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Henderson daily dispatch. (Henderson, N.C.) 1914-1995, August 18, 1937, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068401/1937-08-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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HENDERSON
GATEWAY to
CENTRAL
CAROLINA
twenty-fourth YEAR
ROOSEVELT AT MAHTEO RENEWS ATTACKS
** ******** *************** ****** * * * *
Japs Give Way In Face Os Dogged Ch inese Attacks
CHiNESE SOLDIERS
OUTNUMBER ENEMY
NEAR FOUR TO ONE
Japarese Warships Shell
Chinese Positions In
Shanghai To Aid
Land Forces
NEAR PANIC AMONG
THE U. S. REFUGEES
Japanese Bombing Planes
Appear Over City in Bright
Moonlight as Americans
Aboard Tender Flee City to
Safety on Dollar Liner Mc-
Kinley
Shanghai. Aug. 18. — (AF) —Japa
nese war planes crashed bombs into
Chinese positions in a moonlight at
tack tonight against the Chinese
hordes that are pushing Japanese
land forces toward the sea.
While Japanese warships shelled
Chinese positions north and east of
here, eight high flying bombers pass
ed westward over the foreign areas to
drop explosives in the direction of
the Chinese airdrome.
The planes appeared as a full moon
illuminated the cloudless sky. They
flew o' ; er both the French concession
and the international settlement,
bringing thousands of foreigners to
jooftops to watch the raid. On land,
Japanese were outnumbered almost
lour to one and were reportedly giv
ing way slowly in the northeastern
uctor of the international settlement.
Japan threw its combined first and
third fleets into the battle to keep
land forces from being hemmed in
completely.
Chinese snipers’ bullets, meanwhile,
three times imperiled Americans
while the Dollar liner McKinley eva
(Continued on Page Six.)
4 Men Die
In Blast On
Destroyer
Philadelphia, Pa., Aug. 18 (AP)
—Four men were killed and ten
injured by a steam explosion
aboard the United States destroyer
Cassin at the Philadelphia navy
yard today, the commandant’s of
fice announced.
The (lead were civilian workers
in the navy yard.
One of those hurt was Lieutenant
Henry Marshall, engineering officer
of the vessel. Six other injured were
navy enlisted men, and three were
civilian employees. Their identities
were not immediately available.
The Casoin, one of the navy’s new
est destroyers, was in drydock at the
navy yard for repairs when an ex
ploding steam pipe showered a crew
(Continued on Page Six.)
Clue Found
On Soviets *
Lost Plane
Fairbanks, Alaska, Aug. 18.—(AP)
. v ’kimos who reported hearing en-
KWe.', along the. northern Alaskan
coa.-j “four or five days ago” furnish-
C>'st definite . clues today in
, ’ fur the missing Soviet trans
polar plane.
Natives gathered at the Barter Is
and to trade told Pilot Bob Randall
fxterday they heard the roar of en-
J nf ' s ’ :1 when they could sight no
° at decided it must have been an
ail Plane.
Border Island is on the 144th meri
ai1 ’ miles east of Barrow. The
da^ U ) Vas Baited from here yester
■’ by stormy weather. The spot is
a s east of the 148th meridian,
t/'n w * uc h the six airmen planned
J >y enroute here on a 4,000-mile
°P across the North Pole from Mos
cow.
Bandall reported from Barrow the
l ! * e Beard by the Eskimos “might
boor, the Russian ‘plane.”
one of the natives told of seeing
lhe Plane.
I Soviet plane was last heard
portly after it crossed the pole
earJ y Friday. ■
.CX»<-cw»U£ PERRY M£MCRi.'.UE- ;
' HENDERSON. G* 4* W
mttwttßtm &mlxs Utapatrh
New Justice U. S. Supreme Court
;g: : ::: ; ;• y d
R y --ysg&mg3&
HUGO BLACK
Washington, Aug. 18.—(AP) —Hugo
L. Black, who came out of the deep
South as a liberal senator ten years
ago, will put on the robes of a Su
preme Court" justice next October.
SCHOOL BUS NEEDS
ARE PROVIDED FOR
Nearly $1,000,000 for Trans
portation Facilities in
Few Months
Dsiiiy Dispatch Burean,
In The Sir Walter lintel,
Raleigh, Aug. 18—'When the coming
school year opens, the school bus sit
uation will be “well in hand” accord
ing to Lloyd Griffin, executive secre
tary of the State School Commission.
Final delivery of buses, scheduled
to be completed before September 1,
will give every county an adequate
number of buses in good operating
condition, he said.
How long the condition will con
tinue satisfactory will depend largely
upon the “kind of winter the weather
man gives us,” Mr. Griffin added.
