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Hickory daily record. [volume] (Hickory, N.C.) 1915-current, September 06, 1922, Image 2

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PAGETVO
THE HICKORY AILY RECORD
Hickory Daily Record
Subscribers desiring the address
of their steer chanced will please
tata In their communication both
OLD and NEW addresses.
To insure efficient delivery, eom
plaints should be made to the Sub
scription Department promptly.
City subscribers should call 167 re
garding complaints.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Year - 15.00
TW mail. 14.00: 6 months, $2.00)
Six Months 12-50
Threa Months ...............
One Month - -45
On Week 1
Entered as second-class matter
ftmtembcr 11. 1915. at the postoffice
at Hickory, N. C, under the act of
Ifairh 8, 1879.
TM Associated Prescs is exclusive
hr entitled to the use of republica
tlon of all , news credited to it or
not credited in this paper and also
the local news . published herein.
This is the season of the year when
most parents are investing in school
books. Those with children in high
school are donating to the cause quite
liberally, while others wicn children
in the elementary grades are not
having to ante so much.
That remainda us of the olden
clays when one inherited a third or
fourth reader from n older brother
tr p. who Merited It it ." homu
other antecedent, and when one could
count on Maury's geography, Mary
F. Hide's lessons in grammar, Har
rington's speller and sonic or the
others as being standard. They stuck.
All Latin Oooks, wo understano, were
alike.
Granted that the new method? aie
easier on the children, who learn more
rapidly than the youth of yesterday ,
perhaps, it is a fact that text-books
change frequently these days and
come comparatively high. These text
books change pretty often, and ths
book James used last year probably
will be an old bird's nest when Jam:
comes along today .
Wouldn't it be as" easy for those
whoaelect text-books to stick to the
gyod ones for a number of years?
. THE FLIGHT FROM REALITY
Ji Hickory -.people will continue to
Vait for their morning paper to
morrow, and it will be some time be
fore they become reconciled to the fact
thnt.it maybe weeks before they
can get these early' in the day. That
will make . them, think of . the shop
men's "strike The shopmen, by the
way, are striking under a national
agreement to fordo northern and
western roads to make the same sort
of terms that their own roads have
offered them. It is a fine piece of
business indeed.
Construction work everywhere has
been slowed up by the coal and rail
strikes and in Hickory several pieces
of work have been stopped for lack
of brick. The kilns are unable to ob
tain coal. It was thought the plants
would be running again soon and
that the delay would not be for long.
The strike is being brought home to
many people.
v Coal already has advanced from
$9 to $12.50 a ton as a result of the
strike in the bituminous fields. It
was high enough at the first price,
but it may go even higher.
LOOKS FOR GOOD BUSINESS
Charlotte Observer.
The Manufacturers Record, analyz
ing the economic situation, finds
ground for a prophecy of good busi
ness in the south following the moving
of crops that have been produced this
year. "There has never been a time
when the advertiser could secure bet
ter dividends from an advertising in
vestment than he can logically expect
now."
Here, is the basis of The Record's
reasoning:
Vlt is said there was a buyer's strike
two years ago. The truth is that the
purchasing power of rural district and
city precinct alike was cut to the bohc.
They could not buy who had not the
means to buy.
"For two years there has been piling
up a mountain of unsatisfied wants
and requirements. Not only are there
years of construction work to be made
up; but there is hardly a farm in the
south, or in the country, which does
not require comparatively heavy pur
chases for maintenance, quite aside
irpm normal improvement.
fCotton is again at something like
a compensatory price and promises to
go higher. Diversified farming is free
ing the southern dining room and feed
troughs. Tobacco prices are good. For
the first time in two "years here will
be . money to spend in the south, mon
ey, to supply , essential things which
people have been temporarily doing
without. Not only so in private en
terprise, but never in all histnrv has
the-south been so generous in providing
u ' , Dublic necessities churches,
schools, bridges, roadn and drainage."
v ' vW.0NJr &B JOHNSON
New York World.
