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Marion progress. [volume] (Marion, N.C.) 1909-19??, December 29, 1949, Image 2

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THE MARION PROGRESS
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY THE
Mcdowell publishing co.
MARION, N. C.
TELEPHONE 64
S. E. WHITTEN, Editor and Publisher
ELIZABETH WHITTEN, New. Editor
Entered at the Postoffice at Marion, N. C.,
as second class matter
SUBSCRIPTION RATE
}ne year $2.00
Strictly in Advance
SAYS 1950 WILL BE "GOOD" YEAR
As 1949 comes to a close, it is refreshing to
hear the prediction that 1950 will be a rela
tively good business year.
The statement comes from Dr. Emerson P.
Schmidt, economic research director of the
Chamber of Commerce !of the United States,
■who expresses the view that the Federal budg
et defict may not be as inflationary, in the
short run, as some4 have assumed.
The economist seems to believe that private
savings may not be absorbed by investment
in production and other facilities and that the
governmental deficit may be financed, to a
greater degree, out of savings rather than the
creation of new money. He finds most market
indicators pointing upward, with installment
credit three times that of 1929 and bank loans
beginning to expand again.
Dr. Schmidt offers little comfort to consum
ers. He does not expect them to fare much bet
ter in 1950 because wage and pension agree
ments raised employers' costs and government
supports will prevent farm prices from going
much lower. Nevertheless, he finds that per
sonal income has been maintained with re
m^rkable stability, consumer prices have re
mained fairly stable and the stock market has
a -favorable outlook.
,«■
DANGER ATTENDS UPLIFT PROGRAM
There has been considerable discussion a
bout the proposal of President Truman that
the United States give financial assistance to
a global program to develop the backward
peoples of the earth.
Recently, Dr. Walter Laves, Deputy-Direc
tor-General of the United Nations Education
al, Scientific and Cultural Organization, warn
ed pf the danger of trying to impose an entire
ly „new economic structure on a nation and
people unprepared for such a major upheav
al. Under such conditions, he says, tensions in
crease, conflicts occur and individuals rise
quickly to positions of power. The effects, he
insists, can imperil peace.
The United Nations official does not pro
pose that the plan to remake the economy of
undeveloped areas be abandoned. However,
he suggests an extension of the work so as to
provide fundamental education to carefully
prepare the population for the necessary
changes. Gradually, the experts are becoming
convinced that there is no simple way to raise
the standard of liying of any people unless
they are prepared to accomplish the major
part of the job themselves.
HAPPIER ON THE FARM
You never hear much about juvenile delin
quency on the farm. That is not to say that
rural children are perfect, but it does seem a
natural result of the fact that youngsters in
most farm families have a host, of useful, in
teresting, constructive things to "do, which
helps to keep them out of mischief.
G. L. Noble, an official of the National 4-H
Clubs, believes cities would have fewer prob
lems with youthful' behavior if they sponsored
programs comparable to those of the young
agriculturists' clubs.
Apart from supervised recreation and leis
ure-time activities, city youngsters need some
thing to do with their hands that has as much
visible relation, to living as has the country
child's chores or the 4-H club pig he is raising
for market. This calls for a little inventiveness.
—Christian Science Monitor.
If you are interested in the development of
Marion, you will give some of your time for
the common good, the town needs personal
service more than it needs a cash contribution.
Farmers of McDowell county represent po
tential customers of every business in Marion
and they deserve the consideration of the busi
ness men of Marion.
Life is too short for the average man to un
derstand all mysteries; don't worry, there'll
always be mysteries.
HOW MUCH FARM AID?
The center of the current farm problem is
the extent of government aid to agriculture.
The National Grange, oldest of the farm or
ganizations, recently rejected the Brannan
plan. The American Farm Bureau Federation,
largest of the farm organizations, has just
taken the same stand. f
The program of Secretary Brannan would
allow the price of one large group of farm pro
ducts to fall to the supply-and-demand level,
and the government would then make up the
difference between these prices and parity
prices by giving the farmers production pay
ments. The leading farm organizations feel it
would "make beggars of farmers," put agri
culture into politics as never before, and mean
highly regimented production.