Since the opening of the fiscal year
the commission has ordered 700 buses,
Mr. Griffin said, many of which have
already been delivered and have been
allocated to various counties. In ad
dition, there were some 50 delivered
between the passage of an emergency
appropriations measure by the 1937
legislature and the end of June. A
total of $750,000 has been spent on
these buses, Mr. Griffin said.
Still to be delivered to the commis
sion and still to be allocated to the
counties are 50 all-steel buses which
will come from an Indiana plant. All
bodies for the other buses are manu
factured in the State at Wilson, High
Point and Conover.
There are already a dozen all-steel
buses in operation, not more than one
in any county. Os the new buses no
more than one will be allocated to any
county, with the possible exception of
two counties which may get two bus
es each, Mr. Griffin said.
They will be allocated, he said, to
those counties in which the bus
routes are most traveled. The school
commission secretary said, however,
that the other buses have proved en
tirely satisfactory and that they have
shown great strength in “crack-up”
tests.
ALAMANCE, STOKES
COUNTIES GO DRY
Heavy Majorities Against Liquor Con
trol Stores Returned in
Tuesday Elections
Raleigh, Aug. 18.—(AP)— Two
more North Carolinian counties
apparently were in the dry col
umn today, after elections yester
day.
Stokes and Alamance counties
voted 2,566 to 1,914, and 4,086 to
3 083, respectively, to prohibit the
institution of alcoholic boards of
control stores. Two precincts re
main to be heard from in each
county, but election officials said
final returns could not change the
results.
ONLY DAILY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN THIS SECTION OF NORTH CAROLINA AND VIRGINIA.
WIRE SERVICE OF
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
HENDERSON, N. C., WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, AUGUST 18, 1937
The outspoken Alabaman, con
firmed by his colleagues in the Sen
ate late yesterday by a 63 to 16 vote,
is the first Roosevelt appointee to
the high tribunal.
ITALIANS, GERMANS
LEAD REBEL DRIVE
Push for Santander May Be
Crucial Campaign of
Spain’s Civil War
Hendaye, Franco-Spanish Frontier,
Aug. 18. —(AP) —An insurgent army,
described by the Spanish government
as built around the Italian “black
arrow” bridgade, and bolstered by 200
German planes, battered toward San
tander today in what may prove the
crucial campaign of Spain’s civil war.
Columns operating on parallel high
ways into Santander, the govern
ment’s last Biscayan seaport-strong
!hold, were reported within 25 miles
of Santander’s outskirts.
That was the distance in straight
line northeast, but each unit faced
the task of covering some 35 or 40
miles of curving highway flanked by
the barked wire and concrete forti
fications of Santander’s defenders.
The fourth day of General Fran
cisco Franco’s big push through the
mountain lands brought into play
yesterday large numbers of tanks,
field guns and planes.
The Valencia government seemed
to regard the Santander offensive as
the pivotal action of the 13-months
old conflict.
STEEL AND COPPER
LEADERS IN STOCKS
These and Specialties Trafficked In
to Virtual Exclusion of
Other Issues
STEEL AND .. .. ocC cmfwyp shr
New York, Aug. 18.—(AP) —Share
market traders liked steels, coppers
and specialties today, but showed lit
tle warmth for other sections. Gains
of fractions to a point or so among
favorite issues contrasted with losses
of about as much in other shares.
From the start, dealings were thin.
Bonds were uneven.
Transfers approximated 650,000
shares.
American Radiator 21 5-8
American Telephone 169 3^l
American Tobacco B 80 1-2
Anaconda 60
Atlantic Coast Line . 51 3-4
Atlantic Refining 29
Bendix Aviation 20 5-8
Bethlehem Steel 100 3-8
Chrysler 115 3-4
Columbia Gas and Elec 13
Commercial 13 7-8
Continental Oil 15 1-2
DuPont 162
Electric Pow & Light 22
General Electric 56 5-8
General Motors 58 1-4
Liggett & Myers B • 52
Southern Railway 29 1-4
Standard Oil N J 68 1-4
U S Steel 118
TrnSs
ALABAMASENATOR
Executive Would Elevate
Mrs. Graves to Black’s
Senate Post Tem
porarily
SEEK TO PREVENT
BLACK’S SERVICE
Alabaman Wants Court To
Order Him To Show Why
He Should Be Allowed To
Serve on High Court;
House and Senate Rush
T o ward Ad j ournment
Washington, Aug. 18.—(AP) —The
possibility developed today that ap
pointment of Senator Hugo Black, of
Alabama, to the Supreme Court may
result in another woman becoming a
member of the Senate.
