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The Monroe journal. [volume] (Monroe, N.C.) 189?-1965, August 04, 1922, Image 4

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THE MONROE JOURNAL
Founded lt4 by the present owners
G. M. Beley ant! r. r. tie if J
G. M. BEASI.EY .
JOHN KEAnI.EY,
L. E. Hi c;t;is . .
...... Manaser
K!i(r
AMM-iaie EUitor
FRIDAY. AUGUST 4. 1922.
JUDGE CONXOK DECLINES INVI
TATION There are few judges in this coun
try who command more respect and
admiration that does Judge Henry
Groves Connor, of the United States
Court for the eastern district of North
Carolina. The more intimately he is
known, the greater is this true.
The Charlotte Observer's Raleigh
correspondent tells of Ju.ltre Connor's
refusal to become affiliated with the
Ku Klux Klan:
"The Ku Klux Klan has been cam
paigning for memberships among
some prominent North Carolinians,
one cf them being Federal Judge H.
G. Connor. During his lecture to the
striking railway shopmen in yester
day's injunction hearing the vener
able jurist let it be known that "A
certain organization" indirectly invit
ed him to become a member.
" 'This organization was against the
Catholics and the Jews, so I couldn't
join in,' Juvlge Or.nor said, adding
that he d;d rot believe an organization
with such ideals would be the best
for thi country, where every citi
zen is accordci the nht to worhsln
BS he pleat s.
"I would mt be! mg to an organ
ization u:ik I -an conform to its
rules.' he s.r', asigr:ng that as his
reason fr d:?regarding the invita
tion to get in:o the rot'-.' and musk.
The Ku K'.ux has given many citi
zens in positions of i,rt'3t responsi
bility an opportunity to join its
ranks.
And Judge Conr.or is admrcJ as
much for h's wisdom as f"r ar.y cf
the oihcr fine parts that g-j to make
up a good and relative'.- gnat r,u.n.
THE ART OF FORGETTING
It is said that wanting things that
we cannot have and which -xi e-,uM
very well be- with. .;. c:.v.ms iv.tiv'.t
of the disappottitni : ts i f ii'c. An
ancient philosopher is c:e.l.t.d wr.h
the' .iaig that ho was wealthy in
being able to do w:th"tit o iv..:r.y
tV.::i.'. "Forget it," has b.-ccsnc a vp
ttbr lit cf rso km slang. Suppose
we sitou d prr.eiieo toe .".it : Jorge:-1
ting, n .'t only forgetting the desire (
for a multiplicity of things beyond j
our r-.ach, but forgetting the dlsa-'
grecab'.c things ' the past. To m;.ny I
ro'ltf it would be a rvj-.tvenatieii.
It is a question whieh class of un
happy people is the larges. those
who make themselves miserable by
longing for things beyond their means
or those who warp their lives by har
boring the things that should be for
gotten. The poison who harbours all the
petty annoyances, the vexing irrita
tion?, the mean words, the unkind
acts, the wrongs and the disappoint
ments he has suffered is travelling a
Toed that leads straight to puna
ncr.t unh.ippiness if not to an insane
asylum.
No superior person ev?r docs this,
for the one who dots it cannot be
superior. His faculties are too much
warped, his vision is blurred. He can
have little wholesome initiative and
no poise. He cannot build character
worth while because his thoughts turn
inward like an ingrowing to.' nail,
rot outward for the absorption of
more strength.
You have often h?ard the expres
sion, "I can forgive but I can't for
get." But no one can do any such
thing. You can only say that you for
give while making the mental reser
vation to remember. While if you for
get first, there will be no trouble
about forgiving. Tretty soon you will
see that it is not worth thinking about
one way or the other.
Tassing by the annoyances or the
irritations or the petty injustices and
thinking of more important things in
life is like having the brush and bush
es and drift that clutter up a winding
foot path and passing out into the
broad and clean highway, where you
can cease to think of your feet, and
hold your head high and behold the
far spaces, th-.- widening rivers and
Hie far flung horizons.
"Holding a high head" has a deeper
mealing than is commonly supposed.
