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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, August 17, 1937, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1937-08-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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HENDERSON
gateway TO
central
CAROLINA
TWENTY -FOURTH YEAR
100,000 HEN ENGAGED IN SHANGHAI WAR
House Brushes Rules Aside
In Rush For Adjournment Os
Session By Coming Saturday
CONFIRMATION OF
BLACK FOR COURT
LIKELY BY NIGHT
Copeland Denounces Ala
bama Senator as “K. K.
K. Sympathizer”
Named to Court
RULE may strike
at extra session
Only Apparent Hitch in
Plans for Adjournment Is
Revolt of Certain House
Democrats Over Abandon
ment of Wages-Hours Bill
In the House
Washington, Aug. 17. —(AP) — The
House took another stride toward ad
journment today by adopting a re
solution to dispense with some of its
rules for the rest of the session.
The next order of business was
passage of the third and final de
ficiency bill. Disposal of that appro
priation measure will leave on the
House program only the Wagner
housing legislation, among major
bills leaders expect to pass.
The Senate heard Senator Cope
land, Democrat, New York, today call
Senator Black, Democrat, Alabama,
a “K. K. K. sympathizer” in debate
on the Alabaman’s nomination to the
Supreme Court. Leaders hope to have
Black confirmed before the Senate
quits for the day.
The House’s tape-cutting resolu
tion Would:
Permit dispensing with the morn
ing prayer and reading of the jour
nal, allow a motion at any time to
suspend the rules and pass a bill by
a two-third vote, authorize day-to-day
tCcnt’-'aed on Page Five)
His Mother Dead,
Gomez Shuts Out
Senators 8 to 0
New York, Aug. 17 (AP) —Lefty
Gomez, pitching with the know
ledge hi*» mother had died this
morning in Rodeo, Cal., shut out
the Washington Senators with
three hits as the league-leading
Yankees won the first game of to
day’s double-header, 8 to 0. Bill
Dickey, and Tony Lazzeri hit home
runs for the Yanks in the second.
POSTMASTERS FOR
STATE NOMINATED
Washington, Aug. 17. —(AP) —Pres-
ident Roosevelt sent to the Senate to
day the nominations of the following
to be postmasters:
North Carolina—Andrews, Galusha
Pulliuni; Whitaker, Mary Williams;
Nelson Hunsucker.
Santander’s
Fait Likely
Within Week
Franco’s Insurgents
Lunge Again At
Last Government
Hold in North
Ai, H, rRI " Vl i’'ianco-Spanish Frontier,
j,. 17-—(AP)—General Francisco
tnr: 0 ’ s i o gj ons i un g e( q against the
f j V(i Pring defenses of Santander from
directions today. Insurgent tac
'an ’ s I'" dieted the fall of ‘the Bis
’Hn within a week,
peri n< Powerful column which rip
ana v Pen a P ath with hand grenades
ish / a y° nf Ms reportedly routed Span
wh' L° Veinrnen t troops from a path
hol i last mountain strong
of Santander on the south,
sain dispatch from the insurgent side
bj ;scven government battalions had
- n trapped by Franco’s fast mov-
Continued on Page Five.).
lEcttfrvrsmt Haily DtspatfHr
ONLY DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THIS SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA.
U. S. WARSHIP RUSHED TO SHANGHAI
- ■■■ -x ... .. •
j
fiL H ... j jj l • • , •-• ■■ |
. U. S. S. Augusta, top; V. S. consulate, below
A view of the U. S. S. Augusta, flagship of the U. S. Asiatic fleet, sent
'to Shanghai, China, to aid in protecting American lives is shown top,
while below is the U. S. consulate in Shanghai, refuge of Americans
in the embattled city.
TO REQUIRE UNION
STATIONS OF BUSES
Utilities Commission To
Force Compliance With
Its Decisions
Daily Dispatch Bureau,
In the Sir Walter Hotel.
Raleigh, Aug. 17. —Efforts of bus
companies to explain delay in provid
ing adequate terminals on the grounds
that they have not decided whether to
maintain union stations or to use
aiate terminals are “all bosh,’’ accord
ing to R. (X Self, chief clerk of the
Slatl 1 Utilities Commission.
“The commission s order of June 12,
-925, provided tha“ union stations
m ist he maintained in certain cities.
Since then all towns served by two
or more bus lines, have been added,
he said.
“The commission Vat r.’t the slight
e-t idea of receding 'mu its position.
F* * cry town must ha ; 'e a union sta
tion and when any bus line says it is
holding up establishment of a new or*
(Continued on Page Three.)