Farmers want government help; They see
labor getting it and winning higher wages,
which mean higher prices for most of the
things farmers buy. Farmers already have ob
tained a great deal of government assistance—
i too much, many of the best farm leaders think.
They anticipate trouble from the high price
supports set by Congress and the great pur
chases of excess farm products thus imposed
on the government. They are convinced that
j lower and flexible price supports and, per
haps, other workable measures are preferable
to the present Anderson-Gore Act and better
than the Brannan plan.
Not all farmers agree. The National Farm
ers' Union, third of the farm bodies and much
smaller than the leaders, goes along with the
Truman administration. It often does with or
ganized labor. And there are dissident minor
ities within the Grange and federation. But
the majority in these chief farm organizations
have chosen a road which heads toward less
rather than more government subsidization.
In so doing they render a service to the farmer
and to the nation. They have furnished an in
dispensible check on superreliance on govern
ment to finance a huge industry.—Christian
Science Monitor.
KILiH 1 b Uh 1HL MAIL
So long as the states keep clamoring for
their share of the Federal-aid loot, there will
be congressmen who will vote to provide it.
That, at any rate, has been America's experi
ence in recent years.
But what would happen if the states should
say to Washington:
You manage your business and we'll man
age ours?
You take care of the affairs which properly
concern all the people, and we'll conduct our
own schools, provide our own charity and
medical care, solve our own housing problems,
and decide our local issues at the grass roots?
That, plainly, is the question which intrig
ues Jimmy Byrnes.
Now at the twilight of his career, he has lit
tle interest, we surmise, in managing the de
tails of state government at Columbia. The job
would add little to the prestige gained in more
eminent positions.
But it would give him a chance to resist and
to organize resistance to Big Government's
encroachment on the liberties of the people—
and thereby make a final, massive contribu
tion to the country which has honored him so
highly.
Friends of freedom in many states will join
in the hope that he will make the fight.—The
Omaha World-Herald.
THESE THINGS I KNOW
This from one of Greig dinger's greeting
cards is taken from Capper's Weekly. It is a
beautiful thought:
I have planted a garden, so I know
what faith is.
I have seen birch trees swaying in the breeze,
so I know what grace is,
I have listened to a bird caroling,
so I know what music is.
I have seen a morning without clouds, after
showers, so I know what beauty is.
I have read a book beside a wood fire, so I
know what contentment is.
I have seen the miracle of the sunset, so I
know what grandeur is.
And because I have perceived all these things,
I know what wealth is.
Confidentially, we hope The Progress will
be better than ever in 1950 and we invite your
suggestions and cooperation.
You can travel around the world and you
will find no better people than your neighbors
in Marion.
1950 will be a good year, according to firn
ancial experts but what it will be to you de
pends upon something besides a forecast.
Advice: When you think you are right, go
ahead; if you are wrong, you'll find it out soon
enough.
There is one sure way for young people to
get ahead in life: Work and save.
OUR DEMOCRACY^—byM.t
7%*^ DynamicsVoluntary Thrift
riwm
INDIVIDUAL INITIATIVE AND
ENTERPRISE— FROM A SENSE OF
RESPONSIBILITY FOR PROVIDING
FOR ONES OWN— HAS BEEN
RECOGNIZED THROUGHOUT OUR
HISTORY AS A DYNAMIC FORCE IN
BUILDING THE STRONG BUSINESS ,
AND AGRICULTURE WHICH IS THE
BACKBONE OF THE WORJ-0 TODAY.
The dynamic force of vouunt/uzy thrift,as we practice it
TODAY, EXTENDS BEYOND ITS IMPACT UPON THE CHARACTER. OF
OUR PEOPLE TO THE STIMULATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF OUR
ECONOMY... FOR THE FUNDS WE SET ASIDE IN LIFE INSURANCE
AND SAVINGS ARE PUT TO WORK IN PRODUCTIVE ENTERPRISE
FOR THE BENEFIT OF ALL THE PEOPLE:.
j ROSES - - - Rose Gardens
I By Mri. R. I. Corbett
Every year interest grows in vis-. ]
iting rose gardens famed for their j •
beauty. Many of these are private- i ■
! i
ly owned, but the municipal rose!