The high head which comes of mere
vanity and the attempt to be disdain
ful is nothing and is justly end quick
ly s'zed up as operc-bouife. But tha
high head which comes fron a de
termination to respect ones self too
much to bj a quibble:-, a nagger, or
a resorvoir of petty rec-jlicctions,
gives pose( and universally challenges
admiration.
THE PRACTICAL APPLICATION
OF THE GOSPEL
The National council of the Episco
pal church has adopted a declaration
of social gervice principles which will
be placed before the Episcopal Gen
rention which assembled at Portland,
Ore. This declaration is described as
it call for a fundamental change in the
spirit and working of our social and
industrial life. There is little doubt
that the declaration will be passed
in substantially its present form. It
in significant' in the fact that it is
commitment of one of the great
protestant religious organizations to
ristianlty f
a practical application of chr
tj Eocii.I and industrial life on the
basis cf human fellowship instead of
the eld hair splitting doctrines which
in no way touch the needs of the
modern life. There is nj question of
the fact that the attitude of the peo
ple, including the organized churches,
on the interpretation of Christianity,
is undergoing a profound change.
Those who are interested beyond the
more superficial phases 'of church
polity may get a very graphic idea
of this change that is going on by
reading the declaration just referred
to. It follows:
"Christian social service means the
application of the principles of the
Gospel of Jesus Christ to all the re
lations into which men and women
are brought, whether in government,
industry, social or political life.
"It means definite obedience, by a'l
who bear the Christian name an i at-
cept the Christian religion, to Christ's
law of duty toward one's neighbor a
neighbor being every person, with
whom one can establish the relation
ship of service.
-We understand the christian re
ligion to have a larger meaning and
field than has been commonly recog
nized and that its message concerns
justice and righteousness, fairness and
the application of the golden rule, to
a'l men by all men. in whatever posi
tion or relation in life they might be.
We understand that a position of any
advantage conferred by material
means, education, soeial or official
position, carries with it responsibility
towards liaise with whom one haj to
ckal and forgetfulness of such res
ponsibility means the disobedience of
tne law of God.
"The church must serve all peop.e.
the unj riviledie.. and the priviledged
alike, and must continue to stand for
mercv, charity and compassion toward
those wha are in trouble; but beyond
that it must stand for social justice,
remembering that .lesu Christ died
for all r.nd that one soul is in His
siiiht. and shou: 1 1" m the sight oi i
his disciples, as oi.i"iis as another.)
"Those who are i.i pos.tion :n bus
i es. professions. v any calling in
life, where they l.ve the service of
0 .hers, whether wi-e earners ,r :n
n:ty other relatio-i, shou'd recognize
the right ef the employed to full op
ortunity of sclf-devel.'pr.iont. The
Welfare 'of human life sho il i be em
phasized above the value of property .
Wages sufficient for a wholesome liv
ing should be the rett'rn for efficient
service and the more that can be
done in making the employer and the
em'ilovee partners in business with
a f'eel'rg of common a'M friendly in
:.e;c t and mr.tu;J service, the bet
cr. "We understand that christian so
cial service, means following the ex
ample c f the Master, who came? n 't to
i e 'ministered unto but to minister,
and to mean obedience to the law of
;.!. "Thou .-halt love thy neighbor
as thy self," and that it is our work to
irng the members of the church to
realize this and so to fill out the
ideal of Chrst toward humanity."
"A larger meaning and field than
is commonly recognized.'' Christ never
assaulted anv of the institutional evils
of his day in terms. Rut he said a
great deal about love. Such institu-i
tions as slavery and poligamy, so uni- j
versal in his d'iy, were not condemned
b yhim. But no sensible man would j
to-day argue that they were right I
because he did not specifically con-!
demn them. Ha knew that the down-S
fall of one evil would simply result j
in the substitution of another until!