Alabama congressmen said they
understood Governor Bibb Graves, of
Alabama, had decided to appoint his
wife, Mrs. Dixie Graves, as a tem
porary successor to Black.
There was some belief this might
be delayed because of a legal move
by Albert Levitt, former Federal
judge in the Virgin Islands, to pre
vent the senator from taking his seat
on the bench.
Levitt asked the Supreme Court
for permission to file a petition re
questing Black to show why he should
be permitted to serve as an associate
justice.
It was understood Mrs. Graves
might be here tomorrow to be sworn
into the Senate. She yould be one of
only two women in the Senate. The
(Continued on Page Six.)
Two Airmen
Lose Lives
With Plane
Maidens, Va., Aug. 18 (AP) —Two
airmen believed to be army fliers were
killed when their disabled plane crash
ed and exploded into flames within
the grounds of the Virginia Indus
trial School for Boys near here today.
Gordon Rudd, acting assistant su
perintendent of the school, said the
low-winged monoplane smashed to
the ground when the pilot tried to
avoid a deep ditch in the school’s
dairy pasture.
“It literally explodded into flames
as it struck within 100 yards of the
dairy barn, where several boys were
at work,” he said.
Rudd ordered the charred bodies in
the wreckage of the airship be left
untouched while he called officers at
Langley Field.
Officers at Langley Field, after a
on Page Five)
Grand Jury
Investigates
Lynch Affair
Covington, Tenn., Aug. 18. —(AP) —
A grand jury of farmers and mer
chants. undertook today to learn the
identifies of the “to hell with the
law” lynchers of a smalltown Negro.
Sheriff W. J. Vaughan offered to
testify “to clear the matter up pro
perly,” but the jury’s task appeared
difficult in the face of the earlier
statement he could not identity any
of the six masked men who snatched
(Continued on Page Six.)
OUR WEATHEi? MAH
FOR NORTH CAROLINA.
Partly cloudy, scattered thund
afternoon or tonight and possibly
ershowers in north portion tins
in central portion Thursday. f '
Guest of North C arolina at Manteo
President Franklin O. Roosevelt
U. S. BUNGLED OVER
WARSHIPLEASINGS
Deal With Brazil May Upset
South American Good
will To Us
By CHARLES P. STEWART
Central Press Columnist
Washington, Aug. 18. —President
Roosevelt and Secretary of State Hull
surely should have had better judg
ment than to imagine that unpleasant
repercussions would not result from
their plan to lease certain obsolete
war vessels to Brazil.
Any one with even a primary
knowledge of South American inter
national relationships should have
been aware that the Argentine Re
public is intensely jealous of Brazil.
Yet apparently the Argentine reac
tion to Uncle Sam’s program of war
ship leasing to the Brazilians has
taken Washington quite by surprise.
It is not an official reaction thus far,
but it is more than sufficiently ob
vious in the Argentine press evident
ly to have nonplused the State De
partment. That the scheme would out
rage Argentine public opinion was as
(Continued on Page Six.)
COTTON AGAIN HAS
SHARP PRICE DROP
Prices Ease on Hedging To Close 15
to 16 Points Lower at End
of Day’s Trading
New York, Aug. 18. —(AP) —Cotton
futures opened quiet, up two to five
points on steadier Liverpool cables,
with traders generally awaiting loan
developments. Shortly after the first
half hour, December sold at 10:30,
with the list about three to five points
net higher. There was some hedging
and December eased to 10.22 by mid
day, when the market generally was
one to three points net lower.
Futures closed steady, 15 to 16
points lower. Spot quiet, middling
10.40.
Open Close
October 10.36 10.15
December 10.29 10.19
January 10.33 *1.0.15
March 10.42 10.23
May 10.46 10.30
(July ...... 10.51 10133
RECOVER BODY OF
MAN OUT OF SOUND
Plymouth, Aug. 18.—(AP) The
body of Will Nixon, Winfall man, who
slipped overboard Thursday between
Reid’s Point, and Laurel Point, was
found Tuesday afternoon in Albe
marle Sound just below the new
bridge site by B. S. Twiddy, of Pea
Ridge.
PUBLISHED EVERT AFTERNOON
EXCEPT SUNDAY.
Manteo Has
Biggest Day
In All Time
Greatest Crowd Ever
on Roanoke Island
Greets Roosevelt at
His Speech
Manteo, Aug. 18.—(AP) —A holiday
spirit prevailed today among Roanoke
Islanders, State officials and thous
ands of visitors here to welcome pres
ident Roosevelt at ceremonies com
memorating the 350th anniversary of
the birth of Virginia Dare, first Eng
lish native American.