! '
garden is growing in popularity, i ]
When this project is properly un- j
dertaken and everybody, adults K
and children alike, are made to ,
feel a share in the care and re- (
sponsibility, then this becomes a ■
real community plan.
A public rose garden must be ]
thought of as a place that is open
to the public at all times, that is,;
having "free access" at all times.
All of us know that some times
we do not crave visitors in our gar- j
dens, but the municipal garden
must have free access at all times. I
Perhaps it does us good, or at leas.t j:
encourages us to see that other gar-;;
der.s are not perfect all the time. I
The first public rose garden was,1
established in Hartford, Conn., in ;
1904 by the great gardener, Theo- j
dore Wirth, who lives at present in ■ ■
Minneapolis. This is called Eliza- j;
I beth Park and has furnished in- i
spiration all over America for sim- j
I ilar plantings. This Hartford Rose j;
Garden is visited extensively every j i
year, special buses are used for j j
transportation for hundreds of j
•miles around Hartford. Some kinds 1
of roses have been grown there ]
over a period of thirty years.j 1
When properly cared for roses j
live a long time. j i
Another famous garden is at j ■
Hershey, Pennsylvania, under the !
supervision of H. L. Erdman, who :
PAYROLL REDUCTIONS
The Joint Committee on Reduc-j
tions of Non-Essential Federal Ex-!
penditures has reported that the :
Executive Branch's civilian payrollj
was reduced by 50-711 employees;
in October, the greatest monthly j
decrease since June of 1947. Total j
employment by the^ Government
still stood at 2,006,365. Ninety-five j
per cent of the reduction occurred |
in the Defense Department. j
CAPITAL EXPENDITURES
Expenditures by U. S. business!
on new plants and equipment prob
ably will reach $4,400,000,000 in
each of the third and fourth quart- j
ers of this year, while total capital ■
outlays for the year are expected;
"bo be $17,900,000,000 according to'
the Securities and Exchange Com- i
mission and the Department of,
Commerce.
current events. j
Read The Progress for local and;
REMARKABLE >
It is truly remarkable how quickly and pleasantly
Liquid Capudine brings relief from headache. Being
liquid it's pain-relieving ingredients are already
dissolved—all ready to go to work at once. Capu- j
dine is a prescription type headache medicine. It ;
contains four specially selected ingredients that
work together to allay simple pains. Use at di
rected on the label 15c, 30c, 60c sizes.
las served as vice president of the
American Rose Society. For many
rears this garden has been a place
)f wondrous beauty and has at
;racted thousands of visitors year
y
In Portland, Oregon, is the In
ernational Rose Test Garden
vhich is the oldest public test gar
ien in America. The Armstrong
Nurseries, located at Ontarion,
California, have twenty acres of
and devoted entirely to roses. The
■ose center / of Eastern United
states is Newark, N. Y., where
'riends of the Queen of Flowers
;hould visit Jackson and Perkin
Company's tremendous display
garden.
If you are interested in lists of
gardens, write the American Rose
society for published "lists of mem
bers with their home locations,
rhis membership runs into thous
inds and covers all of America.
As you are planning automobile
;rips, make inquiries about famous
gardens along your itinerary and
;ake time to visit these places of
nterest. Then come home to Mar
on and tell us about these spots
ind then try to improve your own
garden.
This article closes the series on
rhe Rose, Marion's flower. We
lope you have enjoyed them, have
>een helped and are so interested
;hat you will ' plant roses this
spring, if you have not done so
;his fall. Let's have the Queen of
blowers in every garden in Mar
on !
GOING TO TRADE
OR BUY A NEW CAR?