the time had come when nten could j
be controlled by love, and when they J
.should be so controlled, such evils j
would pass away. He .-poke of the v.a-:
ter of life which he gave. Love is the
solvent of all evils. Love must become j
the motive power of life be fore the j
evils which suppress the better im-1
pulses of men can be abolished. No j
form of force, however benevolent, j
can do this, for no form of human
agency can long continue wholly be-1
nevolent when entrusted with too
much power. Every agency must be j
constantly nourished by the water of;
life if it is to remain highly useful, j
This argument does not mean, of
course, that outbreaking evils shall
not be suppressed by force, but it
does mean that unless society is op- i
crated on a basis of love the suppres-1
sion of one ev.l will but be substituted j
by another one. I
LOCAL MARKET j
Rowilen catton 2:1.25 '
hort cotton 22.25 1
Kegs 22
Hnms 27.50
Butter 15 to 3.V
Youn chickens 30 to 65 1
Cotton seed 51 i
Beef cattle 4 to 5
Irish Potatoes 51.03 to $1.2" j
Peeswax 20 .
Onions $1.00'
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
Having duly qualified ag executrix
of the last will and testament of
Samuel F. Coaklcy, deeM, all person.?
holding claims against the estate of
snid deceased are hereby notified to
present the same to tho undersigned
executrix on or before the 15th day
of August, 1923, or this notice will be
pleaded in bar of their right of re
covery. All persons indebted to saiJ
estate are notified to make prompt
payment and save costs.
This 5th day of August. 1921
LAURA S. COAKLEY, Executrix
of the last will and testament of S.
F. Coaklcy, dee'd.
P.. B. Redwine, Atty.
Dr. Kemp Funderburk
Dentist
Office Over Lee Crif fin's Store.
THE MOTROE JOCTWAI.
Special Notices
One cent a word each Insertion.
FOR SALE Six fine setter bird pups
at attractive prices. J. A. Council,
Brief tn Unionville, Route one.
FOR RENT A tent at Pleasant
Grove camp ground. Would sell.
J. A. Winchester. I'hone Winchester
central.
BUY YOUR HOSE at
Special Hosiery Sale.
Ab Joseph's
AB JOSEFH COMPANY is offering
unusual bargains in Men's and La-
. dies' hose at their Special Bargain
Saie, now on.
JUST RECEIVED Car load
Chow. Gulledge & Snyder.
Cow-
FOR SALE Oakland car, in fair con
dition. J. F. Peach, 412, Hill street,
Monroe.
DRINK MINERAL WATER The
kind that's best and also fresh, de -
livered to you in Monroe, on any or
every week day. Price reasonable.
Free trial on request. What could
be more convenient? Luther Wil
liams, at Lee Griffin's store, or tel
ephone 5S6-J.
WANTED A position as stenograph
er. Telephone 303-R.
SHOE REPAIRING First class
work at moderate prices. Hand
sewing a specialty. Also machine
repa.ring. All work guaranteed.
Monroe Shoe Shop, 201 East Jef
ferson Street.
FOR RENT A new
W. K;ehardson.
bungalow. J.
PHONE US vonr orders for groceries
?nd vegetables. McCollum Bros.,
Phone 4T4.
GREEN'S PILE REMEDY is the
remedy that advertised itself across
the continent. Guaranteed to re
lieve any case cf piles, or money re
funded. Supplied by The English
lrutr Co., or The Union Drug Co.
U SAVE by buying your supplies at
Dr. Whit.ey's store, Unionville. We
handle the best goods.
FULL LINE Turina dairy feed and
laying mash at Gulle-ge & Snyder's.
AUTO TRANSFER If you want I
good service. Phone 496. Frank!
Helms' Transfer.
i
SEE US for your fruit Jars, Jar lings
and raps. McCollum Eros. I
GET MAGAZINES at the Union Va-!
riety Store. I
FOR RENT One cottage.
Copple.
H. E. '
R. L. PAYNE, M. D.
Office Over Tnlon Drug Co.
Residence Phone 466
Office Phone 466
li
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M
FRIDAY, AI GI ST 4. 122
STRAYED OR STOLEN A small!
female setter, white with brown
ears, brown spot on left shoulder.
Liberal reward for return. J. E.
