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Hickory daily record. [volume] (Hickory, N.C.) 1915-current, November 17, 1922, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn91068423/1922-11-17/ed-1/seq-5/

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Thumbnail for PAGE FIVE

TV
4 -
.EVENING
NOVEMBER 17 ,1922.
HICKORY DAILY RECORD:
PAGE FIVE
0
nchcrs Punch in Germany
dWhcrs Punch in Germanv ""f' v-- - - .x -r
ir s auuuaanDnonDQnnnEannPBonBiiiipEsssKi
jj yfe&l .. CHEVROLET
p '111 r T)h'7 I I .. -
ivrnwr. sr1'1 13 horseback boxing. Notice the cowV.y ET .
I?'' i vv -v'rlt niovmc t:cturcs. A literal tmriot? n
F.jasClicr roabJy suggested the latest sport. 1
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2S9DDDDODCnacadDDDODDDDDDODRaaaDIDDaDDDDODDDDDBCaDC3CZZZ3K
CARS and SERVICE FARTS
..3 iM.
Watson MotorjCo.
Phone 225 Hickory, N. C.
These Things Try the
Toughness
of a Battery
1. Hard, fast driving
2. Kough roads
3. Mud and dust
4. Infrequent testing
5. Lack of water
6. Long tours
7. Much stopping and starting
8. Cold weather
9. Hot weather
10. Poor carburetion
11. Stiff oil
12. Tight motor bearings
13. Short circuits ' ' .
14. Loose connections
15. Generator out of adjustment
16. Generator worn or dirty
1". Distributer worn or dirty
18. Excessive use of lights
19. Loose hold-downs
20. Electrical devices added beyond
capacity of battery
Hickory Battery Co.
1226 Ninth Avenue.
Hickory, N. C.
Representing
Ml&ri Batteries
(THREADED RUBBER INSULATION)
and Batteries
(WOOD SEPARATORS )
1 i "liiiliiMiiii
" ituiiift'i
HUSBAND'S LOVE WORTH A MILLION
illlWftl"1"
fl Want Ads Bring Results. Try Them.
xiiDDDDDDDDDDDDaaaaaDaaaDaaaaaaD
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For Your Ford and
Chevrolet
l'll
rCt spnnvnfmti v fnoVi tread
extends from bead to bead in
JJ1ece. The tread itself is semi-
v-vi.v;i liy U11U. xvii&J. "
Cord
Consider the
cost a
30x3
nly $12.50. Get them at
'filler Vulcanizing Co.
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One million dollars is the value which Mrs. Dorrit Van Duesen Stevens
of Burlington, Vt., places on the affections of her husband. She has sued
her husband's parent for that amount,' charging that they alienated her hus-
Dand s love for her. L hey deny the charge. . ,
P
D
vVilhelm on His Wedding Day
'
a
Tfii-A. cxtraordiiiary photograph, shows the lormer- kp.
closed automobile and 'catering xhe-kisre.ot unoin ..-asn Uh
van of the marriage ceremony.. The -'picture was taUsti ivit
(h a J-.j
!iutancc camera by a photographer suUlonoit outs'ifkvthe cut!e fi-ynn
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Advertise in the Record
" - : : : !'
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Try a Record Want Ad and Find Lost Articles
jannnnnqbnnnm
S Al
g (THIS WAS WRITTEN BY A WOMAN) L' '4 j
Why I Use Advertisieg
A
My Buyieg Guide
, c t. ..
s
In my capacity as housewife I am the general
manager of a household. Upon me devolves the duty of
making rather large purchases which leads into anoth
er duty that of the economical . expenditure of the
household funds.
My husband reads very assiduously what he calls
"trade papers." These papers pertain almost entirely
to his business. He says he could not get along without
, therfi because they keep him posted on matters .which
come up m his business life every day.
In running my household I fin,d that the news
papers and the magazines are my "trade papers." The
advertisements tell me nearly everything I wish to know
about the purchases I should make. Like my liusband
who spends hours engrossed in. his trade magazines so
that he may conduct his business more successfully, I
study with care the advertisements in the newspapers
and the magazines which I have found out enable me
to conduct my business, whicTT is my household, more
economically and successfully. ...
In doing my neighborhood buying I think that;!;
am able to choose the store that gives m the greatest
value for my money. My choice is always the one where
I am sure to get the advertised goods I ask for and where:
I am not told : "Here is something else just . as good!"
I buy advertised goods because experience has taught
me I save money thereby. .., f r
It has been my obseryatipni;hat the storekeeper '
who handles advertised articles sells more goods and it '
isn't hard for me;to figure out that if the dealer wants :
to make only a fair: prof it he can sell me goods cheaper
- if he sejls a great many goods than if he sells a smaller
amount. Goincidently, I have noticed that dealers who
do handle articles which are advertised seenr to grow
and expand.
I have often wondered if it isn't because the
goods which they see oh tneir own shelves remind them
constantly of the forward-looking work which is being
done by the manufacturer of those goods, thus setting
an example for greater industry. - y v ;r
I know that if I want to buy a barrel of flour, I
can buy it cheapethan I can buy a ten or twenty-five
pound sack. My storekeeper can do the same thing in
buying his merchandise. I have heard my husband talk
often enough on the" question of small profits and rapid
turnover to know that it isn't t dealer who makes the
long profit that gets ahead but the one who makes the
. small profit and turns his capital over -and over. But
this is not the only benefit I get in buying from a store
keeper who sells his customers goods which are adver- ,
tised. The goods I buy are fresher and hewer and I feel
that because many of them have been advertised for
years they are more dependable.
For how could people continue to buy them. if
they were not? And K6w'eoultn
tinue to advertise them' if they did not buy ?
Published by the Hickory Daily Record, in co-operation
: with The American Association of Advertising Agencies. '
1!)
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Hickory, N. C.

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