For information recording H»wkIh| cmd
automobile iaswranoo, it wiL bo to yoor
advantage to buoro wHfc Ml oovorago
Farm Buroau Mwtval Aiitonobflo Imv
•mo—which *1 fwRy protoet yoor b
torosh ami tboM of tho liaicbg 0*900
facatioo which yoo toloot.
rot rau owmmajioh-cau ot www
J. H. TATE, Agent
Office: 32 N. Madison
Phone 120-X
Fn Bra S^TlrtauMi taL Ct
Invest in U. S. Savings Bonds
ft
Library Notes
BY ALICE BRYAN
County Librarian
Among the new books:
(For Adults) "A Treasury of
Great Reporting" edited by Louis
L. Snyder and Richard B. Morris
—A newspaper chronicle of the
past three and one half centuries
written by the world's great re
porters; 160 masterpieces ranging
from the report of a witch's trial
and conviction in 1587 to Lowell
Thomas' broadcast on the birth of
Israel in 1940. The book covers
everything from battles and mur
der trials to ball games and the
weather, plus the stories behind
.the stories by the editors.
"Modern Arms and Free Men"
by Vannever Bush—A discussion
of the role of science in preserving
democracy.
"A World History of Our Own
Times" by Quincy Howe—The
first volume of a 3-volume world
history of war, personalities, and
credos which are only fifty years
behind us. The book is illustrated
with over 250 photographs and
drawings by Beerholm, Charles
Dana, Gibson, Raedaemaker, • and
other artists of the period.
"The Law" by Rene Wormser—
The laws and the men who made
them from the earliest times to the
present. Rene Wormser, a lawyer,
in non-technical language, traces
the fascinating evolution of our
legal heritage, and examines the
growth of our own democracy,
from the harsh statutes of the He
brews and Egyptians through
those of Greece, Rome and the
Middle Ages down to the present
day.
"Brief Gaudy Hour" by Margar
et Campbell Barnes—The story of
a girl—Ann Boleyn—who wanted
to be a great queen but who, be
cause of her mistakes, is remem
bered only as a passionate and
proud woman.
"Vittoria Cottage" by D. E.
Stevenson—Story of an attractive
widow in her early forties and of
the romantic problems of her chil
dren. The widow lives with her
children in Vittoria Cottage in
Ashbridge, a small country town
in rural England.
"The Catherine-Wheel" by Pa
tricia Wentworth—Because Jacob
Taverner has decided to make his
will, he invites eight of his cousins
down to the Catherine-Wheel, an
old inn on the Channel Coast which
has been in the family for genera
tions. But a ninth turns up as- well,
and before the week end is over
there are two murders.
"This I Do Believe" by David E.
Lilienthal—In this inspirational
and practical book, the Chairman
of the Atomic Energy Commission
sets forth his belief in the ethical
concepts that have made as strong
in a tradition which is independ
ent of dogma and built upon the
free will of free men. He avows
his faith in a diversity of control
and a primary regard for human
beings as individuals, tells the
need for a broad view, and shows
the dependence of science upon
spiritual values—a worthwhile
book.
Light romances: "You'll Re
member" by Ann Carter; "Love on
a Tray" by Minna Bardon; and
"The Girl Next Door" by Peggy
Gaddis.
Westerns: "The Renegade Kid"
by Abel Shott; and "Silvertip
Ranch" by Lynn Westland.
NOTICE
North Carolina
McDowell County
In The Superior Court.
Annie Ennie Plemmons,
Plaintiff,
vs.
William Cauley Plemmons,
Defendant
The defendant Wm. Cauley Plem
mons will take notice that an action
entitled as above has been commenc
ed in the Superior Court of Mc
Dowell County, North Carolina, to
secure an Absolute Divorce from
him on the statutory ground of two
(2) years separation; and the said
defendant will further take notice
that he is required to appear at the
office of the Clerk of the Superior
Court of McDowell County, in the
Courthouse in Marion, North Caro
lina, within twenty (20) days after
the 12th day of January, 1950, and
answer or demur to the Complaint
filed in said action, or the plaintiff
4'ill apply to the Court for the re
lief demanded in said Complaint.
This the 7th day of December,
1949.
S. D. MARTIN,
Clerk Superior Court,
McDowell County, N. C„

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