Liles, at Monroe Auto Service Sta
tion. FOR SALE New Oliver Typewriter
in perfee-t condition, $20.00 cash.
Phone 303. W. J. Hudson 4 Son.
WANTED Chickens
W. Richardson.
and eggs.-
HOUSE MOVING If you want your
house moved or raised, see me or
rail at Lee Park Dairy. Jas. &
Helms, Monroe Route 1.
JUST RECEIVED Barrel Fanc
Porto Rico Molasses Flyler, Fun
derburk 4k Co.
LOST In Monroe, Saturday night, a
ladies' brown slipper, slightly used.
Bring to Lee Lee Co. Reward.
SEE GULLEDGE & SNYDER for
Purina, the best dairy feed and
l:leimr mak
; HOUSE FOR RENT Close in. Mrs.
Elite Wilson.
BUY YOUR Goodyear tires at Dr.
Whitley's store and save money.
Fresh stock at all times.
FOR RENT Furnished room, with
boartl if desired. rhone 354-J.
WHITE HOUSE pure apple vinegar
at 50c per sallon. Bring your
Jug. McCollum Bros.
BUY YOUR Goodyear tires at Dr.
Whitley's store and save money.
Fresh stock at all times.
PINO TUNING and rccnlatinit
Work guaranteed. Hollaway Mu.
sic House, Phone 5T1, Monroe, X.
C.
FRESH SEEDS All kinds, 5 cents
paper. Plyler-Funderburk Co.
U SAVE by buying your supplies at
Dr. Whitley's store, Unionville. We
handle the best goods.
.NICE DESIRABLE room, one block
irom square, lor rent at reasona
ble price. Mrs. R. G. Mason, tele
phone 407.
FOR RENT n-room house and 4
room house n-ar graded school.
H. D. Stewart.
FIFTY MARBLES for five cents at
the Union Variety Store.
DR. HOWARD SMITH.
Eyesight Specialist,
will te in his office all this week.
Don't neglect your eyes.
Glasses fitted and guaranteed
to relieve your eye troubles, at a
reasonable price. Examination
free. Office phone 594."
Cotton Growers and Business Men
WE PRODUCE MILLIONS.
GROUP MARKETING OF
He&ir J.
Director Agricultural Extension Service of North Carolina, Raleigh.
He Spe&Jks at
Monroe Cowirt fiomse
Monday,
2 o'clock p. m.
The government is backing this movement through the War Finance Corpor
ation with a loan of ten million dollars for the orderly selling of cotton of
NORTH CAROLINA FARMERS. Attend this meeting and get First Hand
Information On How This Money Can Be Obtained to Bring Prosperity to
Your Community. .
YOU ARE INVITED- IT COSTS YOU NOTHING. OPEN TO EVERYBODY
leans
00frfrfr00"frfr9efr
New Fall
Clothing
We have just received a large shipment of
our Fall Curlee Clothing, and every Suit
guaranteed to give satisfaction. Every
Curlee Suit is made to wear, and if you buy a
Curlee Suit from us, if tailoring or lining
doesn't give satisfaction, we want it back.
We carry these suits in all sizes from 34 to 50,
and we don't charge anything for extra
sizes. We have them in Young Men's, Regu
lars, Stouts, Slims
$1 9.95 $25.00 $30.00.
Now if you want a cheaper suit, we have
them also
$10.00 $12.50 $15.00 $18.50.
We have only 4 Palm Beach Suits left. So if
we have your size you can get the suit cheap.
MISSES AND LADIES OXFORDS
Received a part of our Fall Oxfords
for Misses and Ladies. Brown, Black and
Patent Leather in one and two straps, low
heel, all with Goodyear heels.
BEST PATENT FLOUR
Every sack guaranteed $3.45 93 lb sack
Self-Rising Flour $3.65 sack
t
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13 lbs BEST GRANUALATEI) SUGAR $1.00
4 .
Smith
Meeting'
LET'S KEEP THEM AT HOME
COTTTON OUR ONLY SALVATION
A,
Junjost 7th
Dollars . For
SEE US
- Lee Co.
Evans
You
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