mexico
New York, Nov. 18.—(AP)—Presi
dent Roosevelt has denied the appeal
of the Knights of Columbus for an
investigation of religious “persecu
tion” in Mexico- with the result that
the Catholic order planned today to
carry it cause to the public.
In a letter to Martin H. Carmody,
supreme knight of the order, the Pre
sident said:
“I decline to permit this govern
ment to undertake a policy of inter
ference in the domestic concerns of
foreign governments and thereby jeo
pardize the maintenance of peaceful
conditions.”
Mr. Roosevelt, reiterating his ab
PUBLISHED BVBfIY AFTSRNOOV
BXCBPT SUNDAY,
51 League Members
End All Trade With
The Italian Nation
Replaces De Bono
I £ =
J
r
Marshal Pietro Badoglio
In a surprise move, Premier Beni
to Mussolini recalled General
Emilio De Bono, commander-in
chief of the Italian armies in East
Africa, and named Marshal Pietro
Badoglio, above, chief of the gen
eral'staff, to the position. Gen. De
tebho was mad A field marshal, in
terpreted as a “kick upstairs”.
Loss Put At
sl,ooo,oooin
Coastal Gale
Area from Nor t h
Carolina to Maine
Lashed Over Week-
End; Seaman Dead
(By the Associated Press.)
A million dollar gale roared north
eastward today after battering the
Atlantic Coast from North Carolina
to Maine.
New Jersey and the southern shore
of Long Island suffered most as
waves and flood tides described as
the worst in 0 years hammered the
coast both south and east of New
York yesterday.
Two 3 000-ton freighters—the Flor
ida and Hartwelson—were crippled
(Continued on Page Two )
made it clear that his refusal was not
to be interpreted as an act of indif
ference.
Carmody, in making public the let
ter, said the Catholic order had asked
only for investigation of the rights
denied American citizens and of the
cruel oppression by that government
of its own people, sought by the Borah
resolution.”
“As citizens and as an organiza
tion,” Carmody concluded, “we shall
continue to use all proper means to
bring the attention of the American
people these deplorable conditions,
with the hope and confidence that an
aroused public sentiment will even
tually produce a condemnation of tho
. ~ . , at ••••( -r nnHpoHed ”
8 PAGES
TODAY
FIVE CENTS COPY
Mussolini, Prepared To
Combat Penalties For
African Invasion,
Is Resisting
TO TREAT OTHERS
AS THEY DO ITALY
Certain Countries Delay
Application of Sanctions
Because of Legal Difficul
ties; Germany Embargoes
Foodstuffs, Pleading Ne
cessities at Home
(By The Associated Press)
Benito Mussolini’s undeclared war
in Ethiopia met world opposition to
day as the League of Nations econo
mic sanctions were applied against
Italy. < -4« r
At midnight the program whereby
51 League members agreed to pre
vent importation of Italian goods and
to stop exporting certain raw mate
rials to Italy went into effect.
Italy, having already made prepa
rations to combat the penalties for its
invasion in East Africa, which the
League has termed “aggressive,” dis
played its “implacable resistance” to
the sanctions in a showing of banners
throughout the nation.
It had promised to treat other na
tions as they treated Italy. The Fas
cist grand council, which on Satur
day denounced the sanctions, was to
meet again tonight to study details
ol Italy’s fight against them, and it
was said in informed quarters to
consider peace proposals raised In
diplomatic contracts.
Italian troops guarded the British
Embassy in Rome and the head
quarters of other sanctionist countries
as youths began demonstrations de
nouncing the sanctions,.
Delay in application of the sanc
tions by certain countries was ex
pected to be cause of legal difficul
ties. The Spanish government had
not yet published its decrease mak
ing the economic penalties effective,
(Continued on Page Two.)
Five White
Men Freed
InLynching
Ashland, City, Tenn., Nov. 18.—
(AP) —Five white men on trial on
charges of murder in connection with
the killing of a Negro near here 14:
days ago were acquitted today by a
jury of Ethan county farmers.
Immediately after the verdict was
announced, Circuit Judge Wirth Court
ney, who presided over the trial, is
sued warrants charging conspiracy to
(Continued on Page Two.)
Nearly Half
PrisonersOn
Liquor Cases
Percentage Would
Be Higher If Indi
rect Causes Were
Included Also
Dally Diiipatck Bareao,
In the Sir Walter Hotel.
HY J. C. BASKERVIL.I.E,
Raleigh, Nov. 12. —Almost half of
the prisoners in jails in 57 of the 100
counties in North Carolina in August,
both before and after conviction were
there for violations of the liquor laws,
while almost two-thirds of those in
these jails were on charges either di
rectly or indirectly involving viola
tion of the liquor laws, figures re
leased today by Director R. Eugene
Brown, director of institutions of
the State Department of Public Wel
(Continued on I 3 age Three.)

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