Wore and more Mr. Harding is
coming to believe that he is destined
knows now that whatever else hap
pens It will not be Hiram W. John-
5?IL wJke,le nomination away
from him in 1924.
Springfield Republican.
Is day-dreaming a pood or a bad
thing? -The question is being; asked
afresh as a result of the vogue of
psychoanalysis, and expert opinion,
if there can be said to be such a
thing, is much divided. Old-fashioned
didactic" literature used particularly
to warn the young apainst this in
sidous habit, which promoted "wool
gathering," and interfered with
practical efficiency. Some modern
psychologists seem h good deal men
tolerant, and suggest that - the day
dream may have both a bio'.ogical
and a social function. To imagina
tion, says a writer in the English
scientific review Discovery, man
owes his supremacy in the struggle
for existence, but this faculty, like
many other deeply-rooted instincts,
may be difficult to utilize or satis iv
in the equable environment of civili
zation. Hence the "flight from re
ality" which is most easily affected
by the day-dream.
Dislike for such an escape from
the realm of fact probably had much
to do with the strong4 opposition to
noVel-reading in the days of our
great-grandfathers. But the fascina
tion of the novel proved irresistible1,
and now the motion picture reaches
an even greater public is the pic
ture more or less likely than tii
book to promote day-dreaming? It
can be argued both ways, for while
it is true, as the writer in Discovery
sajs, that the spectator "can be
come, with a minimum of effort, a
participator in the drama," the inv
agination may be less vigorously ex
ercised than in conjuring up a visai
image out of printed word.;. Thus
the film drama conceivably might
tend to Viko the, place of the day
dream, leaving the mind less given
to fantasy at other times. But the
whole" subject, as yet, has been in
adequately investigated.
Not much, indeed, is .yet krwv.j.
about what people do with their
minds when they are free to do what
they please. Novels are still the
best guide, but the mostgiftcJ nov
elist has to depend partly on intui
tion, partly on the close study of c.
few individuals. Filson Young, in a
recent Saturday Review remarked
that "few people make p. habit .of
thinking at all for more than a few
seconds at a time; thinking require
effort and concentration J lard
thinking does, but the statement as
a whole seems too sweeping to nc
warranted until more is known of
the mental habits of peopi? in gen
eral. Mr. Young distinguishes be
tween "thinking and imagining, which
latter, ; he says, occupies the Drains
of mosVof us: "We see mental pic
tures 6f various 20 iditions, pleasing
or distressing; we see ourselves act
ing various parts, and on the lighter
or fea to experience it, are pro-
screeni of , the mind pictures of lift
as we y experience ' s-'W hope
jected.''
The. -secret of ret for tired people,
he holds, is learning to cut off the
magic lantern that project? these
phantasmagoria, but possibly tin-
some minds relief is best to be gt?
from that other- process wbicn he
calls thinking; conceivably in times
of harassement it might be restful to
hind thoueht to som'jthina so dull
and harmless as Ihe b.nomial the
orem'. ';; How little we know 01 wha;
goes on in other people' mind is il
lustrated in R. L. Stevenson'; revela
tion that his .father, a famous en-
gmeer,- every mgnt 01 ms me put.
himself to sleep with stories of his
own. making that' "dealt perpetually
with ships, roadside inns, robbers,
old sailors, and commercial travelers
before the era of steam. He never
finished one of these romances; the
lucky man did not require to. But
if thev prevented insomnia, they
served what the most pregmatic foe
of the. "flight from reality" would
have to , recoenize as a useful func
tion; nowadays anything that can ba
shown to possess "therapeutic value"
is falrlv immune from criticism. It
more were known about the msiaes
of peoples' minds it would probably
be found that a surprising number
of them had learned some mental
routine of thought control, making
for tranquility and for some measure
of contentment. That the day-dream.
in its protean ' forms, has a' useful
function can hardly be questioned.
but whether it is harmful or iniur:
ous must depend largely on the. chan
nels into which it is directed.