The crowd termed by islanders the
largest ever gathered here, swarmed
through gaily decorated streets and
virtually filled nearby Fort Raleigh,
site of Sir Walter Raleigh’s Lost
Colony, where the Presirdent will
speak at 3:30 p. m.
Two hundred troops from Fort
Bragg at Fayetteville, 60 State high
way patrolmen and a squad of secret
service men were on hand.
The President arrived by special
train at Elizabeth City early today
and boarded a coast guard cutter.
Mr. Roosevelt will leave the cruiser
and drive to Fort Raleigh, where he
will speak from a specially built plat
form within a star-shaped enclosure.
Representative Lindsay Warren, Dem
ocrat, North Carolina, will preside,
and Governor Clyde Hoey, of North
Carolina, will introduce the Presi
dent. Bishop Thomas Darrt, of Wil
mington, bishop of the East Carolina
Diocese of the Episcopal Church, will
ask the invocation.
Immediately after his address, the
President will drive past a memorial
(Continued on Page Six.)
ROOSEVELT’S SON~
DENIES AN INSULT
Honeymooning John in Paris Says He
Didn’t Squirt Champagne at
Mayor of Cannes
Paris, Aug. 18—(AP) —John Roose
velt, youngest son of President Roose
velt, told The Associated Press to
night he did not squirt champagne
at the mayor of Cannes or hit him
with a bouquet of flowers at a fes
tival Sunday.
The mayor’s aides had said the
President’s son was the pferson who
thus greeted him during Cannes’ bat
tle of flowers.
“The first inkling I had of the
whole situation was when a London
newspaper called me here in Paris
early today,” young Roosevelt said.
8 PAGES
TODAY
FIVE CENTS COPY
“MORE DEMOCRACY”
AN® TO CRITICS
OF NEWDEAL PLAN
President Declares He Seeks
No Change in Form of
the United States
Government
BIG CROWD GREETS
CHIEF EXECUTIVE
Throngs Cheer Him at Eliza
beth City Where He Leavee
Train To Take Coast Gubrd
Cutter for Island;. Intro
duced by Governor Clyde
R. Hoey
Manteo, Roanoke Island, Aug.
18 (AP) —President Roosevelt
declared today “democracy—
and more democracy” is the ans
wer to Tory insistence that “sal
vation lies in the vesting of
power in the hands of a select
class.’’
“I seek no change in the form
of American government,” he
said. “Majority rule must be
preserved as the safeguard of
both libertv and civilization.”
The President, renewing his cri
ticism of the Liberty League and oth
ers who he said “thunder todgy,"
spoke at a celebration marking the
350th anniversary of the founding of
“the Lost Colony.”
He based much of his address,
broadcast nationally, on a letter,
which Lord MacAuiey, English his
torian, sent in 1857 to an American
friend, Sam Randall, a New York
writer.
MacAuiey wrote “democracy would
not succeed in the United States,” ad
ding.
“Either some Caesar or Napolfton
will seize the reins of government
with a strong hand or ypur republic
will be laid waste by barbarians in
the twentieth century.”
Mr. Roosevelt dubbed “American
Lord Macauleys” persons who “tell
(Continued on Page Olx.)
New Stamp
Is Having■
Fast Sale
Manteo, Aug. 18.—(AP)—The tiny
post office here was doing a bumper
business today as persons high and
low cla4*>red for the five-cent stamps
commemorating the birth of Virginia
Dare.
“We were sent three quarters of a
million of them,” said Postmaster C.
R. Evans, of this village of less than.
1,000 year-round residents, “and at
the rate they are going they will all
be sold out today.”
History says Virginia Dare was
born 350 years ago today at the site
of nearby Fort Raleigh, where Sir
Walter Raleigh’s “Lost Colony”* was
established. The blue stamp shows the
infant and her parents, Eleanor and
Ananias Bare, against a background
of a log cabin at the fort.
Mrs. Lindsay Warren, of Washing
(Continued on Page Six.)
Clipper Is
At Azores
On Flight
Port Washington, Aug. 18.—
(AP)—The 22-ton Pan-American
Clipper HI landed at Horta, in
the Azores, at 5:45 a. m. (eastern
standard time) today after a 2,-
067-mile flight from Bermuda,
Pan-America Airways officials re
ported.
The giant seaplane, making a
survey flight over the Atlantic,
completed the hop in 14 hours, 24
minutes, flying at an average
speed of 145 miles most of the
way.
Clipper will leave Horta Au
gust 21 for Lisbon, Portugal, and
fly from there to Southamitton,
England. *

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