FUTURES ARE QUIET
ON COTTON OPENING
Little Net Change in Prices Indicated
at Close of New York Trad
ing Session
New York, „ Aug. 17. —(AP) Cotton
futures opened quiet, one to three
noints higher with steadier Liverpool
partly offset by foreign and
southern selling. December, which
had eased to 10.20, had recovered to
in 24 shortly after the first half hour,
when The market generally was three
points net tower to three higher De_
cemiber at midday was selling at 10.26
with prices generally one point ne
lower to three higher.
Futures closed steady, one point
lower to three higher. Spot steady,
middling 10.56. Qpen Close
, .. 10.33 10.31
October 10-26 10.26
December 1031 10.29
January 10 ' 37 i 0.38
March 1044 10.44
May 10 ; 4 5 10.48
July
D . W!RE SERVICE OF
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
HENDERSON, N. C., TUESDAY AFTERNOON, AUGUST 17, 1937
BLACK NOT RATED
AS COURT STATURE
Was Never Even Thought of
in Speculations Before
Appointment
By CHARLES P. STEWART
Central Press Columnist
Washington, Aug. 17—If anything
ever struck Washington all of a heap
it was President Roosevelt’s nomina
tion of Senator Hugo L. Black of
Alabama to a seat on the United
Stated States Supreme Court bench.
Experienced guessers had suggest
ed a list of possibilities a quarter of
a column long, but Black’s name was
not on one of them.
Which, as one of his fellow senators
remarked to me with a strict injunc
tion as to anonymity, “Just goes to
prove that the Alabaman is estimat
ed at only about .22 caliber.” For, as
my informant added, “All the guessing
was done on the supposition that the
appointee would be a big man.”
Constitutional Expert.
Nevertheless, Black generally is
commented on as an excellent lawyer
and especially a constitutional expert.
Continued on Page Fivu.)
Tennessee Negro,
Accused of Death
Os Man, Is Hanged
Covington, Tenn., Aug. 17.—(AF)—
The bullet-punctured body of a 35-
year-old Negro slaying suspect was
found hanging beneath a highway
bridge 12 miles east of here early to
day.
The Negro, Albert Gooden, was
taken from Sheriff W. J. Vaughan by
a band of six masked men late yes
terday while the sheriff was bring
ing his prisoner by car from Memphis
to Covington.
Gooden was accused of slaying
Marshall Chester Doyle, of Mason,
Tenn., July 17, and was being brought
here for a hearing today after having
been held in Memphis for safe-keep
ing.
Bomb Victim
lyn i
Dr. Robert K. Reischauer (above),
professor of International Rela
tions at Princeton University, has
been reported killed in Shanghai,
China, with two other Americans,
when Chinese plane’s bombs landed
near the International Settlement.
(Central Press)
Farley Lauds
Postal Men’s
Short Week
Also Praises Roose
velt in His Address
To Postmasters At
Fayetteville
Fayetteville, Aug. 17. —(AP) —Post-
master General James A. Farley told
postmasters of the Carolinas here to
day that after two years of operation
he had no cause to regret the 40-hour
week which he approved for postal
employees.
“President Roosevelt has proven
the wisdom of offering greater oppor
tunity to the man who works,” he
said. “His policies are exemplified to
a greater degree in the postal service
than in any other public or private
establishment. I have believed for a
long time that good wages and good
working conditions are essential to
good business.’’
The Post Office Department head
emphasized the necessity of courteous
treatment of the public and urged fair
straightforward dealings with postal
employees.
“I can assure you,” he said, “that
the postal service is in good, healthy
condition. We are too busy even to
think of reduction In personnel.”
Radios For
N. C. Patrol
Again Late
Daily Dispatch Bureau,
In The Sir Walter Hotel,
Raleigh, Aug. 17—Difficulty in ob
taining bullet-proof windshields has
indefinitely held up inauguration of
the State highway patrol’s system of
radio broadcasting, though it may
seem a far cry from one to the other.
It all comes about through inabil
ity of the patrol to get delivery of the
sixty spick, span and shiny new pa
trol cars it has had ordered for many
weeks.
More than a week ago nineteen of
the roadsters, a captain’s sedan and
a coach were delivered and at the
same * time the patrol was informed
the other cars would be turned over
at the rate of about four or five a day,
according to Paul Rosekrans, com
munications engineer of the highway
commission. But so far no more
cars have come in and Mr. Rosekrans
Continued on Page Five.)
OUR WEATHER MAH
FOB NORTH CAROLINA
Generally fair tonight, slightly
warmer in north central portion
and near the southeast coast;
Wednesday partly cloudy.