MODERN METEOROLOGY
lOBBamtaWWWinMMWMHMV
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WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 6, 1922
Springfield Republican.
It has not been generally realized
!in this country that during the past
I lli: months an important r.ev epoch
I in the history of. meteorology has
j opened with the systematic use oft;
wireless for the collection oi weath
er reports. This does not benefit our
own country so much as it does Eu
rope, lor weather comes irom the
west, and our great continental areaj
1 makes it possible a lamiy enective
1 . 1 j. l- i
service wiinout reports xrum. sui
at sea. valuable as these are. But
for Europe this effect is revolution
ary. iiy arrangement with the United
States government, observations tak
en at 8 p. m. eastern time, are now
being sent daily to France, and thence
are broadcast in Europe at 11:30 a.
m. Greenwich time. With these full re-
J ports from JNorth America, supple-j
mented by data irom snips scatLereu ,
over the north Atlantic, European j
meteorologists are hble to forecast the
weather with a precision previously
undreamed of, and in particular it has
now become possible to forecast chang
es two ov three days ahoad, which is
of special value for a maritime coun
trv like Great Britain, which former
ly got -little warning of cyclones ad- t
vancing across the Atlantic.
Hardly less important i:- the re
cent establishment of a chain of cir
cum polar observatories, which it is
hoped may soon be completed by a
station, on Baffin island at-the point
on - Davis strait nearest to western
Greenland.'. The first of ihese out
posts was ' established on Spitzlergen,
whore there .are now several stations.
Even more desolate and remote as Jan
Mayen, a solitary island, 400 miles
nnrVh nf Ireland, on which the Nor-
weign engineer, Haghard Ekero'd last
year establi-hcr an observatory. The
wirt'leas equipment was wrecked by a
hurricane in the 'favl but it is now 'in
working order and is giving, reports
which have proved invaluable Uv Nor
wegian shipping, in oddition to then
practical utility th?sc circumpol ar sta
tions are of scientific importance and
are expected to help in testi.cg the
theories of Bjorknes in' regard to the
origin of cyclones in ihe meeting of
a cold current from the polar regions
and the warm equatorial air.
From thesa new sources of in
formation our own weather bureau
will profit greatly, even if it is less
dependent than. Europe an meteorolo
gists on data derived from outside.
While every region has its own climate
and its own local peculiarities of
weathe, the atmosphere is a unit and
the 'arga movements that affect the
weather may have their origin in some
remote a; ea.. The United States should
o'o its par: in the support of what sta
tions may be needed in the far north.
EXTRAORDINARY
ATTRACTION
PASTIME
mm
Today and
Tomorrow
The aftei-noon tea is playing. an im
portant part in American politics now
adays, but it is fortunate that the la
dies bless 'cm do not form their voting
op'.on of a fat candidate by .the grace
with 'which he holds a lunch 'plate
in his lap. Kansas City Star.
iwi i.r mM . j
Thorny
ei s mi tm mtr
ire
From the novel by Edward I'eple
author of "The Prince Chap"
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE
Added 'Altraclbn
Fi)X Nl'I'iVli
Adinission-lO and 30 Cents
3
HALF ACEKTURY
Gklahoman Praises BlackDranglit,
Having Used It "Can Safely
Say for 50 Years "
Grandfield, Okla. One of tnehet
known farmers of Tilman. County, Mr.
G. W. Tlsdale, who owns and manages
a wagon yard here, says:
"I have -used Thedford's Black
Draught I believe I can safely say for
fifty years.
"I was born and reared in Texas,
Freestone County, sixty-four years ago,
I have been married forty-four years.
My father used Black-Draught before 1
was married, and gave it to us . . .
"For forty-four years of my. married
life, it has had a place on our medi
cine shelf, and is the only laxative, or
liver medicine, we use. We use it
for torpid liver, sour stomach, head
ache, indigestion ... I don't think we
tsH fh mi t 1 1. Vnowine
what it h&3 done for us, and the money g
it lias saved. It is just as good and re
liable today as it was when we began
lt3 use. My boys use it and they are
satisfied it's the best liver medicine
they have ever used."
Thedford'-tf Black-Draught Is purely
vegetable, not disagreeable to take
and acts in a prompt and natural way.
So many thousands of persons have
teen benefited by the r.se of Thedford's
Black-Draught, you should have no
hesitancy in trying this valuable ol
well-established r&saedy, for most liver
and stomach disorders. NC-139D.
President and Mrs. Harding took a
veek- end yachting cruise. The ' Hard
ings must have all their winter's coal
in the cellar or they wouldn't feel so
carefree.Philadelphia North American.
WOULD SHUT DOWN GAS WORKS
"JVly stomach has boen so filled with
?as for the last three years that I felt
l could pretty nearly supply our town.
I also had frequent pains in right side
n region of the anriendix. Doctors
Jidn't help much. On'ti day my neigh
bor told me about what Mayr's Won
ikrful Remedy had d ore for him an:"
I got a bottle, of our. druggist. I car
say that it will do all and more thai
you claim for it." It is a' simple, harm
less preparation that removes the
catarrhal mucus from the intestinal
tract and allays the inflammation
which-causes--practically all stomach,
liver and intestinal ailments,- includ
ing appendicitis. One dose wall con
vinee or money refunded. For sale at
all druggists. Adv. .
The public is always exnected to be
patient while the people directly con-
cornea m a strike take time to think
it over. rhiladelphia Record.
Trotzky's Wife
uality
iires
at
"Gyp" Prices
30x3'2 Pathfinder .. $ 8.85
30x3 Cross Rib Tread . .$10.65.
30x3 All Weather Tread $12.50.
30x3 Cross Rib Cord ..$12.50
32x4 .Cross Rib Cord ....$24.50
Every Year is A' Good Year For
Goodyear Tires.
Standard Garage &
Safes Company
HICKORY, N. C.
O f f s
In - B
UOSIJS
THERE'S many a md':e inglorious Morgan
anl Carcegie, -as well as. Miltcn, in thw worbi
today. And they constitute a vast fund of
treasure in iSusiness thesa men who have fAiW
to develop 'their' possibilities.
It is the aeration of this .Bank to uncc c- v-: K
treasure and: enrich the world thereby. V
H to enlist thcco-oDeraticnioflour customers I.i
quest. v; . . i . -. .... s
ra.m3T Company
Reccrd Want Ads Bring Results. Try The
m.
J
Notice of Redemption
To Holders of Victory Bonds
All 4 3-4 per cent Victory Notes (Bonds), known as
United States of America Gold Notes of 1922-1923, which
bear the distinguishing letters A, B, C, D, E, or F, pre
fixed to their serial numbers, are called for redemption
on December 15, 1922. Interest on all 4 3-4 per cent Vic
. tory Notes thui; calleri for redemption will cease on said
redemption date, December 15, 1922.
All owners of 4 3-4 per cent Victory Notes (Bonds),
bearing the distinguishing letters A, B, C, D, E, or F,
.may brins them in to us, and we will be glad to transmit
them to the Treasury Department for redemption, or give
you credit for thcan at the market price, which will be
not less than par and accrued interest.
First National Bank
HICKORY, N. C.
Capital and Surplus $300,000
J. D. Elliott president; K. C. Menzics, vice-president and
cashier; J, L. Cilley, asst. cashier.
31
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thiflSfftSan,ce one mlht think
but hX La modern flapper,
out she a the wife of Leon Trotzkv
r-uaaian leader, it was teSn at
fJe palace in Ptrogrod. -
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WANTED!
This new
sugar-coated
gum delight!
young and old
It "melts in vour
mouth" and the gum in the
center remains to 4 aid digestion,'
brighten teeth and soothe mouth
and throat. ;
There are thetheTWRIjGLEY
mends to choose trom, too:
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In
achinists, Boiler
--Makers, Blacksmiths,
Gar. Carpenters,' Helpers
Apply at Shops to
P. D. PLANK,
General Foreman,
Hickory, N. C.
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