ROOSEVELT OFF BY
MANIEOmSM
Ten Congressmen Accom
pany President for Vir
ginia Dare Celebra
tion Tomorrow
WILL BE PRESENTED
BY GOVERNOR HOEY
Chief Executive Leaves Ra
leigh for Roanoke Island;
Roosevelt Also To See
Musical Pageant Depicting
“Lost Colony” of 350 Years
Ago
Washington, Aug. 17.—(AP)—Presi
dent Roosevelt will leave tonight by
special train for Roanoke Island on
the North Carolina coast to join in
celebrating the 350t;h anniversary of
the founding of Sir Walter Raleigh’s
“Lost Colony.” /
Ten members of Congress will ac
company him. A feature of the pro
gram will be commemoration of the
birth of Virginia Dare, first child
born of English parentage on this con
tinent. Mr. Roosevelt’s address at 3:30
p. m., eastern standard time, tomor
row will be broadcast. He will remain
for a musical drama telling the story
of the ill-fated colony which began its
short existence July 4, 1587.
Virginia Dare was the granddaugh
ter of John White, leader of Sir Wal
ter’s second expedition to found an
agricultural colony. Her mother was
the former Eleanor White, who mar
ried A. Dare, the governor’s assistant.
The child was born a month after
the expedition reached the then dis
trict of Virginia, after which she was
named. Three years later, when White
returned from a trip to England, there
was no trace of the colony. Its fate is
still a mystery.
The. pageant which the President
will see will be given in a seaside
amphitheatre marked out of the big
sanddunes at Old Fort Raleigh.
Because of the Sino-Japanese con
flict and the likelihood Congress will
adjourn this week-end, Roosevelt will
return by train tomorrow night in
stead of cruising back from Norfolk.
GOVERNOR HOEY LEAVES
FOR DARE CELEBATION
Raleigh, Aug. 17. —(AF)—Governor
Hoey said today he regretted he would
be unaYle to speak at a convention
of postmasters of the Carolinas at
Fayetteville this afternoon. Hoey pre-.
viously had tentatively agreed to in
troduce Postmaster Ganerajl James
A. Farley.
The governor, Mrs. Hoey and their
daughter, Miss Isabel, will leave here
by automobile at 2 o’clock this after
noon for Manteo, where Hoey will in
troduce President Roosevelt tomor
row.
Robeson County
Indians Admitted
To Jury Service
Lumberton, Aug. 17 (AP) —Robeson
county Indians were called for duty in
superior court this week in what ob
servers said was the first time.
Four were included in a list of tales
men summoned yesterday on the ord
er of Judge G. V. Cowper, of Kinston,
presiding over a special term of court
hen*.
The Indians had petitioned the court
and county commissioners to be allow
ed to serve on juries, asserting their
presence would increase convictions
among the race and reduce Indian
homicides.
The right of the Indians to vote has
been recognized for years.
BOND FOR FUGITIVE
ORDERED FORFEITED
Alfred Malicord Fails To Appear In
Alabama Court for Extradi
tion North
Burlington, Aug. 17. —(AP) —Su-
perior Court Judge Walter Bone, of
Nashville, ordered forfeited today the
$2,000 bond of Alfred Malicord, want
ed in New York State to face an ar
son charge.
Malicord had been given until yes
terday to surrender after an unsuc
cessful fight against extradition to
Warren county, New York, where a
grand jury had indicted him on a
Charge of arson in connection with
the burning of a boat.
The defendant had not appeared at
the opening of today’s court session,
and attorneys presented for th*
court’s approval a compromise ar
rangement under which Ataman .-e
county would get SBOO of the bond and
New York State $1,200. Judge Bone
approved the proposal.
Sheriff H. J. Stockard, of Alamance
county, said he immediately disposed
of it according to the court’s direc
tion. .
PUBLISHBP UVBUY AFTHKNOON
EXCEPT SUNDAY.
Americansßushing
From WarZoneFor
Philippines Refuge
Seek Missing Fliers
... •%, f y <q.
r;3
•~p‘V •
|.<v * •
141
• V ° RK
Six Soviet fliers, lead by Sigismund
Levanevsky, were last heard from
after crossing the North Pole (A)
on their route to Fairbanks, Alaska,
for refuling. Dotted lines show the
routes taken by searching planes
which over the tundra
wastes where the giant Russian
plane is believed to have been
forced down.
(Central Press)
Will Expand
Arctic Hunt
For Airmen
Fliers of Three Na
tions at Fairbanks
Ready for Hop into
Frozen North
Fairbanks, Alaska, Aug. 17. —(AP)
—Aviators of three nations gathered
on the rim of the Arctic today for a
search into the bleak wastes where six
Russian trans-polar fliers vanished
last Friday.
Wind, rain and lowering clouds,
which swiapt ominously across the
top of the world yesterday, balked
American, Russian and Canadian air
men from launching an aerial hunt.
Among those grounded by the
storm was Jimmy Mattern, American
aviator who in 1933 was saved from
death in the wilds of Siberia by Sigis
mund Levaneffsky, pilot of the miss
ing plane, which was enroute here on
a 4,000-mile flight from Moscow.
Mattern, on a world flight when he
crashed in Siberia, spent yesterday
equipping his ship with de-icers, and
a refuelling plane to enable fn m to
extend his search was en route here
from his California headquarters.
In the Northwest territory Cana
dian Pilot Bob Randall was ready to
soar over the frozen Arctic ocean in a
plane chartered by the Russian Em
bassy in Washington.
GUILFORD SHERIFF
HEADS ASSOCIATION
Joe Fhipps Elected at Closing Session
of Sheriffs in Greensboro;
Others Named
Greensboro, Aug. 17 (AP) Sheriff
Joe Phipp3, of Guilford, was elected
president of the Sheriffs’ Association
of North Carolina today at the clos
ing session today of the organizations
fourteenth annual convention. He
succeeds Sheriff Samuel Whitehurst,
of Pitt county, to serve during the en
suing year as chairman of the asso
ciation’s steering committee.
Sheriff Clyde Robinson, of Gaston,
was elected first vice-president, and
Sheriff David Jones, of New Hanover,
was second vice-president, and John
R. Norris, of Wilmington, former
sheriff of New Hanover county, was
re-elected secretary-treasurer for the
seventh year of service in that capa
city.
The association voted by acclama
tion to accept the invitation of Sheriff
Ernie Shore, of Forsyth, to hold the
1938 convention at Winston-Salem.
The date will be announced after it
has been determined by the president
and other officers.
8 PAGES
TODAY
FIVE CENTS COPY
Over 2,000 American and
British Women and Chil
dren Have Left
Battle Sector
CITY RINGED ABOUT
WITH RAGING FIRES
Business Has Ceased To Be
As Shell Splinters Spray
Peaceful Foreign Home
Area; Japanese Big Guns
Bombard City Both Day
and Night
Washington, Aug. 17 (AP) —Sec-
retary Hull said today this gov
ernment had ordered 1,200 Ma
rines to sail from San Diego to
Shanghai to protect American na
tionals from violence.
Shanghai, Aug. 17.—(AP) Shell
splinters sprayed peaceful foreign
home areas with death by day and
great guns roared out terror tonight
for the Chinese-Japanese battlefield
of Shanghai.
One hundred thousand men with
guns and bombs fought on to a goal
none could foresee.
Fire ringed the city.
Japanese big guns boomed after
dark in a renewal of the duel which
earlier in the day threw shell frag
ments into the French concession,
where most Americans in Shanghai
live.
Concession police were unable to
learn the number of dead or injured,
but estimated 50 persons, all Chinese,
were struck by shrapnel or shell splin
ters.
Business collapsed.
More than 2,000 American and Bri
tish women and children fled from
Shanghai.
Sunset found “French town’’ ready
for another dark night of siege.
At dusk guns of Japanese warships
in the river began a terrific bombard
ment. The shells’ direction could not
be ascertained.
Chinese-Japanese air duels shook
the city until early in the afternoon.
Among the refugees who left Shang
hai today were Mrs. Theodore Roose
velt, Jr., and son, Quentin, who went
down the W'hangpoo river to the Ptes
ident Jefferson, bound for Manila.
CUMBERLAND POSSE
WEARY OF MANHUNT
About 75 Men Continue, However, To
Bog Through Swamps For
Allegeed Assailant
Roseboro, Aug. 17 (AP) —About 75
tired possemen bogged through Cum
berland county swamps today, begin
ning the third day of a hunt for a
Negro accused of criminally attack
ing and wounding an elderly woman.
The hunt began Sunday in Samp
son county, when Miss Mittie Ses
soms, of Roseboro, told officers a Ne
gro she identified as Odell Hadley
ravished her and then inflicted a head
wound upon her with a pistol.
Bloodhounds mouthed along a mean
dering trail throughout yesterday and
late in the day the chase led into the
fringe of Cumberland county. Posse
men said they had not cited the fugi
tive, although several persons living
in the lowlands reported having seen
the farm hand in flight.
ALAIiICEITjNG
ON ABC IS HEAVY
Church Bells Ring Out;
Quiet Referendum Had
In Stokes County
Burlington, Aug. 17. —(AP) —Voting
in Alamance county’s referendum on
the establishment of liquor stores was
termed “surprisingly heavy” this
morning by election officials, consid
ering the minimum interest shown
over the county at large in pre-elec
tion activity. On the basis of the num
her of votes casi. at 10 o’clock this
morning, it was estimated authorita
tively that three-fourths of the coun
ty’s registered voters would ballot be
fore the polls close.
The date for the referendum had
been set by the county commissioners
after petitions presented with what
sponsors said was the required fifteen
percent of registered Voters’ names
were twice voided, on the grounds the
number of signers’ names challenged
successfully reduced the signed
strength to less than 15 percent.
Taking a leaf from the prohibition
ists’ technique of 1933, when Alamance
voted two to one against repeal, along
Continued on Page Five.; ;

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